3654 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2025  |  PA 1401 Section 001: Public Affairs: Community Organizing Skills for Public Action (56955)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Public affairs work, roles of citizens in democratic way of life. Community organizing skills, their importance for public affairs. Negotiations among diverse audiences, understanding different interests, mapping power relationships. Relevant public affairs and governance theory.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?donov013+PA1401+Spring2024
Class Description:

*meets University of Minnesota Liberal Education requirement for Citizenship/Public Ethics Theme"


This course is a hands-on introduction for undergraduate students wanting to develop the skills, confidence, and knowledge to become empowered agents of change.This course involves an examination of key concepts of citizenship, politics, ethics, and democracy, as well as hands-on experiential learning in problem solving skills and team work especially from the framework called Civic Studies, developed to address the challenge of collective action in a world of often radically different ethical frameworks.


The goal of this class is to:

1. Give students a hands on introduction to organizing skills such as public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings.

2. Enable students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives

3. To provide stages for students' public speaking

4. Open the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers

5, To acquaint students with the methods and outlook of community organizing tradition in America as a strand of the emerging "Civic Studies" field

6. To provide students with an introduction to the approach to ethics in Civic Studies, compared to other approaches. Such topics include: mass incarceration, racism, immigration, climate change, education, gender issues, etc.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students should take this class if they like classes that are co-created by students and instructor and are engaging. All disciplines and years are welcome. During this time in our history, people want to acquire knowledge and skills of how to solve public problems.. This course provides knowledge, skills and practice for creating change.
Learning Objectives:
This course will help students acquire skills for effective citizenship and life-long learning through the course goals of:
• Acquainting students with Civic Studies and the community organizing tradition in America and the distinctive ways in which this framework addresses questions of ethical pluralism
• Giving students a hands on introduction to organizing skills for civic agency, such as writing, public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings
• Enabling students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives
• Providing stages for students' public speaking
• Opening the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers
Grading:
40% Two Essays
20% Weekly Reflections on Readings
20% In-Class Participation
20% Public Work Project
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
Discussion based with some lecture. All are teachers and learners. You will learn how to become a change agent through active learning.
Workload:
50 Pages of Reading Per Week (average)
30-45 Pages of Individual Writing, Including Weekly Reading Reflections
3 Short Papers
1 Public Work Project Report
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56955/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2020.docx (Fall 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 July 2020

Spring 2025  |  PA 3001 Section 001: Changing the World: Contemporary Public Policy (56959)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Foundation for understanding the what, who, where, and how of public policy making. These components are explored from different perspectives while delving into questions such as: What is public policy good for? Who decides policy priorities? What effect does public policy actually have in solving public problems? How can we improve public policy making? After successfully completing this course, students will understand the process, structure, and context of policymaking; identify who, how, and what influences the policy process; and apply knowledge of public policy and the policymaking process to a specific policy issue. A strong understanding of the American political system is encouraged.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bfh+PA3001+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56959/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 3972 Section 001: Elections and the Law (56934)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5972 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
12:00AM - 12:00AM
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theories and basic structure of the American legal system. Experience with basic tools and skills for using the law to understand and analyze issues facing election administrators across the nation. Use of election-related and non-election related materials to prepare election administrators for interacting with counsel, legislators and the courts in carrying out their responsibilities.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?choat024+PA3972+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56934/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 3975 Section 001: Election Design (64963)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, East Bank
Enrollment Status:
Closed (0 of 0 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Election administration design principles, including ballot and polling place design and poll worker training materials. Application of principles of field.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64963/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 3976 Section 001: Voter Participation (56972)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5976 Section 001
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Voter participation issues and challenges including historical survey of voter participation in US and methods to increase voter turnout.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?robe2358+PA3976+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56972/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 3984 Section 001: Elections Security: How to Protect America's Elections (56965)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5984 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/18/2025 - 05/05/2025
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
"Elections Security" uses the Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election as a case study to identify the vulnerabilities of US elections (especially state voter registration databases) as well as catalogue new protections. Readings and discussion will focus on best practices and technology options available to the public (social media) and elections professionals (cybersecurity) in guarding against future influence efforts and assuring public confidence in election outcomes. Special focus will be given to describing how local election officials can protect their election technology, most notably those vulnerabilities associated with their voting system and voter registration database. "Elections Security" will draw heavily on concrete cases and challenges facing election professionals, using government and independent reports and an indepth analysis of new resources created by the US Department of Homeland Security and its collaborations with election professionals.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA3984+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56965/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 3991 Section 001: Independent Study (57013)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
12 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. prereq: instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57013/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5002 Section 001: Introduction to Policy Analysis (56900)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/18/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon 05:45PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
Class Description:
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56900/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 September 2007

Spring 2025  |  PA 5002 Section 002: Introduction to Policy Analysis (56964)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/18/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
Class Description:
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56964/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 September 2007

Spring 2025  |  PA 5002 Section 003: Introduction to Policy Analysis (64998)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Delivery Mode
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
Extended Regular Session
 
01/06/2025 - 01/10/2025
Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 10:00AM - 12:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
01/06/2025 - 01/10/2025
Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 01:00PM - 03:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
Class Description:
This course is an intensive 1-week session. We will meet via Zoom for a 2-hour morning session and a 2-hour afternoon session. The morning sessions will consist of instructor lectures and class discussion. The afternoon sessions will be dedicated to team meetings with the instructor and the TA and team working sessions. Students will be evaluated based on an individual critique and quiz and their team policy brief. The workload for the week will be 20 hours of in-class activities and up to 20 hours of out-of-class readings and class preparation.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64998/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 October 2022

Spring 2025  |  PA 5003 Section 001: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (65179)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
Class Description:

The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good." In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of financial analysis and management.


This is an introductory course to financial analysis and management in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.


Learning Objectives:

By the end of the semester, students should be able:

  • To obtain basic knowledge and terminology of budgeting and financial management;

  • To summarize budgetary process, revenues, and expenditures of a public or nonprofit organization;

  • To apply basic tools of financial analysis, such as break-even analysis and marginal cost analysis, in making simple financial decisions;

  • To know how financial information is organized and reported in the accounting system;

  • To interpret data in financial statements and relate them with each other; and

  • To determine and calculate financial ratios to assess financial condition

Grading:
Each class there will be an assignment that you are to prepare and submiy via email (You may work with others in completing the assignments.). These will not be graded. You should actively participate in class discussions and class problem-solving. Class discussion, timely assignment completion, and on-line attendance count toward your participation grade. Participation represents 12 points of your grade.

There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course taken at the Humphrey School. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.

The final assignment is a group project in which you will review the financials of a real government or nonprofit organization and present your findings to the class in person. You will be assigned to groups in the second week of class. The group should submit a 5+ page paper of your findings at the last class. The group will also present a power point presentation (no more than 10 minutes) of the findings at the last class. The group should provide me a copy of the power points and any other information that would be helpful. This group paper (20 points) and presentation (8 points) are worth 28 points.

First Test 30 points Second Test 30 points Group Project 28 points Class Participation 12 points Total 100 points
Class Format:
This class is "flipped." Traditional lectures are videotaped and made available on Moodle. Also, students will be able to "attend" sessions in their own homes via a WebEx software system. Students will log into the WebEx system to participate in the problem-solving sessions. There are 8 class periods generally an hour and 45 minutes. Class time is used to review assignments, review additional videos and/or material, and take exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65179/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2025  |  PA 5003 Section 002: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (56926)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/18/2025 - 05/05/2025
Wed 05:30PM - 08:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
Class Description:

The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good." In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of financial analysis and management.


This is an introductory course to financial analysis and management in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.


Learning Objectives:

By the end of the semester, students should be able:

  • To obtain basic knowledge and terminology of budgeting and financial management;

  • To summarize budgetary process, revenues, and expenditures of a public or nonprofit organization;

  • To apply basic tools of financial analysis, such as break-even analysis and marginal cost analysis, in making simple financial decisions;

  • To know how financial information is organized and reported in the accounting system;

  • To interpret data in financial statements and relate them with each other; and

  • To determine and calculate financial ratios to assess financial condition

Grading:
Each class there will be an assignment that you are to prepare and submiy via email (You may work with others in completing the assignments.). These will not be graded. You should actively participate in class discussions and class problem-solving. Class discussion, timely assignment completion, and on-line attendance count toward your participation grade. Participation represents 12 points of your grade.

There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course taken at the Humphrey School. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.

The final assignment is a group project in which you will review the financials of a real government or nonprofit organization and present your findings to the class in person. You will be assigned to groups in the second week of class. The group should submit a 5+ page paper of your findings at the last class. The group will also present a power point presentation (no more than 10 minutes) of the findings at the last class. The group should provide me a copy of the power points and any other information that would be helpful. This group paper (20 points) and presentation (8 points) are worth 28 points.

First Test 30 points Second Test 30 points Group Project 28 points Class Participation 12 points Total 100 points
Class Format:
This class is "flipped." Traditional lectures are videotaped and made available on Moodle. Also, students will be able to "attend" sessions in their own homes via a WebEx software system. Students will log into the WebEx system to participate in the problem-solving sessions. There are 8 class periods generally an hour and 45 minutes. Class time is used to review assignments, review additional videos and/or material, and take exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56926/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2025  |  PA 5011 Section 001: Dynamics of Public Affairs Organizations (56975)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Critical analysis of organizations in the world of public affairs from multiple levels - including the individual, group, organization, and sector - and the dynamics of relationships among them. Develop actionable recommendations to improve organizational effectiveness in the context of multiple (often contested) prosocial purposes and conflicting stakeholder demands. Memo writing, case analyses, simulations, guest speakers, and self-awareness exercises
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTE (synchronously online during the scheduled time). Students may contact Stacey Grimes (grime004@umn.edu) regarding registration.
Class Description:

Organizations pervade human life. They are sites of power, innovation and social change but can also be places that discourage initiative and reinforce inequalities found in society. Effective organizational management and leadership are critical to achieving broadly beneficial social, economic, and public value. The task is difficult because of the complexity of human behavior in organizations, constrained resources, competing demands of many stakeholders outside of the organization, and pervasive changes in the world we live in. Most of you will work in some kind of organization when you graduate and many, if not most, of you will be managers and leaders during your careers. This course will help prepare you to be an organizational leader in this realm, focusing on empowering you with the courage to act under uncertainty in order to strengthen the effectiveness of your organization. Furthermore, it aims to provide both "the forest" and "the trees", and give you practice in thinking back and forth between the different levels so that when you are working and approach a problem at one of these levels, you have an awareness of the complexity of the situation at the alternative level.

To create that foundation, we focus on different ways to analyze organizations and develop sound recommendations for change - leaders and managers must understand organizational complexity in order to act.This course introduces students to some of the major theoretical approaches to organizational analysis, including concepts from public administration, sociology, political science, organizational psychology, and management. Learning to use multiple perspectives is critical because all perspectives contribute to understanding how to develop and sustain effective organizations and, ultimately, to how well individuals can help create public value. By gaining insight across different theoretical perspectives, students will develop an understanding of how theories provide distinctive windows into understanding behavior in complex social settings. Throughout, you will come to see that organizations provide opportunities and constraints as well as power and privilege within particular contexts.

Grading:
25% Participation
20% Reading Analysis Memos
30% Management Memos
15% Personal Reflection Essay
5% Group Norms
5% Personal User Manual
Class Format:
Pre-Recorded Lecture
50% Discussion
50% Small Group Activities
Workload:
60-100 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Organizational Management Memos
1 Personal Reflection Essay
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56975/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 January 2024

Spring 2025  |  PA 5012 Section 001: The Politics of Public Affairs (56932)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Politics is how we make collective decisions about matters of shared consequence. This course examines politics and introduces students to key concepts and skills needed for effective political analysis. The central themes of the course focus on power; institutions and organizations; discourse; and citizenship.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56932/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5012 Section 002: The Politics of Public Affairs (56958)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Politics is how we make collective decisions about matters of shared consequence. This course examines politics and introduces students to key concepts and skills needed for effective political analysis. The central themes of the course focus on power; institutions and organizations; discourse; and citizenship.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56958/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5023 Section 001: Stratification Economics and Public Policy (56992)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Delivery Mode
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:40PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Stratification economics differs from conventional neoclassical economics and its related offspring of behavioral economics because it does not assume that the nature of inequality arises solely via rational choices made in competitive markets. Rather, it posits structural and historical processes that impede the ability of marginalized groups to gain access to markets. One of the key insights from stratification economics is that conventional policy mechanisms (e.g. deterrence policies in the criminal justice system) don't work because they fail to take account of the legacy of inequality (e.g. convict lease systems and vagrancy laws). The arguments in favor of reparations, baby bonds, universal health care can be viewed and examined using the methods and techniques of stratification economics. This course introduces students to some new methodologies that complement their training in conventional economic analysis. Topics: A review of conventional microeconomic approaches to policy analysis, including the core assumptions and key conclusions Summary and critique of the conventional microeconomic approach The historical backdrop to the evolution of "identity economics" and stratification economics for understanding racial disparities Core assumptions of stratification economics Applications: Housing markets and residential segregation; racial profiling; discrimination in labor markets. Policy proposals based on stratification economics - reparations, baby bonds, universal income and health payments. Advanced undergraduate students may register with permission of the instructor.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?myers006+PA5023+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56992/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5032 Section 001: Applied Regression (56886)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis and assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
Class Notes:
Lecture 001 will be HyFlex and students may participate either In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: PA 5046.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56886/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5032 Section 002: Applied Regression (56897)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Fri 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis and assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
Class Notes:
Lecture 001 will be HyFlex and students may participate either In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: PA 5046.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56897/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5032 Section 003: Applied Regression (56970)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Fri 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis and assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
Class Notes:
Lecture 001 will be HyFlex and students may participate either In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: PA 5046.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56970/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5041 Section 001: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (56962)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56962/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5041 Section 002: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (56963)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56963/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5042 Section 001: Urban and Regional Economics (56915)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Major/minor, Urb-Reg Planning
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Evaluation of city existence/growth using economics. Economic forces in development of cities. Economic analysis of urban areas/land market. Economic analysis of planning issues in land use, transportation, housing, environment. prereq: [Major or minor in urban and regional planning, microeconomics course] or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Learning Objectives:
This course uses the principles of microeconomics to analyze urban/regional economic issues and problems. By the end of the course, students should be able to:
 Provide an economics-based explanation for why cities exist and what causes them to grow and shrink;
 Evaluate the importance of major economic forces in the development of cities;
 Conduct economic analysis of an urban area and its land markets;
 Use economic tools to analyze planning issues in different areas (land use, transportation, housing and environment) and to illustrate and address their impacts on the economy, social equity and environmental quality.
Grading:
Grades will be based on three short papers (20%, 30% and 40%) and participation (10%).
Class Format:
The lectures will cover only the key concepts presented in the readings. There will be some class discussion of topics, challenging economic assumptions and applying the theories to real-world policies.
Workload:
This class is demanding. It covers a lot of material at a pace that students describe as "relentless" or (more positively) "high energy." It requires considerable outside-of-class time. UM policy states that for each credit hour of a class, undergraduates are expected to work three hours - counting class time and study time - to achieve an average grade. If we apply that policy to this graduate-level class, that means a work load of 12 hours per week for this class, implying at least 8 hours per week outside of class. Count on it.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56915/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5042_Spring2024.pdf (Spring 2024)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cao_PA5042_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 April 2023

Spring 2025  |  PA 5042 Section 002: Urban and Regional Economics (56949)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Fri 10:10AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Evaluation of city existence/growth using economics. Economic forces in development of cities. Economic analysis of urban areas/land market. Economic analysis of planning issues in land use, transportation, housing, environment. prereq: [Major or minor in urban and regional planning, microeconomics course] or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Learning Objectives:
This course uses the principles of microeconomics to analyze urban/regional economic issues and problems. By the end of the course, students should be able to:
 Provide an economics-based explanation for why cities exist and what causes them to grow and shrink;
 Evaluate the importance of major economic forces in the development of cities;
 Conduct economic analysis of an urban area and its land markets;
 Use economic tools to analyze planning issues in different areas (land use, transportation, housing and environment) and to illustrate and address their impacts on the economy, social equity and environmental quality.
Grading:
Grades will be based on three short papers (20%, 30% and 40%) and participation (10%).
Class Format:
The lectures will cover only the key concepts presented in the readings. There will be some class discussion of topics, challenging economic assumptions and applying the theories to real-world policies.
Workload:
This class is demanding. It covers a lot of material at a pace that students describe as "relentless" or (more positively) "high energy." It requires considerable outside-of-class time. UM policy states that for each credit hour of a class, undergraduates are expected to work three hours - counting class time and study time - to achieve an average grade. If we apply that policy to this graduate-level class, that means a work load of 12 hours per week for this class, implying at least 8 hours per week outside of class. Count on it.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56949/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5042_Spring2024.pdf (Spring 2024)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cao_PA5042_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 April 2023

Spring 2025  |  PA 5042 Section 003: Urban and Regional Economics (56920)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Fri 11:15AM - 12:05PM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Evaluation of city existence/growth using economics. Economic forces in development of cities. Economic analysis of urban areas/land market. Economic analysis of planning issues in land use, transportation, housing, environment. prereq: [Major or minor in urban and regional planning, microeconomics course] or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Learning Objectives:
This course uses the principles of microeconomics to analyze urban/regional economic issues and problems. By the end of the course, students should be able to:
 Provide an economics-based explanation for why cities exist and what causes them to grow and shrink;
 Evaluate the importance of major economic forces in the development of cities;
 Conduct economic analysis of an urban area and its land markets;
 Use economic tools to analyze planning issues in different areas (land use, transportation, housing and environment) and to illustrate and address their impacts on the economy, social equity and environmental quality.
Grading:
Grades will be based on three short papers (20%, 30% and 40%) and participation (10%).
Class Format:
The lectures will cover only the key concepts presented in the readings. There will be some class discussion of topics, challenging economic assumptions and applying the theories to real-world policies.
Workload:
This class is demanding. It covers a lot of material at a pace that students describe as "relentless" or (more positively) "high energy." It requires considerable outside-of-class time. UM policy states that for each credit hour of a class, undergraduates are expected to work three hours - counting class time and study time - to achieve an average grade. If we apply that policy to this graduate-level class, that means a work load of 12 hours per week for this class, implying at least 8 hours per week outside of class. Count on it.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56920/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5042_Spring2024.pdf (Spring 2024)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cao_PA5042_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 April 2023

Spring 2025  |  PA 5043 Section 001: Economic and Demographic Data Analysis (56916)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Major/minor, Urb-Reg Planning
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/18/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 44 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Economic/demographic data analysis techniques for planning. Exposure to most important data sources. Conceptual understanding of range of methods/hands-on experience in applying these methods. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56916/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5043 Section 002: Economic and Demographic Data Analysis (56917)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/18/2025 - 05/05/2025
Fri 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 22 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Economic/demographic data analysis techniques for planning. Exposure to most important data sources. Conceptual understanding of range of methods/hands-on experience in applying these methods. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56917/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5043 Section 003: Economic and Demographic Data Analysis (56918)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/18/2025 - 05/05/2025
Fri 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 22 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Economic/demographic data analysis techniques for planning. Exposure to most important data sources. Conceptual understanding of range of methods/hands-on experience in applying these methods. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56918/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5046 Section 001: Econometrics for Public Policy (57010)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA 5031 or PA 5045 or PA 5205
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course covers basic econometric methods commonly used by policy analysts and social scientists, including bivariate and multivariate regression. Students will become familiar with the application and interpretation of these methods, including the assumptions behind them and the problems that arise when these assumptions are not met. The course also covers more advanced methods such as panel data and fixed effects, instrumental variables, and basic time series analysis and forecasting. It is intended to provide students with the foundation to take more advanced quantitative methods courses. During the course, students will demonstrate their learning by completing a research project of their own design, culminating with a poster presentation at the conclusion of the course. Students will also become familiar with the Stata statistical package.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57010/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5046 Section 002: Econometrics for Public Policy (57011)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Fri 12:45PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
This course covers basic econometric methods commonly used by policy analysts and social scientists, including bivariate and multivariate regression. Students will become familiar with the application and interpretation of these methods, including the assumptions behind them and the problems that arise when these assumptions are not met. The course also covers more advanced methods such as panel data and fixed effects, instrumental variables, and basic time series analysis and forecasting. It is intended to provide students with the foundation to take more advanced quantitative methods courses. During the course, students will demonstrate their learning by completing a research project of their own design, culminating with a poster presentation at the conclusion of the course. Students will also become familiar with the Stata statistical package.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57011/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5046 Section 003: Econometrics for Public Policy (57012)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Fri 02:15PM - 03:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
This course covers basic econometric methods commonly used by policy analysts and social scientists, including bivariate and multivariate regression. Students will become familiar with the application and interpretation of these methods, including the assumptions behind them and the problems that arise when these assumptions are not met. The course also covers more advanced methods such as panel data and fixed effects, instrumental variables, and basic time series analysis and forecasting. It is intended to provide students with the foundation to take more advanced quantitative methods courses. During the course, students will demonstrate their learning by completing a research project of their own design, culminating with a poster presentation at the conclusion of the course. Students will also become familiar with the Stata statistical package.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57012/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5052 Section 001: Public Affairs Leadership (56905)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/24/2025
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
01/25/2025
Sat 08:30AM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
02/07/2025
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
02/08/2025
Sat 08:30AM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
03/07/2025
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
03/08/2025
Sat 08:30AM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
04/04/2025
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
04/05/2025
Sat 08:30AM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
05/02/2025
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
05/03/2025
Sat 12:30PM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Continues 5051. Leadership concepts, tools, and strategies in diverse settings for mid-career students. Prereq: Master in Public Affairs student(cohort program) or public affairs leadership certificate student (cohort program). 5051-5052 must be taken in same academic yr
Class Notes:
Students should register for 5052, 5054, and 5056. 5052, 5054, and 5056 will meet on Jan 24-25, Feb 7-8, Mar 7-8, Apr 4-5 and May 2-3 (Fri: 10:00 - 5:00, Sat: 8:00 - 4:30)
Class Description:
Continues 5051. Leadership development tools, and strategies for mid-career students. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or Publi Affairs Leadership (PAL) certificate; 5051-5052 must be taken in sequence in the same academic year. Students may contact the instructor or department for additional information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56905/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 June 2016

Spring 2025  |  PA 5054 Section 001: Program Design and Implementation Analysis (56906)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Continues 5053. Process of public policy and program analysis, including problem formulation, program design, and implementation. Opportunity to draw upon published research and conduct field-based research to understand implementation conditions. Professional communications, including writing of memos, requests for proposals, and implementation briefs, are stressed. Prereq: Master in Public Affairs student (cohort program) or public affairs leadership certificate student (cohort program). 5053-5054 must be taken in same academic yr
Class Notes:
Students should register for 5052, 5054, and 5056. 5052, 5054, and 5056 will meet on Jan 19-20, Feb 16-17, Mar 15-16, Apr 12-13 and May 3-4 (Fri: 10:00 - 5:00, Sat: 8:00 - 4:30) http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bless062+PA5054+Spring2024
Class Description:
Continues 5053. Process of public policy and program analysis, including program design and evaluation, implementation, and communication of findings. Use of multimedia mini-cases, including readings and contemporary policy cases. prereq: Major in Masters of Public Affairs (MPA) (cohort) or Public Affairs Leadership (PAL) certificate (cohort); 5053-5054 must be taken in same academic yr. Students may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56906/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 June 2016

Spring 2025  |  PA 5056 Section 001: Quantitative Research Methods and Analysis (56904)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Extended Regular Session
 
05/03/2025
Sat 08:00AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Problem-based learning to analytical reasoning through social science research methods. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability, statistical inference. Hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation, analysis of variance, correlation. Simple regression analysis. prereq: Master in Public Affairs student (cohort program) or public affairs leadership certificate student (cohort program). 5055-5056 must be taken in same academic yr
Class Notes:
Students should register for 5052, 5054, and 5056. 5052, 5054, and 5056 will meet on Jan 19-20, Feb 16-17, Mar 15-16, Apr 12-13 and May 3-4 (Fri: 10:00 - 5:00, Sat: 8:00 - 4:30). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cheng838+PA5056+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56904/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5080 Section 001: Capstone Preparation Workshop (56902)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/18/2025 - 05/05/2025
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project management, qualitative research, and critical framework to complete Capstone course. Students write draft of client project group norms and client contract.
Class Notes:
4/2/2024 session will be REMOTE (synchronously online). All other work will be COMPLETELY ONLINE (asynchronously online). PA 5080:1 is required for students who will enroll in the Summer 2024 PA 8081. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kelle644+PA5080+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56902/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5104 Section 001: Human Resource Management for Public and Nonprofit Organizations (56954)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theory/practice of developing, utilizing, and aligning human resources to improve culture/outcomes of nonprofit/public organizations. HR strategy, individual diversity, leadership, selection, training, compensation, classification, performance appraisal, future HR practices.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56954/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/upoma001_PA5104_Spring2023.pdf (Spring 2023)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/upoma001_PA5104_Spring2022.pdf (Spring 2022)

Spring 2025  |  PA 5123 Section 001: Philanthropy in America: History, Practice, and Trends (56936)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Wed 05:45PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theory/practice of philanthropy. Foundation/corporate/ individual giving. History/economic structure/dynamics. Models of philanthropy, components of grant making/seeking. Current debates, career options.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56936/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5136 Section 001: Group Process Facilitation for Organizational and Public/Community Engagement (56940)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Group process facilitation components, theories, tools, techniques. Facilitator's role in group goals and processes. Facilitation in public policy. Cross-cultural challenges. Topics may include meeting management, group decision-making, conflict, participatory leadership, and other tools.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bravo047+PA5136+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56940/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5144 Section 001: Social Entrepreneurship (56961)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to field of social entrepreneurship. Prepares current/future managers/leaders to create, develop, lead socially entrepreneurial organizations/initiatives. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Description:

This course will help prepare students to understand the context of, participate in, create, develop and lead socially entrepreneurial organizations and initiatives.

The term "social entrepreneurship" means many different things to many people. In general, most agree that social entrepreneurship refers to innovative responses to social needs that create social change. Social entrepreneurship is not sector specific - it can occur in nonprofit, for-profit, and government entities as well as in "hybrids" and partnerships. We will treat the term in its most expanded description while continuing to ask ourselves as the course progresses, "What does social entrepreneurship mean? How broadly should we define its boundaries? How does it differ from other kinds of entrepreneurial activity? Other kinds of social change? How has it evolved over time? Where does it fit into our broader society?"

Though the label is relatively new, this kind of activity has been underway for a long time all over the world. It has been growing in intensity in recent years with new efforts that address old and new problems. Reduction of direct government involvement in social problems, active embracing of business practices by nonprofit leaders, businesses finding new ways to integrate social values into their business - all of these trends encourage new "social" entrepreneurial action. Global interconnectedness is also raising awareness of social issues across continents and individuals and local civic leaders and local, regional and national governments are calling for creative solutions. How does social enterprise play an integral role in shaping our future? See her bio here.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56961/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/barre041_PA5144_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 October 2022

Spring 2025  |  PA 5145 Section 001: Civic Participation in Public Affairs (56938)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/MS-STEP/MURP/Ph.D.-Public Affairs
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 56 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Critique/learn various approaches to civic participation in defining/addressing public issues. Readings, cases, classroom discussion, facilitating/experiencing engagement techniques. Examine work of practitioner, design engagement process.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56938/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5209 Section 001: Urban Planning and Health Equity (56976)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
sr or grad
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This interdisciplinary course examines the causes and consequences of place-based health disparities in cities, explores how health disparities can be mitigated and exacerbated by urban planning decisions, and introduces best practices in urban planning for achieving community health equity. The course will involve extensive readings, guest lectures, field-based assignments, data-collection activities, and local community involvement. Twin Cities has one of the largest disparities in health outcomes in the nation and local practitioners are pioneering new urban planning solutions to reduce place-based health disparities. The course will utilize this location advantage and use the region as an immersive learning environment. Students are expected to apply knowledge and skills learned in the class locally in the Twin Cities region. At the end of the course, students will be able to: Understand the historical foundations, current trends and challenges, and international perspectives in connecting urban planning to health equity issues; investigate how various planning sectors and urban environment dimensions, including land use, transportation, open space, housing, food systems, and community social capital, interact to affect health disparities in cities; critically evaluate how existing planning processes and decisions respond to the needs of vulnerable populations and contribute to health equity; and develop skills to engage communities and identifying community-sensitive solutions for reducing place-based health disparities. Fulfills a requirement for graduate Health Equity Minor (http://www.sph.umn.edu/academics/minor/health-equity/).
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56976/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/yingling_PA5209_Spring2024.pdf (Spring 2024)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/yingling_PA5209_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)

Spring 2025  |  PA 5213 Section 001: Introduction to Site Planning (56969)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 36 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Analyzing/preparing graphic plans for development or redevelopment of property. Site planning issues, process, opportunities, details, and techniques. Hands-on preparation of a site plan. Site visits, lectures, research, presentations, exam, in-class exercises. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Description:
Analyzing/preparing graphic plans for development or redevelopment of property. Site planning issues, process, opportunities, details, and techniques. Hands-on preparation of a site plan. Site visits, lectures,research, presentations, exam, in-class exercises. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56969/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hfburga_PA5213_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hfburga_PA5213_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Spring 2025  |  PA 5234 Section 001: Urban Transportation Planning and Policy (56939)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will integrate key theories and practices, traditional and emerging policy instruments, and techniques for urban and transportation planning. The goal is to introduce students to essential concepts, influential thinkers, and important debates associated with the land use-transportation connection as a foundation for both professional and academic work. By the end of the course, students will be able to comprehend urban transportation planning process and demand forecasting; the theories and empirical evidence on land use and transportation interactions; land use and transportation policy instruments and their effectiveness; and land use and transportation planning in developing countries.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56939/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5242 Section 001: Environmental Planning, Policy, and Decision Making (64706)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theory and practice. Ethical, legal, and institutional frameworks relative to a range of environmental issues. Innovative environmental decision making informed by collaboration, conflict resolution, adaptive management, and resilience thinking. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64706/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5243 Section 001: Environmental Justice in Urban Planning & Public Policy (64707)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Environmental racism can be defined as policies and practices that result in communities of Black, Indigenous and other people of color (BIPoC communities) being overexposed to environmental harms and being denied access to environmental goods. The environmental justice (EJ) movement in the United States was birthed in the 1980s with the aim of ending environmental racism. Early EJ activism was led by Black rural communities protesting the disproportionate presence of toxic waste facilities in their neighborhoods and Latinx migrant farmworkers who were overexposed to harmful pesticides. Central to the course is the understanding that structural racism, in the form of social, political, and economic forces, has denied BIPoC individuals and communities their rights to live in clean environments and access natural resources that allow communities to build and maintain their physical, mental, emotion, and fiscal health. Although the course focuses on race and racism, it takes as axiomatic that racism is intertwined with other systems of oppression including, but not limited to, sexism, classism, ableism, homophobia, and transphobia. The course begins by tracing the history of the EJ movement and unpacking the terms "racism" and "justice." The main body of the course will focus on a series of issues that EJ scholars and activists address including pollution, greening, transportation, disasters, and climate change. The course ends with discussions and reflections on our roles, responsibilities and possibilities as public policy and planning scholars, researchers and practitioners to work towards ending environmental racism and achieving EJ for all. The required "readings" for the course will include academic journal articles, news stories, governmental policies, podcasts, videos, poetry, and short stories. This will allow us to understand the theoretical and methodological approaches to EJ activism and research and explore popular and creative forms of knowledge abo
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64707/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5261 Section 001: Housing Policy (56899)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Institutional/environmental setting for housing policy in the United States. Competing views of solving housing problems through public intervention in the market. Federal/local public sector responses to housing problems. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56899/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5263 Section 001: Financing Affordable Multi-Family Rental Hsg in US (56957)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Law student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Fri 01:00PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Financing affordable multifamily housing in the United States is a complicated endeavor that requires more than just a command of financial principles and analysis but also an appreciation for the nuances and fluidity of policy, public-private-partnership, and public discourse. This course will demystify the financial drivers and consequences in our affordable housing delivery system. It will simultaneously build participants' confidence in basic financial modeling of affordable housing using the most common capital structures, while also exploring the relationship of finance with policy and regulation, real estate and urban planning objectives, design, and program limitations. Participants in this course will emerge with: - An understanding of the roles, risk sharing and influence of public and private actors in the financing and provision of affordable housing. - A practical familiarity with the major financing programs and policies that drive investment in this sector. - Experience in financial modeling specific to multifamily affordable housing which will prepare them for work in the industry, regardless of role.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schm0023+PA5263+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56957/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5271 Section 001: Geographic Information Systems: Applications in Planning and Policy Analysis (56919)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Urban/Regional Planning, major and minor or PA PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to GIS. Applications in public planning and policy analysis. Operational skills in GIS software. Mapping analysis of U.S. Census material. Local/state government management/planning. Spatial statistical analysis for policy/planning. prereq: Major in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Notes:
Non-MURP students may contact Geoff Maas (maas0021@umn.edu) regarding the waiting list/permission numbers.
Class Description:

GIS Applications in Planning and Policy Analysis is intended for the planning and public policy student who desires a fundamental working knowledge of the core concepts of GIS. Students can expect to work with geospatial data in a lab environment, develop core skills in working with, manipulating and understanding geospatial data. Lectures explore the data types, origins, uses and limitations.


Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are an important supportive technology for the fields of planning and public policy. Both fields involve exploring location-based issues and GIS facilitates spatial visualization of phenomena such as crime, poverty, pollution, health, land use, economics, environmental conditions and many others. GIS - a discipline in its own right - is now firmly woven into the fabric of government and many business operations. It is vital that planning and public policy students have a fundamental knowledge of the concepts, usage, processes and potential of GIS technology.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in working with spatial data, making maps, presenting and communicating spatial data.
Learning Objectives:
Development of foundational skills in GIS, understanding of the various uses and limits of the technology and how it can be applied to the work of urban planning, public policy, public health and urban studies.
Grading:
10 Lab Assignments using GIS Software (55% of grade)
Class Attendance (10% of grade)
Final Project (25% of grade)
Final Exam (10% of grade)
Exam Format:
Final Exam: Cumulative, written exam for core concepts covered in the class.
Class Format:
Tuesday Evenings: 6:00 PM - 8:45 PM
Workload:
Emphasis is on topical lectures, in-class lab exercises and assignments. Students will leave the course with a firm command of core GIS and geospatial concepts, tools, processes and methods and their applicability to the fields of urban and regional planning and policy analysis.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56919/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2017

Spring 2025  |  PA 5281 Section 001: Immigrants, Urban Planning and Policymaking in the U.S. (56987)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course examines the impact of contemporary immigration in the U.S. on urban planning and public affairs. Through a review of canonical scholarship and contemporary research, it engages several issues including migration theory, an exploration of immigrant settlement patterns, labor market outcomes for immigrants, and community development in immigrant communities. The course concludes with a focus on how urban planners and public policy makers can work more effectively with immigrants in the U.S.
Class Description:
This course examines the impact of contemporary immigration in the U.S. on urban planning and public affairs. Specifically, it engages several important questions: How have immigrants changed cities in the U.S.? What kind of social, political and economic experiences do immigrants have once they arrive in the U.S.? How can urban planners and public policy makers fashion plans and policies that expand the opportunities and improve outcomes and improve outcomes for immigrants? To help answer these questions, we focus on the following areas: immigration theory, the residential settlement patterns of immigrants, labor market outcomes, community formation, and examples of effective (and ineffective) practices for working with immigrants in planning and public policy contexts.
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
Workload:
80-100 Pages Reading Per Week
40 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56987/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/allen650_PA5281_Fall2015.doc (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 August 2016

Spring 2025  |  PA 5290 Section 001: Topics in Planning -- Transportation Engineering Principles for Planners (65040)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
12 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Mon, Wed 06:00PM - 07:40PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Description:
Transportation planners interact with engineers on a daily basis. Because of different emphases of professional training, many planners who graduate from urban planning programs have experienced difficulty in communicating with transportation engineers. In response to feedback from Humphrey alumni, this course is developed to introduce fundamental concepts and principles of transportation engineering in terms of traffic volume and capacity, level of service, travel demand forecasting, traffic impact analysis, intersection control and signalization, safety and crash analysis, storm water management, infrastructure operation and maintenance, the ethics of a professional engineer, etc. It will bridge the gaps between the two closely related professions and help you succeed in your career in transportation.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65040/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cao_PA5290_Spring2022.pdf (Spring 2022)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 November 2021

Spring 2025  |  PA 5311 Section 001: Program Evaluation (56937)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course covers the core principals, methods, and implementation of evaluation research. Students will learn through an applied partnership with a nonprofit or state/local government clients. The course is designed for both students interested in a potential career in evaluation and those that want to be better consumers of research. Past programmatic/policy areas included health and human services, education, environment science, economic development, transportation, and evidence-based policymaking.
Class Notes:
Class will meet in person during the scheduled class times (Jan 19, Feb 2, Feb 16, Mar 1, Mar 15, Mar 29, April 12, and April 26). There will be asynchronous work during the weeks class is not scheduled. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?heima019+PA5311+Spring2024
Class Description:
This course provides an overview to program evaluation in public affairs. It explores the complexities and realities of conducting program evaluation studies in community-based settings, such as public agencies, schools, non-profit organizations, and collaborative initiatives. The overall purpose of this course is to provide students with a theoretical framework and practical strategies for conducting community-based evaluation studies.
Grading:
50% Program Evaluation Field Work

25% Reports/Papers/Memos

15% Student Presentations

10% Participation
Class Format:

30% Lecture

20% Small Group Activities

20% Student Presentations

15% Discussion

10% Laboratory

5% Guest Speakers
Workload:

50 Pages Reading Per Week

2 Reports/Papers/Memos

1 Presentation

1 Special Project
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56937/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 August 2015

Spring 2025  |  PA 5312 Section 001: Cost-Benefit Analysis for Program Evaluation (56950)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This class introduces students to cost-benefit analysis, the leading evidenced-based method for determining whether a government program or policy improves the well-being of society. Starting with the foundations of welfare economics, students learn how to monetize important benefits and costs associated with government activities. Topics include discounting future benefits and costs, the roles of standing and risk, ways of valuing human lives and other benefits that may be hard to value in dollar terms. Students will acquire skills needed to perform relevant calculations needed for the economic assessment of benefits relative to costs and the ability to critique the use of these methods regarding how they may advantage or disadvantage some members of society or particular types of policies. Policy areas include preventive interventions in social, health and education as well as applications in transportation and environmental policy. Prerequisite: PA 5021 or other prior course in microeconomics.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5312+Spring2023
Class Description:
Meets Monday/Wednesdays at 4:00-5:15 pm, January 17 -
March 13, 2023


This class introduces MPP students and others to methods used in cost-benefit analysis, the leading evidenced-based method for guiding decisions about whether a government program or policy improves the well-being of society. For Humphrey students, this course can be used as an elective or as part of the economics core requirement. For students who have already fulfilled that requirement, this course can be used to satisfy requirements in the Advanced Policy Analysis concentration.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students who have had some exposure to introductory microeconomics. Senior undergrads may also enroll.

Required Text: Boardman, Greenberg, Vining, Weimer (2019) Cost-Benefit Analysis: Concepts and Practice, 5th edition, Cambridge University Press. Note that the fourth edition also is OK, except that some of the chapters are in a different order.

Learning Objectives:
We'll cover the theory of CBA in just a few weeks and then jump right into the applications!
Grading:
There will be two quizzes taken remotely worth 15% each, five short assignments worth 7% each and a final paper worth 30% in total. The final paper will have three parts - a one paragraph summary with several relevant references submitted in advance, a short presentation during class time and the final paper. Class participation could add another 5% to your grade. The final paper will either be an evaluation and critique of an existing cost-benefit analysis or a proposal of a benefit-cost study of an actual policy or program. Students will be able to update the class on their topic during the semester.

Workload:
Standard workload. While the class only meets for 2.5 hours a week for 7 weeks, there will be a small number of how-to videos to watch on your own.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56950/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5312_Spring2023.pdf (Spring 2023)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2022

Spring 2025  |  PA 5405 Section 001: Public Policy Implementation (56994)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theory, tools, and practice of the implementation of public policy, particularly in areas involving public, private, and nonprofit organizations. Analytical approach focuses on multiple levels in policy fields to pinpoint and assess implementation challenges and levers for improvement.
Class Description:
This course examines issues in the implementation of public programs and policies. Implementation is an integral, dynamic and important component of using policy and programs to improve public problems. Policies are not only created by elected officials, who authorize and fund government activities, but also by state administrators, local managers, front-line staff, and groups targeted by policy change. Because of this complexity, this course introduces students to a multilevel implementation analysis framework. Multilevel analysis focuses on understanding how the core policy or program is understood at the policy field, organizational, and front-line levels. It also provides ways to better understand how a social process that involves power and culture often significantly shapes implementation processes and tasks. This helps improve students' skills in navigating complex system in which most public policy implementation occurs.
Learning Objectives:
Because implementation is inherently a social process, it requires skillful actors who can both analyze situations and work effectively with others to direct resources, manage competing demands, and move toward positive social outcomes. As such, students need to cultivate their abilities to be analytical, reflective and adaptive. The course is designed to help students build all of these skills through lecture, field work, and discussion.
Exam Format:
There are no exams. Assignments will be in the form of field projects, presentations, and participation.
Class Format:
Classes are face-to-face with weaving in of on-line materials, small group informal meetings, and consultation with the instructor.
Workload:
One textbook is required - Effective Implementation In Practice: Integrating Public Policy and Management by Sandfort and Moulton (2015). Other materials are provided on Moodle, including readings, case studies, videos, etc. Students engage in field research projects that allow them to focus on their areas of interest and explore implementation processes and results.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56994/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 March 2017

Spring 2025  |  PA 5416 Section 001: Economics of U.S. Social Insurance Programs (56951)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Law student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This class will introduce you to the Economics of Social Insurance Programs. It begins by introducing a framework to evaluate the efficiency and equity of social insurance programs, drawing on theory from the economics of insurance programs and behavioral economics. It then applies this framework to social insurance programs such as workers' compensation, unemployment insurance, health insurance, social security, TANF and Supplemental Nutritional Assistance, and the Earned Income Tax Credit. Prerequisite: PA 5021 or other prior course in microeconomics.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hanra003+PA5416+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56951/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5421 Section 001: Racial Inequality and Public Policy (56993)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Delivery Mode
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Sat 09:00AM - 11:45AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Historical roots of racial inequality in American society. Contemporary economic consequences. Public policy responses to racial inequality. Emphasizes thinking/analysis that is critical of strategies offered for reducing racism and racial economic inequality. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?myers006+PA5421+Spring2024
Class Description:
This seminar explores the historical roots of racial inequality in American society and the economic consequences for contemporary times. Focus will be placed on public policy developments and intellectual debates in the "Post-Civil Rights Era," i.e., recent years when race-based strategies for reduction of economic disparities no longer are politically feasible and the "Post-Racialism Era" when race itself is no longer considered an explanation for inequality. The first half of the course explores the various causes and the empirical evidence on racial and ethnic economic inequality. The second half the course introduces the methods and techniques for assessing the effectiveness of alternative remedies to inequality. Some consideration is given to the problem of race and racial inequality in a comparative perspective, even though the main focus of much of the course is on the United States. Special attention is paid to changing notions of race and federal and state responses to rapid demographic changes. The seminar will provoke open debate and discourse about public policy responses to racial inequality. The emphasis is on stimulating seminar participants to think about and to analyze critically the range of strategies offered for reducing racism and racial and ethnic economic inequality.

This course fulfills a requirement for the 7-credit Health Disparities Interdisciplinary Concentration. For more information on the concentration and a full list of requirements, please visit http://www.sph.umn.edu/academics/ic/disparities/.

Grading:

Individual Assignments 60%

10 Reflective Essays 10%
5 Online Forum Essays 10%
Quiz #1 20%
Quiz #2 20%

Team Assignments 40%

Team Reading Response Paper 5%
Peer Evaluation of Team-Led Discussion 5%
Problem Statement 5%
Policy Brief 10%
Peer Evaluation of Team Policy Brief Presentation 5%
Within-Group Peer Evaluation 10%


TOTAL 100%
Exam Format:

There will be two timed, computer graded quizzes. The format will include multiple-choice and true-false questions as well as matching and completion formats. These quizzes will be based largely on the lectures and required and recommended readings. The quizzes will be posted online. Study guides will be distributed two weeks before each quiz.
Class Format:

Class sessions will be devoted to highlighting some of the central issues that confound theoretical and empirical assessments of racism and racial and ethnic inequality. These central issues are developed extensively in the required readings, which cover a broad range of scholarly and popular perspectives and approaches. The sessions will include lectures, group activities, discussions, and films.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56993/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/myers006_PA5421_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/myers006_PA5421_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/myers006_PA5421_Spring2016.docx (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 October 2018

Spring 2025  |  PA 5426 Section 001: Community-Engaged Research and Policy with Marginalized Groups (57001)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Wed 05:30PM - 08:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Marginalized populations tend to be viewed as objects of social policy, passive victims, or a cause of social problems. Processes of marginalization we will explore in this class include: structural racism, colonization, economic exclusion and exploitation, gender bias, and more. Policy and research are typically driven by mainstream/dominant society members with little direct knowledge about the real lives of people on the margins. This can lead to misguided actions, misunderstandings, paternalism, unintended negative consequences, and further marginalization and/or stigmatization. In this course, we will learn about community-engaged research methodologies such as participatory action research (PAR) and community-based participatory research (CPBR). We will use case studies to explore the challenges, rewards, and ethical implications of these community-engaged approaches to research and policy-making. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, sex trafficking, housing, and youth work. Instructors and students in the course will work together on a real-world research and policy challenge so that students contribute to ongoing work in the field in real-time.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2024 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?fritz290+PA5426+Spring2024.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57001/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/melan108_fritz290_PA5426_Spring2023.docx (Spring 2023)

Spring 2025  |  PA 5521 Section 001: Development Planning and Policy Analysis (56901)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Techniques of development planning/policy analysis at national, regional, and project levels. Effects of external shocks and government interventions on national/regional economies. Macroeconomic modeling, input-output analysis, social accounting matrices/multipliers, project evaluation. prereq: 5031 or equiv recommended or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56901/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5521 Section 002: Development Planning and Policy Analysis (56903)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Fri 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Techniques of development planning/policy analysis at national, regional, and project levels. Effects of external shocks and government interventions on national/regional economies. Macroeconomic modeling, input-output analysis, social accounting matrices/multipliers, project evaluation. prereq: 5031 or equiv recommended or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?assaad+PA5521+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56903/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5531 Section 001: Global Sustainable Development in Practice (56973)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to the concept of global sustainable development, with a particular focus on the systems and institutions supporting and implementing development and the challenges associated with achieving positive development outcomes. The class will cover the Sustainable Development Goals and other key development indicators; explore theoretical concepts underpinning development practice including political economy and political ecology; provide critical insight into the institutions engaging in sustainable development including governments, NGOs, and international financial institutions; and consider ethical issues associated with working in the field of sustainable development.
Class Notes:
Professor Heather Randell will be the instructor. http://classinfo.umn.edu/? hrandell+PA5531+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56973/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5715 Section 001: Deliberating Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (65046)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/18/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Exploration of the conceptual and ethical dimensions of science, technology, and environmental policy. Discussion-based course with rotating topics.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65046/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5721 Section 001: Energy Systems and Policy (56956)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Impact of energy production/consumption choices on environmental quality, sustainable development, and other economic/social goals. Emphasizes public policy choices for energy/environment, linkages between them.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56956/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5772 Section 001: Fundamentals of Sustainability Science (65183)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Wed 06:00PM - 06:50PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is offered in conjunction with the certificate in Sustainable Environmental, Social, and Governance Leadership. Many students who are interested in contributing to sustainability activities in their organizations or communities may not have had the opportunity to learn basic concepts in sustainability science. This course provides the student with a grounding in the science of climate change, water, waste, and health that is relevant to the sustainability of organizations. Students will develop an understanding of greenhouse gas emissions and the carbon cycle, climate change and meteorological risk, water and human activity, waste, biodiversity, electrification and health risks and be able to apply them to sustainability challenges facing for profit, nonprofit, or governmental organizations.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65183/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5790 Section 001: Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Geopolitics & Governance of the Energy Transition (65041)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
9 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
TOPIC: Geopolitics & Governance of the Energy Transition This module addresses the interplay between global politics and the energy transition. Climate change, environmental degradation, and resource scarcity necessitate a shift to more sustainable forms of energy. The geographic and technical changes such a transition implies will reshape industrial opportunities, trade relationships, and political dependencies. At the same time, global politics shapes the speed and direction of such transitions. Great power rivalry influences who trades with whom and what agreements can be reached and enforced. A smooth energy transition hence rests on understanding this complex interplay and finding ways for policy makers to balance national and collective interests. This course therefore delves deeper into academic insights on the geopolitics of the energy transition and has students apply them to past, present, and future energy systems.
Class Description:
This module addresses the interplay between global politics and the energy transition. Climate change, environmental degradation, and resource scarcity necessitate a shift to more sustainable forms of energy. The geographic and technical changes such a transition implies will reshape industrial opportunities, trade relationships, and political dependencies. At the same time, global politics shapes the speed and direction of such transitions. Great power rivalry influences who trades with whom and what agreements can be reached and enforced. A smooth energy transition hence rests on understanding this complex interplay and finding ways for policy makers to balance national and collective interests. This course therefore delves deeper into academic insights on the geopolitics of the energy transition and has students apply them to past, present, and future energy systems.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65041/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 October 2023

Spring 2025  |  PA 5801 Section 001: Global Public Policy (56960)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 08:30AM - 09:45AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course explores the emergence and evolution of rules, norms, and institutions that constitute international relations. It will focus, in particular, on those related to questions of war, peace, and governance. For students with an interest in international security, foreign military intervention, democracy and governance promotion, and the political economy of aid.
Class Notes:
Instructor will be Brigitte Seim. Note time change to Tu/Th, 8:30-9:45. Selected classes will be held "synchronousely remote." Instructor will provide those dates in the syllabus. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5801+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56960/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5805 Section 001: Global Economics (57006)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Global trade, exchange rates, finance, international business, and migration in the context of theories and evidence that inform the policies pursued at a national level. The operation of main international organizations dealing with these issues will also be examined.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5805+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57006/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5825 Section 001: Crisis Management in Foreign Affairs (56933)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/23/2025
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
02/06/2025
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
02/20/2025
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
03/06/2025
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
03/20/2025
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
04/03/2025
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
04/17/2025
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
05/01/2025
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Crisis decision making in foreign policy. Examination of the organization and structure of crisis decision-making within U.S. national security apparatus. Analysis of in-depth four foreign policy crises (Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam Tet, Iraq, and a current crisis). Crisis simulation with students in the role of national security leaders.
Class Notes:
Meets alternating Thursdays.
Class Description:
·
This course will analyze crisis decision making in foreign policy. Students will:

o Examine the organization and structure of crisis decision-making within the U.S. national security apparatus;

o Analyze in depth four foreign policy crises: the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962); Vietnam - Tet (1968); Iraq (2006-2008) and a Current Events Crisis (2016).

o Put themselves in the position of national security leaders as part of a crisis simulation; and

o Write an analysis of a historical foreign policy crisis.


Four books will be required for this course and will be available through the UM Bookstores:

o Allison, Graham T., and Zelikow, Philip D., "Essence of Decision: Explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis" (2nd edition), Pearson Longman (January 1999).

o Stern, Sheldon M., "The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis (Stanford Nuclear Age Series)" (Paperback) Stanford University Press (January 18, 2005).

o McMaster, H.R., "Dereliction of Duty," Harper Perennial; Reprint Edition (Paperback), (May 8, 1998).

o Harris, David, "The Crisis: The President, the Prophet, and the Shah - 1979 and the Coming of Militant Islam," Little, Brown and Company (Paperback) (2004).

Grading:
Grades will be based on oral participation and a written foreign policy crisis analysis.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56933/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/andre104_PA5825_Spring2020.docx (Spring 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/andre104_PA5825_Spring2018.docx (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/andre104_PA5825_Spring2017.docx (Spring 2017)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2018

Spring 2025  |  PA 5887 Section 001: Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar II (56927)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA 5886
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
02/04/2025
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
02/18/2025
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
03/04/2025
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
03/18/2025
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
04/01/2025
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
04/15/2025
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
04/29/2025
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar is a required course for all first-year MHR students. The course is intended to create a cohort group and ensure that all MHR students have an opportunity to work together to explore current issues related to human rights practice, focusing on emerging events or crises, and debates over policy, practice, or theory and for direct contact with and networking particularly with counterparts in the Global South. This course is in a series with, and taken after, PA 5886.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56927/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5890 Section 001: Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs -- Human Rights, Business, and Governance (64927)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
15 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Full title: Human Rights, Business, and Governance
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64927/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5890 Section 002: Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs (64990)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
0.5-5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
15 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64990/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5920 Section 001: Skills Workshop -- Public Policy and the State Attorney General (65106)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
48 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics on public policy or planning skills. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65106/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5926 Section 001: Presentation Skills: How to Inspire Your Audience and Change the World (56968)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Repeat Credit Limit:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Learn techniques for making effective, persuasive presentations to different kinds of audiences. Practice is essential to improve speaking skills and reduce anxiety. Students practice by recording brief weekly presentations and making class presentations in a supportive environment. Techniques for using Powerpoint to create effective slides are practiced. Course components include presentation assignments; peer reviews; readings/videos and reflections; and class participation. May be repeated once.
Class Notes:
Class will meet January 17 - March 27, 2024. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?free0303+PA5926+Spring2024
Class Description:
Learn techniques for making effective, persuasive presentations to different kinds of audiences. Students practice by recording brief weekly presentations and making class presentations in a supportive environment. Techniques for creating effective slides are practiced. Course components include presentation assignments; peer reviews; readings/videos and reflections; and class participation. May be repeated once.
Learning Objectives:

By the end of the course, students should be able to:


• speak publicly with greater confidence


• present more persuasively


• create effective, high-impact slides


• tailor presentations to audiences

Grading:
Course can be taken either as Pass/Fail or on an A-F basis.

50% Presentations
25% Feedback to other students
10% Completion of assigned readings/videos and reflections on them
5% Reviewing and reflecting on your own presentations
10% Class participation, including attendance, collegiality, being an audience
Exam Format:
This course does not have a final exam.
Class Format:
10% Lecture
40% Discussion
50% Student Presentations
Workload:
Workload for this class will comprise approximately three hours of work each week, including in-class and out-of-class time.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56968/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/free0303_PA5926_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 July 2018

Spring 2025  |  PA 5927 Section 001: Effective Grantwriting for Nonprofit Organizations (57000)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Law student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Thu 05:45PM - 08:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Grantwriting skills, processes, problem,s and resources for nonprofit organizations. Researching and seeking grants. Communication with potential funders and generating financial support. Collaborating effectively with the organization and clients to create substantive, fundable proposals.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?chinc002+PA5927+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57000/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5928 Section 001: Data Management and Visualization with R (56952)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/MS-STEP/MURP/Ph.D.-Public Affairs
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Wed 05:30PM - 08:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to R Studio software. Use of R Studio to carry out R file and related database management functions. Tools and techniques for data analysis and statistical programming in quantitative research or related applied areas. Topics include data selection, data manipulation, and data and spatial visualization (including charts, plots, histograms, maps, and other graphs). Prerequisite knowledge: Introductory statistics; ability to create bar graphs, line graphs, and scatter plots in MS Excel; and familiarity with principles of data visualization.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mayer443+PA5928+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56952/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5929 Section 001: Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers (56928)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Tools for communicating quantitative information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way. Topics covered include 1) writing and speaking about data; 2) data management in Excel in order to prepare data for charting; 3) understanding and ability to deploy core concepts in of design, layout, typography and color to maximize the impact of their data visualizations 4) determining which types of statistical measures are most effective for each type of data and message; 5) determining which types of design to use for communicating quantitative information; and 6) designing graphs and tables that are intelligent and compelling for communicating quantitative information.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dorelien+PA5929+Spring2024
Class Description:
The class will have a practical approach, combining discussion and practical exercises. The course is designed to be like a walk-through, starting from collecting and organizing data and ending with advanced graph designs.

The course in the spring will use Excel and Tableau. There will be additional modules available for more advance Excel users and those who want to go beyond the basics in Tableau. I will not teach R as part of the class but will make available the R modules and handouts for students that are interested in learning R.
Learning Objectives:
Learn to make better tables- see example below
ClearOffTheTableMd
Learn to make better figures
Grading:
Please note that it is possible to audit the course or take the course S/N. I encourage students that are already taking a full load of classes to sign up for this class S/N, that way you can focus on learning the material and not on the letter grade.

4 Problem Sets (each problem set is worth 15% of final grade). The problem sets will be due one week after being assigned and will need to be uploaded to Canvas before the start of class.
If you are satisfied with your grades from the first 3 assignments, you do not have to turn in assignment 4. If you are not, you should turn in assignment 4 and I will drop the lowest of your assignment grades.
1 Final Report (40% of final grade)
Class Format:
Meets twice a week for first half the semester. The majority of class time is spent doing in-class exercises. There is one Saturday virtual session, in which we hold a Tableau Workshop.
Workload:
There are 4 problem sets and a final memo. The highest 3 Problem Set Grades make up your final PS grades.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56928/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA5929_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 November 2023

Spring 2025  |  PA 5929 Section 002: Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers (56990)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/18/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Tools for communicating quantitative information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way. Topics covered include 1) writing and speaking about data; 2) data management in Excel in order to prepare data for charting; 3) understanding and ability to deploy core concepts in of design, layout, typography and color to maximize the impact of their data visualizations 4) determining which types of statistical measures are most effective for each type of data and message; 5) determining which types of design to use for communicating quantitative information; and 6) designing graphs and tables that are intelligent and compelling for communicating quantitative information.
Class Notes:
Saturday session moved to 4/6/24 (from 3/30/24). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dorelien+PA5929+Spring2024
Class Description:
The class will have a practical approach, combining discussion and practical exercises. The course is designed to be like a walk-through, starting from collecting and organizing data and ending with advanced graph designs.

The course in the spring will use Excel and Tableau. There will be additional modules available for more advance Excel users and those who want to go beyond the basics in Tableau. I will not teach R as part of the class but will make available the R modules and handouts for students that are interested in learning R.
Learning Objectives:
Learn to make better tables- see example below
ClearOffTheTableMd
Learn to make better figures
Grading:
Please note that it is possible to audit the course or take the course S/N. I encourage students that are already taking a full load of classes to sign up for this class S/N, that way you can focus on learning the material and not on the letter grade.

4 Problem Sets (each problem set is worth 15% of final grade). The problem sets will be due one week after being assigned and will need to be uploaded to Canvas before the start of class.
If you are satisfied with your grades from the first 3 assignments, you do not have to turn in assignment 4. If you are not, you should turn in assignment 4 and I will drop the lowest of your assignment grades.
1 Final Report (40% of final grade)
Class Format:
Meets twice a week for first half the semester. The majority of class time is spent doing in-class exercises. There is one Saturday virtual session, in which we hold a Tableau Workshop.
Workload:
There are 4 problem sets and a final memo. The highest 3 Problem Set Grades make up your final PS grades.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56990/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA5929_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 November 2023

Spring 2025  |  PA 5933 Section 001: Survey Methods: Designing Effective Questionnaires (56984)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Fri 09:05AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 18 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Applied (hands-on) introduction to survey questionnaire design. Student teams design a questionnaire for a client. For example, students may draft and revise questions about respondents' demographics and employment; life histories; knowledge, use, and opinions about services; and/or anxiety and well-being. The syllabus evolves depending on the needs of the client and the class' decisions about how to build the survey; a complete syllabus will not be available at the beginning of class for this reason. Readings include a textbook and articles related to the client's survey. Students actively engage in class and in groups about draft questions, thus learning how to improve them, with regular feedback from the instructor. Questions are tested on volunteers. Students learn: the process of questionnaire design in a team; pitfalls of survey design; and how to track questions, coded responses, and prompts for interviewers. This class is not a substitute for a comprehensive survey research class or a statistical course on sampling and weighting. Students will learn: - The process of questionnaire design in a team - Basic pitfalls of survey design - names, definitions, examples. - How to use Excel to track questions, coded responses, and prompts for interviewers - How to use interviewing software SurveyToGo This class is not a substitute for a comprehensive survey research class or a statistical course on sampling and weighting.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56984/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5962 Section 001: State Governing and Legislating: Working the Process (56935)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The Minnesota Capitol and rules and reality of state governance and legislating. Classroom discussions, high-profile guest speakers (including legislators, lobbyists, and potentially the governor), and an extensive State Capitol practicum to explore state politics and policies.
Class Notes:
Note: A practicum in Spring 2024 is part of the course requirements. Students must contact the instructor by December 15, 2023 to obtain a permission number and to arrange a practicum. Briana can be reached at brianabierschbach@gmail.com. More info at http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bier0136+PA5962+Spring2024
Class Description:

Using the Minnesota Capitol as our laboratory, this course will dive into the rules and reality of state governance and legislating. The course will include classroom discussions, guest speakers and a significant State Capitol practicum to give you a deep look into state politics and policies.

This is a praxis-oriented course, not a theoretical course. You are expected to be active learners, absorbing readings, lectures, guest speakers' talks and your practicums to become equipped to understand and operate within the state decision-making process.

The goal of this class: If you participate fully and complete this course, by the end, you should be prepared to approach a job or issue in state government with an understanding of the role you can play and the roles of those around you.

Briana Bierschbach is a veteran Minnesota political reporter who covers politics for the Star-Tribune. She has also worked for Minnesota Public Radio. She has covered state politics and campaigns for nearly a decade with publications like the Associated Press, Politics in Minnesota and MinnPost. She's been twice named one of the top political journalists in Minnesota by the Washington Post and was the Society of Professional Journalists' 2015 Young Journalist of the Year.

Note: A practicum in Spring 2022 is part of the course requirements. Students must contact the instructor, Briana Bierschbach, at bier0136@umn.edu by December 14, 2021 to obtain a permission number and to arrange a practicum. More info at http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bier0136+PA5962+Spring2022


Learning Objectives:
● Identify and analyze the pressures on state government and individuals in state government.

● Explore the real world relationship between elected officials, lobbyists, interests groups, voters and the public.

● Gain the ability to interact with powerful decision-makers, by listening with respect and questioning with authority.

● Improve public speaking skills through practice.

● Develop the tools to build relationships within state government and have a network of resources to tap.

Grading:
Final paper - 30%

Practicum - 30%

Class participation -- 16%

Other assignments -- 12%

Question memos -- 12%

There is no extra credit in this class.


A = 100% - 90%

B = 89% - 79%

C = 78% - 69%

D = 68% - 59%

F = less than 59%

Exam Format:
No exams
Class Format:
Discussions/guest speakers
Workload:
8 hours per week practicum at the Capitol

Three monthly reports from the practicum

Weekly question memos/short readings to prepare for speakers

Active participation in class

Final project on issue/bill and mid-semester memo outlining project

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56935/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bier0136_PA5962_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 November 2021

Spring 2025  |  PA 5972 Section 001: Elections and the Law (56925)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 3972 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
12:00AM - 12:00AM
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theories and basic structure of the American legal system. Experience with basic tools and skills for using the law to understand and analyze issues facing election administrators across the nation. Use of election-related and non-election related materials to prepare election administrators for interacting with counsel, legislators and the courts in carrying out their responsibilities.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?choat024+PA5972+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56925/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5976 Section 001: Voter Participation (56971)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 3976 Section 001
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/21/2025 - 03/17/2025
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Voter participation issues and challenges including historical survey of voter participation in US and methods to increase voter turnout.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?robe2358+PA5976+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56971/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 5984 Section 001: Elections Security: How to Protect America's Elections (56966)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
PA 3984 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/18/2025 - 05/05/2025
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
"Elections Security" uses the Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election as a case study to identify the vulnerabilities of US elections (especially state voter registration databases) as well as catalogue new protections. Readings and discussion will focus on best practices and technology options available to the public (social media) and elections professionals (cybersecurity) in guarding against future influence efforts and assuring public confidence in election outcomes. Special focus will be given to describing how local election officials can protect their election technology, most notably those vulnerabilities associated with their voting system and voter registration database. "Elections Security" will draw heavily on concrete cases and challenges facing election professionals, using government and independent reports and an indepth analysis of new resources created by the US Department of Homeland Security and its collaborations with election professionals.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5984+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56966/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 8006 Section 001: Current Research in Public Affairs: Topics, Approaches, and Cultures (56931)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Public Affairs PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Students participate in research seminars exploring current topics, approaches, and cultures in public affairs. Students responsible for discussion, presentation, and evaluation of research, including peer review of papers and presentations. Discussion of research ethics and skills, including literature reviews, research design, data visualization, public engagement, presentation, and project management.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56931/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 8081 Section 004: Capstone Workshop (65185)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65185/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 8081 Section 006: Capstone Workshop -- Urban and Regional Planning (64473)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Wed 08:15AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64473/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 8081 Section 012: Capstone Workshop -- Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (65045)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Learning Objectives:
1. Articulate a public problem/opportunity statement and develop/manage a scope of work that supports the needs of a public or nonprofit client
2. Prepare and execute a research/project plan to strengthen theoretical and practical grounding in leadership, public policy or program analysis, and reflective problem-solving to inform action on a public problem.
3. Collect and analyze data from a variety of research methods to deepen understanding of social conditions and produce information and evidence-based recommendations that will improve understanding and enable effective public action.
4. Develop ideas and recommendations responsive to the needs expressed by your client and the terms of your agreement.
5. Communicate findings and recommendations - both orally and in writing - with confidence and professionalism to influence decisions and inspire action that advances public objectives and interests.
6. Work effectively with others with diverse experiences and perspectives to forge professional relationships with a governmental or nonprofit client and Capstone teammates.
7. Develop a better understanding or your own learning process through reflection.
Grading:
Individual grades will be based on in-class participation (15%) and the four reflections (20%).
Team grades will be given at mid-term based on the status report (15%) and on the final presentation and report (50%)
Workload:
1. Readings: The readings will be posted to the course Moodle site.

2. Class discussion: Participation in class includes attendance and active engagement with your team and other teams.

3. Team Assignments
a. Memorandum of Agreement in draft and final form between your team and your client
b. Work Plan in draft and final form that describes your plan for meeting the deadlines for completing your work and the unique roles of team members, if any.
c. Mid-term Status Report Presentation (not a prose report)
d. Preliminary Findings and Recommendations for instructor and peer comment
e. Draft Report for instructor and client comment
f. Project Presentation in draft and final form
g. Final Project Report

4. Individual reflections: There will be four short individual reflection papers of 750-1000 words in which I will ask you to comment on the progress of your learning and your work with your team and your client at the contract
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65045/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kelle644_PA8081_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2018

Spring 2025  |  PA 8081 Section 014: Capstone Workshop -- Human Rights (64919)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Fri 08:30AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64919/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 8081 Section 015: Capstone Workshop -- Urban and Regional Planning (64474)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Wed 08:15AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64474/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 8082 Section 001: Professional Paper-Writing Seminar (56953)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Wed 08:15AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Facilitates completion of research paper on current issues in public policy, management, and science, technology and environment. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives studied in core courses. Written report includes analysis of issue, policy recommendations. All topics accepted. Plan A students welcome. prereq: completion of core courses, or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dlevison+PA8082+Spring2024
Class Description:
Course objective: to help 2nd+ year masters students finish high-quality, well-written individual Professional Papers or Plan A Papers by the end of the semester.

This seminar provides a supportive environment in which students can make regular progress on papers, but it does not dictate how that should happen. The seminar avoids a one-size-fits-all approach to paper-writing. There does not exist one correct series of tasks to produce an excellent paper. Different projects require quite different starting points and different processes.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Required for Humphrey masters students writing professional papers in Spring semester. Space permitting, PhD students may join the group to write dissertation papers.
Learning Objectives:
Graduate school is a time when students are expected to gain substantial knowledge about topics within their areas of expertise and demonstrate their ability to conduct analysis of such topics. Conceptualizing, planning, producing, and polishing a professional paper or Plan A thesis not only train students how to do a substantial in-depth study but also demonstrates this ability to future employers. Other objectives of this seminar include (1) improved writing skills and (2) improved ability to give feedback to others.
Grading:
Students who complete each requirement for each week, in a timely manner, will get an A
or A- in the class. The two hardest things to do are (1) make progress each and every week; and (2) give high-quality feedback to your classmates.
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
In-person seminar format.
Workload:
Students are expected to:

Attend every meeting of the seminar. Anyone who cannot attend due to illness should contact the instructor via email before class begins. Unexcused absences and systematic lateness will lower your grade.

Complete assigned reading, such as Howard Becker's Writing for Social Scientists (which is fun reading, believe it or not, as well as being useful).

Report-in at each class. Questions asked each week include: What goals did you have for today? Did you meet them or not? What are reasonable goals for next week?

Post a each week, including brief responses to the reporting-in questions; expect to elaborate on them in class.

Post your latest (an outline, some written pages, a table, a figure, etc.) for volunteers who will give you feedback on them.

Review short drafts (e.g., outlines, text, tables, figures) and provide high-quality

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56953/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dlevison_PA8082_Spring2022.docx (Spring 2022)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 October 2022

Spring 2025  |  PA 8082 Section 002: Professional Paper-Writing Seminar (64945)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Facilitates completion of research paper on current issues in public policy, management, and science, technology and environment. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives studied in core courses. Written report includes analysis of issue, policy recommendations. All topics accepted. Plan A students welcome. prereq: completion of core courses, or instr consent
Class Description:
Course objective: to help 2nd+ year masters students finish high-quality, well-written individual Professional Papers or Plan A Papers by the end of the semester.

This seminar provides a supportive environment in which students can make regular progress on papers, but it does not dictate how that should happen. The seminar avoids a one-size-fits-all approach to paper-writing. There does not exist one correct series of tasks to produce an excellent paper. Different projects require quite different starting points and different processes.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Required for Humphrey masters students writing professional papers in Spring semester. Space permitting, PhD students may join the group to write dissertation papers.
Learning Objectives:
Graduate school is a time when students are expected to gain substantial knowledge about topics within their areas of expertise and demonstrate their ability to conduct analysis of such topics. Conceptualizing, planning, producing, and polishing a professional paper or Plan A thesis not only train students how to do a substantial in-depth study but also demonstrates this ability to future employers. Other objectives of this seminar include (1) improved writing skills and (2) improved ability to give feedback to others.
Grading:
Students who complete each requirement for each week, in a timely manner, will get an A
or A- in the class. The two hardest things to do are (1) make progress each and every week; and (2) give high-quality feedback to your classmates.
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
In-person seminar format.
Workload:
Students are expected to:

Attend every meeting of the seminar. Anyone who cannot attend due to illness should contact the instructor via email before class begins. Unexcused absences and systematic lateness will lower your grade.

Complete assigned reading, such as Howard Becker's Writing for Social Scientists (which is fun reading, believe it or not, as well as being useful).

Report-in at each class. Questions asked each week include: What goals did you have for today? Did you meet them or not? What are reasonable goals for next week?

Post a each week, including brief responses to the reporting-in questions; expect to elaborate on them in class.

Post your latest (an outline, some written pages, a table, a figure, etc.) for volunteers who will give you feedback on them.

Review short drafts (e.g., outlines, text, tables, figures) and provide high-quality

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64945/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dlevison_PA8082_Spring2022.docx (Spring 2022)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 October 2022

Spring 2025  |  PA 8331 Section 001: Economic Demography (56947)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
Mon 04:40PM - 07:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Classical theory, advanced econometric methods, recent empirical work, and available datasets for research in economic demography. Topics include the economics of mortality, fertility, migration, marriage, women's labor supply, intra-family bargaining, and age structure. Students develop critical analysis and academic discourse skills through in-depth discussions and replications of papers, presentations, referee-style writing assignments, and a term paper. prereq: Grad-level economic theory (PA 5021 or equiv) and econometrics (PA 5033 or equiv) and instructor permission
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jannaj+PA8331+Spring2023
Class Description:

This course will expose you to the major economic theories in demography, including those of migration, mortality, fertility, marriage, family formation, and others. We will also discuss recent empirical work on these same topics and explore the difficulties of causal inference in demography. You will have the opportunity to lead discussions and prepare lectures on demographic topics of your choice.

This course is targeted toward PhD students and master's students considering a PhD. As it is a small seminar-style class, course participation and attendance is mandatory, and a permission number is required for enrollment. Please contact the instructor with any questions, and to receive a permission number.

Who Should Take This Class?:
PhD students interested in demographic topics, regardless of degree program, and Master's students thinking about continuing their academic training in demographic-related fields
Exam Format:
No exams are given in this course.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56947/1253
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jannaj_PA8331_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 November 2021

Spring 2025  |  PA 8444 Section 001: FTE: Doctoral (56929)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
No Grade Associated
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Enrollment Requirements:
Advanced Doctoral Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 200 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
FTE: Doctoral prereq: Doctoral student, adviser and DGS consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56929/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 8777 Section 001: Thesis Credits: Master's (56894)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-18 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
50 Credits
Grading Basis:
No Grade Associated
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 200 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]
Class Description:
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]. Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56894/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 October 2015

Spring 2025  |  PA 8888 Section 001: Thesis Credit: Doctoral (56930)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-24 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
100 Credits
Grading Basis:
No Grade Associated
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Enrollment Requirements:
PA PhD and ETCR or Doct
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, East Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 100 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Doctoral thesis credit. prereq: [Max 18 cr per semester or summer], 24 cr required
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56930/1253

Spring 2025  |  PA 8921 Section 001: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (56907)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Independent/Directed Study
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, East Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option).prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
If you wish to register for a section of PA 8921, please contact MPP adviser Joel Mixon in the Humphrey School Student Services office.
Class Description:
Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56907/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Spring 2025  |  PA 8991 Section 001: Independent Study (56893)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Independent/Directed Study
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Notes:
Contact Stacey Grimes (grime004@umn.edu) to have an 8991 section set up with the faculty member with whom you wish to work after consulting your professional adviser
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56893/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Spring 2025  |  PA 8991 Section 002: Independent Study (56888)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Independent/Directed Study
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Notes:
"Collaborative Initiatives Consulting Project - Leveraging Cross-Sector Engagement to Enhance the Teacher of Color Pipeline in Minnesota" 4 credits with Kathy Quick. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksquick+PA8991+Spring2023
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56888/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Spring 2025  |  PA 8991 Section 003: Independent Study (56898)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Independent/Directed Study
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2025 - 05/05/2025
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56898/1253
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Fall 2024  |  PA 1401 Section 001: Public Affairs: Community Organizing Skills for Public Action (23076)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 125
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Public affairs work, roles of citizens in democratic way of life. Community organizing skills, their importance for public affairs. Negotiations among diverse audiences, understanding different interests, mapping power relationships. Relevant public affairs and governance theory.
Class Description:

*meets University of Minnesota Liberal Education requirement for Citizenship/Public Ethics Theme"


This course is a hands-on introduction for undergraduate students wanting to develop the skills, confidence, and knowledge to become empowered agents of change.This course involves an examination of key concepts of citizenship, politics, ethics, and democracy, as well as hands-on experiential learning in problem solving skills and team work especially from the framework called Civic Studies, developed to address the challenge of collective action in a world of often radically different ethical frameworks.


The goal of this class is to:

1. Give students a hands on introduction to organizing skills such as public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings.

2. Enable students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives

3. To provide stages for students' public speaking

4. Open the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers

5, To acquaint students with the methods and outlook of community organizing tradition in America as a strand of the emerging "Civic Studies" field

6. To provide students with an introduction to the approach to ethics in Civic Studies, compared to other approaches. Such topics include: mass incarceration, racism, immigration, climate change, education, gender issues, etc.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students should take this class if they like classes that are co-created by students and instructor and are engaging. All disciplines and years are welcome. During this time in our history, people want to acquire knowledge and skills of how to solve public problems.. This course provides knowledge, skills and practice for creating change.
Learning Objectives:
This course will help students acquire skills for effective citizenship and life-long learning through the course goals of:
• Acquainting students with Civic Studies and the community organizing tradition in America and the distinctive ways in which this framework addresses questions of ethical pluralism
• Giving students a hands on introduction to organizing skills for civic agency, such as writing, public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings
• Enabling students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives
• Providing stages for students' public speaking
• Opening the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers
Grading:
40% Two Essays
20% Weekly Reflections on Readings
20% In-Class Participation
20% Public Work Project
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
Discussion based with some lecture. All are teachers and learners. You will learn how to become a change agent through active learning.
Workload:
50 Pages of Reading Per Week (average)
30-45 Pages of Individual Writing, Including Weekly Reading Reflections
3 Short Papers
1 Public Work Project Report
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23076/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2020.docx (Fall 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 July 2020

Fall 2024  |  PA 3002 Section 001: Basic Methods of Policy Analysis (23150)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to policy analysis. Theoretical foundations/practical methods of analysis. Tools for problem definition, data collection/analysis, presentation techniques, implementation strategies. Multidisciplinary case-study approach.
Class Description:
The complex economic, political and social issues that define our world are not easily solved. PA 3002 teaches students to apply the methods and techniques of the social science discipline to address these multifaceted challenges that increasingly confront public agencies and nonprofit organizations.
Who Should Take This Class?:
PA 3002 is designed for students who share an interest in analyzing issues of public policy. This multidisciplinary course is appropriate for students from various undergraduate majors, including economics, political science, business and other social sciences. In particular, this introductory course provides a firm academic background for students preparing for graduate studies and careers in public and nonprofit organizations at the local, state, national and international levels.
Grading:
Participation 30 points
Graded Assignments 30 points
Group Presentation 40 points
Total 100 points

Points for Grades
90.0 & Above
87.5-89.9
83.5-87.4
80.0-83.4
77.5-79.9
73.5-77.4
70.0-73.4
67.5-69.9
63.5-67.4
60.0-63.4
59.9 & Below

An I (Incomplete) may be assigned at the instructor's discretion if, due to extraordinary circumstances, the student was unavoidably prevented from completing course work on time. An Incomplete requires a written agreement between the instructor and the student specifying the time and manner in which the student will complete the unfinished work
Exam Format:
There are no exams.
Class Format:
Class time is approximately 40 percent lecture, 30 percent interactive discussion and
30 percent small group activity.
Workload:

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23150/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2024

Fall 2024  |  PA 3003 Section 001: Nonprofit and Public Financial Management (23123)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
junior or senior
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Thu 04:40PM - 07:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Concepts/tools for project/budget planning. Program analysis. Interpreting financial reports. Identifying/resolving organizational performance issues. Case studies, real-world exercises. prereq: Jr or sr
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23123/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 3969 Section 001: Survey of Election Administration (23086)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Election Administration cert
Meets With:
PA 5971 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Survey of building blocks of election administration, from voter registration to recounts.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23086/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 3976 Section 001: Voter Participation (32307)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5976 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Voter participation issues and challenges including historical survey of voter participation in US and methods to increase voter turnout.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32307/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 3985 Section 001: Physical Election Security (23111)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5985 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
U.S. Homeland Security designated election security as a "critical infrastructure" after threats from foreign governments, and collaborates with states in detecting and responding to foreign interference. This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of the current security context and best practices and processes for physically safeguarding elections based on 2016 and 2020. Students will learn the difference between physical and cyber threats to U.S. systems; tangible steps to protect election offices and their equipment; the use of audits to ensure the accuracy of elections; the integration of security into vendor relationships; and the connection between physical election security and citizen trust in elections. Content will be explored through readings (including government documents and studies), videos, discussions, and writing assignments.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23111/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 3991 Section 001: Independent Study (33837)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
12 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
UMTC, East Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
Please contact Dennis Donovan at donov013@umn.edu for a permission number.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33837/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 4101 Section 001: Nonprofit Management and Governance (23050)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue 05:30PM - 08:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Managing/governing nonprofit/public organizations. Theories, concepts, real-world examples. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of different funding environments, management of multiple constituencies.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTE (synchronously online during the scheduled time). Please contact Kabo Yang at kabo_legendconsulting@live.com with questions about PA 4101.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23050/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 4200 Section 001: Urban and Regional Planning (23046)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 220
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Fundamental principles of urban/regional land-use planning. Introduction to planning theory and its applications. Political-economic context of urban/regional planning.
Class Description:
This course is geared toward upper division undergraduates who are curious about a career in urban and regional planning, or simply want to know how planning works and affects our lives. It provides an introductory overview of planning theory and practice, with primary attention to current issues in planning practice in the U.S. The content covers land use, urban design, transportation, community development, housing, and environmental planning problems within the broader context of the historic development of cities, political processes, and regional and national economic forces. Attention to the planning process, or how planning actually occurs, represents a constant theme in the course. The first half of the class is largely lecture based, to provide a common foundation for the class, culminating in the mid-term exam. The 2nd half is a small group exercise where small groups of students create draft comprehensive plans for hypothetical urban areas, and present them to a guest jury. After this course, you will be expected to: Identify how major social, political, and economic forces have shaped urban development in the U.S.; Understand the primary tenets of the urban planning profession; Describe approaches for examining urban form and function; Discuss whose interests are served (and not served) by urban planners and plans; and Evaluate and suggest responses to current policy and planning challenges affecting U.S. urban areas, with a particular focus on the Twin Cities. Over the course of the semester, you will gain an appreciation for the complexity of urban areas and an understanding of what urban planners do and the possibilities and limitations that they face. In summary, if you have any interest in knowing how cities and metropolitan areas develop and function the way they do, you should find the class interesting, and engaging, and perhaps even enjoyable!
Who Should Take This Class?:
This course is open to upper level (e.g. junior and senior status) students with an interest in urban and regional planning, either as a potential career, or simply to be better informed citizens. The most common majors are urban studies, engineering and design, but the course is not limited to them. The wider the number of perspectives, the richer the experience!
Learning Objectives:
After taking this course, students will be expected to:
  1. Identify how major social, political, and economic forces have shaped urban development in the U.S.;
  2. Understand the primary tenets of the urban planning profession;
  3. Describe approaches for examining urban form and function;
  4. Discuss whose interests are served (and not served) by urban planners and plans; and
  5. Evaluate and suggest responses to current policy and planning challenges affecting U.S. urban areas, with a particular focus on the Twin Cities.

Over the course of the semester, students will gain an appreciation for the complexity of urban areas and an understanding of what urban planners do and the possibilities and limitations that they face.

Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
30% Reports/Papers
10% Reflection Papers
20% In-class Presentations
10% Class Participation
10% grading from small group peers
Exam Format:
In class: multiple choice, short answer and essay
Class Format:
30% Lecture
25% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
10% Service Learning
Workload:
20 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23046/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/douma002_PA4200_Fall2023.docx (Fall 2023)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/douma002_PA4200_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/douma002_PA4200_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/douma002_PA4200_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 April 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5002 Section 001: Introduction to Policy Analysis (23047)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Meets With:
PA 5002 Section 002
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 30
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered remotely. Class will meet synchronously online during the scheduled class period. Students who want to register for an in-person option should register for section 2.
Class Description:
This course is an intensive 1-week session. We will meet via Zoom for a 2-hour morning session and a 2-hour afternoon session. The morning sessions will consist of instructor lectures and class discussion. The afternoon sessions will be dedicated to team meetings with the instructor and the TA and team working sessions. Students will be evaluated based on an individual critique and quiz and their team policy brief. The workload for the week will be 20 hours of in-class activities and up to 20 hours of out-of-class readings and class preparation.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23047/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 October 2022

Fall 2024  |  PA 5002 Section 002: Introduction to Policy Analysis (23128)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Meets With:
PA 5002 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 30
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
Class Notes:
This section is the in-person option for students who can't register for the remote 5002-01.
Class Description:
This course is an intensive 1-week session. We will meet via Zoom for a 2-hour morning session and a 2-hour afternoon session. The morning sessions will consist of instructor lectures and class discussion. The afternoon sessions will be dedicated to team meetings with the instructor and the TA and team working sessions. Students will be evaluated based on an individual critique and quiz and their team policy brief. The workload for the week will be 20 hours of in-class activities and up to 20 hours of out-of-class readings and class preparation.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23128/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 October 2022

Fall 2024  |  PA 5003 Section 001: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (23033)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
09/03/2024 - 10/21/2024
Thu 05:30PM - 08:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
Class Description:

The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good." In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of financial analysis and management.


This is an introductory course to financial analysis and management in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.


Learning Objectives:

By the end of the semester, students should be able:

  • To obtain basic knowledge and terminology of budgeting and financial management;

  • To summarize budgetary process, revenues, and expenditures of a public or nonprofit organization;

  • To apply basic tools of financial analysis, such as break-even analysis and marginal cost analysis, in making simple financial decisions;

  • To know how financial information is organized and reported in the accounting system;

  • To interpret data in financial statements and relate them with each other; and

  • To determine and calculate financial ratios to assess financial condition

Grading:
Each class there will be an assignment that you are to prepare and submiy via email (You may work with others in completing the assignments.). These will not be graded. You should actively participate in class discussions and class problem-solving. Class discussion, timely assignment completion, and on-line attendance count toward your participation grade. Participation represents 12 points of your grade.

There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course taken at the Humphrey School. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.

The final assignment is a group project in which you will review the financials of a real government or nonprofit organization and present your findings to the class in person. You will be assigned to groups in the second week of class. The group should submit a 5+ page paper of your findings at the last class. The group will also present a power point presentation (no more than 10 minutes) of the findings at the last class. The group should provide me a copy of the power points and any other information that would be helpful. This group paper (20 points) and presentation (8 points) are worth 28 points.

First Test 30 points Second Test 30 points Group Project 28 points Class Participation 12 points Total 100 points
Class Format:
This class is "flipped." Traditional lectures are videotaped and made available on Moodle. Also, students will be able to "attend" sessions in their own homes via a WebEx software system. Students will log into the WebEx system to participate in the problem-solving sessions. There are 8 class periods generally an hour and 45 minutes. Class time is used to review assignments, review additional videos and/or material, and take exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23033/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Fall 2024  |  PA 5004 Section 001: Introduction to Planning (23032)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Urban/Regional Planning, major and minor or PA PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 135
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
History/institutional development of urban planning as profession. Intellectual foundations, planning theory. Roles of urban planners in U.S./international settings. Scope, legitimacy, limitations of planning/planning process. Issues in planning ethics/settings of diverse populations/stakeholders. prereq: Major/minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Description:
History, institutional development of urban planning as a profession. Intellectual foundations, planning theory. Roles of urban planners in U.S./international settings. Scope, legitimacy, limitations of planning and of planning process. Issues in planning ethics and in planning in settings of diverse populations/stakeholders.
Learning Objectives:

After this course, you will be able to:

  1. Identify how major social, political, and economic forces have shaped urban development in the U.S.;

  2. Locate the urban planning profession in the U.S. within the historical context of urbanization;

  3. Describe and compare theoretical approaches used by urban planners in their work;

  4. Discuss ethics in urban planning and whose interests are served (and not served) by urban planners and plans;

  5. Evaluate and generate responses to current policy and planning challenges affecting urban areas in the United States and abroad; and

  6. Demonstrate skills of written and oral analysis and communication.


The goals and expectations of this course are ambitious, but no one will finish this course ready to become a practicing urban planner. Instead, over the course of the semester, you will gain a deeper appreciation for the complexity of urban areas and an understanding of what planners do and the possibilities and limitations that they face

Grading:

Participation 50 points (5%)

Reading Responses 200 points (20%)

Planning Meeting 50 points (5%)

Planning Memo #1 200 points (20%)

Planning Memo #2 250 points (25%)

Final Exam 250 points (25%)

Total Points 1,000 points (100%)
Class Format:
45% Lecture
30% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
Workload:
80-100 Pages of Reading per Week
3 Memos
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23032/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/allen650_PA5004_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/allen650_PA5004_Fall2015.docx (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 October 2017

Fall 2024  |  PA 5011 Section 001: Dynamics of Public Affairs Organizations (23127)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Critical analysis of organizations in the world of public affairs from multiple levels - including the individual, group, organization, and sector - and the dynamics of relationships among them. Develop actionable recommendations to improve organizational effectiveness in the context of multiple (often contested) prosocial purposes and conflicting stakeholder demands. Memo writing, case analyses, simulations, guest speakers, and self-awareness exercises
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTE (synchronously online during the scheduled time). PA 5011 will also be offered in Spring 2025.
Class Description:

Organizations pervade human life. They are sites of power, innovation and social change but can also be places that discourage initiative and reinforce inequalities found in society. Effective organizational management and leadership are critical to achieving broadly beneficial social, economic, and public value. The task is difficult because of the complexity of human behavior in organizations, constrained resources, competing demands of many stakeholders outside of the organization, and pervasive changes in the world we live in. Most of you will work in some kind of organization when you graduate and many, if not most, of you will be managers and leaders during your careers. This course will help prepare you to be an organizational leader in this realm, focusing on empowering you with the courage to act under uncertainty in order to strengthen the effectiveness of your organization. Furthermore, it aims to provide both "the forest" and "the trees", and give you practice in thinking back and forth between the different levels so that when you are working and approach a problem at one of these levels, you have an awareness of the complexity of the situation at the alternative level.

To create that foundation, we focus on different ways to analyze organizations and develop sound recommendations for change - leaders and managers must understand organizational complexity in order to act.This course introduces students to some of the major theoretical approaches to organizational analysis, including concepts from public administration, sociology, political science, organizational psychology, and management. Learning to use multiple perspectives is critical because all perspectives contribute to understanding how to develop and sustain effective organizations and, ultimately, to how well individuals can help create public value. By gaining insight across different theoretical perspectives, students will develop an understanding of how theories provide distinctive windows into understanding behavior in complex social settings. Throughout, you will come to see that organizations provide opportunities and constraints as well as power and privilege within particular contexts.

Grading:
25% Participation
20% Reading Analysis Memos
30% Management Memos
15% Personal Reflection Essay
5% Group Norms
5% Personal User Manual
Class Format:
Pre-Recorded Lecture
50% Discussion
50% Small Group Activities
Workload:
60-100 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Organizational Management Memos
1 Personal Reflection Essay
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23127/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 January 2024

Fall 2024  |  PA 5011 Section 002: Dynamics of Public Affairs Organizations (23131)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Critical analysis of organizations in the world of public affairs from multiple levels - including the individual, group, organization, and sector - and the dynamics of relationships among them. Develop actionable recommendations to improve organizational effectiveness in the context of multiple (often contested) prosocial purposes and conflicting stakeholder demands. Memo writing, case analyses, simulations, guest speakers, and self-awareness exercises
Class Description:

Organizations pervade human life. They are sites of power, innovation, and social change. They can also be places that discourage initiative and reinforce inequalities found in society. Effective organizational management and leadership are critical to achieving broadly beneficial social, economic, and public value. The task is difficult because of the complexity of human behavior in organizations, constrained resources, competing demands of many stakeholders outside of the organization, and pervasive changes in our world. Most of you will work in some kind of organization when you graduate, and many, if not most, of you will be leaders (and potentially managers) during your careers. This course will help prepare you to be an organizational leader, focusing on empowering you with the courage to act under uncertainty in order to build community amongst staff, lead by example, and strengthen the effectiveness of your organization.


To create that foundation, we focus on different ways to analyze organizations and develop sound recommendations for change. Part of the analytical task is to dissect important aspects of organizations in general, including for example, both their formal and informal structures, systems, and cultures. Another part of this task is to learn how organizations are shaped by and shape external environments that encompass political, policy, and resource institutions. Additionally, to analyze organizations, one must also pay close attention to the human beings who work there and their experiences, identities, and motivations. The course introduces you to some of the major theoretical approaches to organizational analysis, including concepts from sociology, psychology, management, public administration, and political science. Learning to use multiple perspectives is critical because each contributes an alternative understanding of how to develop and sustain effective organizations and, ultimately, to create public value. While the course is applicable to a wide range of organizational settings, it pays particular attention to studies of nonprofit and governmental settings. Throughout, you will be encouraged to share your own professional experiences with organizations. It also may be possible that you have not worked for a "formal" organization. If this is the case, remember that your experience is equally important for collective growth and learning in the course, and feel free to contribute using parallel experiences that have affected you - whether you have been managed or advised by a professor in the university, engaged in volunteer work at an organization, or participated in another community group where you have learned about organizational dynamics.
Learning Objectives:

· Understand how to work effectively in and through public and nonprofit organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) public purposes, conflicting stakeholder demands, and a diverse world;

· Think critically about organizations and managerial roles, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege;

· Develop actionable recommendations from your organizational analyses in order to improve their effectiveness; and,

· Demonstrate management skills including memo writing, professional presentations, and team development and management.
Grading:

Assignment

Grade Weighting

Participation

25%

Weekly Reflection Posts (11 @ 1.82% each)

20%

Personal User Manual

5%

Group Norms

5%

Management Case Memos (3 @ 10% each; or the first 2 at 15% )

30%

Reflected Best Self-Exercise

15%

Class Format:
In-person
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23131/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 September 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5012 Section 001: The Politics of Public Affairs (23053)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 50 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Politics is how we make collective decisions about matters of shared consequence. This course examines politics and introduces students to key concepts and skills needed for effective political analysis. The central themes of the course focus on power; institutions and organizations; discourse; and citizenship.
Class Notes:
MPA students are encouraged to register, but will need instructor permission (a permission number).
Class Description:
America has witnessed five significant surges of protests, organizing, and political upheaval over the past fifteen years: The Tea Party (started in 2010), Occupy Wall Street (occurred in September 2011), grassroots resistance following President Trump's election in 2016, and the demonstrations sparked by George Floyd's killing in Minneapolis on May 25, 2020. Each promised deep, enduring political change -- but what normative and legal impacts did they produce?

Sophisticated agents of change appreciate that there are "varieties of politics," which offer discrete and interconnected avenues. Elections, legislation, and administrative and legal accountability - along with protests and community organizing - are used by political activists and policy entrepreneurs to produce or thwart change. Each modality of politics is distinctive, varying in terms of the types of actors involved; the resources that are required; the scope of political debate; the visibility of the policy design; and their potential consequences. If political change is the objective, which variety of politics is most feasible and potentially impactful?

Time is a critical - often overlooked - dimension in politics. President Barack Obama's health reform and the conservative movement's attack on estate taxes not only produced change at one point in time but also influenced subsequent politics by generating new public expectations, interest groups, and government agencies committed to ongoing implementation. Politically astute reformers design progressive and conservative policies to secure change in the first instance and then to influence politics downstream.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.
Learning Objectives:
The learning objectives are to develop the skills to assess the political feasibility of proposed policy changes and to identify the tools of politics that create opportunities and mitigate vulnerabilities.
Students will learn:
- Models of change from direct citizen mobilization to elections and the legislative, executive, and judicial institutional arenas
- Political time in which policies produce altered downstream politics
- Challenges to democracy in the form of markets, erosion of democratic rules and norms, and the unexpected complexity of transparency
- The forms and challenges of political accountability
Grading:
Four five-page political feasibility papers and Final Examination
Exam Format:
Short answer and one essay drawn from questions distributed in class
Class Format:
Large and small group discussions, lectures, guests from national and state policy debates and politics
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23053/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ljacobs_PA5012_Fall2020.pdf (Fall 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ljacobs_monda006_PA5012_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ljacobs_monda006_PA5012_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 April 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5013 Section 001: Law and Urban Land Use (23031)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Major/minor, Urb-Reg Planning
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 50B
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Role of law in regulating/shaping urban development, land use, environmental quality, local/regional governmental services. Interface between public/private sector. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23031/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5021 Section 001: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (23068)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Major or minor Public Policy or STEP major or minor or Human Rights major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
Class Notes:
The Lecture section (PA 5021, sec 1) will be IN PERSON only. The discussion section (PA 5021, sec 2) will be via Zoom.
Class Description:
The required textbook for this class is Microeconomics by Pindyck and Rubinfeld, 9th edition (2018). The 8th edition would work also. Students do not need to purchase a study guide nor are special access codes needed. Please try to find a good deal on this textbook so you don't have to pay full price!

NEW INFO on textbook (updated August 16, 2021)

The publisher (Pearson) has just offered a special price of $29 for the electronic version available through the U bookstore. If you purchase this ebook, you will find it waiting for you in Canvas (as I have been told!). This is a new option. You don't need to purchase any study guides or other accompanying materials.

Here is the Bookstore info page on Inclusive Access. Per the page, "Upon enrolling in a course using Inclusive Access, students are considered opted in, and will be charged for the cost of the digital materials through their student account. Students will either receive access to their content through Canvas, along with a welcome email from noreply@verbasoftware.com, or in a separate email from the U of MN Bookstores by the first day of class.

If students do not want to receive the digital course materials through Inclusive Access, they can opt out via the emailed link, or by emailing inclusiveaccess@umn.edu with their course information and requesting to opt out before the deadline. After this, a refund for the initial Inclusive Access charge will be issued, and the student will be considered opted out, meaning they will lose access to the Inclusive Access digital content."
Who Should Take This Class?:
Most of the students will be first year MPP students, but students in other graduate degree programs are welcome to enroll. Most students will have had a prior microeconomics course, but that is not required. The Humphrey School offers an online review program called Foundations for Success that some students might want to look into that helps students review some basic algebra.
Learning Objectives:
The objective of this course is for you to understand consumer and firm decisions and to understand when government intervention in the private market may be efficient and/or equitable. We will explore how resources are allocated in a market economy and we will investigate the role of government in a market economy (or mixed economy) such as the United States. We will focus most of our time developing the analytical microeconomic tools needed to discuss efficiency and fairness concerns and throughout the semester we will apply these tools to various relevant public policy examples.
This course contributes to several learning objectives for the MPP program, especially (3) "to analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve complex problems, and make decisions" and (4) to understand the role of government in a market economy.
Grading:
The course grade will be based on the homeworks ,in class exams,quizzes,and the cumulative final exam.
Exam Format:
The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, short one paragraph answers, and problems involving algebra and graphical analysis.
Class Format:
We'll be meeting in person this fall unless university directives change.
Workload:
The university's policy titled "Expected student academic work per credit" indicates that at least two additional hours of work per week is expected for each hour of class time for graduate students.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23068/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 August 2021

Fall 2024  |  PA 5021 Section 002: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (23113)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Fri 12:45PM - 01:35PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
Class Notes:
The Lecture section (PA 5021, sec 1) will be IN PERSON only. The discussion section (PA 5021, sec 2) will be via Zoom.
Class Description:
The required textbook for this class is Microeconomics by Pindyck and Rubinfeld, 9th edition (2018). The 8th edition would work also. Students do not need to purchase a study guide nor are special access codes needed. Please try to find a good deal on this textbook so you don't have to pay full price!

NEW INFO on textbook (updated August 16, 2021)

The publisher (Pearson) has just offered a special price of $29 for the electronic version available through the U bookstore. If you purchase this ebook, you will find it waiting for you in Canvas (as I have been told!). This is a new option. You don't need to purchase any study guides or other accompanying materials.

Here is the Bookstore info page on Inclusive Access. Per the page, "Upon enrolling in a course using Inclusive Access, students are considered opted in, and will be charged for the cost of the digital materials through their student account. Students will either receive access to their content through Canvas, along with a welcome email from noreply@verbasoftware.com, or in a separate email from the U of MN Bookstores by the first day of class.

If students do not want to receive the digital course materials through Inclusive Access, they can opt out via the emailed link, or by emailing inclusiveaccess@umn.edu with their course information and requesting to opt out before the deadline. After this, a refund for the initial Inclusive Access charge will be issued, and the student will be considered opted out, meaning they will lose access to the Inclusive Access digital content."
Who Should Take This Class?:
Most of the students will be first year MPP students, but students in other graduate degree programs are welcome to enroll. Most students will have had a prior microeconomics course, but that is not required. The Humphrey School offers an online review program called Foundations for Success that some students might want to look into that helps students review some basic algebra.
Learning Objectives:
The objective of this course is for you to understand consumer and firm decisions and to understand when government intervention in the private market may be efficient and/or equitable. We will explore how resources are allocated in a market economy and we will investigate the role of government in a market economy (or mixed economy) such as the United States. We will focus most of our time developing the analytical microeconomic tools needed to discuss efficiency and fairness concerns and throughout the semester we will apply these tools to various relevant public policy examples.
This course contributes to several learning objectives for the MPP program, especially (3) "to analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve complex problems, and make decisions" and (4) to understand the role of government in a market economy.
Grading:
The course grade will be based on the homeworks ,in class exams,quizzes,and the cumulative final exam.
Exam Format:
The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, short one paragraph answers, and problems involving algebra and graphical analysis.
Class Format:
We'll be meeting in person this fall unless university directives change.
Workload:
The university's policy titled "Expected student academic work per credit" indicates that at least two additional hours of work per week is expected for each hour of class time for graduate students.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23113/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 August 2021

Fall 2024  |  PA 5021 Section 003: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (23048)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Major or minor Public Policy or STEP major or minor or Human Rights major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23048/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5021 Section 004: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (23114)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Fri 11:15AM - 12:05PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 003
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23114/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5023 Section 001: Stratification Economics and Public Policy (32185)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Delivery Mode
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:40PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Stratification economics differs from conventional neoclassical economics and its related offspring of behavioral economics because it does not assume that the nature of inequality arises solely via rational choices made in competitive markets. Rather, it posits structural and historical processes that impede the ability of marginalized groups to gain access to markets. One of the key insights from stratification economics is that conventional policy mechanisms (e.g. deterrence policies in the criminal justice system) don't work because they fail to take account of the legacy of inequality (e.g. convict lease systems and vagrancy laws). The arguments in favor of reparations, baby bonds, universal health care can be viewed and examined using the methods and techniques of stratification economics. This course introduces students to some new methodologies that complement their training in conventional economic analysis. Topics: ? A review of conventional microeconomic approaches to policy analysis, including the core assumptions and key conclusions ? Summary and critique of the conventional microeconomic approach ? The historical backdrop to the evolution of ?identity economics? and stratification economics for understanding racial disparities ? Core assumptions of stratification economics ? Applications: Housing markets and residential segregation; racial profiling; discrimination in labor markets. ? Policy proposals based on stratification economics ? reparations, baby bonds, universal income and health payments. Advanced undergraduate students may register with permission of the instructor.
Class Notes:
Interested students may also register for a one-credit Extra Credit section. Contact Dr. Myers for more details.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32185/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5031 Section 001: Statistics for Public Affairs (23028)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Dev prac or Human Rights major or Pub Pol or STEP ng major or minor or PA PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 425
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
UMTC, West Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
Class Notes:
PA 5031-001 lecture will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). More info about stats course options here: https://z.umn.edu/HHH_Stats_Options
Class Description:

Quantitative analysis skills for public affairs research and practice. Topics will include quantitative study design, descriptive statistics, correlation, probability distributions, sampling, statistical tests, and ordinary least squares regression.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Entering graduate students in the social sciences. Students interested in domestic issues and data should register for sections 001, 002, and 003, which will use US data for examples and assignments. For students interested in using international data, please register for sections 004, 005, or 006.

Learning Objectives:
This course is intended to provide familiarity with statistical terminology and methodology used in the policy arena as well as the popular media; to teach you to interpret and criticize statistical results; to enable you to use basic statistical techniques for research or policy analysis; and to encourage you to think about how statistics can be used to shed light on (or hide) and enhance positions of power or privilege in societies.
Grading:

Class Format:
Sections 001, 002, and 003 lecture will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remote (synchronously online). All lectures will be video recorded for later viewing. Lab sessions are in-person only in a computer lab in the Humphrey Building. Note that sections 004, 005, and 006 will be in person only for lectures and labs.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23028/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2023.pdf (Fall 2023)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 August 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5031 Section 002: Statistics for Public Affairs (23029)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Fri 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
Class Notes:
PA 5031-001 lecture will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). Lab is in person. More info about stats course options here: https://z.umn.edu/HHH_Stats_Options
Class Description:

Quantitative analysis skills for public affairs research and practice. Topics will include quantitative study design, descriptive statistics, correlation, probability distributions, sampling, statistical tests, and ordinary least squares regression.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Entering graduate students in the social sciences. Students interested in domestic issues and data should register for sections 001, 002, and 003, which will use US data for examples and assignments. For students interested in using international data, please register for sections 004, 005, or 006.

Learning Objectives:
This course is intended to provide familiarity with statistical terminology and methodology used in the policy arena as well as the popular media; to teach you to interpret and criticize statistical results; to enable you to use basic statistical techniques for research or policy analysis; and to encourage you to think about how statistics can be used to shed light on (or hide) and enhance positions of power or privilege in societies.
Grading:

Class Format:
Sections 001, 002, and 003 lecture will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remote (synchronously online). All lectures will be video recorded for later viewing. Lab sessions are in-person only in a computer lab in the Humphrey Building. Note that sections 004, 005, and 006 will be in person only for lectures and labs.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23029/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2023.pdf (Fall 2023)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 August 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5031 Section 003: Statistics for Public Affairs (23030)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Fri 12:45PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
Class Notes:
PA 5031-001 lecture will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). Lab is in person. More info about stats course options here: https://z.umn.edu/HHH_Stats_Options
Class Description:

Quantitative analysis skills for public affairs research and practice. Topics will include quantitative study design, descriptive statistics, correlation, probability distributions, sampling, statistical tests, and ordinary least squares regression.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Entering graduate students in the social sciences. Students interested in domestic issues and data should register for sections 001, 002, and 003, which will use US data for examples and assignments. For students interested in using international data, please register for sections 004, 005, or 006.

Learning Objectives:
This course is intended to provide familiarity with statistical terminology and methodology used in the policy arena as well as the popular media; to teach you to interpret and criticize statistical results; to enable you to use basic statistical techniques for research or policy analysis; and to encourage you to think about how statistics can be used to shed light on (or hide) and enhance positions of power or privilege in societies.
Grading:

Class Format:
Sections 001, 002, and 003 lecture will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remote (synchronously online). All lectures will be video recorded for later viewing. Lab sessions are in-person only in a computer lab in the Humphrey Building. Note that sections 004, 005, and 006 will be in person only for lectures and labs.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23030/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2023.pdf (Fall 2023)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 August 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5031 Section 004: Statistics for Public Affairs (23126)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Dev prac or Human Rights major or Pub Pol or STEP ng major or minor or PA PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 415
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 36 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
Class Notes:
Uses int'l data for some examples/assignments; in-person only. MORE INFO about stats course options: https://z.umn.edu/HHH_Stats_Options.
Class Description:
This is the global section of PA 5031. The course will cover: basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives; frequency distributions; descriptive statistics; elementary probability/probability distributions; statistical inference; estimation/hypothesis testing; cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution; correlation; simple/multiple regression analysis; sampling and survey design.
Who Should Take This Class?:
The global section of PA 5031 is ideal for students interested in international development and/or global policy. The datasets, examples, and journal articles used in this section will focus primarily on low- and middle-income countries.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23126/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 August 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5031 Section 005: Statistics for Public Affairs (23129)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Fri 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 004
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 18 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
Class Notes:
Uses int'l data for some examples/assignments; in-person only. More info about stats course options here: https://z.umn.edu/HHH_Stats_Options
Class Description:
This is the global section of PA 5031. The course will cover: basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives; frequency distributions; descriptive statistics; elementary probability/probability distributions; statistical inference; estimation/hypothesis testing; cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution; correlation; simple/multiple regression analysis; sampling and survey design.
Who Should Take This Class?:
The global section of PA 5031 is ideal for students interested in international development and/or global policy. The datasets, examples, and journal articles used in this section will focus primarily on low- and middle-income countries.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23129/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 August 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5031 Section 006: Statistics for Public Affairs (23125)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Fri 02:15PM - 03:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 004
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 18 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
Class Notes:
Uses int'l data for some examples/assignments; in-person only. More info about stats course options here: https://z.umn.edu/HHH_Stats_Options
Class Description:
This is the global section of PA 5031. The course will cover: basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives; frequency distributions; descriptive statistics; elementary probability/probability distributions; statistical inference; estimation/hypothesis testing; cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution; correlation; simple/multiple regression analysis; sampling and survey design.
Who Should Take This Class?:
The global section of PA 5031 is ideal for students interested in international development and/or global policy. The datasets, examples, and journal articles used in this section will focus primarily on low- and middle-income countries.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23125/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 August 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5041 Section 001: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (23055)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon 04:00PM - 05:40PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23055/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5041 Section 002: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (23056)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Wed 04:00PM - 05:40PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23056/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5045 Section 001: Statistics for Public Affairs, Accelerated (23090)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Dev prac or Human Rights major or Pub Pol or STEP ng major or minor or PA PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 184
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Fri 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 184
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduces a range of quantitative tools that are commonly used to inform issues in public affairs. The course provides an introduction to descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference, with an emphasis on the ways in which quantitative tools are applied to a diverse range of practical policy questions. PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031.
Class Description:
Lab section for PA 5045. See course description for PA 5045 Section 001.
Who Should Take This Class?:
PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031. PA 5045 moves at a more rapid pace and spends more time on policy applications and advanced topics. While neither PA 5031 or PA 5045 have enforced prerequisites, PA 5045 is recommended for students with prior statistical coursework or for students without prior coursework but a strong interest in pursuing a quantitatively oriented career and a willingness to work hard during the semester. PA 5045 is recommended (but not required) for students planning on enrolling in PA 5044 (Applied Regression, Accelerated) in the Spring.

Students self-select into taking PA 5031 or PA 5045. Students should consult instructors of the courses during orientation and their advisor. Below are some suggested rules of thumb of making a decision about which course to enroll in. For students interested in PA5045, it is recommended that you:
  • have taken at least one prior course in statistics covering topics such as: basic probability rules, conditional probability, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals
  • scored above the 80th percentile on the quantitative GRE
  • have professional experience applying statistical techniques in a public affairs context
  • anticipate a career that will require extensive application and consumption of quantitative analysis
Learning Objectives:
Develop an appreciation for the applicability and limitations of the tools of probability and statistics to inform real-world situations and courses of action in public affairs;

Apply quantitative reasoning to inform contemporary issues in public affairs by beginning with a policy question, identifying a data set, determining appropriate statistical analysis techniques, conducting such analysis using software, identifying the most salient findings and patterns emerging from the data, and presenting your findings in an effective manner to a decision maker;

Critically consume and critique policy analysis in which statistical analysis and quantitative reasoning is used;

Develop confidence in learning new statistical techniques, approaching quantitative data, and synthesizing empirical evidence.
Grading:
Final class grades will be based on the following criteria:

10% - Problem sets (9 total)

10% - Class participation

15% - Final exercise

15% - Midterm 1

15% - Midterm 2

5% - Stata quiz

30% - Final Exam

Exam Format:
There will be two midterms and a final exam. These will be closed book/notes and a formula sheet will be provided. Calculators may be used, but statistical functions on them may not. Calculators that allow text storage are not permitted.
Class Format:
Class instruction will be delivered in two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab.

The required textbook for the class is OpenIntro Statistics (3rd Edition) by David Diez, Christopher Barr, and Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel, developed by the OpenIntro 501(c)(3) nonprofit. This textbook is available immediately and for free online in regular PDF and tablet-friendly PDF (you may also purchase a hard copy for $15-25 on Amazon): https://www.openintro.org/stat/textbook.php

Software is an integral part of conducting statistical analysis. This semester, you will conduct analysis in two software packages, Microsoft Excel and Stata. Labs will teach you key software skills, and problem sets will contain exercises designed to get you to practice the basics of both software packages. The Humphrey School's computer labs have Stata installed and you are not required to purchase Stata. You will learn the key Excel and Stata skills necessary for the course in lecture and labs.

mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">We'll also be making use of the in-class polling platform, Poll Everywhere. To participate, you will need to bring an internet-connected device (i.e. smartphone, tablet, or laptop) or phone to every class.

Workload:
PA 5045 requires concurrent enrollment in a lab section and is a 4-credit course. Under UMN policy, it is expected that the academic work required of graduate and professional school students will exceed three hours per credit per week. Therefore, you should expect a workload of at least 12 hours per week. Each week there will be two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab. Therefore, you should expect approximately 7 hours per week of work outside of scheduled class.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23090/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 July 2018

Fall 2024  |  PA 5045 Section 002: Statistics for Public Affairs, Accelerated (23091)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Fri 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Introduces a range of quantitative tools that are commonly used to inform issues in public affairs. The course provides an introduction to descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference, with an emphasis on the ways in which quantitative tools are applied to a diverse range of practical policy questions. PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031.
Class Description:
Lab section for PA 5045. See course description for PA 5045 Section 001.
Who Should Take This Class?:
PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031. PA 5045 moves at a more rapid pace and spends more time on policy applications and advanced topics. While neither PA 5031 or PA 5045 have enforced prerequisites, PA 5045 is recommended for students with prior statistical coursework or for students without prior coursework but a strong interest in pursuing a quantitatively oriented career and a willingness to work hard during the semester. PA 5045 is recommended (but not required) for students planning on enrolling in PA 5044 (Applied Regression, Accelerated) in the Spring.

Students self-select into taking PA 5031 or PA 5045. Students should consult instructors of the courses during orientation and their advisor. Below are some suggested rules of thumb of making a decision about which course to enroll in. For students interested in PA5045, it is recommended that you:
  • have taken at least one prior course in statistics covering topics such as: basic probability rules, conditional probability, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals
  • scored above the 80th percentile on the quantitative GRE
  • have professional experience applying statistical techniques in a public affairs context
  • anticipate a career that will require extensive application and consumption of quantitative analysis
Learning Objectives:
Develop an appreciation for the applicability and limitations of the tools of probability and statistics to inform real-world situations and courses of action in public affairs;

Apply quantitative reasoning to inform contemporary issues in public affairs by beginning with a policy question, identifying a data set, determining appropriate statistical analysis techniques, conducting such analysis using software, identifying the most salient findings and patterns emerging from the data, and presenting your findings in an effective manner to a decision maker;

Critically consume and critique policy analysis in which statistical analysis and quantitative reasoning is used;

Develop confidence in learning new statistical techniques, approaching quantitative data, and synthesizing empirical evidence.
Grading:
Final class grades will be based on the following criteria:

10% - Problem sets (9 total)

10% - Class participation

15% - Final exercise

15% - Midterm 1

15% - Midterm 2

5% - Stata quiz

30% - Final Exam

Exam Format:
There will be two midterms and a final exam. These will be closed book/notes and a formula sheet will be provided. Calculators may be used, but statistical functions on them may not. Calculators that allow text storage are not permitted.
Class Format:
Class instruction will be delivered in two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab.

The required textbook for the class is OpenIntro Statistics (3rd Edition) by David Diez, Christopher Barr, and Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel, developed by the OpenIntro 501(c)(3) nonprofit. This textbook is available immediately and for free online in regular PDF and tablet-friendly PDF (you may also purchase a hard copy for $15-25 on Amazon): https://www.openintro.org/stat/textbook.php

Software is an integral part of conducting statistical analysis. This semester, you will conduct analysis in two software packages, Microsoft Excel and Stata. Labs will teach you key software skills, and problem sets will contain exercises designed to get you to practice the basics of both software packages. The Humphrey School's computer labs have Stata installed and you are not required to purchase Stata. You will learn the key Excel and Stata skills necessary for the course in lecture and labs.

mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">We'll also be making use of the in-class polling platform, Poll Everywhere. To participate, you will need to bring an internet-connected device (i.e. smartphone, tablet, or laptop) or phone to every class.

Workload:
PA 5045 requires concurrent enrollment in a lab section and is a 4-credit course. Under UMN policy, it is expected that the academic work required of graduate and professional school students will exceed three hours per credit per week. Therefore, you should expect a workload of at least 12 hours per week. Each week there will be two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab. Therefore, you should expect approximately 7 hours per week of work outside of scheduled class.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23091/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 July 2018

Fall 2024  |  PA 5051 Section 001: Leadership Foundations (23058)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Extended Regular Session
 
08/14/2024
Wed 02:00PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
 
09/05/2024 - 09/07/2024
Thu, Fri, Sat 08:30AM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
09/27/2024
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
09/28/2024
Sat 08:30AM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
10/25/2024
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
10/26/2024
Sat 08:30AM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
11/22/2024
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
11/23/2024
Sat 08:30AM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
12/13/2024
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 180
 
08/14/2024 - 12/13/2024
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Leadership concepts, tools, and strategies in a personal, community, and organizational context for mid-career students. Prereq: Master in Public Affairs student(cohort program) or public affairs leadership certificate student (cohort program). 5051-5052 must be taken in same academic yr
Class Notes:
MPA students should register for PA 5051, PA 5053, and PA 5055.
Class Description:

The Public Affairs Leadership Cohort is a unique offering at the Humphrey School that is designed for mid-career professionals that integrates adult learning methodologies in a schedule that accommodates working adults. Three core (required) courses are offered in an integrated format and students can either apply the cohort experience to a U of Mn Regent's approved graduate certificate in Public Affairs Leadership (PAL) or towards the Masters in Public Affairs (MPA) degree. The three courses integrated into the MPA cohort are: 1) Cohort Leadership I & II, 2) Cohort Policy and Program Analysis I & II, and 3) Cohort Research Methods & Analysis I & II.


The cohort program focuses on developing a range of skills essential in public affairs through an intensive learning community. A theoretical framework emphasizing transformational leadership guides us and creates awareness that leadership is demonstrated through acts undertaken by many people, not just by those in formal authority positions. Leaders must have skills to address both technical and adaptive challenges and the content of these courses highlights those most critical to public policy and public affairs.


Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23058/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 June 2016

Fall 2024  |  PA 5053 Section 001: Policy Analysis in Public Affairs (23059)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Extended Regular Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/13/2024
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Process of public policy and program analysis, including problem formulation, program design, and implementation. Opportunity to draw upon published research and conduct field-based research to understand implementation conditions. Professional communications, including writing of memos, requests for proposals, and implementation briefs, are stressed. Prereq: Master in Public Affairs student (cohort program) or public affairs leadership certificate student (cohort program). 5053-5054 must be taken in same academic yr
Class Notes:
MPA students should register for PA 5051, PA 5053, and PA 5055.
Class Description:

This is one of the required classes integrated into the year-long cohort for the Master of Public Affairs (MPA) and Public Affairs Leadership Certificate programs.


The Public Affairs Leadership Cohort is a unique offering at the Humphrey School. The Cohort is designed for mid-career professionals and integrates adult learning methodologies in a schedule that accommodates working adults. Three core (required) courses are offered in an integrated format and students can either apply the cohort experience to a University of Minnesota Regent's approved graduate certificate in Public Affairs Leadership (PAL) or towards the Master of Public Affairs (MPA) degree. The three courses integrated into the MPA cohort are: 1) Public Affairs Leadership 2) Policy and Program Analysis , and 3) Research Methods & Analysis.


The cohort program focuses on developing a range of skills essential in public affairs through an intensive learning community. A theoretical framework emphasizing transformational leadership guides us and creates awareness that leadership is demonstrated through acts undertaken by many people, not just by those in formal authority positions. Leaders must have analytical skills to address both technical and adaptive challenges and the content of these courses highlights those most critical to public policy and public affairs.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Only those who are admitted into the MPA or Public Affairs Leadership (PAL) certificate programs are eligible to register for this class.
Learning Objectives:
  • Expand personal leadership capacity by strengthening a sense of personal purpose, voice, agency, and experience in leading a group and communicating publicly about professional work.


  • Strengthen capacity for adaptive problem solving through reflective analysis of complex organizations, community conditions, programs, and policy networks.


  • Cultivate ability to engage effectively with others, while holding tension, by strengthening one's theoretical understanding and practical experience in instituting change.


  • Deepen understanding of program design and factors affecting implementation.


  • Learn strengths and limitations of quantitative and qualitative data analysis to inform decision-making.


  • Improve one's ability to collect, evaluate, and use research-based evidence in defining public policy concerns and making recommendations for improvements.


  • Enhance skills to connect with community and to confidently and productively engage with others in the context of diverse cultures, virtually and face-to-face.


  • Deepen understanding of social conditions and engage with complex dynamics of difference and diverse perspectives to strengthen public value.


  • Develop an appreciation of the value of "otherness" by establishing new relationships, gaining diverse perspectives, and creating professional networks in a trusting community of praxis.

Class Format:
The Cohort meets for an orientation in early August, a 3-day "foundations week" at the end of August and two days each month (Friday and Saturday) from September - May.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23059/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 April 2022

Fall 2024  |  PA 5055 Section 001: Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis (23060)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Extended Regular Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/13/2024
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Problem-based learning of analytical reasoning through social science research methods. Systematic review and literature review. Qualitative research including interviews, focus groups, and analysis. Research proposal. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5055-5056 must be taken in same academic yr
Class Notes:
MPA students should register for PA 5051, PA 5053, and PA 5055.
Class Description:

This is one of the required classes integrated into the year-long cohort for the Master of Public Affairs (MPA) and Public Affairs Leadership Certificate programs.


The Public Affairs Leadership Cohort is a unique offering at the Humphrey School. The Cohort is designed for mid-career professionals and integrates adult learning methodologies in a schedule that accommodates working adults. Three core (required) courses are offered in an integrated format and students can either apply the cohort experience to a University of Minnesota Regent's approved graduate certificate in Public Affairs Leadership (PAL) or towards the Master of Public Affairs (MPA) degree. The three courses integrated into the MPA cohort are: 1) Public Affairs Leadership 2) Policy and Program Analysis , and 3) Research Methods & Analysis.


The cohort program focuses on developing a range of skills essential in public affairs through an intensive learning community. A theoretical framework emphasizing transformational leadership guides us and creates awareness that leadership is demonstrated through acts undertaken by many people, not just by those in formal authority positions. Leaders must have analytical skills to address both technical and adaptive challenges and the content of these courses highlights those most critical to public policy and public affairs.

In this class, students will design a qualitative research project involving their own data collection. They will collect qualitative data, using participant observation and interviews, conduct iterative analysis of qualitative data, and interpret the findings. At the conclusion of the course, they will communicate the essential elements of a qualitative research study.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Only students enrolled in the MPA cohort program can take this class.
Learning Objectives:
  • Expand personal leadership capacity by strengthening a sense of personal purpose, voice, agency, and experience in leading a group and communicating publicly about professional work.


  • Strengthen capacity for adaptive problem solving through reflective analysis of complex organizations, community conditions, programs, and policy networks.


  • Cultivate ability to engage effectively with others, while holding tension, by strengthening one's theoretical understanding and practical experience in instituting change.


  • Deepen understanding of program design and factors affecting implementation.


  • Learn strengths and limitations of quantitative and qualitative data analysis to inform decision-making.


  • Improve one's ability to collect, evaluate, and use research-based evidence in defining public policy concerns and making recommendations for improvements.


  • Enhance skills to connect with community and to confidently and productively engage with others in the context of diverse cultures, virtually and face-to-face.


  • Deepen understanding of social conditions and engage with complex dynamics of difference and diverse perspectives to strengthen public value.


  • Develop an appreciation of the value of "otherness" by establishing new relationships, gaining diverse perspectives, and creating professional networks in a trusting community of praxis.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23060/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 September 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5080 Section 001: Capstone Preparation Workshop (23082)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Meets With:
MDP 5100 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
11/01/2024
Fri 02:00PM - 04:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 110 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project management, qualitative research, and critical framework to complete Capstone course. Students write draft of client project group norms and client contract.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23082/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5081 Section 001: Understanding Power and Teamwork in Public Affairs Education (32493)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
09/14/2024 - 09/21/2024
Sat 08:30AM - 04:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 15
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Power and teamwork in public affairs education.
Class Notes:
Impacting global and local communities requires future professionals to bring innovative solutions to pressing social problems. Effective communication is the first step in this process, but creating synergies between individuals in different power positions entails multiple challenges. Cross-cultural differences add complexity to this task. Students will participate in facilitated constructive dialogues that teach them to prioritize mutual understanding. This will strengthen their ability to navigate difficult topics and help them become effective leaders who can work with those with different values, beliefs, and perspectives. The course aims to develop leadership skills for fostering collaborative efforts among diverse groups by engaging in conversations about power dynamics in stratified societies, sharpen their understanding of effective collaboration across a diverse team, and co-create solutions to complex problems experienced in public affairs practice spanning the school's five disciplines.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32493/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5101 Section 001: Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations (23087)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue 05:45PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 36 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theories, concepts, and real world examples of managerial challenges. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of funding environments, management of multiple constituencies. Types of nonprofits using economic/behavioral approaches. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Description:
Theories, concepts, and real world examples of managerial challenges. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of funding environments, management of multiple constituencies. Types of nonprofits using economic/behavioral approaches.
Learning Objectives:
This course focuses on distinctive features of leading/managing and governing nonprofit organizations and draws on current theories, concepts, and real-world examples to explore management changes. This course is designed to provide current and future nonprofit managers and leaders with an overview of a range of nonprofit management concerns and practices. Course projects and discussions expand learners' management skills, analytical tools, and knowledge. In this course learners are asked to take the perspectives of nonprofit leaders/managers, volunteers, board members, policy makers, donors, and clients.
Grading:
15% Classroom Participation
20% Memo #1
20% Memo #2
20% Op Ed Piece
25% Reflective essay
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23087/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/davi1315_PA5101_Fall2019.pdf (Fall 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/davi1315_PA5101_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 August 2019

Fall 2024  |  PA 5105 Section 001: Integrative Leadership: Leading Across Sectors to Address Grand Challenges (23099)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
LAW 6623 Section 001
MGMT 6402 Section 060
OLPD 6402 Section 001
PUBH 6702 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management L-114
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Are you interested in working across government, business, and the non-profit sector for public good? Are you wondering how you can create sustainable shared leadership on challenges that can best be addressed together? This course explores multi-sector leadership and related governance and management challenges from a variety of perspectives and provides an opportunity for students to work together to apply what they are learning individually and in teams through in-class exercises and a final team project. The course is taught by a team of interdisciplinary faculty and considers different contexts, forms, and specific examples of multisector leadership that can enable transformative action to tackle a significant societal issue and achieve lasting change. Credit will be not be granted if credit has been received for GCC 5023, OLPD 6402, PUBH 6702, MGMT 6402, PA 5130, LAW 6623.
Class Notes:
If all class sections are full, please contact Samantha Silker at the Center for Integrative Leadership (sbsilker@umn.edu) for a permission number.
Class Description:
This is an interdisciplinary, 3-credit seminar led by co-instructors from multiple schools of the university. Students will: a) learn to recognize and diagnose integrative leadership challenges and opportunities; b) build their own capacities to practice integrative leadership through group work in individualized peer-to-peer coaching in diverse teams and through being exposed to a range of boundary work practices; and c) gain better knowledge of the leadership contexts within their own profession and in other sectors. We emphasize contexts for integrative leadership at five basic levels: within individuals, within and across groups, within and across organizations, within and across sectors, and at the societal scale. Learning occurs through reading foundational materials, personal leadership coaching, engaging extensively with examples from guest speakers and case materials, developing a group capstone project on integrative leadership, and iteratively co-producing an understanding of what integrative leadership is. This course is sponsored by four departments. If PA 5105 shows as full, please check for space under the other departments - MGMT 6402, OLPD 6402, and PubH 6702. They are all for the same class, with the same instructors, meeting at the same time. Every section in all four schools must be filled before any over-ride permission numbers are issued. If all class sections are full, please contact Samantha Silker at the Center for Integrative Leadership (sbsilker@umn.edu) for a permission number.
Grading:
30% Reports/Papers
30% Reflection Papers
20% Class Participation
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: Participation in class-based learning and discussion - 20% Biweekly reading notes and biweekly reflection notes - 30% Team case study project research, presentation, and report - 30% Integrative leadership peer-to-peer coaching: 20%
Class Format:
15% Lecture
20% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
10% Student Presentations
15% Guest Speakers
15% Web Based
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23099/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 April 2020

Fall 2024  |  PA 5108 Section 001: Board leadership development (32531)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/14/2024
Sat 09:00AM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
 
10/11/2024
Fri 09:00AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
 
11/08/2024
Fri 09:00AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
 
12/06/2024
Fri 09:00AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Nonprofit board governance. Governance models, roles/responsibilities, ethics/dynamics. Current research/concepts along with students' current board experiences to illuminate challenges/explore solutions that build board leadership competencies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Kate Barr has worked in leadership roles the nonprofit sector for 25 years. She most recently served as President & CEO of Propel Nonprofits and had led Nonprofits Assistance Fund prior to the merger that created Propel. She currently provides leadership to the Minnesota CDFI Coalition. Kate currently serves on two nonprofit boards and has served on, guides, and consulted with dozens of nonprofit boards. If you want to learn more about nonprofit board governance, consider this class. Nonprofit organizations are increasingly adding younger members to their boards of directors; however, they are rarely investing in opportunities for board leadership development. Our purpose is to directly address this challenge by spending time reading about governance and sharing among ourselves the challenges of serving on boards to improve board leadership skills. More specifically, the practicum focuses on distinctive features of nonprofit board governance and uses research and concepts along with students' current board experiences to illuminate challenges and explore solutions to build board leadership competencies. The course will cover legal requirements of nonprofit boards, their basic roles and responsibilities, important issues of recruitment, composition and diversity, intra-board and board-staff dynamics, life cycle changes, and emerging issues relevant to governance.
Class Description:
This course builds on students' experience serving on or reporting to nonprofit boards to strengthen leadership as board members and effectiveness of boards. This practicum class focuses on distinctive features of nonprofit board governance and uses research and concepts along with students' current board experiences to illuminate challenges and explore solutions to build board leadership competencies. The course will cover legal requirements of nonprofit boards, their basic roles and responsibilities, important issues of recruitment, composition and diversity, intra-board and board-staff dynamics, life cycle changes, and emerging issues relevant to governance. The class reading and discussion will also explore whether the "best practices" for nonprofit boards are serving organizations and the sector well.

Instructor biography: Kate Barr is the President and CEO of Propel Nonprofits, a Minneapolis-based nonprofit whose mission is to fuel the impact and effectiveness of nonprofits with guidance, expertise, and capital. Kate leads Propel's team in developing and implementing innovative financing and programming and works with the board of directors to direct organizational planning and growth. She frequently presents workshops and presentations on nonprofit strategy and finance and is a sector level leader with articles, blogs, and policy papers. Prior to joining the organization in 2000, Kate was Senior Vice President of Riverside Bank in Minneapolis with a wide portfolio of strategic and business responsibilities. She began her professional life as business manager of a performing arts nonprofit. Kate holds an MA in Leadership from Hamline University. She has been on the adjunct faculty of both the Hamline University Masters in Nonprofit Management Program and the University of Minnesota Masters in Arts & Cultural Leadership program. She is an alumnus of the Humphrey School's Policy Fellows Program and the Shannon Institute. She currently serves on the boards of Borealis Philanthropy and the Jerome and Camargo Foundations. Outside of work, Kate takes advantage of the Twin Cities' vibrant arts scene and amazing restaurants, diving into policy issues, and traveling with her husband. She has lived in seven states and is an enthusiastic transplant to Minnesota. Kate couldn't be prouder that her two adult children both work at nonprofits.
Who Should Take This Class?:
This course is geared for students who serve on the board of a nonprofit organization or who work directly with the board of directors as a nonprofit leader or staff person. For students who have served on nonprofit boards in the past, the course is an opportunity to build on that experience and prepare for a new board opportunity.

Grading:

S/N basis. Grading reflects class participation and several short reflection papers

Class Format:
The class meets four times during the semester. The first class is an extended Saturday session for a grounding in nonprofit governance practices and research and for in depth discussion about board experiences and questions of students. Three two-hour Friday sessions will be devoted to discussion of assigned readings and student's reflections and discussion about how the topics apply in practice. There will be guests for each class sessions to offer additional experiences from nonprofits.

Workload:

In addition to readings assigned for each class sessions, students are asked to reflect on how the topics discussed are applicable for their board experience. Several short (1 - 2 page) reflection pagers are assigned.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32531/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ksbarr_PA5108_Spring2021.pdf (Spring 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ksbarr_PA5108_Fall2019.docx (Fall 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 December 2020

Fall 2024  |  PA 5135 Section 001: Managing Conflict: Negotiation (23077)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 184
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course teaches the theory and the practice of negotiation strategies with an emphasis on applied, personal skill building constructed on a foundation of research and practice in the field. Students will apply their negotiation skills across interpersonal, public dispute, government, and private sector settings. The course focuses on developing students' personal theory of practice for decision-making, effective communication and impactful leadership through practice of distributive bargaining, value creation, consensus building, facilitation, and mediation exercises and discussions.
Class Notes:
PA 5135 will be offered In Person. Instructor will be Takeo Kuwabara. He may be contacted at kuwabara.takeo@gmail.com.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23077/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5136 Section 001: Group Process Facilitation for Organizational and Public/Community Engagement (31083)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
09/21/2024
Sat 09:00AM - 04:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
 
10/12/2024
Sat 09:00AM - 04:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Group process facilitation components, theories, tools, techniques. Facilitator's role in group goals and processes. Facilitation in public policy. Cross-cultural challenges. Topics may include meeting management, group decision-making, conflict, participatory leadership, and other tools.
Class Description:
A work team seeks to create a strategic plan to guide work for 3-5 years. A city seeks to create a new policy with input from various stakeholders. A family seeks to plan an enormous annual reunion. Each scenario involves people with individual opinions, values, motivations, and feelings about the task at hand. The alignment of their positions can range from synched and complementary to completely opposed and contentious.
To guide groups of diverse thought towards collective decisions, the facilitator plays a key role in driving a process for the collection, evaluation, and synthesis of ideas and feedback. In this course, students will be introduced to the art of facilitation: philosophy, tools, and methodology. We will examine case studies that illustrate approaches and problem-solving scenarios and end our course with hands-on practice.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/31083/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 May 2020

Fall 2024  |  PA 5190 Section 001: Topics in Public and Nonprofit Leadership and Management -- Prvnting Burnout: Sustnble Careers/Meaningful Work (33068)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
9 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon 04:00PM - 06:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Course Topic: Understanding and Addressing Burnout: Fostering Meaningful and Sustainable Careers Class will be offered REMOTE (synchronously online during the scheduled time). We spend most of our waking hours for the majority of our adult lives at work. Not surprisingly, people are increasingly demanding work that is engaging and meaningful. Simultaneously, research demonstrates that when people find their work meaningful, they are more likely to undergo personal sacrifices and engage in practices that result in burnout. This seminar-style course will help you: *understand the phenomenon of burnout and why it is increasingly prevalent; *develop practices that facilitate your ability to thrive in a career that is personally meaningful and personally sustainable; *examine organizational and institutional strategies that address burnout, underscoring the systemic nature of the phenomenon. Deliverables include weekly analytical memos engaging with the learning materials, exercises that apply the learning materials, brief daily reflections that assist in developing burnout prevention practices, and a narrative essay at the end of the course.
Class Description:

We spend most of our waking hours for the majority of our adult lives at work. Not surprisingly, people are increasingly demanding work that is engaging and meaningful. Simultaneously, research demonstrates that when people find their work meaningful, they are more likely to undergo personal sacrifices and engage in practices that result in burnout. This seminar-style course will help you:

*understand the phenomenon of burnout and why it is increasingly prevalent;

*develop practices that facilitate your ability to thrive in a career that is personally meaningful and personally sustainable;

*examine organizational and institutional strategies that address burnout, underscoring the systemic nature of the phenomenon.

Deliverables include weekly analytical memos engaging with the learning materials, exercises that apply the learning materials, brief daily reflections that assist in developing burnout prevention practices, and a narrative essay at the end of the course.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33068/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 October 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5205 Section 001: Statistics for Planning (23092)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Urban/Regional Planning major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis in urban and regional planning, including descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, elementary probability theory, research design and sampling, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution, correlation, and simple/multiple regression analysis.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23092/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5205 Section 002: Statistics for Planning (23093)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis in urban and regional planning, including descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, elementary probability theory, research design and sampling, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution, correlation, and simple/multiple regression analysis.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23093/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5205 Section 003: Statistics for Planning (23094)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis in urban and regional planning, including descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, elementary probability theory, research design and sampling, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution, correlation, and simple/multiple regression analysis.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23094/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5206 Section 001: The City of White Supremacy (23116)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Urban/Regional Planning major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The title of this course is meant to signal the objective of scrutinizing how systems of white supremacy have shaped the American city and how the American city functions in ways that reproduce and reinforce white supremacy. The colonization of the Americas coincided with the fabrication of racial identities that set the terms for membership in what became a white supremacist/racial state wherein all things, including spatial thinking and design, conformed to a racial calculus. As Lipsitz (2007: 12) tells us, "The lived experience of race has a spatial dimension, and the lived experience of space has a racial dimension." The core of this class will, however, focus on later developments characteristic of the period of rapid urbanization from the Jim Crow era through the New Deal and Civil Rights periods to today. The first section of the course will focus on frameworks for understanding white supremacy generally, and as it relates to urban development specifically. The second section considers specific domains of urban policy and planning using white supremacy as the analytic framework. In these weeks we examine how white supremacy has been expressed across a range of urban development issue areas, including housing, transportation, the urban environment, education, criminal justice, and urban design, and how policies and planning practice have maintained or disrupted systems of white supremacy.
Class Notes:
Contact Ed Goetz at egoetz@umn.edu if you need a permission number.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23116/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5206 Section 002: The City of White Supremacy (23155)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Urban/Regional Planning major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The title of this course is meant to signal the objective of scrutinizing how systems of white supremacy have shaped the American city and how the American city functions in ways that reproduce and reinforce white supremacy. The colonization of the Americas coincided with the fabrication of racial identities that set the terms for membership in what became a white supremacist/racial state wherein all things, including spatial thinking and design, conformed to a racial calculus. As Lipsitz (2007: 12) tells us, "The lived experience of race has a spatial dimension, and the lived experience of space has a racial dimension." The core of this class will, however, focus on later developments characteristic of the period of rapid urbanization from the Jim Crow era through the New Deal and Civil Rights periods to today. The first section of the course will focus on frameworks for understanding white supremacy generally, and as it relates to urban development specifically. The second section considers specific domains of urban policy and planning using white supremacy as the analytic framework. In these weeks we examine how white supremacy has been expressed across a range of urban development issue areas, including housing, transportation, the urban environment, education, criminal justice, and urban design, and how policies and planning practice have maintained or disrupted systems of white supremacy.
Class Notes:
Contact Ed Goetz at egoetz@umn.edu if you need a permission number.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23155/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5211 Section 001: Land Use Planning (23052)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Major/minor, Urb-Reg Planning
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 184
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 36 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Physical/spatial basis for land use planning at community/regional level. Role of public sector in guiding private development. Land use regulations, comprehensive planning, growth management, innovative land use planning/policies. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Description:
PA 5211 provides an introduction to the theory, practice, and innovation of land use policy in American cities and beyond. Land use regulations are an essential facet of rural, suburban and urban life across municipalities, unincorporated areas and natural preserves in the United States. As residents of these communities we encounter the consequences of land use regulation on a daily basis. The rules and conventions of land use define where we live, how we move, and why places develop in particular ways according to pre-­‐established legal mandates and the imperative of the public interest. Indeed, our future as healthy, just and sustainable communities is contingent upon innovations in land use that will shape the environments of the places we call home.
Grading:
20% Corridor Zoning Analysis
10% White Space Reflection
20% Urban Frameworks Analysis
40% Proposal
10% Final Markups Submission
Exam Format:
no final exam, but final presentations
Workload:
6.5-7 hours of assigned exercises outside of class including site visits, archival research, data collection and visualization, graphic board layout design, printing and practice presentations with team members.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23052/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hfburga_PA5211_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hfburga_PA5211_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 October 2016

Fall 2024  |  PA 5221 Section 001: Private Sector Development (23136)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Fri 09:00AM - 11:45AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Roles of various participants in land development. Investment objectives, effects of regulation. Overview of development process from private/public perspective.
Class Description:
The course will provide students with a framework that integrates theory and practice into a developer's-eye-view of urban real estate development. Students will gain an understanding of the development process, real estate markets and products, the project cycle, and the developer's motivations and decision-making process. In completing this course, students will achieve the following three objectives:

- Overview of the Real Estate Development Business

- Develop a general understanding of the real estate development business including products, markets, and actors, with an emphasis on developers and particularly their personalities, motivations, and interests.

- Tools and Skills: Develop an understanding of the quantitative and qualitative tools used to evaluate a real estate opportunity and the skills required to build and use those tools.

Students will learn how to create and manipulate their own "pro forma" economic models and use them to evaluate the economics and finances of an investment or business.

Generalization to Urban Development: With this new knowledge, tools, and analytical skills, students will be able to generalize across a broad spectrum of urban development activities from the perspectives of a variety of actors ranging from developers, investors, and lenders to city planners, elected officials, and community members.

With this combination of knowledge, tools, and skills, students will also be prepared to work in the real estate development industry and will be able to confidently tell prospective employers, "I know how to create a proforma."

More information about Peter Brown's projects, teaching, and writing can be found at http://www.peterhendeebrown.com/.
Who Should Take This Class?:
This course is for graduate and qualified undergraduate students interested in learning the nuts and bolts of how real estate developer think, how urban real estate markets work, and how to analyze a real estate development opportunity. This course will prepare you to work in city government and work with developers with confidence, or to work in private or nonprofit development.
Learning Objectives:
See the syllabus
Grading:
40% Case study write-ups
20% Homework exercises
20% Book Review
20% Final Exam
Exam Format:
Take-home midterm and final exams. See syllabus for details.
Class Format:
30% Lectures (most lectures will be asynchronous)
30% Class Discussion of case studies
20% Student Presentations
20% Guest Speakers
Workload:
20-30 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Homework Assignment(s)
7-9 Case Studies including write-ups and spread sheets
1 Final Exam
1 Book
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23136/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/brow1804_PA5221_Fall2023.pdf (Fall 2023)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gunde208_brow1804_PA5221_Spring2021.pdf (Spring 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gunde208_brow1804_PA5221_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gunde208_brow1804_PA5221_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/brow1804__PA5221_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
18 April 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5231 Section 001: Transit Planning and Management (23142)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
CEGE 5213 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 20
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Principles/techniques related to implementing transit systems. Historical perspective, characteristics of travel demand, demand management. Evaluating/benchmarking system performance. Transit-oriented development. Analyzing alternative transit modes. System design/finance. Case studies, field projects. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Description:
Principles/techniques related to implementing transit systems. Historical perspective, characteristics of travel demand, demand management. Evaluating/benchmarking system performance. Transit-oriented development. Analyzing alternative transit modes. System design/finance. Case studies. Field projects.
Grading:
25% Final project (individual work)
10% Capacity analysis exercise (team work)
10% Participation (individual work)
15% Route scheduling exercise (team work)
10% Review (individual work)
2 x 10% Case study memos (team work)
5 + 5% Case study presentation (team work)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23142/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cao_CEGE5213_Fall2016.doc (Fall 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cao_PA5231_Fall2015.doc (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 May 2017

Fall 2024  |  PA 5262 Section 001: Neighborhood Revitalization Theories and Strategies (23102)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Policymaking/politics of planning in housing, community development, social policy. Connecting policy to local/regional politics. Role of institutional decision-making structures on policy outcomes. Importance of citizens, social movements, interest groups in policymaking process.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23102/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5271 Section 001: Geographic Information Systems: Applications in Planning and Policy Analysis (23051)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Urban/Regional Planning, major and minor or PA PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to GIS. Applications in public planning and policy analysis. Operational skills in GIS software. Mapping analysis of U.S. Census material. Local/state government management/planning. Spatial statistical analysis for policy/planning. prereq: Major in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Notes:
Non-MURP students should contact Geoff Maas (maas0021@umn.edu) regarding the waiting list/permission numbers. Permission numbers will be distributed later this summer.
Class Description:

GIS Applications in Planning and Policy Analysis is intended for the planning and public policy student who desires a fundamental working knowledge of the core concepts of GIS. Students can expect to work with geospatial data in a lab environment, develop core skills in working with, manipulating and understanding geospatial data. Lectures explore the data types, origins, uses and limitations.


Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are an important supportive technology for the fields of planning and public policy. Both fields involve exploring location-based issues and GIS facilitates spatial visualization of phenomena such as crime, poverty, pollution, health, land use, economics, environmental conditions and many others. GIS - a discipline in its own right - is now firmly woven into the fabric of government and many business operations. It is vital that planning and public policy students have a fundamental knowledge of the concepts, usage, processes and potential of GIS technology.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in working with spatial data, making maps, presenting and communicating spatial data.
Learning Objectives:
Development of foundational skills in GIS, understanding of the various uses and limits of the technology and how it can be applied to the work of urban planning, public policy, public health and urban studies.
Grading:
10 Lab Assignments using GIS Software (55% of grade)
Class Attendance (10% of grade)
Final Project (25% of grade)
Final Exam (10% of grade)
Exam Format:
Final Exam: Cumulative, written exam for core concepts covered in the class.
Class Format:
Tuesday Evenings: 6:00 PM - 8:45 PM
Workload:
Emphasis is on topical lectures, in-class lab exercises and assignments. Students will leave the course with a firm command of core GIS and geospatial concepts, tools, processes and methods and their applicability to the fields of urban and regional planning and policy analysis.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23051/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2017

Fall 2024  |  PA 5290 Section 001: Topics in Planning -- Twin Cities Regional Planning (32744)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
12 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Meets With:
LAW 6031 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/02/2024
Thu, Fri 01:25PM - 02:50PM
UMTC, West Bank
Walter F. Mondale Hall 55
 
12/03/2024 - 12/04/2024
Tue, Wed 01:25PM - 02:50PM
UMTC, West Bank
Walter F. Mondale Hall 55
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32744/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5290 Section 002: Topics in Planning -- FutureofUrban Spaces: Applying AI in City Planning (33017)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
12 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue 08:15AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTE (synchronously online during the scheduled time). The Future of Urban Spaces: Applying Artificial Intelligence in City Planning is an advanced course designed to bridge the gap between theoretical knowledge and practical application of AI in urban environments. Through a hands-on, project-based approach, students will explore how AI technologies can be leveraged to address complex urban challenges, enhance sustainability, and improve the quality of life in cities. The course covers various topics, including data management, GIS integration, predictive modeling, and ethical considerations in AI deployment. By engaging with real-world case studies and utilizing cutting-edge AI tools, students will emerge equipped to contribute to the innovative and responsible development of smart, future-ready urban spaces.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33017/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5301 Section 001: Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South (23089)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Basic demographic measures/methodology. Demographic transition, mortality, fertility. Perspectives on nonmarital fertility, marriage, divorce, cohabitation. Cultural differences in family structure, aging, migration, refugee movements, population policies. Discussion of readings. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23089/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5311 Section 001: Program Evaluation (23088)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2024
Fri 09:45AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
 
09/20/2024
Fri 09:45AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
 
10/04/2024
Fri 09:45AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
 
10/18/2024
Fri 09:45AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
 
11/01/2024
Fri 09:45AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
 
11/15/2024
Fri 09:45AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
 
12/06/2024
Fri 09:45AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
UMTC, West Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course covers the core principals, methods, and implementation of evaluation research. Students will learn through an applied partnership with a nonprofit or state/local government clients. The course is designed for both students interested in a potential career in evaluation and those that want to be better consumers of research. Past programmatic/policy areas included health and human services, education, environment science, economic development, transportation, and evidence-based policymaking.
Class Description:
This course provides an overview to program evaluation in public affairs. It explores the complexities and realities of conducting program evaluation studies in community-based settings, such as public agencies, schools, non-profit organizations, and collaborative initiatives. The overall purpose of this course is to provide students with a theoretical framework and practical strategies for conducting community-based evaluation studies.
Grading:
50% Program Evaluation Field Work

25% Reports/Papers/Memos

15% Student Presentations

10% Participation
Class Format:

30% Lecture

20% Small Group Activities

20% Student Presentations

15% Discussion

10% Laboratory

5% Guest Speakers
Workload:

50 Pages Reading Per Week

2 Reports/Papers/Memos

1 Presentation

1 Special Project
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23088/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 August 2015

Fall 2024  |  PA 5390 Section 001: Topics in Advanced Policy Analysis Methods -- Demography & Aging Seminars and Workshops (32330)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Repeat Credit Limit:
9 Credits
Grading Basis:
S-N or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon 12:15PM - 01:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Virtual Rooms ROOM-TBA
 
09/13/2024 - 12/11/2024
Fri 12:00PM - 01:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Virtual Rooms ROOM-TBA
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics in advanced policy analysis methods.
Class Notes:
Demography & Aging Seminars and Workshops. Population trainees will attend ALL DATES. All other students (not Population trainees) will attend all Mondays but only the following Fridays: Schedule to be determined. This class will be held in Willey Hall room 50.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32330/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5401 Section 001: Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy (32987)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 184
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Nature/extent of poverty/inequality in the United States, causes/consequences, impact of government programs/policies. Extent/causes of poverty/inequality in other developed/developing countries. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Description:
Nature/extent of poverty/inequality in the United States, causes/consequences, impact of government programs/policies. Extent/causes of poverty/inequality in other developed/developing countries.
Grading:

- Reaction Paragraphs (15% of grade)

- Class Presentation and Class Participation (10% of grade)

- Short Memo on Poverty Measurement (10% grade)

- Policy Memos (40% grade)

- Final Group Project: (25% grade)

-Late work will receive penalty in grading.

Exam Format:
No exams, the assignments are your grades. There will be a final group paper and presentations. (Look to syllabus for more information)
Workload:
Look at syllabus below to see work load within course.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32987/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5401_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5401_Fall2015.docx (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 November 2015

Fall 2024  |  PA 5422 Section 001: Diversity and Public Policy (23138)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 15
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
What is diversity? What role does it play in public policy? What role should it play? Whom does diversity include or exclude? In this highly participatory class, we will apply a policy analysis lens to explore how diversity interacts with, contributes to, and is impacted by policy. The interdisciplinary course readings draw from topics such as gender identity, intersectionality, socio-economic class, race and ethnicity, indigenous ways of knowing, sexual orientation, and disability. Students examine the evolution of difference and diversity, explore various domains of diversity (gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, disability, class), and synthesize and apply this knowledge to the development of a policy brief that focuses on a particular policy or organizational problem.
Class Notes:
What is diversity? What role does it play in public policy? Whom does diversity include or exclude? In this highly participatory class, we will apply a policy analysis lens to explore how diversity interacts with, contributes to, and is impacted by policy. The interdisciplinary course readings draw from topics such as gender identity, intersectionality, socio-economic class, race and ethnicity, indigenous ways of knowing, sexual orientation, and disability. Students examine the evolution of difference and diversity, explore various domains of diversity (gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, disability, class), and synthesize and apply this knowledge to the development of a policy brief that focuses on a particular policy or organizational problem. David Stanton is a postdoctoral associate with the Roy Wilkins Center for Human Relations and Social Justice.
Class Description:
This course provides a practical foundation for analyzing and integrating diversity in contemporary organizations and businesses. The course applies a policy analysis lens to an interdisciplinary approach to exploring how diversity interacts with, contributes to, and is impacted by policy. The course readings draw from topics such as gender identity, intersectionality, socio-economic class, and race and ethnicity.
The course is divided into three parts:
1) Foundations of diversity, which covers definitions, legal and economic implications, and academic debates
2) Diversity and difference, which focuses on specific elements of diversity, such as gender, race, sexual identity, class, and disability. Guest speakers will provide their unique perspective on these subjects.
3) Diversity and resource allocation, which consists of hands-on discussions about how a policy maker or organization leader might go about allocating resources for different diversity groups, as well as the inherent trade-offs in this process.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Any graduate student who is interested in an interdisciplinary approach that focuses on how to analyze and integrate diversity into policy analysis.
Grading:
50% Individual reflections/essays
20% Team policy brief
20% Team presentation
5% Within-team peer evaluation
5% Participation
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23138/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 November 2021

Fall 2024  |  PA 5431 Section 001: Public Policies on Work and Pay (23124)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
HRIR 5655 Section 060
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 20
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Public policies affecting employment, hours of work, and institutions in labor markets. Public programs impacting wages, unemployment, training, collective bargaining, job security, and workplace governance. Policy implications of the changing nature of work. prereq: [[PA 5031 or equiv], grad student] or instr consent
Class Description:
The purpose of this course is to examine and analyze how public policies affecting the employment relationship can be developed and evaluated. The major methods of analysis used are cost/benefit techniques and economic methods. Lessons from other countries are integrated throughout the course. The latter part of the course is devoted to the issue of who should govern the workplace, with a special emphasis on proposals for potential changes in U.S. public policy on labor and industrial relations in both the public and private sector.
Grading:
Class Participation and homework 10%
In-Class exam 40%
Class debates on a labor policy topic 20%
Essay/Exam on Workplace governance 30%

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23124/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/klein002_HRIR5655_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 October 2017

Fall 2024  |  PA 5442 Section 001: Education Law and Policy (23147)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Meets With:
LAW 6233 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 50B
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The nation's schools have become a conflict zone where our polarized views and values are clashing. There are new arguments over curriculum, books in school libraries, and support for transgender students, as well as continuing struggles over racial segregation, disparities in learning, the quality of education, and how to pay for it. This course will explore these challenges from the perspectives of law and public policy, recognizing that decisions of institutions in both sectors contribute to the design of America's system of public preK-12 education. Justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion are central to nearly all the topics we will discuss. We will explore the process of education law and policy change, including school integration, the inclusion of students with disabilities, accountability, and calls for education reform. We will also consider the existing empirical evidence informing the debates on policy alternatives. Discussions and readings about a diverse range of cultures and countries will help us think about education law and policy in a broader context. Course readings will include judicial decisions, statutes, policy analyses, law reviews, empirical research articles, and journalistic accounts of education and human development issues. Classes will consist of active student discussion of legal and policy design issues, presentations by guest speakers who are active practitioners and advocates in education law and policy, and presentations of group research projects.
Class Notes:
This course will be co-taught by Steve Kelley and Meg Luger.
Class Description:
PA 5442/LAW 6233 Education Law and Policy:

The nation's schools have become a conflict zone where our polarized views and values are clashing. There are new arguments over curriculum, books in school libraries, and support for transgender students, as well as continuing struggles over racial segregation, disparities in learning, the quality of education, and how to pay for it.

This course will explore these challenges from the perspectives of law and public policy, recognizing that decisions of institutions in both sectors contribute to the design of America's system of public preK-12 education. Justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion are central to nearly all the topics we will discuss. We will explore the process of education law and policy change, including school integration, the inclusion of students with disabilities, accountability, and calls for education reform. We will also consider the existing empirical evidence informing the debates on policy alternatives.

Discussions and readings about a diverse range of cultures and countries will help us think about education law and policy in a broader context.

Course readings will include judicial decisions, statutes, policy analyses, law reviews, empirical research articles, and journalistic accounts of education and human development issues. Classes will consist of active student discussion of legal and policy design issues, presentations by guest speakers who are active practitioners and advocates in education law and policy, and presentations of group research projects.

Steve Kelley, J.D. practiced commercial litigation for over 20 years, served in the Minnesota Legislature for
14 years, chaired the Minnesota Senate Education Committee, and served recently as Minnesota's Commerce Commissioner. He also has served on the boards of education non-profit organizations.


Corey Savage, Ph.D. is an education policy researcher at the American Institutes for Research (AIR). He studies civic education, curricular reform, and teacher quality in the US and abroad. Prior to joining AIR, Savage held research positions at the Annenberg Institute at Brown University, the Hector Institute at the University of Tübingen, and Educational Testing Service.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Any graduate student who is interested in the legal and public policy issues that influence U.S. public education
Grading:
Reports/Memo
Homework/Written Reflections
Group Presentation
Participation
Exam Format:
Final paper in lieu of exam.
Class Format:
Discussion
Guest Speakers
Lecture
Small Group Discussion/Activities
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23147/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kelle644_PA5442_Fall2015.docx (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 April 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5501 Section 001: Theories and Policies of Development (23083)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
What makes some countries wealthier than others, one group of people healthier and more educated than another? How does the behavior of rich nations affect poor nations? Origins of development thought, contemporary frameworks and policy debates. Economic, human, and sustainable development. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Note time change.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23083/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5503 Section 001: Economics of Development (23065)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA 5501 or &5501
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Economic growth, inequality, poverty, rural/urban labor markets, risk/insurance. Investments in human capital, credit markets, gender/household economics, governance/institutional issues. Microfinance, conditional cash transfers, labor/education policies. prereq: PA 5501 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in PA 5501
Class Notes:
5503 fulfills the MPP economics requirement.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23065/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5512 Section 001: Planning for Jobs (30924)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 15
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This seminar explores the changing nature of the American job and the transformative forces - from corporate power and labor union decline to the rise of the 'gig' economy and even climate change - that have influenced this shift in recent decades and have added to growing economic insecurity. We will consider local and regional strategies for helping today's workers withstand changing economic and environmental pressures, including: shoring up labor laws and wage protections; coordinating economic and workforce development initiatives; advancing forms of labor and community organizing that promote economic and environmental justice; using novel employer engagement tools to promote strong, safe, and opportunity-rich workplaces. This seminar will not only help you think through the policy and planning implications of U.S. labor market restructuring, but also consider how the forces behind this restructuring potentially affect your own career prospects. prereq: Grad or instructor consent
Class Description:
This course examines community, economic, and workforce development from a regional U.S. perspective. It is organized around four broad segments: Theories of regional development, Community development practice, Economic development practice, and Workforce development practice. This class will also engage the City of Rosemount in the creation of a holistic strategic asset-based plan for development.
Grading:
25% Economic Base Analysis
25% Economic Development Plan for the City of Rosemount
15% Readings and Commentary and Discussion (RMD) Topical Literature Review and Class Discussion
25% Final Exam
10% Attendance and Participation
Class Format:
Lecture, student presentations, discussion included.
Workload:
For the theoretical segment of the course (weeks 2-6), approximately 50-75 pages of reading assigned per session. For the remaining weeks, a single set of readings will be assigned on Tuesdays. Student presentations and discussion will also follow.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/30924/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 August 2016

Fall 2024  |  PA 5711 Section 001: Science, Technology & Environmental Policy (23054)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 28 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Interplay of science, technology, the environment, and society. Approaches from across the social sciences will cover how science and technology can create new environmental pressures as well as policy challenges in a range of spheres from climate change to systems of intellectual property and international development.
Class Notes:
Students who need a class permission number should contact Elise Harrington at eliseh@umn.edu.
Class Description:

This survey course investigates the ways in which human society is transforming (and being transformed by) science, technology, and the environment. This course will prepare you to grapple with complex contemporary policy issues in arenas such as global climate change, technology development, innovation, and regulation of issues at the intersection of science, technology, and the environment.

The focus of the course is public policy in the United States, but we will work with a comparative mindset to tackle issues of globalization, sustainable development, and global environmental challenges.
Grading:
Grading for this course will have three major components: written policy memos, developing positions on current policy topics (debates, case studies), and a final research project.
Exam Format:
No Exams
Class Format:
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23054/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
31 July 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5715 Section 001: Deliberating Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Communicating Science for Environmental Policy (32085)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
09/03/2024 - 10/21/2024
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 50A
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Exploration of the conceptual and ethical dimensions of science, technology, and environmental policy. Discussion-based course with rotating topics.
Class Notes:
TOPIC: Communicating Science for Environmental Policy Why does resistance to and mistrust of science persist surrounding environmental issues? And what can we do about it? This half-semester section of PA 5715 (Deliberating STEP) will focus on how we use and communicate science for environmental policymaking, key areas of bias, and strategies for better communicating scientific information to different audiences. We will explore sources of mistrust in scientific information, cognitive biases that impact comprehension of scientific knowledge, and strategies to overcome such challenges in policy areas heavily reliant on scientific knowledge.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32085/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5722 Section 001: Economics of Environmental Policy (23106)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to economic principles and methods as they apply to environmental issues such as climate change, biodiversity conservation, and water quality. Course will cover benefit-cost analysis, methods of environmental valuation, as well as critiques of market-based solutions to environmental challenges.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23106/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5724 Section 001: Climate Change Policy (23105)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Existing and proposed approaches to mitigate and adapt to climate change through policies that cross scales of governance (from local to global) and impact a wide range of sectors. Exploration of climate change policy from a variety of disciplinary approaches and perspectives, emphasizing economic logic, ethical principles, and institutional feasibility. How policy can be shaped in the face of a variety of competing interests to achieve commonly desired outcomes. Students develop a deep knowledge of climate change in particular countries through a team final project. prereq: Intro microecon (such as Econ 1101 or equiv)
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23105/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5771 Section 001: Change Leadership for Environmental, Social and Governance Action (23121)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 50B
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Sustainability is increasingly being defined broadly to include the environmental, social and governance (ESG) actions, and effects of organizations. ESG concepts integrate environmental sustainability with diversity, equity, and inclusion. Individuals working within organizations or seeking to join those organizations have expressed desires to affect the actions of an organization. This course aims to give students hands-on experience with a project investigating, designing, advocating for and implementing an ESG improvement in an existing or new organization. We imagine students in this course as future intrapreneurs (an employee of an organization who creates new opportunities or products in the style of an entrepreneur) transforming practices in existing organizations or as entrepreneurs seeking to create new sustainable organizations, or both. Non-degree-seeking students possessing a bachelor's degree are encouraged to contact the instructor for permission to register.
Class Description:
Learning Objectives:
The learning objectives are:


1. Enable students to develop leadership competencies in systems thinking, future anticipation, normative values and principles, strategy and interpersonal collaboration.


2. Enable students to apply problem-solving practices applicable to wicked problems including a) questioning, listening and empathizing, b) applying solution design frameworks and concepts such as empathy maps, personas, and sustainable value propositions, and c)
prototyping, testing and iteration.


3. Enable students to apply ESG concepts and theory such as stakeholder capitalism, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, social, economic and ecological boundaries or limits, and ESG reporting and measurement frameworks.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23121/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 April 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5813 Section 001: US Foreign Policy: Issues and Institutions (23078)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 330
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course helps students develop a deep understanding of U.S. foreign policy issues and institutions, and the implications of U.S. global engagement. Through readings, class discussions, and guest lectures, we look at the institutions and processes involved in developing and managing US foreign policy, and use case studies to advance students' knowledge of bilateral and regional issues. We examine the workings of the State Department, the National Security Council, and the Department of Defense; how economic instruments like sanctions are used to advance policy; and how American citizens, lobbyists, and foreign governments influence policy. We incorporate discussions of current events into each class, with students developing skills in writing and presentation critical to foreign policy careers.
Class Description:
The class will be taught by Eric Schwartz, who was Assistant Secretary of State during the Obama administration and Senior Director and Special Assistant to the President during the Clinton Administration. In the class, we will examine how U.S. policy-makers define national interests and how they seek to pursue them globally. We will consider various (and often competing) perspectives on these issues -- among both practitioners and academics -- and how foreign policy perspectives have evolved over time. We will review and assess the actions of recent administrations on key bilateral and regional issues, including those involving U.S. relations with China, the U.S. and the NATO alliance as well as U.S.-European relations, U.S. relations with governments in Central and South America, and Africa, among others. We will consider functional issues, such as the U.S. posture on climate change and international human rights and humanitarianism. And we will examine key institutions in the foreign policy-making process, such as the Department of State and the National Security Council.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students with interests in U.S. foreign policy; students who are planning careers in foreign policy or international affairs, and students whose work, including work i advocacy, will put them in contact with the U.S. government's foreign policy institutions.
Learning Objectives:

Students who successfully complete the course will gain a broad understanding of the policy challenges confronting U.S. foreign policy-makers, as well as an understanding of the options which are available to policy-makers and the costs and benefits of various courses of action. Students will also gain of the key foreign policy institutions and the roles that they play in the policy-making process.

Grading:
Policy memo 15%
Class participation: 25%
Take home (open book) mid-term exercise: 30%
Final exam: 30%
Exam Format:
Midterm is take home exercise (open book)..
Final exam will be closed book, but students will have essay questions at least 10 days in advance and we will have review sessions prior to exam..
Class Format:
Class will be limited to 15 students.
Lecture or guest lecture and Qs and As: about 25%
Student discussion, in whole class or in smaller groups: about 75%
Workload:
About 150 pages per week of reading, on average; and occasional videos.
One policy memo, take home midterm (open book),exercise and final essay exam (see above)..
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23078/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5813_Fall2023.docx (Fall 2023)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 August 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5823 Section 001: Human Rights and Humanitarian Crises: Policy Challenges (32465)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 330
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Examines response of governments, international organizations, NGOs, and others to global humanitarian and human rights challenges posed by civil conflict and other complex emergencies in places such as Syria, Ukraine, South Sudan, Somalia, Burma, and elsewhere. Course will also consider and assess UN and other institutions established to address these issues (like UNOCHA and UNHCR). In addition, course will examine US policy toward humanitarian issues and refugees (including US refugee admissions).
Class Description:
Professor Eric Schwartz, who has recently completed a five year tenure as president of Refugees International in Washington, DC, will return to full-time status at the Humphrey School and teach this course in the spring. Before serving as Dean of the Humphrey School from 2011 to 2017, Professor Schwartz served in the White House and the State Department in the Clinton and Obama Administrations, as well as the United Nations and with Human Rights Watch.

Whether in Burma (Myanmar), Syria, Ukraine, Somalia, South Sudan or the countries of Central America, repression, human rights abuses, civil conflict, climate change, and complex emergencies, which principally impact populations in poorer countries of the world, pose compelling challenges to the capacities of governments, NGOs and international organizations, and affected populations themselves to prevent and alleviate suffering and promote recovery. This course will examine efforts to respond to these challenges. The course will also include examination of issues relating to refugees and forced migration. And we will study the roles and institutions of the U.S. government, with a particular focus on policies and practices involving overseas humanitarian and refugee assistance, and the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. The course will involve lecture; guest lecture from practitioners, policy-makers, and individuals from affected populations; and class discussion,

This 3-credit course will take a broad and integrated approach, designed to give students a wide understanding of the lay of the refugee and humanitarian land and the questions with which advocates, policy makers and policy practitioners grapple.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interests in human rights, refugees, asylum, international humanitarian response, multilateral humanitarian organizations and U.S. foreign policy
Learning Objectives:
Students will gain a broad understanding of the policy issues that are involved in international refugee and humanitarian response -- an understanding that will integrate concepts from a range of fields - as well as knowledge of the key international and U.S. institutions that define and affect policy and practice in this area. Students will also develop an appreciation of key dilemmas faced by policy-makers and practitioners, challenges to achieving policy and operational objectives, and strategies for success.

Grading:
Class participation (25%)
Preliminary short policy memorandum (15%)
Second policy memo (20%)
Final exam (two hours, essay, with questions presented in advance) 40%
Note: these requirements may be subject to modest changes after consultation with class members
Exam Format:
Essay, with questions presented in advance
Class Format:
Combination of lecture, guest lecture and class discussion/presentation.
Workload:
About 130-150 pages per week of reading in syllabus. (See also grading section, above.)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32465/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5823_Spring2023.pdf (Spring 2023)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5823_Spring2021.pdf (Spring 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5823_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5823_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5823_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5823_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 November 2022

Fall 2024  |  PA 5826 Section 001: National Security Policy (23101)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 20
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will analyze U.S. national security policy and process from the viewpoint of the National Security Council staff. Students will examine the organization and structure of the U.S. national security apparatus and the national security decision-making process, including individual and political factors; assess central threats to U.S. and international security and develop and discuss policy options to deal with those threats; undertake a major policy review on a specific national security challenge facing the United States, including analysis and recommendations; produce products, both written and oral, crucial to national security policy making (e.g., concise information and action memorandum), and put themselves in the position of national security leaders as part of a policy simulation. Grades will be based on oral participation, papers, and class reports.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23101/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/andre104_PA5826_Fall2020.docx (Fall 2020)

Fall 2024  |  PA 5827 Section 001: International Strategic Crisis Negotiation Exercise (23156)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Repeat Credit Limit:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
10/18/2024
Fri 03:00PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
 
10/19/2024
Sat 08:00AM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The course will enable students to engage in a simulated multi-party negotiation of a complex, high stakes international crisis with multiple players, focused on a future or current international crisis. It provides students across all degree programs the opportunity to participate in a dynamic, actively managed exercise in which teams attempt to negotiate a solution to a fictional future crisis based on current global realities. Students will be divided into six or seven teams representing countries or non-state actors involved in the crisis. A subject-matter expert (such as a retired ambassador) will guide the negotiations playing the role of a UN envoy. Each team will be mentored by a retired diplomat, military officer,or other experienced volunteer who will provide negotiating and strategic advice. A team from the Army War College, a leading institution in strategic exercises, will lead the exercise, providing structured input that gives students a realistic sense of how strategic actors must think and behave in crisis negotiation scenarios. Students are given course material in advance and meet with mentors to prepare for the exercise. A different international crisis is featured each year, and students are encouraged to participate more than once.
Class Notes:
Please direct requests for permission numbers or approval of class time conflict forms to Stacey Grimes at grime004@umn.edu.
Class Description:
Jon Olson was commissioned in May 1990 from the US Naval Academy with a BS in History. He spent 21 years on active duty with three years and 17 days at sea aboard aircraft carriers and large-deck amphibious assault ships. He participated in Operation SOUTHERN WATCH, Operation RESTORE HOPE, Operation JOINT FORGE, support for UNAMET in East Timor, and in Operation ENDURING FREEDOM - Afghanistan. Along the way, he earned an MA in National Security and Strategic Studies at the US Naval War College, as well as logged 35 parachute jumps as a US Navy Parachutist. After retiring in 2011, Jon returned home to Minnesota, earned a Master of Public Affairs at the Humphrey School while also teaching college courses on national security at Carleton College and Metropolitan State University. He continues to co-author national security thrillers with his fellow Annapolis graduate David Bruns, and Jon hosts National Security This Week each Wednesday morning on KYMN Radio.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23156/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 April 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5885 Section 001: Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors (23100)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Politics of human rights issue emergence; relevant international, regional, and domestic norms; correlates of state repression; measurement of human rights abuse and remedies; human rights promotion by states, political parties, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, faith-based organizations, and providers of international development assistance.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23100/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5886 Section 001: Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar I (23079)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Human Rights M H R
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
09/17/2024
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
10/01/2024
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
10/15/2024
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
10/29/2024
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
11/12/2024
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
11/26/2024
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
12/10/2024
Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 22 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar is a required course for all first-year MHR students. The course is intended to create a cohort group and ensure that all MHR students have an opportunity to work together to explore current issues related to human rights practice, focusing on emerging events or crises, and debates over policy, practice, or theory and for direct contact with and networking particularly with counterparts in the Global South. This course is in a series with, and taken before, PA 5887. prereq: First-year MHR
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23079/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5910 Section 001: Developing Your Public Service Career (23049)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
PA majors: Development Practice; Human Rights; Public Policy; Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy; or Urban and Regional Affairs
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 435
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
UMTC, West Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Students investigate/analyze interests, skills, and abilities and combine them in a career plan. Develop tools to demonstrate abilities, document experiences/knowledge, and explore public service career options.
Class Notes:
3-5 sessions will be virtual.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23049/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5920 Section 001: Skills Workshop -- Stakeholder Analysis Tools (30987)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
0.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
48 Credits
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
11/02/2024
Sat 09:00AM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics on public policy or planning skills. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Stakeholder Analysis Tools The key to success in most policy and organizational change efforts is the satisfaction of key stakeholder according to their criteria for satisfaction. The purpose of this course is to introduce participants to a range of stakeholder identification, analysis, and engagement techniques that in combination can help advance change efforts in positive directions. The course will involve brief lectures and discussions followed by practice using some of the most important techniques. These include: basic identification techniques, power versus interest grids, stakeholder influence diagrams, bases of power versus directions of interest diagrams, techniques for discerning the common good, support versus opposition matrices, and participation planning matrices, among others. Key readings and worksheets will be provided.
Class Description:
The key to success in most policy and organizational change efforts is the satisfaction of key stakeholder according to their criteria for satisfaction. The purpose of this course is to introduce participants to a range of stakeholder identification, analysis, and engagement techniques that in combination can help advance change efforts in positive directions. The course will involve brief lectures and discussions followed by practice using some of the most important techniques. These include: basic identification techniques, power versus interest grids, stakeholder influence diagrams, bases of power versus directions of interest diagrams, techniques for discerning the common good, support versus opposition matrices, and participation planning matrices, among others. Key readings and worksheets will be provided.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/30987/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bryso001_PA5920_Fall2018.pdf (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bryso001_PA5920_Summer2018.pdf (Summer 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bryso001_PA5920_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bryso001_PA5920_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 June 2022

Fall 2024  |  PA 5920 Section 002: Skills Workshop -- Visual Strategy Mapping (30988)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
0.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
48 Credits
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
11/09/2024
Sat 09:00AM - 04:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics on public policy or planning skills. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Visual Strategy Mapping Visual strategy mapping is a powerful technique for graphically developing and showing the connections between mission, goals, strategies and actions. Strategy mapping is a statement-and-arrow technique in which the arrows show what leads to what. In other words, the approach involves causal mapping, in which the arrows mean "causes," "produces," or "might result in." The technique is related to logic models and theories of change, but is far more specific in showing what can be expected to lead to what - and therefore is more helpful when it comes to managing change or designing processes to do so. At the end of the course participants should be able to: articulate the basic theory of causal mapping, produce maps, and understand how to use mapping as part of a policy, organizational, or strategy change process.
Class Description:

Visual strategy mapping is a powerful technique for graphically developing and showing the connections between mission, goals, strategies and actions. Strategy mapping is a statement-and-arrow technique in which the arrows show what leads to what. In other words, the approach involves causal mapping, in which the arrows mean "causes," "produces," or "might result in." The technique is related to logic models and theories of change, but is far move specific in showing what can be expected to lead to what - and therefore is more helpful when it comes to managing change or designing processes to do so. At the end of the course participants should be able to: articulate the basic theory of causal mapping, produce maps, and understand how to use mapping as part of a policy, organizational, or strategy change process.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/30988/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bryso001_PA5920_Fall2018.pdf (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bryso001_PA5920_Summer2018.pdf (Summer 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bryso001_PA5920_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bryso001_PA5920_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 June 2022

Fall 2024  |  PA 5926 Section 001: Presentation Skills: How to Inspire Your Audience and Change the World (23117)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Repeat Credit Limit:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon 11:15AM - 12:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Learn techniques for making effective, persuasive presentations to different kinds of audiences. Practice is essential to improve speaking skills and reduce anxiety. Students practice by recording brief weekly presentations and making class presentations in a supportive environment. Techniques for using Powerpoint to create effective slides are practiced. Course components include presentation assignments; peer reviews; readings/videos and reflections; and class participation. May be repeated once.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23117/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5929 Section 001: Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers (23080)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon 04:00PM - 05:40PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Tools for communicating quantitative information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way. Topics covered include 1) writing and speaking about data; 2) data management in Excel in order to prepare data for charting; 3) understanding and ability to deploy core concepts in of design, layout, typography and color to maximize the impact of their data visualizations 4) determining which types of statistical measures are most effective for each type of data and message; 5) determining which types of design to use for communicating quantitative information; and 6) designing graphs and tables that are intelligent and compelling for communicating quantitative information.
Class Description:
This course will teach students how to organize and present data in the most effective way. Lectures will explore theories and elements of graphs and tables design, more specifically with how to create and organize tables and data. The central goal is to provide students with the tools for communicating information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in efficiently and effectively communicating data visually.
Learning Objectives:
Develop a firm understanding of the role of design, color, composition, type and statistical rigor in effectively communicating data visually.
Grading:
15% class attendance and completion of in-class exercises
70% series of six assignments
15% final project
Exam Format:
No exams
Class Format:
This class will combine lecture, in-class critique of data visualization approaches and discussion, and practical lab exercises and assignments. Classes will begin with a lecture to introduce topics to be explored and discussed. Hands-on work with the software will also be emphasized to allow students to complete the assignments and relate their skills to their own research interests.
Workload:
Weekly lectures including critique of data visualizations, in-class labs each week to help students gain familiarity with the tools and weekly assignments. Students will work with and become familiar with the core visualization functions in Microsoft Excel, Adobe Illustrator, Tableau and R.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23080/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5929_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5929_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 December 2019

Fall 2024  |  PA 5929 Section 002: Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers (32282)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
09/03/2024 - 10/21/2024
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
 
09/21/2024
Sat 01:00PM - 04:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Tools for communicating quantitative information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way. Topics covered include 1) writing and speaking about data; 2) data management in Excel in order to prepare data for charting; 3) understanding and ability to deploy core concepts in of design, layout, typography and color to maximize the impact of their data visualizations 4) determining which types of statistical measures are most effective for each type of data and message; 5) determining which types of design to use for communicating quantitative information; and 6) designing graphs and tables that are intelligent and compelling for communicating quantitative information.
Class Description:
The class will have a practical approach, combining discussion and practical exercises. The course is designed to be like a walk-through, starting from collecting and organizing data and ending with advanced graph designs.

The course in the spring will use Excel and Tableau. There will be additional modules available for more advance Excel users and those who want to go beyond the basics in Tableau. I will not teach R as part of the class but will make available the R modules and handouts for students that are interested in learning R.
Learning Objectives:
Learn to make better tables- see example below
ClearOffTheTableMd
Learn to make better figures
Grading:
Please note that it is possible to audit the course or take the course S/N. I encourage students that are already taking a full load of classes to sign up for this class S/N, that way you can focus on learning the material and not on the letter grade.

4 Problem Sets (each problem set is worth 15% of final grade). The problem sets will be due one week after being assigned and will need to be uploaded to Canvas before the start of class.
If you are satisfied with your grades from the first 3 assignments, you do not have to turn in assignment 4. If you are not, you should turn in assignment 4 and I will drop the lowest of your assignment grades.
1 Final Report (40% of final grade)
Class Format:
Meets twice a week for first half the semester. The majority of class time is spent doing in-class exercises. There is one Saturday virtual session, in which we hold a Tableau Workshop.
Workload:
There are 4 problem sets and a final memo. The highest 3 Problem Set Grades make up your final PS grades.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32282/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA5929_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 November 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5932 Section 001: Working with Data: Finding, Managing, and Using Data (23115)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Hands-on experience with common issues that arise when using secondary data sets. After successful completion of the course, students should be able to: 1. Determine where to find data and information about data (metadata) for policy-related topics. 2. Repurpose, manipulate, and/or clean data collected by someone else or for a different purpose in order to answer questions. 3. Determine appropriate units of analysis, weights, data structure, and variables of interest in order to answer policy-related questions. 4. Document workflow to allow reproducibility and protect the confidentiality of the data. 5. Conduct basic data manipulation tasks (making tables) using existing software including Excel and Stata. 6. Learn how to find answers for questions through online support. This course will focus on Excel and Stata equally. Previous experience in Stata is preferred, but the course will include a brief introduction to relevant skills.
Class Notes:
The Fall 2024 offering of PA 5932 will mainly use Stata with some Excel applications.
Class Description:

In this course, you will learn how to find, manage, analyze, and present quantitative data to answer policy questions. Working with data is a powerful skill that helps you gain a deeper and more nuanced understanding of issues you are interested in. It also helps you make an argument backed by evidence to convince your audience. The class gives you the opportunity to apply the skills you learn to policy issues that concern you. Through the class, you will gain hands-on experience working in Stata (mainly) and Excel to become an independent user of the software.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23115/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 June 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5934 Section 001: HPAR - Humphrey Public Affairs Review Board Seminar (23103)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2024
Wed 11:15AM - 12:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
 
09/18/2024
Wed 11:15AM - 12:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
 
10/02/2024
Wed 11:15AM - 12:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
 
10/16/2024
Wed 11:15AM - 12:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
 
10/30/2024
Wed 11:15AM - 12:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
 
11/13/2024
Wed 11:15AM - 12:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
 
11/27/2024
Wed 11:15AM - 12:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
 
12/11/2024
Wed 11:15AM - 12:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides a seminar context for the work of members of the editorial board for the Humphrey Public Affairs Review (HPAR). It meets seven times over the course of Fall semester to provide logistical and technical guidance for the Board as it produces the online journal. Students engage in the various activities required to publish the journal. In the beginning of the semester, students conduct outreach to solicit submissions and discuss the selection criteria for submissions. They work closely with the conventions of APA style and citations, while developing their copyediting abilities. Central to journal production is engaging with the peer-review process, through providing feedback to authors and discussing critiques with editing teams. Finally, students submit their own pieces of writing to the journal for publication. As a result, students participate in peer-review as both an editor and an author.
Class Notes:
Blended/hybrid. Class meets alternating weeks.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23103/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5951 Section 001: Humphrey International Fellows Seminar (23081)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Humphrey Institute Fellow
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Thu 09:00AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This seminar introduces Humphrey International Fellows to the public policy landscape of Minnesota and the US, and provides opportunities for professional growth. Through a series of discussions, trainings, and site visits, fellows will be exposed to professional development, skills building, and networking opportunities. The seminar provides a forum for fellows to exchange views with one another and with guest speakers.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23081/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5963 Section 001: Tribal-State Relations Workshop (23151)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
0.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
09/14/2024
Sat 08:30AM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
10/05/2024
Sat 08:30AM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The State of Minnesota occupies and shares geography with many sovereign Indian nations. Tribal jurisdiction impacts thousands of acres of land in Minnesota both within and beyond reservation boundaries, and tribes are among the top 20 employers in the state. While tribes share prominent nation-to-nation diplomatic relationships with the U.S. federal government, tribal relationships with state agencies are increasingly significant. Since the administration of Governor Jesse Ventura, each Minnesota governor has implemented an executive order focused on state relations with Indian nations. In 2021, the body of policy associated with those executive orders was passed into law and codified in a state statute providing a considerable mandate for state agencies to develop and implement tribal consultation policies and to build associated partnerships. This class introduces participants to the legal and policy contexts in which contemporary tribal-state relations occur. We will explore the shifting history of federal Indian policy, the often-contentious past of tribal-state interactions, current emphases on building government-to-government relationships, and potential future trends. Participants will engage with elected tribal leaders and with the Tribal-State Relations Training program delivered to state employees through a partnership between the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, MnDOT, and the University of Minnesota Duluth Tribal Sovereignty Institute. Students will consider how their own civic and professional trajectories may connect to Indian nations, and collaboratively draw conceptual and practical links between tribal affairs and other areas of study.
Class Notes:
Class will be held REMOTELY (synchronously online).
Class Description:
The State of Minnesota occupies and shares geography with many sovereign Indian nations. Tribal jurisdiction impacts thousands of acres of land in Minnesota both within and beyond reservation boundaries, and tribes are among the top 20 employers in the state. While tribes share prominent nation-to-nation diplomatic relationships with the U.S. federal government, tribal relationships with state agencies are increasingly significant. Beginning with the administration of Governor Jesse Ventura, each Minnesota governor has implemented an executive order focused on state relations with Indian nations. In 2021 the body of policy developed across those executive orders was passed into law and codified in a state statute providing a considerable mandate for state agencies to develop and implement tribal consultation policies and to build associated partnerships. This class introduces participants to the legal and policy contexts in which contemporary tribal-state relations occur. We will explore the shifting history of federal Indian policy, the often-contentious past of tribal-state interactions, current emphases on building government-to-government relationships, and potential future trends. Participants will engage with elected tribal leaders and key players within the Tribal-State Relations Training program delivered to state employees through a partnership between the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, MnDOT, and the University of Minnesota Duluth Tribal Sovereignty Institute. Students will consider how their own civic and professional trajectories may connect to Indian nations, and collaboratively draw conceptual and practical links between tribal affairs and other areas of study.
Who Should Take This Class?:
All graduate and professional students.
Learning Objectives:
~ enhanced understanding of American Indian tribal sovereignty
~ awareness of unique relationships and complex current issues shared across tribal, state, and federal governments
~ applicable insight into effective approaches to collaborating and building partnerships with American Indian nations
~ familiarity with the State of Minnesota Tribal-State Relations Training Program delivered pursuant to Minnesota Statute 10.65
~ development of conceptual and practical links between tribal affairs and other areas of study and practice
Grading:
s/n
Exam Format:
not applicable
Class Format:
real-time remote delivery
Workload:
0.5 credit
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23151/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 April 2023

Fall 2024  |  PA 5971 Section 001: Survey of Election Administration (23084)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 3969 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Survey of building blocks of election administration, from voter registration to recounts.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23084/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5976 Section 001: Voter Participation (32308)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 3976 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Voter participation issues and challenges including historical survey of voter participation in US and methods to increase voter turnout.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32308/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5985 Section 001: Physical Election Security (23112)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
PA 3985 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
10/22/2024 - 12/11/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
U.S. Homeland Security designated election security as a "critical infrastructure" after threats from foreign governments, and collaborates with states in detecting and responding to foreign interference. This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of the current security context and best practices and processes for physically safeguarding elections based on 2016 and 2020. Students will learn the difference between physical and cyber threats to U.S. systems; tangible steps to protect election offices and their equipment; the use of audits to ensure the accuracy of elections; the integration of security into vendor relationships; and the connection between physical election security and citizen trust in elections. Content will be explored through readings (including government documents and studies), videos, discussions, and writing assignments.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23112/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 5990 Section 001: Topics: Public Affairs - General Topics -- Intro to Artificial Intelligence Ethics & Issues (32607)

Instructor(s)
Ren Dixon
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
18 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
09/03/2024 - 10/21/2024
Fri 01:00PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
General topics in public policy.
Class Notes:
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence Ethics and Issues: What is Artificial Intelligence? How will AI affect employment? How does AI collect and use our data? How can we deter AI from perpetuating social inequalities? If you're curious about these questions or want to take a more proactive role in shaping AI's future, in your career or beyond, this course is for you. No background in computer science is required. This class will provide you with the knowledge and critical agency necessary to navigate and thrive in a future with AI. You will develop fundamental AI literacy, explore its changing regulatory landscape, and gain insight into discourses on AI issues.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32607/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 8003 Section 001: Integrative Doctoral Seminar in Public Affairs I (23067)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Public Affairs PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Thu 09:45AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 274
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 7 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Lays foundation for doctoral-level study of public affairs through introduction of key concepts, literature, research questions of public affairs. Critically examines paradigms/methodologies through readings, discussions, writing assignments, research presentations. Facilitates development of dissertation research ideas. prereq: Public Affairs doctoral student
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23067/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 8005 Section 001: Doctoral Research Seminar in Public Affairs (23135)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Public Affairs PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Thu 09:00AM - 11:45AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 175
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 7 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Conduct of research, including ethics. Students develop and refine their research ideas. Facilitates development of dissertation research prospectus. prereq: Public Affairs doctoral student
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23135/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 8006 Section 001: Current Research in Public Affairs: Topics, Approaches, and Cultures (23085)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Public Affairs PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Students participate in research seminars exploring current topics, approaches, and cultures in public affairs. Students responsible for discussion, presentation, and evaluation of research, including peer review of papers and presentations. Discussion of research ethics and skills, including literature reviews, research design, data visualization, public engagement, presentation, and project management.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23085/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 8302 Section 001: Applied Policy Analysis (23122)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 04:25PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 50B
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Design/evaluation of public policies. Emphasizes market/non-market contexts. Microeconomics and welfare economics of policy analysis. Econometric tools for measurement of policy outcomes. Applications to policy problems. prereq: Intermediate microeconomics, introduction to econometrics
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23122/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 8444 Section 001: FTE: Doctoral (23069)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
No Grade Associated
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Enrollment Requirements:
Advanced Doctoral Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
UMTC, East Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 100 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
FTE: Doctoral prereq: Doctoral student, adviser and DGS consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23069/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 8461 Section 001: Global and U.S. Perspectives on Health and Mortality (32329)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 15
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The health of populations in developing and developed countries is very different. Within countries, great health disparities exist between more advantaged and more disadvantaged populations. When crafting policies that aim to improve population health, it is crucial to know how to measure health and how to think about the health needs of the specific population in question. This course will provide an overview to the factors driving health, mortality, and aging across different populations. In addition, students will learn the best sources of data and measures to use to describe the health status of a population. They will also be able to assess policy options that address the health of their population.
Class Description:
This course is aimed at both master and doctoral students. You do not need a background in health or demography to enroll. All are welcome.

COVID-19 Update: The current pandemic reminds us that demography matters. This is especially the case when trying to understand differences in case fatality rates between countries; or how differences in social mixing patterns between different age groups (ex Italy vs Germany) influences the epidemic. I will be modifying the syllabus to spend more time focused on emerging infectious diseases and also include some COVID-19 specific case studies throughout the syllabus (for instance when discussing factors to think about when trying to calculate diseases attributable mortality rates).

The health of populations in developing and developed countries is very different. When crafting policies that aim to improve population health, it is crucial to know how to measure health and how to think about the health needs of the specific population in question. This course will provide an overview to the factors driving health, mortality, and aging across different populations. In addition, students will learn the best sources of data and measures to use to describe the health status of a population. Furthermore, students will be able to assess policy options that address the health of their population. At the end of the course, students will know answers to questions such as: What are the major causes of death in developed vs. developing nations? Why is life expectancy at birth often used to describe the health of a population? Will we continue to live longer or is there a limit to increases in life expectancy? And what are the implications of longer and healthier lives for the viability of social security and other public policies? Will women always live longer than men? Is socio-economic status positively correlated with health, worldwide?
Who Should Take This Class?:
This course is designed for both PhD and Masters students. It counts towards the completion of the Population Studies Minor, Training Program in Population Studies or Population Health. This course is also considered a course in the Global Policy Area.
Grading:
  • Problem sets/ short responses (40%)
  • Leading class discussion (20%)
  • Final Paper Presentation (10%)
  • Final Paper (Op-Ed or Empirical Paper Proposal) (30%)
Exam Format:
No final exam but there will be a final paper and presentation.
Class Format:
This fall the class will be taught online.

Tuesday and Thursdays from 2:30 pm to 3:45pm.
No Thursday class the week of Thanksgiving.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32329/1249
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA8461_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA8461_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 April 2022

Fall 2024  |  PA 8777 Section 001: Thesis Credits: Master's (23045)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-18 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
50 Credits
Grading Basis:
No Grade Associated
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 200 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]
Class Description:
(No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]. Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23045/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 October 2015

Fall 2024  |  PA 8888 Section 001: Thesis Credit: Doctoral (23070)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-24 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
100 Credits
Grading Basis:
No Grade Associated
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Enrollment Requirements:
PA PhD and ETCR or Doct
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
UMTC, East Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 100 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Doctoral thesis credit. prereq: [Max 18 cr per semester or summer], 24 cr required
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23070/1249

Fall 2024  |  PA 8921 Section 001: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (23057)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Independent/Directed Study
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option).prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
Please contact your program coordinator in the Humphrey School's Career and Student Success office regarding scheduling a section of 8921 for a specific faculty member.
Class Description:
Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23057/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Fall 2024  |  PA 8991 Section 001: Independent Study (23035)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Notes:
Please contact your program coordinator in the Humphrey School's Career and Student Success office regarding scheduling a section of 8991 for a specific faculty member.
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23035/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Summer 2024  |  PA 3973 Section 001: Strategic Management of Election Administration (87151)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 3976 Section 001
PA 5976 Section 001
PA 5973 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (2 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Strategic management for election administrators in the political environment. Election official tools and challenges. The role of the lawmaking process in budgeting and organizational planning.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/87151/1245

Summer 2024  |  PA 3983 Section 001: Introduction to Election Security (82990)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5983 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (4 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will examine the history of cyberattacks on the United States and the American election system, with special attention to the 2016 election cycle. Students will explore the types of cybersecurity threats that exist and strategies to protect against them; understand the roles different levels of government can play in the process, and hear from key officials about the issues raised by the official response to election security threats at the federal, state and local levels as well as in related private sector communities.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA3983+Summer2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82990/1245

Summer 2024  |  PA 5690 Section 001: Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy -- Global Gender-Based Violence: Law, Film&Advocacy (87217)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
9 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
06/03/2024 - 06/28/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (4 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Professor Shannon Walsh is a faculty member on the Duluth campus. Class will be online-only. Two optional/synchronous components will be offered each week after polling students about a convenient time. This course examines the dynamics of gender-based violence and violence against women at a global level through the lenses of the law, film, and advocacy. We research international and domestic legal frameworks to understand advances and limitations in laws and implementation. Through films and other expressions of popular culture, we analyze how gender-based violence is represented, and learn how various forms of media can be utilized as an effective advocacy tool. Finally, we actively engage in advocacy efforts and learn effective strategies to influence policy change and implementation. The course is offered by Dr. Shannon Drysdale Walsh, associate professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth, and affiliate faculty at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs. Her research focuses on state response to violence against women in Central America. She is happy to answer questions at sdwalsh@d.umn.edu. The course has a flexible online-only format, with two optional zoom meetings/week.
Class Description:

This course examines the dynamics of gender-based violence and violence against women at a global level through the lenses of the law, film, and advocacy. We research international and domestic legal frameworks to understand advances and limitations in laws and implementation. Through films and other expressions of popular culture, we analyze how gender-based violence is represented, and learn how various forms of media can be utilized as an effective advocacy tool. Finally, we actively engage in advocacy efforts and learn effective strategies to influence policy change and implementation.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate Students & Undergraduates (Sophomore or higher)
Grading:
A-F
Class Format:
Online-only with a flexible format that includes two optional zoom meetings/week.
Workload:
3 credits
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/87217/1245
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 February 2024

Summer 2024  |  PA 5911 Section 001: Humphrey School Summer Internship (87309)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 10 wk
 
06/03/2024 - 08/09/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to guide students through their summer internship experiences with meaningful exercises in goal setting, networking, professional and identity development, and practical skill building. It is a requirement for students receiving funding through the Humphrey School's Office of Career and Student Success's Unpaid Internship Grants.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/87309/1245

Summer 2024  |  PA 5973 Section 001: Strategic Management of Election Administration (87152)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 3976 Section 001
PA 5976 Section 001
PA 3973 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (1 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Strategic management for election administrators in the political environment. Election official tools and challenges. The role of the lawmaking process in budgeting and organizational planning.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/87152/1245

Summer 2024  |  PA 5983 Section 001: Introduction to Election Security (82991)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
PA 3983 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (3 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will examine the history of cyberattacks on the United States and the American election system, with special attention to the 2016 election cycle. Students will explore the types of cybersecurity threats that exist and strategies to protect against them; understand the roles different levels of government can play in the process, and hear from key officials about the issues raised by the official response to election security threats at the federal, state and local levels as well as in related private sector communities.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5983+Summer2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82991/1245

Summer 2024  |  PA 8081 Section 001: Capstone Workshop -- Leading Organizational & Community Change (86806)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 14 wk
 
05/14/2024
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
05/28/2024
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
06/11/2024
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
06/25/2024
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
07/09/2024
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
07/23/2024
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
08/06/2024
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
08/16/2024
Fri
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (9 of 18 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be delivered online via Zoom. Class will meet on alternate weeks.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/86806/1245

Summer 2024  |  PA 8444 Section 001: FTE: Doctoral (82993)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
No Grade Associated
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Enrollment Requirements:
Advanced Doctoral Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
UMTC, East Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 200 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
FTE: Doctoral prereq: Doctoral student, adviser and DGS consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82993/1245

Summer 2024  |  PA 8888 Section 001: Thesis Credit: Doctoral (82994)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-24 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
100 Credits
Grading Basis:
No Grade Associated
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Enrollment Requirements:
PA PhD and ETCR or Doct
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
UMTC, East Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (1 of 200 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Doctoral thesis credit. prereq: [Max 18 cr per semester or summer], 24 cr required
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82994/1245

Summer 2024  |  PA 8921 Section 001: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (82983)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Independent/Directed Study
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option).prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
If you wish to register for a section of PA 8921, please contact your program coordinator in the Humphrey School Student Services office.
Class Description:
Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82983/1245
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Summer 2024  |  PA 8921 Section 002: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (82984)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Independent/Directed Study
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (1 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option).prereq: instr consent
Class Description:
Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82984/1245
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Summer 2024  |  PA 8991 Section 001: Independent Study (82975)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Notes:
Contact Stacey Grimes (grime004@umn.edu) to have an 8991 section set up with the faculty member with whom you wish to work after consulting your professional adviser.
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82975/1245
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Summer 2024  |  PA 8991 Section 002: Independent Study (82976)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82976/1245
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Summer 2024  |  PA 8991 Section 003: Independent Study (82977)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 15 wk
 
05/13/2024 - 08/23/2024
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82977/1245
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Summer 2024  |  PA 8991 Section 004: Independent Study (82978)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
07/01/2024 - 07/26/2024
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82978/1245
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Summer 2024  |  PA 8991 Section 005: Independent Study (82979)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
May Session
 
05/13/2024 - 05/31/2024
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82979/1245
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Summer 2024  |  PA 8991 Section 007: Independent Study (83000)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Independent/Directed Study
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83000/1245
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Spring 2024  |  PA 1401 Section 001: Public Affairs: Community Organizing Skills for Public Action (57261)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2024 - 04/29/2024
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Enrollment Status:
Open (19 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Public affairs work, roles of citizens in democratic way of life. Community organizing skills, their importance for public affairs. Negotiations among diverse audiences, understanding different interests, mapping power relationships. Relevant public affairs and governance theory.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?donov013+PA1401+Spring2024
Class Description:

*meets University of Minnesota Liberal Education requirement for Citizenship/Public Ethics Theme"


This course is a hands-on introduction for undergraduate students wanting to develop the skills, confidence, and knowledge to become empowered agents of change.This course involves an examination of key concepts of citizenship, politics, ethics, and democracy, as well as hands-on experiential learning in problem solving skills and team work especially from the framework called Civic Studies, developed to address the challenge of collective action in a world of often radically different ethical frameworks.


The goal of this class is to:

1. Give students a hands on introduction to organizing skills such as public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings.

2. Enable students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives

3. To provide stages for students' public speaking

4. Open the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers

5, To acquaint students with the methods and outlook of community organizing tradition in America as a strand of the emerging "Civic Studies" field

6. To provide students with an introduction to the approach to ethics in Civic Studies, compared to other approaches. Such topics include: mass incarceration, racism, immigration, climate change, education, gender issues, etc.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students should take this class if they like classes that are co-created by students and instructor and are engaging. All disciplines and years are welcome. During this time in our history, people want to acquire knowledge and skills of how to solve public problems.. This course provides knowledge, skills and practice for creating change.
Learning Objectives:
This course will help students acquire skills for effective citizenship and life-long learning through the course goals of:
• Acquainting students with Civic Studies and the community organizing tradition in America and the distinctive ways in which this framework addresses questions of ethical pluralism
• Giving students a hands on introduction to organizing skills for civic agency, such as writing, public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings
• Enabling students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives
• Providing stages for students' public speaking
• Opening the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers
Grading:
40% Two Essays
20% Weekly Reflections on Readings
20% In-Class Participation
20% Public Work Project
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
Discussion based with some lecture. All are teachers and learners. You will learn how to become a change agent through active learning.
Workload:
50 Pages of Reading Per Week (average)
30-45 Pages of Individual Writing, Including Weekly Reading Reflections
3 Short Papers
1 Public Work Project Report
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57261/1243
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2020.docx (Fall 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 July 2020

Spring 2024  |  PA 3001 Section 001: Changing the World: Contemporary Public Policy (57274)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2024 - 04/29/2024
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 30
Enrollment Status:
Open (17 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Foundation for understanding the what, who, where, and how of public policy making. These components are explored from different perspectives while delving into questions such as: What is public policy good for? Who decides policy priorities? What effect does public policy actually have in solving public problems? How can we improve public policy making? After successfully completing this course, students will understand the process, structure, and context of policymaking; identify who, how, and what influences the policy process; and apply knowledge of public policy and the policymaking process to a specific policy issue. A strong understanding of the American political system is encouraged.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bfh+PA3001+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57274/1243

Spring 2024  |  PA 3972 Section 001: Elections and the Law (57226)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5972 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2024 - 04/29/2024
12:00AM - 12:00AM
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (12 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theories and basic structure of the American legal system. Experience with basic tools and skills for using the law to understand and analyze issues facing election administrators across the nation. Use of election-related and non-election related materials to prepare election administrators for interacting with counsel, legislators and the courts in carrying out their responsibilities.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?choat024+PA3972+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57226/1243

Spring 2024  |  PA 3976 Section 001: Voter Participation (65271)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5976 Section 001
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/16/2024 - 03/11/2024
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (10 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Voter participation issues and challenges including historical survey of voter participation in US and methods to increase voter turnout.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?robe2358+PA3976+Spring2024
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65271/1243

Spring 2024 &