3145 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2023  |  PA 1401 Section 001: Public Affairs: Community Organizing Skills for Public Action (57578)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Freshman Full Year Registration
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Public affairs work, roles of citizens in democratic way of life. Community organizing skills, their importance for public affairs. Negotiations among diverse audiences, understanding different interests, mapping power relationships. Relevant public affairs and governance theory.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?donov013+PA1401+Spring2023
Class Description:

*meets University of Minnesota Liberal Education requirement for Citizenship/Public Ethics Theme"


This course is a hands-on introduction for undergraduate students wanting to develop the skills, confidence, and knowledge to become empowered agents of change.This course involves an examination of key concepts of citizenship, politics, ethics, and democracy, as well as hands-on experiential learning in problem solving skills and team work especially from the framework called Civic Studies, developed to address the challenge of collective action in a world of often radically different ethical frameworks.


The goal of this class is to:

1. Give students a hands on introduction to organizing skills such as public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings.

2. Enable students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives

3. To provide stages for students' public speaking

4. Open the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers

5, To acquaint students with the methods and outlook of community organizing tradition in America as a strand of the emerging "Civic Studies" field

6. To provide students with an introduction to the approach to ethics in Civic Studies, compared to other approaches. Such topics include: mass incarceration, racism, immigration, climate change, education, gender issues, etc.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students should take this class if they like classes that are co-created by students and instructor and are engaging. All disciplines and years are welcome. During this time in our history, people want to acquire knowledge and skills of how to solve public problems.. This course provides knowledge, skills and practice for creating change.
Learning Objectives:
This course will help students acquire skills for effective citizenship and life-long learning through the course goals of:
• Acquainting students with Civic Studies and the community organizing tradition in America and the distinctive ways in which this framework addresses questions of ethical pluralism
• Giving students a hands on introduction to organizing skills for civic agency, such as writing, public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings
• Enabling students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives
• Providing stages for students' public speaking
• Opening the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers
Grading:
40% Two Essays
20% Weekly Reflections on Readings
20% In-Class Participation
20% Public Work Project
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
Discussion based with some lecture. All are teachers and learners. You will learn how to become a change agent through active learning.
Workload:
50 Pages of Reading Per Week (average)
30-45 Pages of Individual Writing, Including Weekly Reading Reflections
3 Short Papers
1 Public Work Project Report
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57578/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2020.docx (Fall 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 July 2020

Spring 2023  |  PA 3003 Section 001: Nonprofit and Public Financial Management (57601)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Enrollment Requirements:
junior or senior
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Concepts/tools for project/budget planning. Program analysis. Interpreting financial reports. Identifying/resolving organizational performance issues. Case studies, real-world exercises. prereq: Jr or sr
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. It will meet synchronously online during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?fonse024+PA3003+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57601/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 3972 Section 001: Elections and the Law (57603)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5972 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
12:00AM - 12:00AM
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theories and basic structure of the American legal system. Experience with basic tools and skills for using the law to understand and analyze issues facing election administrators across the nation. Use of election-related and non-election related materials to prepare election administrators for interacting with counsel, legislators and the courts in carrying out their responsibilities.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?choat024+PA3972+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57603/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 3975 Section 001: Election Design (57631)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5975 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Election administration design principles, including ballot and polling place design and poll worker training materials. Application of principles of field.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wquesenb+PA3975+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57631/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/wquesenb_dchisnel_PA3975_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)

Spring 2023  |  PA 3976 Section 001: Voter Participation (57613)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Election Administration cert
Meets With:
PA 5976 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Voter participation issues and challenges including historical survey of voter participation in US and methods to increase voter turnout.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?aochoa+PA3976+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57613/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 3984 Section 001: Elections Security: How to Protect America's Elections (57621)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5984 Section 001
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
"Elections Security" uses the Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election as a case study to identify the vulnerabilities of US elections (especially state voter registration databases) as well as catalogue new protections. Readings and discussion will focus on best practices and technology options available to the public (social media) and elections professionals (cybersecurity) in guarding against future influence efforts and assuring public confidence in election outcomes. Special focus will be given to describing how local election officials can protect their election technology, most notably those vulnerabilities associated with their voting system and voter registration database. "Elections Security" will draw heavily on concrete cases and challenges facing election professionals, using government and independent reports and an indepth analysis of new resources created by the US Department of Homeland Security and its collaborations with election professionals.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57621/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 3991 Section 001: Independent Study (57668)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
12 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
UMTC, East Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. prereq: instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57668/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 4101 Section 001: Nonprofit Management and Governance (57554)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Managing/governing nonprofit/public organizations. Theories, concepts, real-world examples. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of different funding environments, management of multiple constituencies.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?banam001+PA4101+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57554/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5002 Section 001: Introduction to Policy Analysis (57552)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 43 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?linds301+PA5002+Spring2022
Class Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the discipline of policy analysis and help you understand where policy analysis fits within the policy process. Members of the Humphrey School faculty have designed a set of exercises to help you acquire specific competencies: developing a problem context, problem structuring, developing alternative policy options, evaluation, forecasting, policy simulation, monitoring, and recommendation. We place special emphasis on the challenges of problem definition or structuring and communication because these are among the most challenging skills to learn.
Grading:
A1. Individual Problem Definition Memo(10%)

A2. Team Problem Definition Memo(10%)

A3. Team Evidence Memo (10%)

A4. Team Alternatives Memo (15%)

A5. Team Policy Poster (15%)

A6. Team Policy Brief (20% including self-and peer assessment)

A7. Individual Elevator Speech Video and Memo (20%)

Class Format:
This course will include a few lectures, discussion, individual and group practice, collaborative learning, and teamwork. PA 5002 historically has been taught as a lecture-discussion class. This year, we are moving more to a problem-based learning approach that involves "flipping" some elements of the class. For Example, you will observe several videos and mini-lectures that introduce topics, and we will explore their complexity in work-groups in class. Because research indicates students learn best when actively engaged in trying to solve problems, we will emphasize in-class exercises and professional practice, sometimes individually, but most often with classmates on assignments and your group project. We meet only seven times, so each week will be filled with activity.
Workload:
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57552/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA5002_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA5002_Spring2016.docx (Spring 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA5002_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 October 2015

Spring 2023  |  PA 5003 Section 002: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (57589)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kiedr003+PA5003+Spring2022
Class Description:

The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good." In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of financial analysis and management.


This is an introductory course to financial analysis and management in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.


Who Should Take This Class?:
This course is required for MPP, MDP, and Nonprofit Certificate students. It is recommended for MPA students.
Learning Objectives:

By the end of the semester, students should be able:

  • To obtain basic knowledge and terminology of budgeting and financial management;

  • To summarize budgetary process, revenues, and expenditures of a public or nonprofit organization;

  • To apply basic tools of financial analysis, such as break-even analysis and marginal cost analysis, in making simple financial decisions;

  • To know how financial information is organized and reported in the accounting system;

  • To interpret data in financial statements and relate them with each other; and

  • To determine and calculate financial ratios to assess financial condition

Grading:
Each class there will be an assignment that you are to prepare and submiy via email (You may work with others in completing the assignments.). These will not be graded. You should actively participate in class discussions and class problem-solving. Class discussion, timely assignment completion, and on-line attendance count toward your participation grade. Participation represents 12 points of your grade.

There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course taken at the Humphrey School. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.

The final assignment is a group project in which you will review the financials of a real government or nonprofit organization and present your findings to the class in person. You will be assigned to groups in the second week of class. The group should submit a 5+ page paper of your findings at the last class. The group will also present a power point presentation (no more than 10
minutes) of the findings at the last class. The group should provide me a copy of the power points and any other information that would be helpful. This group paper (20 points) and presentation (8 points) are worth 28 points.

First Test 30 points Second Test 30 points Group Project 28 points Class Participation 12 points Total 100 points
Exam Format:
There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.
Class Format:
This is a "flipped" course. Students will watch normal lectures on videos at home. There are 8 class periods. Class time is used to review material, solve assignments, review additional videos and/or material, and take exams.
Workload:
6 Homework Assignment(s).
2 Exams In person.
1 Group Presentation in person. Students indicate that the workload is similar to other Humphrey courses. Generally, 3-5 hours per class is required.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57589/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2020.docx (Spring 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2018.docx (Summer 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2018.docx (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2017.docx (Summer 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2017.docx (Spring 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2015.docx (Summer 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5011 Section 001: Management of Organizations (57608)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Challenges facing higher-level managers in public and nonprofit organizations in mixed economy and democratic republic. Distinctive features of public and nonprofit management, skills necessary for effective management, manager's role as creator of public value. Lectures, case discussions.
Class Notes:
Class will be IN PERSON on Mondays and REMOTE (synchronously online during the scheduled time) on Wednesdays. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hurk0002+PA5011+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57608/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5012 Section 001: The Politics of Public Affairs (57600)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Stages of policy making from agenda setting to implementation. Role and behavior of political institutions, citizens, social movements, and interest groups. Concepts of political philosophy. Theories of state. Team taught, interdisciplinary course. Small discussion sections.
Class Notes:
If the class is full; MPP/MS-STEP students should add themselves to the system's waitlist. Other students should contact Stacey Grimes at grime004@umn.edu to be placed on a manual waitlist. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jbsoss+PA5012+Spring2022
Class Description:
Our challenge in this course is to get serious about questioning and sharpening the political perspectives we bring to bear on our work. All too often, our beliefs about politics are based on little more than civics-book platitudes, cynical clichés, and the commonsense views that prevail in our particular social circle. The purpose of this course is to unsettle such beliefs and invite students to think more critically and systematically about how to approach the political dimensions of their work. If you expect most of your future work to be technical - and therefore, "not political" - I'm especially hopeful that you will find opportunities in this course to question that assumption, as well as the politics that underlie it.
Learning Objectives:
This semester, we will work to develop a variety of political perspectives on public policy and public affairs. Toward these ends, we will organize our work around four concepts that guide any well-specified understanding of politics: power, institutions and organizations, discourse, and citizenship. We will ask how these elements of politics may be understood, how they operate in practice, why they matter, how they limit and enable political action, and how they can be engaged and navigated effectively.
Grading:
20% Class participation
80% Major Writing Assignments
- Power (20%)
- Institutions (20%)
- Political Discourse (20%)
- Democratic Citizenship (20%)
Your grade will depend, first and foremost, on the ways you engage, explain, critique, and apply ideas from our readings and class discussions.
Class Format:
Discussion and Lecture
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57600/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jbsoss_PA5012_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jbsoss_PA5012_Spring2016.doc (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2023  |  PA 5032 Section 001: Applied Regression (57534)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis, assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5032+Spring2023
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57534/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5032 Section 002: Applied Regression (57535)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Fri 02:15PM - 03:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis, assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5032+Spring2023
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57535/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5032 Section 003: Applied Regression (57549)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Fri 12:45PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis, assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5032+Spring2023
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57549/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5033 Section 004: Multivariate Techniques (57544)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?klein002+PA5033+Spring2021
Class Description:
This class examines how statistical approaches can be used to examine public policies. This course is designed to help the student read, understand, interpret, use and evaluate empirical work used in the social sciences and by policy analysts. The course concentrates attention on several quantitative techniques used by public policy researchers and advisors to policy makers. The course covers techniques such as time series analysis, statistical cause and effect, forecasting models, limited dependent variables, combining time series and cross section data, and an introduction to big data and machine learning. A basic statistics class is a required prerequisite. Here is a link to a video: http://player.vimeo.com/external/89316179.sd.mp4?s=5148a78bbdba654e8040327fa8ae93f1
Who Should Take This Class?:

To learn quantitative techniques such as time series analysis, statistical cause and effect, forecasting models, limited dependent variables, combining time series and cross section data, and an introduction to big data and machine learning.

https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57544/1233

Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/klein002_PA5033_Spring2021.doc (Spring 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/klein002_PA5033_Spring2019.doc (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 December 2020

Spring 2023  |  PA 5033 Section 006: Multivariate Techniques (57548)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
Fri 12:45PM - 01:35PM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 004
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?klein002+PA5033+Spring2021
Class Description:
This class examines how statistical approaches can be used to examine public policies. This course is designed to help the student read, understand, interpret, use and evaluate empirical work used in the social sciences and by policy analysts. The course concentrates attention on several quantitative techniques used by public policy researchers and advisors to policy makers. The course covers techniques such as time series analysis, statistical cause and effect, forecasting models, limited dependent variables, combining time series and cross section data, and an introduction to big data and machine learning. A basic statistics class is a required prerequisite. Here is a link to a video: http://player.vimeo.com/external/89316179.sd.mp4?s=5148a78bbdba654e8040327fa8ae93f1
Who Should Take This Class?:

To learn quantitative techniques such as time series analysis, statistical cause and effect, forecasting models, limited dependent variables, combining time series and cross section data, and an introduction to big data and machine learning.

https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57548/1233

Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/klein002_PA5033_Spring2021.doc (Spring 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/klein002_PA5033_Spring2019.doc (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 December 2020

Spring 2023  |  PA 5041 Section 001: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (57583)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 28 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
Class Notes:
The lecture time is meant for students to work in their teams. Discussion sections will be in person on Wednesdays. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gfs+PA5041+Spring2022
Class Description:

The class involves two weekly class sessions that consist of lectures, discussion, presentations, and practical training. The course also includes a weekly 75-minute lab to workshop the different components involved in research design, learn data analysis, and code by hand or using the qualitative data analysis software package, NVivo.


Who Should Take This Class?:
Anyone interested in having a complete methodological toolbox.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the course, students should be able to:

Navigate the ethical and practical challenges of research with human subjects.


Determine when to use qualitative methodology.


Develop strong qualitative research design skills.



Design questions and protocols appropriate to each method.


Gather qualitative data via primary source documents and human subjects research.


Deploy a variety of interviewing techniques.


Use basic techniques to analyze data using Atlas qualitative data analysis software.

Grading:
Class Participation 5%
Reading quizzes 15%
Lecture quizzes 15%
Group reading response to ethics readings 5%
Research Assignments 30%
Research Proposal 15%
Final Project 20%
Exam Format:
There is no final exam. There is a final research project which is the results of running a research study with all its components
Workload:
This is a 4 credit class, expect and plan to spend more time in class, doing readings, and preparing research materials. The class is designed to give students the basic tools to run a research study from beginning to end.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57583/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2021.docx (Spring 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 November 2020

Spring 2023  |  PA 5041 Section 002: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (57584)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 28 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
Class Notes:
The lecture time is meant for students to work in their teams. Discussion sections will be in person on Wednesdays. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gfs+PA5041+Spring2022
Class Description:

The class involves two weekly class sessions that consist of lectures, discussion, presentations, and practical training. The course also includes a weekly 75-minute lab to workshop the different components involved in research design, learn data analysis, and code by hand or using the qualitative data analysis software package, NVivo.


Who Should Take This Class?:
Anyone interested in having a complete methodological toolbox.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the course, students should be able to:

Navigate the ethical and practical challenges of research with human subjects.


Determine when to use qualitative methodology.


Develop strong qualitative research design skills.



Design questions and protocols appropriate to each method.


Gather qualitative data via primary source documents and human subjects research.


Deploy a variety of interviewing techniques.


Use basic techniques to analyze data using Atlas qualitative data analysis software.

Grading:
Class Participation 5%
Reading quizzes 15%
Lecture quizzes 15%
Group reading response to ethics readings 5%
Research Assignments 30%
Research Proposal 15%
Final Project 20%
Exam Format:
There is no final exam. There is a final research project which is the results of running a research study with all its components
Workload:
This is a 4 credit class, expect and plan to spend more time in class, doing readings, and preparing research materials. The class is designed to give students the basic tools to run a research study from beginning to end.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57584/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2021.docx (Spring 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 November 2020

Spring 2023  |  PA 5042 Section 001: Urban and Regional Economics (57570)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Major/minor, Urb-Reg Planning
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Evaluation of city existence/growth using economics. Economic forces in development of cities. Economic analysis of urban areas/land market. Economic analysis of planning issues in land use, transportation, housing, environment. prereq: [Major or minor in urban and regional planning, microeconomics course] or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5042+Spring2023
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Learning Objectives:
This course uses the principles of microeconomics to analyze urban/regional economic issues and problems. By the end of the course, students should be able to:
 Provide an economics-based explanation for why cities exist and what causes them to grow and shrink;
 Evaluate the importance of major economic forces in the development of cities;
 Conduct economic analysis of an urban area and its land markets;
 Use economic tools to analyze planning issues in different areas (land use, transportation, housing and environment) and to illustrate and address their impacts on the economy, social equity and environmental quality.
Grading:
Grades will be based on the following:
Homework assignments 48% (6 x 8%)
Pop-up Quizzes 12%
Final exam 30%
Participation 10%
Class Format:
The lectures will cover only the key concepts presented in the readings. Completing the readings before lectures is essential to maximize your learning. Attendance at lab sessions is mandatory. Your attendance and participation in lab activities will affect your participation score. Feel free to discuss homework problems with your peers. However, you are expected to finish your assignments individually. All homework needs to be typed (graphs are okay with handwriting). Any handwriting homework will not be graded.
Workload:
This class is demanding. It covers a lot of material at a pace that students describe as "relentless" or (more positively) "high energy." It requires considerable outside-of-class time. UM policy states that for each credit hour of a class, undergraduates are expected to work three hours - counting class time and study time - to achieve an average grade. If we apply that policy to this graduate-level class, that means a work load of 12 hours per week for this class, implying at least 8 hours per week outside of class. Count on it.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57570/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cao_PA5042_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2023  |  PA 5042 Section 002: Urban and Regional Economics (57636)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Fri 10:10AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Evaluation of city existence/growth using economics. Economic forces in development of cities. Economic analysis of urban areas/land market. Economic analysis of planning issues in land use, transportation, housing, environment. prereq: [Major or minor in urban and regional planning, microeconomics course] or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5042+Spring2023
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Learning Objectives:
This course uses the principles of microeconomics to analyze urban/regional economic issues and problems. By the end of the course, students should be able to:
 Provide an economics-based explanation for why cities exist and what causes them to grow and shrink;
 Evaluate the importance of major economic forces in the development of cities;
 Conduct economic analysis of an urban area and its land markets;
 Use economic tools to analyze planning issues in different areas (land use, transportation, housing and environment) and to illustrate and address their impacts on the economy, social equity and environmental quality.
Grading:
Grades will be based on the following:
Homework assignments 48% (6 x 8%)
Pop-up Quizzes 12%
Final exam 30%
Participation 10%
Class Format:
The lectures will cover only the key concepts presented in the readings. Completing the readings before lectures is essential to maximize your learning. Attendance at lab sessions is mandatory. Your attendance and participation in lab activities will affect your participation score. Feel free to discuss homework problems with your peers. However, you are expected to finish your assignments individually. All homework needs to be typed (graphs are okay with handwriting). Any handwriting homework will not be graded.
Workload:
This class is demanding. It covers a lot of material at a pace that students describe as "relentless" or (more positively) "high energy." It requires considerable outside-of-class time. UM policy states that for each credit hour of a class, undergraduates are expected to work three hours - counting class time and study time - to achieve an average grade. If we apply that policy to this graduate-level class, that means a work load of 12 hours per week for this class, implying at least 8 hours per week outside of class. Count on it.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57636/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cao_PA5042_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2023  |  PA 5042 Section 003: Urban and Regional Economics (57576)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Fri 11:15AM - 12:05PM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Evaluation of city existence/growth using economics. Economic forces in development of cities. Economic analysis of urban areas/land market. Economic analysis of planning issues in land use, transportation, housing, environment. prereq: [Major or minor in urban and regional planning, microeconomics course] or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5042+Spring2023
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Learning Objectives:
This course uses the principles of microeconomics to analyze urban/regional economic issues and problems. By the end of the course, students should be able to:
 Provide an economics-based explanation for why cities exist and what causes them to grow and shrink;
 Evaluate the importance of major economic forces in the development of cities;
 Conduct economic analysis of an urban area and its land markets;
 Use economic tools to analyze planning issues in different areas (land use, transportation, housing and environment) and to illustrate and address their impacts on the economy, social equity and environmental quality.
Grading:
Grades will be based on the following:
Homework assignments 48% (6 x 8%)
Pop-up Quizzes 12%
Final exam 30%
Participation 10%
Class Format:
The lectures will cover only the key concepts presented in the readings. Completing the readings before lectures is essential to maximize your learning. Attendance at lab sessions is mandatory. Your attendance and participation in lab activities will affect your participation score. Feel free to discuss homework problems with your peers. However, you are expected to finish your assignments individually. All homework needs to be typed (graphs are okay with handwriting). Any handwriting homework will not be graded.
Workload:
This class is demanding. It covers a lot of material at a pace that students describe as "relentless" or (more positively) "high energy." It requires considerable outside-of-class time. UM policy states that for each credit hour of a class, undergraduates are expected to work three hours - counting class time and study time - to achieve an average grade. If we apply that policy to this graduate-level class, that means a work load of 12 hours per week for this class, implying at least 8 hours per week outside of class. Count on it.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57576/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cao_PA5042_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2023  |  PA 5043 Section 001: Economic and Demographic Data Analysis (57571)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Major/minor, Urb-Reg Planning
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 44 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Economic/demographic data analysis techniques for planning. Exposure to most important data sources. Conceptual understanding of range of methods/hands-on experience in applying these methods. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?assaad+PA5043+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course aims at developing quantitative data analysis skills in the areas of economic and demographic analysis of small geographic areas. The methods covered are used to analyze the structure of regional and local economies, such as location quotient analysis and the economic base model, and to analyze the structure of the population and project population change over time. Familiarity with Excel is assumed.
Learning Objectives:
Become familiar with, and able to search, the most important online public sources of quantitative economic and demographic data that provide information at the regional and local levels
Able to effectively download data from these sources and put them in a suitable format for analysis
Become comfortable with models and mathematical representations of reality, and be able to competently move back and forth from verbal to mathematical formulations of economic and demographic concepts.
Able to effectively manipulate data and conduct quantitative analyses using a spreadsheet program such as Excel.
Able to accurately interpret quantitative results
Understand the economic and demographic factors that underlie the growth of urban and regional economies
Able to evaluate the assumptions that underlie quantitative models and analyses and assess their limitations
Able to prepare clear, accurate and compelling reports using text, tables and graphics
Become intelligent consumers and critical readers of work that uses quantitative methods.
Be aware of the ethical dimensions of quantitative data analysis and interpretation and the various ways in which data can be manipulated to come up with the "right answer."

Grading:
Quizzes 20%, Team Projects 40% , Take-Home Final 40%
Exam Format:
Two in-class open-book, open-notes quizzes, Open-book, open-note take home final exam
Class Format:
67% lecture, 33% computer lab
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57571/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2018

Spring 2023  |  PA 5043 Section 002: Economic and Demographic Data Analysis (57572)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
Fri 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 22 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Economic/demographic data analysis techniques for planning. Exposure to most important data sources. Conceptual understanding of range of methods/hands-on experience in applying these methods. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?assaad+PA5043+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course aims at developing quantitative data analysis skills in the areas of economic and demographic analysis of small geographic areas. The methods covered are used to analyze the structure of regional and local economies, such as location quotient analysis and the economic base model, and to analyze the structure of the population and project population change over time. Familiarity with Excel is assumed.
Learning Objectives:
Become familiar with, and able to search, the most important online public sources of quantitative economic and demographic data that provide information at the regional and local levels
Able to effectively download data from these sources and put them in a suitable format for analysis
Become comfortable with models and mathematical representations of reality, and be able to competently move back and forth from verbal to mathematical formulations of economic and demographic concepts.
Able to effectively manipulate data and conduct quantitative analyses using a spreadsheet program such as Excel.
Able to accurately interpret quantitative results
Understand the economic and demographic factors that underlie the growth of urban and regional economies
Able to evaluate the assumptions that underlie quantitative models and analyses and assess their limitations
Able to prepare clear, accurate and compelling reports using text, tables and graphics
Become intelligent consumers and critical readers of work that uses quantitative methods.
Be aware of the ethical dimensions of quantitative data analysis and interpretation and the various ways in which data can be manipulated to come up with the "right answer."

Grading:
Quizzes 20%, Team Projects 40% , Take-Home Final 40%
Exam Format:
Two in-class open-book, open-notes quizzes, Open-book, open-note take home final exam
Class Format:
67% lecture, 33% computer lab
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57572/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2018

Spring 2023  |  PA 5043 Section 003: Economic and Demographic Data Analysis (57573)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
Fri 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 22 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Economic/demographic data analysis techniques for planning. Exposure to most important data sources. Conceptual understanding of range of methods/hands-on experience in applying these methods. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?assaad+PA5043+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course aims at developing quantitative data analysis skills in the areas of economic and demographic analysis of small geographic areas. The methods covered are used to analyze the structure of regional and local economies, such as location quotient analysis and the economic base model, and to analyze the structure of the population and project population change over time. Familiarity with Excel is assumed.
Learning Objectives:
Become familiar with, and able to search, the most important online public sources of quantitative economic and demographic data that provide information at the regional and local levels
Able to effectively download data from these sources and put them in a suitable format for analysis
Become comfortable with models and mathematical representations of reality, and be able to competently move back and forth from verbal to mathematical formulations of economic and demographic concepts.
Able to effectively manipulate data and conduct quantitative analyses using a spreadsheet program such as Excel.
Able to accurately interpret quantitative results
Understand the economic and demographic factors that underlie the growth of urban and regional economies
Able to evaluate the assumptions that underlie quantitative models and analyses and assess their limitations
Able to prepare clear, accurate and compelling reports using text, tables and graphics
Become intelligent consumers and critical readers of work that uses quantitative methods.
Be aware of the ethical dimensions of quantitative data analysis and interpretation and the various ways in which data can be manipulated to come up with the "right answer."

Grading:
Quizzes 20%, Team Projects 40% , Take-Home Final 40%
Exam Format:
Two in-class open-book, open-notes quizzes, Open-book, open-note take home final exam
Class Format:
67% lecture, 33% computer lab
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57573/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2018

Spring 2023  |  PA 5044 Section 001: Applied Regression, Accelerated (57579)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Bivariate/multivariate models used in regression analysis, including assumptions behind them/problems that arise when assumptions are not met. Course covers similar topics as PA 5032 but delves deeper into theory/application of methods. prereq: 5031 or equiv, or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jannaj+PA5044+Spring2022
Class Description:
Newly revised and updated for Spring 2022!

This course covers the theory and application of basic regression models, and is targeted to students who intend to continue their quantitative training with further coursework and/or who will likely use quantitative methods with regularity in their future career. Through multiple in-class examples and both individual and group projects, students will gain extensive experience with both consuming and producing the results of regression models, with particular emphasis on the challenges that can arise when applying these methods to different contexts. The course covers the same concepts as PA 5032, but with the aim of a deeper understanding of their implementation. The foundation provided in this course will prepare students for more advanced econometrics courses, either offered at the Humphrey school or at other departments in the University.

Section 002 of PA 5044 is the lab section of the course, held on Fridays and taught by the teaching assistant. For more course information, see the main listing for PA 5044 Section 001.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students who intend to continue their quantitative analysis training with more advanced courses during their graduate studies, and/or those who would like deeper training in basic regression methods. PA 5031/5045 or equivalent is a preferred prerequisite course.
Exam Format:
No exams will be given in this course. Quizzes will be held via Canvas.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57579/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jannaj_PA5044_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jannaj_PA5044_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5044 Section 002: Applied Regression, Accelerated (57580)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Fri 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Bivariate/multivariate models used in regression analysis, including assumptions behind them/problems that arise when assumptions are not met. Course covers similar topics as PA 5032 but delves deeper into theory/application of methods. prereq: 5031 or equiv, or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jannaj+PA5044+Spring2022
Class Description:
Newly revised and updated for Spring 2022!

This course covers the theory and application of basic regression models, and is targeted to students who intend to continue their quantitative training with further coursework and/or who will likely use quantitative methods with regularity in their future career. Through multiple in-class examples and both individual and group projects, students will gain extensive experience with both consuming and producing the results of regression models, with particular emphasis on the challenges that can arise when applying these methods to different contexts. The course covers the same concepts as PA 5032, but with the aim of a deeper understanding of their implementation. The foundation provided in this course will prepare students for more advanced econometrics courses, either offered at the Humphrey school or at other departments in the University.

Section 002 of PA 5044 is the lab section of the course, held on Fridays and taught by the teaching assistant. For more course information, see the main listing for PA 5044 Section 001.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students who intend to continue their quantitative analysis training with more advanced courses during their graduate studies, and/or those who would like deeper training in basic regression methods. PA 5031/5045 or equivalent is a preferred prerequisite course.
Exam Format:
No exams will be given in this course. Quizzes will be held via Canvas.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57580/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jannaj_PA5044_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jannaj_PA5044_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5044 Section 003: Applied Regression, Accelerated (57581)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Fri 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Bivariate/multivariate models used in regression analysis, including assumptions behind them/problems that arise when assumptions are not met. Course covers similar topics as PA 5032 but delves deeper into theory/application of methods. prereq: 5031 or equiv, or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jannaj+PA5044+Spring2022
Class Description:
Newly revised and updated for Spring 2022!

This course covers the theory and application of basic regression models, and is targeted to students who intend to continue their quantitative training with further coursework and/or who will likely use quantitative methods with regularity in their future career. Through multiple in-class examples and both individual and group projects, students will gain extensive experience with both consuming and producing the results of regression models, with particular emphasis on the challenges that can arise when applying these methods to different contexts. The course covers the same concepts as PA 5032, but with the aim of a deeper understanding of their implementation. The foundation provided in this course will prepare students for more advanced econometrics courses, either offered at the Humphrey school or at other departments in the University.

Section 002 of PA 5044 is the lab section of the course, held on Fridays and taught by the teaching assistant. For more course information, see the main listing for PA 5044 Section 001.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students who intend to continue their quantitative analysis training with more advanced courses during their graduate studies, and/or those who would like deeper training in basic regression methods. PA 5031/5045 or equivalent is a preferred prerequisite course.
Exam Format:
No exams will be given in this course. Quizzes will be held via Canvas.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57581/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jannaj_PA5044_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jannaj_PA5044_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5052 Section 001: Public Affairs Leadership (57560)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Extended Regular Session
 
12/19/2022 - 08/23/2023
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Continues 5051. Leadership concepts, tools, and strategies in diverse settings for mid-career students. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5051-5052 must be taken in same academic yr
Class Notes:
Class to be offered as HyFlex. Students should register for 5052, 5054, and 5056. 5052, 5054, and 5056 will meet on Jan 7-8, Feb 4-5, Mar 4-5, Apr 1-2 and Apr 29 - 30 (Fri: 10:00 - 5:00, Sat: 8:30 - 4:30) http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksquick+PA5052+Spring2022
Class Description:
Continues 5051. Leadership development tools, and strategies for mid-career students. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or Publi Affairs Leadership (PAL) certificate; 5051-5052 must be taken in sequence in the same academic year. Students may contact the instructor or department for additional information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57560/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 June 2016

Spring 2023  |  PA 5054 Section 001: Program Design and Implementation Analysis (57561)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Continues 5053. Process of public policy and program analysis, including problem formulation, program design and implementation. Opportunity to draw upon published research and conduct field-based research to understand implementation conditions. Professional communications, including writing of memos, requests for proposals, and implementation briefs, are stressed. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5053-5054 must be taken in same academic yr
Class Notes:
Students should register for 5052, 5054, and 5056. 5052, 5054, and 5056 will meet on Jan 7-8, Feb 4-5, Mar 4-5, Apr 1-2 and Apr 29 - 30 (Fri: 10:00 - 5:00, Sat: 8:30 - 4:30) http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5054+Spring2022
Class Description:
Continues PA 5053, Policy Analysis by focusing on program analysis, including analysis of program design and implementation, and communication of findings. Uses readings and contemporary policy cases. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the Masters of Public Affairs (MPA) (cohort) or Public Affairs Leadership (PAL) certificate (cohort); PA 5053-5054 must be taken in same academic yr. Students may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57561/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 April 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5056 Section 001: Quantitative Research Methods and Analysis (57559)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Problem-based learning to analytical reasoning through social science research methods. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability, statistical inference. Hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation, analysis of variance, correlation. Simple regression analysis. prereq: Major in public affairs or public affairs certificate, [5055-5056 must be taken in same academic yr]
Class Notes:
Students should register for 5052, 5054, and 5056. 5052, 5054, and 5056 will meet on Jan 7-8, Feb 4-5, Mar 4-5, Apr 1-2 and Apr 29 - 30 (Fri: 10:00 - 5:00, Sat: 8:30 - 4:30). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cheng838+PA5056+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57559/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5080 Section 001: Capstone Preparation Workshop (57555)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project management, qualitative research, and critical framework to complete Capstone course. Students write draft of client project group norms and client contract.
Class Notes:
4/5/2022 session will be REMOTE (synchronously online). All other work will be COMPLETELY ONLINE (asynchronously online). PA 5080:1 is required for students who will enroll in the Summer 2022 PA 8081. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5080+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57555/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5104 Section 001: Strategic Human Resource Management (57662)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theory/practice of developing, utilizing, and aligning human resources to improve culture/outcomes of nonprofit/public organizations. HR strategy, individual diversity, leadership, selection, training, compensation, classification, performance appraisal, future HR practices. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?upoma001+PA5104+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57662/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/upoma001_PA5104_Spring2022.pdf (Spring 2022)

Spring 2023  |  PA 5108 Section 001: Board leadership development (57582)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Nonprofit board governance. Governance models, roles/responsibilities, ethics/dynamics. Current research/concepts along with students' current board experiences to illuminate challenges/explore solutions that build board leadership competencies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksbarr+PA5108+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57582/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5113 Section 001: State and Local Public Finance (57577)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theory/practice of financing. Providing public services at state/local level of government. Emphasizes integrating theory/practice, applying materials to specific policy areas, and documenting wide range of institutional arrangements across/within the 50 states. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?quisp004+PA5113+Spring2022
Class Description:
Examines theory and practice of financing and providing public services at state and local levels of government. Emphasis is placed on integrating theory and practice, applying materials to specific policy areas and documenting wide range of institutional arrangements across and within the fifty states.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57577/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 May 2007

Spring 2023  |  PA 5122 Section 001: Law and Public Affairs (57607)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Overview of evolution of American legal system. Role of courts, legislatures, and political actors in changing law. How law is used to change public policy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
Devin Driscoll spent nearly a decade working for progressive candidates and issues. A veteran of both Obama campaigns, Devin served as Rhode Island state director for the 2012 reelect. He later managed a governor's race and was senior advisor to Congressman David Cicilline's campaign. Devin spent the bulk of 2013 working on marriage-equality campaigns across the country, first as communications director for Rhode Islanders United for Marriage, and then as northeast regional director of President Obama's nonprofit, Organizing for Action. After trading in the campaign trail for law school, Devin was elected editor-in-chief of Minnesota Law Review. He also served as president of both the Asylum Law Project, a student-led immigration service project, and the law-student chapter of the Federal Bar Association. He has been a judicial law clerk for Justice David L. Lillehaug of the Minnesota Supreme Court and Chief Judge John R. Tunheim of the U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota. Devin holds a bachelor's degree from Providence College, a Master of Public Policy degree from the Humphrey School, and a Juris Doctor from the University of Minnesota Law School. He lives in Saint Paul with his wife, Katie, and son, Jack.
Class Description:

"What is law, and how do we use it to address public problems?" This is the central question that Law and Public Affairs will seek to answer. We will approach the question in three phases; first we'll consider the major sources of law - constitutions, statutes, and the common law - and the institutions that develop those sources - the people, the legislature, and the courts. Next we'll consider several substantive areas of law, including constitutional law, administrative law, criminal law, and immigration law. Finally, we'll consider the lawmaking process, and how individuals and organizations can impact the law through lobbying the legislature and bringing lawsuits.


We will review American law from a historical perspective, but primarily focus upon comprehending how political, judicial, legislative, and administrative actions change and frame public affairs. We will not learn how to "practice" law; instead we will learn how to use the law to accomplish our public-policy goals.


Other non-Humphrey graduate students, law school students who want a breath of fresh air, and mature upper-class undergraduates are welcome to contact the instructor about joining us. Other such students have enjoyed this course in the past.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Those interested in learning more about how public policy shapes the law and how the law can shape public policy.
Grading:
Grade will be based on a mixture of class participation - which includes both the submission weekly of a news story relevant to the class and engagement in class discussion - experiential learning opportunities, short writing assignment, and objective assessment (quiz/test).
Class Format:
Our weekly meetings will focus on assigned reading (mostly judicial decisions, along with some scholarship/criticism) and discussions with guest field experts: lawyers, judges, legislators, staffers, and lobbyists.
Workload:
As a graduate-level course that meets once a week, there will be appropriately sized reading assignments.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57607/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5123 Section 001: Philanthropy in America: History, Practice, and Trends (57609)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5-3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Wed 05:45PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theory/practice of philanthropy. Foundation/corporate/ individual giving. History/economic structure/dynamics. Models of philanthropy, components of grant making/seeking. Current debates, career options.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jreedy+PA5123+Spring2022
Class Description:
Jen Ford Reedy has been president of the Bush Foundation since September 2012. The Bush Foundation invests in great ideas and the people who power them in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and 23 Native Nations. The Foundation was established in 1953 by Archibald Bush, a 3M executive who played a key role in growing 3M into one of the world's leading companies.

Prior to joining the Foundation, Jen served as chief of staff and vice president of strategy for St. Paul and Minnesota Foundation, where she led the creation of GiveMN.org, Give to the Max Day, and the Minnesota Idea Open. Jen was also a consultant with McKinsey and Company for nine years and was the first director of the Itasca Project, a CEO-led regional civic initiative in the Twin Cities. Her current community service includes board work with Region's Hospital, GHR Foundation and Independent Sector.

Jen has a bachelor's degree from the University of Kansas and a master's degree from the University of Chicago. She has been honored as a "40 Under 40" leader by the Minneapolis-Saint Paul Business Journal, as one of the "100 Minnesotans You Should Know" by Twin Cities Business Magazine, and as a NextGen Fellow by Independent Sector.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57609/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 December 2019

Spring 2023  |  PA 5136 Section 001: Group Process Facilitation for Organizational and Public/Community Engagement (57615)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Group process facilitation components, theories, tools, techniques. Facilitator's role in group goals and processes. Facilitation in public policy. Cross-cultural challenges. Topics may include meeting management, group decision-making, conflict, participatory leadership, and other tools.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bravo047+PA5136+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57615/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5145 Section 001: Civic Participation in Public Affairs (57611)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/MS-STEP/MURP/Ph.D.-Public Affairs
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 56 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Critique/learn various approaches to civic participation in defining/addressing public issues. Readings, cases, classroom discussion, facilitating/experiencing engagement techniques. Examine work of practitioner, design engagement process.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hfburga+PA5145+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57611/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5162 Section 001: Public Service Redesign Workshop (57599)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
PA 5161
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Public service delivery innovation and redesign in health and human services fields to improve outcomes. Study and application of theories of organizational development, leadership, and system change. Social system dynamics analysis. Engaging diverse stakeholders. Effects and influence of implicit bias on current and redesigned efforts. Models and tools for public service redesign.
Class Notes:
Some class sessions will be face-to-face, others will be in synchronous, virtual meetings. There will also be asynchronous recorded lectures, videos, podcasts and readings, as well as virtual reading forums/threads to support the learning. Instructor will notify students once the schedule has been finalized. PA 5161 is the prerequisite for PA 5162. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?herna939+PA5162+Spring2022 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cmlabine+PA5162+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57599/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5209 Section 001: Urban Planning and Health Equity (57604)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
sr or grad
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This interdisciplinary course examines the causes and consequences of place-based health disparities in cities, explores how health disparities can be mitigated and exacerbated by urban planning decisions, and introduces best practices in urban planning for achieving community health equity. The course will involve extensive readings, guest lectures, field-based assignments, data-collection activities, and local community involvement. Twin Cities has one of the largest disparities in health outcomes in the nation and local practitioners are pioneering new urban planning solutions to reduce place-based health disparities. The course will utilize this location advantage and use the region as an immersive learning environment. Students are expected to apply knowledge and skills learned in the class locally in the Twin Cities region. At the end of the course, students will be able to: Understand the historical foundations, current trends and challenges, and international perspectives in connecting urban planning to health equity issues; investigate how various planning sectors and urban environment dimensions, including land use, transportation, open space, housing, food systems, and community social capital, interact to affect health disparities in cities; critically evaluate how existing planning processes and decisions respond to the needs of vulnerable populations and contribute to health equity; and develop skills to engage communities and identifying community-sensitive solutions for reducing place-based health disparities. Fulfills a requirement for graduate Health Equity Minor (http://www.sph.umn.edu/academics/minor/health-equity/).
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?yingling+PA5209+Spring2022 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gaile009+PA5209+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57604/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/yingling_PA5209_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)

Spring 2023  |  PA 5213 Section 001: Introduction to Site Planning (57586)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 34 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Analyzing/preparing graphic plans for development or redevelopment of property. Site planning issues, process, opportunities, details, and techniques. Hands-on preparation of a site plan. Site visits, lectures, research, presentations, exam, in-class exercises. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hfburga+PA213+Spring2022
Class Description:
Analyzing/preparing graphic plans for development or redevelopment of property. Site planning issues, process, opportunities, details, and techniques. Hands-on preparation of a site plan. Site visits, lectures,research, presentations, exam, in-class exercises. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57586/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hfburga_PA5213_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hfburga_PA5213_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Spring 2023  |  PA 5234 Section 001: Urban Transportation Planning and Policy (57612)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will integrate key theories and practices, traditional and emerging policy instruments, and techniques for urban and transportation planning. The goal is to introduce students to essential concepts, influential thinkers, and important debates associated with the land use-transportation connection as a foundation for both professional and academic work. By the end of the course, students will be able to comprehend urban transportation planning process and demand forecasting; the theories and empirical evidence on land use and transportation interactions; land use and transportation policy instruments and their effectiveness; and land use and transportation planning in developing countries.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cao+PA5234+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57612/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5261 Section 001: Housing Policy (57551)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Institutional/environmental setting for housing policy in the United States. Competing views of solving housing problems through public intervention in the market. Federal/local public sector responses to housing problems. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?damia025+PA5261+Spring2022
Class Description:

This course will explore the institutional, political, and economic context for the making of housing policy in the United States. We will examine competing ideas about solving the nation's housing problems through public intervention in the market focusing on the shift from social welfare to neoliberal policy approaches. In so doing, we will evaluate federal and local public sector responses to housing problems in this country, the different approaches taken by successive federal administrations in the U.S., and regional approaches to affordable housing. Special emphasis will be given to recent initiatives to increase the residential mobility of subsidized housing residents and to deconcentrate poverty by dispersing subsidized housing throughout metropolitan regions, and to the foreclosure crisis.


Institutional/environmental setting for housing policy in the United States. Competing views of solving housing problems through public intervention in the market. Federal/local public sector responses to housing problems.
Grading:

Term Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35% of final grade

Mid-term exam . . . . . . . . . . . . 25% of final grade

Final exam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30% of final grade

Class participation . . . . . . . . . 10% of final grade

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57551/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/damia025_PA5261_Spring2018.docx (Spring 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2023  |  PA 5271 Section 001: Geographic Information Systems: Applications in Planning and Policy Analysis (57574)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Urban/Regional Planning, major and minor or PA PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to GIS. Applications in public planning and policy analysis. Operational skills in GIS software. Mapping analysis of U.S. Census material. Local/state government management/planning. Spatial statistical analysis for policy/planning. prereq: Major in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kongh+PA5271+Spring2022 Non-MURP students should contact Stacey Grimes (grime004@umn.edu) regarding the waiting list/permission numbers.
Class Description:

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are an important supportive technology for the fields of planning and public policy. Many professional fields involve exploring location-based issues and the tools offered by GIS facilitates spatial visualization of phenomena such as crime, poverty, pollution, public health, land use, economics, environmental conditions and many others. GIS - a discipline in its own right - is now firmly woven into the fabric of government and into many business operations and it is vital that students of planning and public policy have a fundamental operational knowledge of the concepts, application, and potential of GIS technology.

This course introduces principles of geographic information systems and their applications in planning and policy analysis. The course is designed to give students an understanding of cutting-edge geospatial technologies, their capabilities, uses, and limitations. Representative applications for each discipline area are demonstrated in the computer laboratory portion.

The course will be offered in the format of lectures and labs.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course students can expect to:

· Be familiar with core terminology, concepts, data types, usage and applications of GIS;

· Demonstrate and make use of a foundational set of technical GIS skills;

· Have a sound understanding of how GIS can be applied to planning and public policy work;

· Be able to communicate with and work effectively with experienced GIS professionals;

· Be able to apply spatial thinking and locational problem solving to the work of planning and public policy;

· Be able to frame, address and propose solutions to a diverse variety of planning and public policy problems by ‘thinking spatially' and using GIS technology.

Grading:
Labs: 12 labs (individual work), 5% each, 60% in total
Quizzes: 3 in-class quizzes (individual work), 10% each, 30% in total
Participation/attendance: 10%
Class Format:
Lectures + Labs
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57574/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 September 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5311 Section 001: Program Evaluation (57610)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2023
Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
02/03/2023
Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
02/17/2023
Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
03/03/2023
Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
03/24/2023
Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
04/07/2023
Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
04/21/2023
Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
UMTC, West Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Principal methods, primary applications of evaluation research as applied to policies/programs in health/human services, education, or the environment. Conducting evaluations. Becoming a critical consumer of studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will meet in person during the scheduled class times (Jan 20, Feb 3, Feb 17, Mar 3, Mar 24, Apr 7, Apr 21). There will be asynchronous work during the weeks class is not scheduled. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bern0201+PA5311+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course provides an overview to program evaluation in public affairs. It explores the complexities and realities of conducting program evaluation studies in community-based settings, such as public agencies, schools, non-profit organizations, and collaborative initiatives. The overall purpose of this course is to provide students with a theoretical framework and practical strategies for conducting community-based evaluation studies.
Learning Objectives:

At the end of the term students will: (a) Understand the purposes and uses of program evaluation in public policy and program delivery; (b) Be familiar with common program evaluation terminology and professional practices and ethics, (c) be able to design and implement an evaluation plan for a specific public or nonprofit program or initiative that is focused on engaging primary stakeholders in using the plan to answer important questions; (d) Recognize the cultural and power dynamics at play in evaluation-related efforts.

Grading:
65% Program evaluation field work

10% Reflection papers

10% Team presentation

10% Exam
5% Contribution to collective learning process
Class Format:

35% Small Group Activities

35% Large group Discussion

20% Lecture

5% Student Presentations

5% Individual reflection


Workload:

50 Pages Reading Per Week

1 Group Project (Semester-long)

1 Memo

1 Exam

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57610/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bern0201_PA5311_Fall2018.pdf (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bern0201_PA5311_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5312 Section 001: Cost-Benefit Analysis for Program Evaluation (57637)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This class introduces students to cost-benefit analysis, the leading evidenced-based method for determining whether a government program or policy improves the well-being of society. Starting with the foundations of welfare economics, students learn how to monetize important benefits and costs associated with government activities. Topics include discounting future benefits and costs, the roles of standing and risk, ways of valuing human lives and other benefits that may be hard to value in dollar terms. Students will acquire skills needed to perform relevant calculations needed for the economic assessment of benefits relative to costs and the ability to critique the use of these methods regarding how they may advantage or disadvantage some members of society or particular types of policies. Policy areas include preventive interventions in social, health and education as well as applications in transportation and environmental policy. Prerequisite: PA 5021 or other prior course in microeconomics.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5312+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57637/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5405 Section 001: Public Policy Implementation (57645)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theory, tools, and practice of the implementation of public policy, particularly in areas involving public, private, and nonprofit organizations. Analytical approach focuses on multiple levels in policy fields to pinpoint and assess implementation challenges and levers for improvement.
Class Notes:
PA 5405 will be offered REMOTELY (synchronously online) in Spring 2023. Class will meet online during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?myhre044+PA5405+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course examines issues in the implementation of public programs and policies. Implementation is an integral, dynamic and important component of using policy and programs to improve public problems. Policies are not only created by elected officials, who authorize and fund government activities, but also by state administrators, local managers, front-line staff, and groups targeted by policy change. Because of this complexity, this course introduces students to a multilevel implementation analysis framework. Multilevel analysis focuses on understanding how the core policy or program is understood at the policy field, organizational, and front-line levels. It also provides ways to better understand how a social process that involves power and culture often significantly shapes implementation processes and tasks. This helps improve students' skills in navigating complex system in which most public policy implementation occurs.
Learning Objectives:
Because implementation is inherently a social process, it requires skillful actors who can both analyze situations and work effectively with others to direct resources, manage competing demands, and move toward positive social outcomes. As such, students need to cultivate their abilities to be analytical, reflective and adaptive. The course is designed to help students build all of these skills through lecture, field work, and discussion.
Exam Format:
There are no exams. Assignments will be in the form of field projects, presentations, and participation.
Class Format:
Classes are face-to-face with weaving in of on-line materials, small group informal meetings, and consultation with the instructor.
Workload:
One textbook is required - Effective Implementation In Practice: Integrating Public Policy and Management by Sandfort and Moulton (2015). Other materials are provided on Moodle, including readings, case studies, videos, etc. Students engage in field research projects that allow them to focus on their areas of interest and explore implementation processes and results.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57645/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 March 2017

Spring 2023  |  PA 5415 Section 001: Economics of Early Childhood Development (57625)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5-3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Early childhood development (ECS) is examined through the first decade of life from an economic perspective. Course focuses on the role of government in helping to promote ECD for purposes of social welfare and economic growth. Readings focus on education and health policies or programs that affect child outcomes from the prenatal period to third grade. Topics range from brain development to kindergarten-third grade policies. Students will become familiar with the importance of rigorous impact evaluations and the use of cost-benefit analysis as a tool for efficient resource allocation of child policies.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5415+Spring2022
Class Description:
Description:

Early childhood development
(ECS) is examined through the first decade of life from an economic perspective. Course focuses on the role of government policies in helping to promote ECD for purposes of social welfare and economic growth. Readings focus on education and health policies or programs that affect child outcomes from the prenatal period to third grade. Students will become familiar with the importance of rigorous impact evaluations and the use of cost-benefit analysis as a tool for efficient resource allocation to promote child wellbeing.

Examples of topics included in the first decade of life:

Cost-effectiveness of nurse home visiting programs and doulas

Long-term consequences of being in utero during a pandemic - evidence from 1918

Universal versus targeted preschool programs - short and long-term effects

Academic red-shirting in kindergarten

Elementary school topics including teachers, charter schools, and small class sizes

Required readings:

Reynolds, Rolnick, Englund and Temple, eds. (2010) Childhood Programs and Practices in the First Decade of Life: A Human Capital Integration. Cambridge University Press.

Additional assigned and optional articles and reports on topics of recent interest.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students and advanced undergraduates with permission. Students from any department are welcome. There is no prereq.
Grading:
One exam, a short paper (perhaps 7-8 pages) on a topic of the student's choosing, and multiple smaller assignments.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57625/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 December 2020

Spring 2023  |  PA 5416 Section 001: Economics of U.S. Social Insurance Programs (57638)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Law student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This class will introduce you to the Economics of Social Insurance Programs. It begins by introducing a framework to evaluate the efficiency and equity of social insurance programs, drawing on theory from the economics of insurance programs and behavioral economics. It then applies this framework to social insurance programs such as workers' compensation, unemployment insurance, health insurance, social security, TANF and Supplemental Nutritional Assistance, and the Earned Income Tax Credit. Prerequisite: PA 5021 or other prior course in microeconomics.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hanra003+PA5416+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57638/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5422 Section 001: Diversity and Public Policy (57644)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
What is diversity? What role does it play in public policy? What role should it play? Whom does diversity include or exclude? In this highly participatory class, we will apply a policy analysis lens to explore how diversity interacts with, contributes to, and is impacted by policy. The interdisciplinary course readings draw from topics such as gender identity, intersectionality, socio-economic class, race and ethnicity, indigenous ways of knowing, sexual orientation, and disability. Students examine the evolution of difference and diversity, explore various domains of diversity (gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, disability, class), and synthesize and apply this knowledge to the development of a policy brief that focuses on a particular policy or organizational problem.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?stant171+PA5422+Spring2022
Class Description:
This course provides a practical foundation for analyzing and integrating diversity in contemporary organizations and businesses. The course applies a policy analysis lens to an interdisciplinary approach to exploring how diversity interacts with, contributes to, and is impacted by policy. The course readings draw from topics such as gender identity, intersectionality, socio-economic class, and race and ethnicity.
The course is divided into three parts:
1) Foundations of diversity, which covers definitions, legal and economic implications, and academic debates
2) Diversity and difference, which focuses on specific elements of diversity, such as gender, race, sexual identity, class, and disability. Guest speakers will provide their unique perspective on these subjects.
3) Diversity and resource allocation, which consists of hands-on discussions about how a policy maker or organization leader might go about allocating resources for different diversity groups, as well as the inherent trade-offs in this process.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Any graduate student who is interested in an interdisciplinary approach that focuses on how to analyze and integrate diversity into policy analysis.
Grading:
50% Individual reflections/essays
20% Team policy brief
20% Team presentation
5% Within-team peer evaluation
5% Participation
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57644/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5490 Section 002: Topics in Social Policy -- Restorative Practices: Policymaking & Activism (64579)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
12 Credits
Grading Basis:
S-N or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Masters or Law
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
02/07/2023
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
02/28/2023
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
03/28/2023
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
04/25/2023
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
UMTC, West Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Full title of class: Restorative Practices: Policymaking & Activism. Class will be offered five Tuesday evenings from 6:00-8:45; however, there will be asynchronous work over the entire semester. Instructor will be dr. raj sethuraju of Metro State. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sethu028+PA5490+Spring2023
Class Description:
Restorative Practices are a way of being. Together we will explore and experience the depths of this indigenous practice. Our exploration will involve classroom gatherings, online discussions, community participation, engaging with practitioners, and developing a restorative practices position paper for policy work.

You!!! The student scholar will examine the historical, sociological, criminological, psychological, educational, and religious perspectives about Restorative Practices. Together, we will explore topics around:

• Trauma and healing
• Conflict and transformation
• Racial Justice
• Indigeneity of Restorative Practices
• Internal colonialism

This course is designed to allow students to develop a working understanding and knowledge of Restorative Practices. Restorative Practices looks at the concept of justice through nontraditional and alternative viewpoints. Rather than focus on "what are the issues at hand, who committed or is responsible and what should the outcome be," Restorative Practices focuses on "who has been harmed/affected, what was the impact, and who is responsible for repairing the harm and addressing the impact." Students will examine Restorative Practices from historical, sociological, criminological, psychological, and educational perspectives. Throughout the course, a wide range of specific "restorative practices" will be studied, reviewed, and analyzed. Some of the concepts the course will explore are trauma and healing, conflict transformation, issues related to education, educational institutions, and alternative processes such as Repairing Harm and the Circle Process.
Tentative Expectations:
• Expect both asynchronous and synchronous engagement
• Only 5 synchronous engagements - Tuesday 6 to 9 pm.
• 30 hours of Service Learning with community, school, and other agencies
• Weekly online discussions.

Questions about the course? Email raj.sethuraju@metrostate.edu. Need a class permission number? Email Stacey Grimes at grime004@umn.edu.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students who want to learn, articulate, and practice the philosophical and practical constructs of restorative justice and the movement of restorative practices.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64579/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 December 2020

Spring 2023  |  PA 5504 Section 001: Transforming Development (57640)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Emerging infectious diseases such as COVID-19, antimicrobial resistance, climate change, loss of species, and habitats are driven by our dominant definition of development and pose existential challenges to humankind. COVID-19 has laid bare the ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities in the ways societies across the globe lead material life (economy). Current social and environmental challenges are global and local in scale and challenge us to consider poverty alleviation not as an international issue and only of concern for low resourced communities and developing countries, but one in need of attention in every country in the world, including peoples in the wealthy West. This course examines the emerging pluriverse paradigm and some of the models intending to transform development: nature rights movement, community economy, solidarity movement, degrowth, transition design, and ontologies and epistemologies of First Nations in North and South America. We will contrast these development models to sustainable development goals and the green growth approach.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gfs+PA5504+Spring2022
Class Description:
We have seldom seen global acts of solidarity and political will such as the one generated by the COVID19 pandemic in the Spring and summer of 2020. The expansion of social distancing policies slowed consumption and resulted in sharp reductions of CO2 emissions, among other positive environmental benefits in 2020 which were, until recently, impossible to achieve. The infusion of financial resources and social safety nets during the pandemic is evidence of their availability when there is political will.


Yet, there is little recognition in international policy arenas that the ultimate drivers of the world's looming existential crises, including that of emerging infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance, climate change, and the accelerated loss of species and habitats, lies in our dominant definition and the historical foundations of development. COVID19 has required an unprecedented shift in paradigms, forcing many to reconsider long-held historical ideologies and approaches to development. The pandemic has also laid bare the ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities in the ways societies across the globe lead lives, proving to be a (in)justice thermometer of sorts: ethnic and racial political minorities, but population majorities across the world are over-represented among those who have been sick or have died from Covid: African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans in the United States and Amerindians and Afro-descendants in South America. Across the globe, women are juggling paid work, parenting responsibilities, and caring for the elderly. Larger numbers of people in the informal sector in the majority world (aka Global South) have food and housing insecurity. The advances in decreasing income poverty across the globe have reversed. The list goes on.



These social and environmental challenges are global and local in scale and challenge us to consider poverty alleviation not as an "international" issue and only of concern for low resourced communities and countries in majority worlds (aka developing, or the Global South), but one in need of attention in every country in the world. Two key ingredients to any economic system, the natural world and the female caring labor that support social and physical reproduction, continue to be invisible in the dominant model of development. Similar factors that lead to social inequities lead to unsustainable development and fuel the COVID19 pandemic, the loss of biodiversity, species extinction, climate change and ultimately, the existential crisis we find ourselves in. Human welfare is intricately connected with species and life-supporting systems welfare.



In this course, we will explore the dominant and alternatives debates about development on how to lead our material lives and how to meet the global challenges of feeding and materially supporting 10 billion humans by 2050, by using food production as the anchor for the course. The course starts by exploring two different arms of the debate (growth and industrial agriculture and community economy/conservation and alternative forms of food production) followed by a review of the planetary systems and species crisis. After studying these foundational areas, we will study various theoretical/policy frameworks across multiple disciplinary fields, providing paths on redefining development and reframing our economy to consider the natural world and care. The latter is understood as the values, attitudes, and practices that sustain all life. We will explore current scholarly and applied definitions of sustainable development and study how it differs (or not) from green growth. We will study different models loosely framed under what is currently known as the pluriverse, models intending to transform development: nature rights movement, community economy, solidarity movement, degrowth, transition design, and pluriversal alternatives for First Nations in North and South America. Concerns about the environment and gender, class/caste, and race/ ethnicity are mainstreamed throughout the course.



For students who have taken PA5501, this course is a deep dive and expansion of the last two weeks of class covering "the right side of the board."


Who Should Take This Class?:
Any individual interested in domestic OR international policy and social and environmental justice
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the course students should be able to:


·
Understand the linkages of dominant development to the planetary crisis.


·
Recognize the false dichotomy developed/developing countries by understanding the linkages of wealth acquisition in the minority world (aka Global North) and wealth dispossession in the majority world (Global South).


·
Understand and apply the concept of planetary boundaries


·
Understand the definition of development as economic growth, as human development, and as sustainable development from scholarly and policy perspectives


·
To understand the scope of the Sustainable Development Goals
(SDGs) and the inherent contradictions among the various goals


·
Understand current alternative proposals to economic development:
green growth; degrowth; community economies; and proposals under the pluriverse umbrella.


·
Understand a variety of policy formulations for sustainable development and how they differ (or not) from formulations for green growth, from degrowth, from community economies, from the pluriverse.


·
Understand the importance of ontology, epistemology, theory and measurement in policy formulation and implementation.


·
Develop a semantic field and conceptual tools on transforming development.


·
Recognize and understand the importance of gender, ethnic and class/caste perspectives in the context of transforming development theory, policy, and implementation.


·
Develop the analytical skills to sort context specific (one size does not fit all), gender specific (there is no such thing as gender neutral); and class/caste
(the rising boat does not lift all equally) development challenges.


·
Recognize that transforming development is anchored in ethics and is based on justice for all beings and the systems that support life.


Grading:
Leading Class 30 points (2x15=30)

Discussant for class 20 (2 x10=20)


Writing assignments 50
(5x10=50)

Class Format:
Our class meetings will be structured in seminar-style. When needed, brief lecture sections at each class meeting will provide enough background information to contextualize the readings. It is vital that you do the reading on time since we will explore the material through discussions.



Every week one student will lead the topic discussion and the readings, while two other students will be discussants.


Workload:

There are five assignments, designed in the spirit of transforming development by transforming how we learn and share what we learn. Assignments are NOT tests of knowledge. They ARE meant to cement information or to help you/us parse out debates. Because the course aims to dismantle the paradigm of individuality, all the assignments will be uploaded to canvas and we will all have access to them. This way, the assignments become education solidarity and solidarity education. The folder in canvas is at the top of the page where main documents for class will be stored.


Most of the workload is reading or watching documentaries.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57640/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5504_Spring2022.pdf (Spring 2022)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5521 Section 001: Development Planning and Policy Analysis (57553)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Techniques of development planning/policy analysis at national, regional, and project levels. Effects of external shocks and government interventions on national/regional economies. Macroeconomic modeling, input-output analysis, social accounting matrices/multipliers, project evaluation. prereq: 5031 or equiv recommended or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?assaad+PA5521+Spring2022
Class Description:
This course examines the techniques and assumptions of development planning and policy analysis at the national, program and project levels. The course focuses on modeling techniques and policy applications rather than on theory. It consists of three parts. First, you will learn how to analyze and interpret macroeconomic data in the context of an open macroeconomy model. Second, you will learn how to conduct financial and economic cost-benefit analyses and will apply what you learn to a real world project for a client. Third, you will become familiar with experimental and quasi-experimental impact evaluation techniques for development projects and programs. Students are assumed to have some background in the theories of economic development and to have had previous preparation in quantitative methods. While the focus will be on developing countries, many of the techniques covered will also have applications in the U.S. context.
Learning Objectives:
Provide and introduction to some widely used quantitative modeling techniques.

-
Build an appreciation of the promise and pitfalls of quantitative modeling.

-
Acquire a specific set of modeling and interpretation skills through hands-on application.

-
Develop an ability to describe the macroeconomic context of a country based on an analysis of time series data on major economic variables.

-
Learn to conduct financial and economic cost-benefit analyses of public and non-profit development interventions and programs and learn how to manage the complexities of real-world projects.

-
Become effective and critical consumers of experimental and non-experimental impact evaluation studies of development programs and interventions

Grading:
15% Midterm Exam; 85% Special Projects
Exam Format:
short essay, short answer
Class Format:
67% Lecture
33% Laboratory
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Exam(s)
Other Workload: Three 15 page project reports done in groups
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57553/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5521_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5521_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2018

Spring 2023  |  PA 5521 Section 002: Development Planning and Policy Analysis (57556)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Fri 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Techniques of development planning/policy analysis at national, regional, and project levels. Effects of external shocks and government interventions on national/regional economies. Macroeconomic modeling, input-output analysis, social accounting matrices/multipliers, project evaluation. prereq: 5031 or equiv recommended or instr consent
Class Description:
This course examines the techniques and assumptions of development planning and policy analysis at the national, program and project levels. The course focuses on modeling techniques and policy applications rather than on theory. It consists of three parts. First, you will learn how to analyze and interpret macroeconomic data in the context of an open macroeconomy model. Second, you will learn how to conduct financial and economic cost-benefit analyses and will apply what you learn to a real world project for a client. Third, you will become familiar with experimental and quasi-experimental impact evaluation techniques for development projects and programs. Students are assumed to have some background in the theories of economic development and to have had previous preparation in quantitative methods. While the focus will be on developing countries, many of the techniques covered will also have applications in the U.S. context.
Learning Objectives:
Provide and introduction to some widely used quantitative modeling techniques.

-
Build an appreciation of the promise and pitfalls of quantitative modeling.

-
Acquire a specific set of modeling and interpretation skills through hands-on application.

-
Develop an ability to describe the macroeconomic context of a country based on an analysis of time series data on major economic variables.

-
Learn to conduct financial and economic cost-benefit analyses of public and non-profit development interventions and programs and learn how to manage the complexities of real-world projects.

-
Become effective and critical consumers of experimental and non-experimental impact evaluation studies of development programs and interventions

Grading:
15% Midterm Exam; 85% Special Projects
Exam Format:
short essay, short answer
Class Format:
67% Lecture
33% Laboratory
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Exam(s)
Other Workload: Three 15 page project reports done in groups
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57556/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5521_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5521_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2018

Spring 2023  |  PA 5631 Section 001: LGBTQ Politics & Policy (57647)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Enrollment Requirements:
jr or sr or grad student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The advancement of LGBTQ rights in the United States has experienced unprecedented success over the last twenty years, shifting both public attitude towards and legal protection for LGBTQ Americans. This course will provide an in-depth analysis of current LGBTQ policy achievements in the United States, including the recognition of marriage equality in all 50 states, the repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell, increased anti-discrimination protections, and rights for people who are transgender or gender non-conforming. Emphasis will be placed on how these victories were achieved, including background on the strategies and tactics used to generate policy results. We will also take a critical look at such milestones and examine what they mean for the entire LGBTQ population, including queer people of color, transgender and gender nonconforming individuals, the disabled, and economically disadvantaged. Intersectionality will be a key aspect of the course, in particular, analysis on how the differential effects of policy among segments of the population that may not experience the benefits of policy passage as quickly or as broadly. Incorporated into this analysis will be readings from queer liberation scholars to help us evaluate the pros and cons of existing LGBTQ policy gains. The course will explore what full equality might look like for LGBTQ people in the United States with an examination of what can and cannot be achieved through policy. Practical application on how policy is made will be intertwined throughout the course. Topics to be covered include the meaning and measurement of LGBTQ identity; estimates of those who identify as LGBTQ; the measurement of Americans' attitudes on LGBTQ issues and how these attitudes have changed over the past few decades; assessment of changes in law and policies at the national, state and local levels; and the implications of these changes for the lived experience of LGBTQ people and their families, including health, well-being, st
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY (synchronously online during the scheduled class times). Instructor will be Ryan W. Bell. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5631+Spring2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57647/1233

Spring 2023  |  PA 5715 Section 001: Survey of Current Issues in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (57557)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Current topics in science, technology, and environmental policy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?keel0041+PA5715+Spring2022
Class Description:
The objective of this course is to explore current topics at the interface of public policy with science, technology, and the environment. You will gain an understanding of current "hot" topics in science, technology and environmental policy; further develop your critical thinking skills; develop discussion facilitation skills; and understand some of the social and historical contexts that have led to the current topics. The class will be taught in a seminar style, with the expectation that you will take significant responsibility, including leading at least one discussion session.
Who Should Take This Class?:
This class is designed for graduate students with interests in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy.
Grading:
student choice
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57557/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/keel0041_PA5715_Spring2022.pdf (Spring 2022)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5723 Section 001: Water Policy (57558)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
WRS 5101 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 12:30PM - 01:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Sociocultural, legal, economic, and environmental forces affecting supply/use of water by individuals, sectors, and governance institutions. Historical trends; water laws in United States and internationally. Institutional structures for managing water at federal, state, and local levels. Current water-related issues/policies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Description:
Sociocultural, legal, economic, and environmental forces affecting supply/use of water by individuals, sectors, and governance institutions. Historical trends; water laws in United States and internationally. Institutional structures for managing water at federal, state, and local levels. Current water-related issues/policies. prereq:
Grad student or instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57558/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 October 2015

Spring 2023  |  PA 5731 Section 001: Emerging Sciences and Technologies: Policy, Ethics and Law (57634)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Grad or Law student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This interdisciplinary course will examine issues at the nexus of public policy, ethics, law, and emerging sciences and technologies (ES&T) including nanotechnology, genetic and biomedical engineering, synthetic biology, and artificial intelligence. Topics we will explore include the role of science and technology as both a tool for and the subject of policy and law; the policy, ethical, economic, and legal implications of ES&T research and development; environmental and human health risk analysis and regulation (e.g., EPA, FDA, OSHA, and state and local regulatory mechanisms); intellectual property issues; liability issues; and global impacts. Topics will be approached from the perspective of different stakeholders (e.g., federal agencies, industry, academic researchers, the environment, international organizations, and the public) and in the context of different application areas (e.g., drugs, devices, food, agriculture, energy, environmental remediation) using a variety of interdisciplinary approaches. Students with a broad range of interests are encouraged to enroll.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pcalow+PA5731+Spring2023
Class Description:

Recognizing that innovations in emerging science and technology bring great benefits to human welfare but also non-trivial risks to people and environment this course will develop an understanding of how these trade-offs might be balanced in making policy and law. It will show how risk assessment and management, markets and government intervention, and ethics are involved in doing this. We shall consider if green (new) deals make sense in terms of promoting innovation; how intellectual property rights are used to protect innovations including biological materials; and if/how the process and products of innovation raise ethical challenges that disadvantage some. Principles will be applied broadly to innovations including genetic modification, new (nano-) materials, responses to climate change, and artificial intelligence. The course will reflect the uniquely interdisciplinary nature of innovations in science and technology that require collaboration between scientists and engineers from virtually all disciplines, as well as involvement of social scientists, ethicists, lawyers and policy analysts.
Who Should Take This Class?:

Enrollment by students with a broad range of interests is encouraged. There are no science, policy or law prerequisites.
Learning Objectives:

After completing this course, you should understand: how risks and costs and benefits of innovations are weighed in policy; how innovations interact with the economy; what part markets or government intervention play in driving innovation; what part patents play in encouraging innovation; the main ethical issues; how all these aspects are used in shaping policy and law.
Exam Format:

Will be by continuous assessment
Workload:

For this 3-credit course at graduate level it is expected that you invest at least 9 hours of effort in carrying out the work to deliver successfully. This includes the instructional time of 2.5 hours in class. The precise amount of effort is likely to vary from week to week.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57634/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/pcalow_PA5731_Spring2021.pdf (Spring 2021)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 December 2020

Spring 2023  |  PA 5741 Section 001: Risk, Resilience and Decision Making (57575)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Interplay between risk analysis, decision making, and policy in the context of new and emerging technologies, environmental and human well-being, risk and resilience. Assessment methods; risk management processes, issues and methods; role/treatment of uncertainty; factors in decision making; risk-based rule making; public values; risk communication and perception. Scientific, technical, social, political, and ethical issues. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pcalow+PA5741+Spring2023
Class Description:
Interplay between risk assessment, decision making, and policy in the context of new and emerging technologies, environmental and human well-being, risk and resilience. Assessment methods; risk management processes, issues and methods; role/treatment of uncertainty; factors in decision making; risk-based rule making; public values; risk communication and perception. Scientific, technical, social, political, and ethical issues. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
This course embraces how risk assessment informs policy development and decision-making in a cross-disciplinary way by addressing core natural science issues on technological impacts and core social science issues on public values and perceptions of risk. It will cover important issues related to risk assessment, risk perception and risk communication.
Grading:
Grading will involve a combination of aspects covering attendance, essays, a quiz and a critical review of risk laws.

One essay (Assignment 3 is a practice and Assignment 5 is the one that will be graded) - worth 25%.
Quiz session 7 worth 25%.
Risk law policy assessments (Assignment 8) worth 30% (10% for presentations and 20% for written policy assessment).
Overall attendance and involvement worth 20%.
Class Format:
Classes will involve lectures from the instructor and interactive sessions where class members will express views based on readings. Risk principles will be translated into practice when the class divides into groups to critically assess risk laws.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57575/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/pcalow_PA5741_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/pcalow_PA5741_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/pcalow_PA5741_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2018

Spring 2023  |  PA 5751 Section 001: Addressing Climate and Energy Challenges at the Local Scale (57657)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Examine energy and climate innovations at local and community scales. Understand how to implement local policies, projects, and programs with a diverse set of perspectives on energy issues. Develop professional and analytical skills that support solutions to energy and climate challenges.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?eliseh+PA5751+Spring2022
Class Description:

Why is action by local organizations, governments, and communities critical for energy innovation in the face of climate change? What policies, programs, and technical solutions are being explored at sub-national levels and how are they implemented? This course examines energy and climate innovations at community and local scales to prepare you (students) for professional work on climate change and energy issues at local and community levels - key areas of activity for careers in sustainability, environmental policy, climate change, and resilience.


Students in this course will apply concepts, theories, and analytical skills to case studies and client-focused projects. As communities face the varying challenges of climate change, this course examines both mitigation and adaptation responses to climate change and asks students to think both critically and practically about how to innovate and respond to these local risks. There are many dimensions to climate change, but this course focuses primarily on energy, including renewable energy integration, responses in the electricity sector to changing climate conditions (e.g. wildfires), and infrastructure change. Each week we will explore issues of local and community energy and climate action and engage (when possible) with those responsible for planning and implementing case study projects. Course content will draw from policy instruments and programs (e.g. community choice aggregation, community solar, solarize), local and regional initiatives (e.g. green training programs, resilience hubs), local governments programs or policies (e.g. utility-municipal partnerships, benchmarking, and efficiency standards), and skills for working across diverse perspectives and positions on energy issues.


Assignments will include a client-based project focused on climate planning and local energy policy, developing a role play scenario, personal reflections, and response papers.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57657/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5761 Section 001: Environmental Systems Analysis at the Food-Energy-Water Nexus (57635)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Agricultural lands, water resources, and energy production and transport are interconnected systems with implications for policy and management at local to global scales. This course will explore contemporary issues at the nexus of food, energy, and water with a focus on Midwestern landscapes. Specific topics include farm policy, permitting of pipelines and energy production, mitigation of air and water pollution, and strategies to incentivize the conservation and restoration of landscapes. Students will develop professional skills in systems thinking, scenario analysis, science communication, facilitation, and collective leadership.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?keel0041+PA5761+Spring2022
Class Description:

Agricultural lands, water resources, and energy production and transport are interconnected systems with implications for policy and management at local to global scales. This course will explore contemporary issues at the nexus of food, energy, and water with a focus on Midwestern landscapes. Specific topics include farm policy, permitting of pipelines and energy production, mitigation of air and water pollution, and strategies to incentivize the conservation and restoration of landscapes. Students will develop professional skills in systems thinking, scenario analysis, science communication, facilitation, and collective leadership.

Learning Objectives:
  • Develop skills in systems thinking and science communication that allow students to understand, diagnose, and effectively communicate environmental challenges.

  • Cultivate an awareness of the diverse viewpoints and perspectives of key stakeholders and how different audiences perceive food-water-energy issues.

  • Identify social, ecological, and technological dimensions of environmental systems and how they are interlinked over time and space.

  • Analyze policy and governance aspects of food, energy, and water challenges, including the roles and capabilities of the market, the state, and civil society in solving these challenges.

Grading:
S/N or student choice
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57635/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/keel0041_PA5761_Spring2022.pdf (Spring 2022)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  PA 5814 Section 001: Global Diplomacy in a Time of Change (57592)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 29 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Taught by the Humphrey School's diplomat in residence, this course examines the changing world of twenty-first century global diplomacy and how state and nonstate actors are challenging the status quo. We look at the dynamics behind major international developments - with case studies including BREXIT, the Iran Agreement, climate negotiations, and China's global initiatives - placed in the context of an examination of how states operate in the international diplomatic sphere and how multilateral organizations enhance or challenge the concept of state sovereignty. Students gain knowledge about the complexities of diplomacy and negotiation through readings, classroom discussions, and guest speakers and develop professional skills through writing and presentation assignments.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mtcurtin+PA5814+Spring2022
Class Description:

This course will examine the theory, practice and profession of twenty-first century diplomacy in bilateral and multilateral environments. While the successful negotiation in 2015 of the Iran nuclear deal and the Paris climate agreement drew more attention to how nations large and small use diplomacy to advance their interests, political shifts ranging from the 2016 U.S. elections to Brexit to Russian actions have raised questions about how nations and non-state actors engage one another to achieve their goals in a complex world. In addition, while international organizations, including the United Nations, and regional organizations, such as the European Union, the Organization of American States, and the African Union, have become not just venues for multilateral diplomacy, but also diplomatic players in their own right, seeking to negotiate resolutions to regional problems, their functioning is being challenged by resurgent nationalism.


During the course of the semester, we will examine the history of diplomacy, and its norms and practices, including its international legal bases, and how modern technology and changing cultural norms have impacted the way that diplomats operate. Through readings, classroom discussions and simulations, students will come to understand the ways in which major powers, and medium and small states use bilateral and multilateral diplomacy to achieve their own goals and work with friends and allies to achieve regional and global objectives. Students will also examine the way in which nations come together in formal and informal blocs to advance regional goals, and look at how non-state actors operate in the diplomatic sphere to achieve their objectives, and at how governments and non-governmental organizations seek to resolve conflicts through Track II processes.

Grading:

Students will be graded on an A-F basis. Grading will be as follows:

  • 30%--Overall Class participation--Students are expected to attend all classes unless excused, to complete all the readings, and to be prepared to participate in the classroom discussion. Students will be separately graded on classroom simulation exercises.

  • 10%--Individual student contributions to discussion on issues of current interest.
  • 15%--Short (400-600) word diplomatic report from an embassy to a home government foreign ministry (or State Department) on an issue, summarizing events, the implication of those events for the home country, and recommendations on next moves or how to react.

  • 15%--Group Negotiating Exercise: Students will identify the specific issues to be negotiated, decide on tactics, and then negotiate a solution with the help of the mediator. In the final session, the group will present a briefing (with visual slides) showing the results of the negotiation

  • 30%--A final 2,500-3,000 word research paper on an assigned topic.
  • Class Format:
    Combined lecture and discussions, with students expected to attend and actively participate in discussions and debates based on assigned reading and familiarity with relevant international events; two negotiation exercises in which students will role play; occasional virtual or in person class visits by professionals in the field.
    Workload:
    Readings 50-100 pages per session, plus assignments detailed above.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57592/1233
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/mtcurtin_PA5814_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    17 December 2020

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5825 Section 001: Crisis Management in Foreign Affairs (57602)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 29 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Crisis decision making in foreign policy. Examination of the organization and structure of crisis decision-making within U.S. national security apparatus. Analysis of in-depth four foreign policy crises (Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam Tet, Iraq, and a current crisis). Crisis simulation with students in the role of national security leaders.
    Class Notes:
    Meets alternating Thursdays. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?andre104+PA5825+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    ·
    This course will analyze crisis decision making in foreign policy. Students will:


    o Examine the organization and structure of crisis decision-making within the U.S. national security apparatus;

    o Analyze in depth four foreign policy crises: the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962); Vietnam - Tet (1968); Iraq (2006-2008) and a Current Events Crisis (2016).

    o Put themselves in the position of national security leaders as part of a crisis simulation; and

    o Write an analysis of a historical foreign policy crisis.

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57602/1233
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    21 February 2017

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5887 Section 001: Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar II (57591)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA 5886
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    The Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar is a required course for all first-year MHR students. The course is intended to create a cohort group and ensure that all MHR students have an opportunity to work together to explore current issues related to human rights practice, focusing on emerging events or crises, and debates over policy, practice, or theory and for direct contact with and networking particularly with counterparts in the Global South. This course is in a series with, and taken after, PA 5886.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walsh912+PA5887+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57591/1233

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5920 Section 004: Skills Workshop -- Tribal-State Relations Workshop (65361)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    0.5 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    48 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Grad or Masters or Law
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    01/28/2023
    Sat 08:30AM - 05:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    02/18/2023
    Sat 08:30AM - 05:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Topics on public policy or planning skills. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be held REMOTELY (syncronously online). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jkb+PA5920+Spring2023 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?taddjohn+PA5920+Spring2023
    Class Description:

    Minnesota is home to 11 sovereign Indian nations and about 120,000 American Indian people. Tribes are among the top 20 employers in the state, and tribal jurisdiction impacts thousands of acres of land in Minnesota both within and beyond reservation boundaries. While tribes share prominent nation-to-nation diplomatic relationships with the U.S. federal government, tribal relationships with state agencies are increasingly significant. Since the administration of Governor Jesse Ventura, each Minnesota governor has implemented an executive order focused on state relations with Indian nations. Under current Governor Tim Walz, Executive Order 19-24 provides a considerable mandate for state agencies to develop and implement tribal consultation policies and to build associated partnerships.


    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65361/1233

    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    4 November 2021

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5926 Section 001: Presentation Skills: How to Inspire Your Audience and Change the World (57596)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
    Wed 11:15AM - 12:55PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Learn techniques for making effective, persuasive presentations to different kinds of audiences. Practice is essential to improve speaking skills and reduce anxiety. Students practice by recording brief weekly presentations and making class presentations in a supportive environment. Techniques for using Powerpoint to create effective slides are practiced. Course components include presentation assignments; peer reviews; readings/videos and reflections; and class participation. May be repeated once.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hansenj+PA5926+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57596/1233

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5926 Section 002: Presentation Skills: How to Inspire Your Audience and Change the World (57663)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Thu 11:15AM - 12:55PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Learn techniques for making effective, persuasive presentations to different kinds of audiences. Practice is essential to improve speaking skills and reduce anxiety. Students practice by recording brief weekly presentations and making class presentations in a supportive environment. Techniques for using Powerpoint to create effective slides are practiced. Course components include presentation assignments; peer reviews; readings/videos and reflections; and class participation. May be repeated once.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?free0303+PA5926+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Learn techniques for making effective, persuasive presentations to different kinds of audiences. Students practice by recording brief weekly presentations and making class presentations in a supportive environment. Techniques for creating effective slides are practiced. Course components include presentation assignments; peer reviews; readings/videos and reflections; and class participation. May be repeated once.
    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the course, students should be able to:


    • speak publicly with greater confidence


    • present more persuasively


    • create effective, high-impact slides


    • tailor presentations to audiences

    Grading:
    Course can be taken either as Pass/Fail or on an A-F basis.

    50% Presentations
    25% Feedback to other students
    10% Completion of assigned readings/videos and reflections on them
    5% Reviewing and reflecting on your own presentations
    10% Class participation, including attendance, collegiality, being an audience
    Exam Format:
    This course does not have a final exam.
    Class Format:
    10% Lecture
    40% Discussion
    50% Student Presentations
    Workload:
    Workload for this class will comprise approximately three hours of work each week, including in-class and out-of-class time.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57663/1233
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/free0303_PA5926_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    16 July 2018

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5927 Section 001: Effective Grantwriting for Nonprofit Organizations (57606)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Grad or Law student
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Wed 05:45PM - 08:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Grantwriting skills, processes, problem,s and resources for nonprofit organizations. Researching and seeking grants. Communication with potential funders and generating financial support. Collaborating effectively with the organization and clients to create substantive, fundable proposals.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mitc0432+PA5927+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57606/1233

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5928 Section 001: Data Management and Visualization with R (57639)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/MS-STEP/MURP/Ph.D.-Public Affairs
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to R Studio software. Use of R Studio to carry out R file and related database management functions. Tools and techniques for data analysis and statistical programming in quantitative research or related applied areas. Topics include data selection, data manipulation, and data and spatial visualization (including charts, plots, histograms, maps, and other graphs). Prerequisite knowledge: Introductory statistics; ability to create bar graphs, line graphs, and scatter plots in MS Excel; and familiarity with principles of data visualization.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?taotao+PA5928+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This course is intended for students who are looking to improve their data analysis (including data management and visualization) skills with R programming language. The emphasis of the course will be on learning tools and techniques which are useful to students who will be doing data analysis and/or statistical programming in quantitative research or related applied areas.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Use RStudio to carry out R file and related database management

    2. Use R to work with different types of databases and conduct basic data management

    3. Use R to visualize data with different types of plots

    4. Use R to carry out exploratory data analysis

    Class Format:

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57639/1233
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/taotao_PA5928_Spring2022.docx (Spring 2022)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/taotao_PA5928_Fall2019.docx (Fall 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    1 December 2021

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5929 Section 001: Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers (57593)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 29 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Tools for communicating quantitative information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way. Topics covered include 1) writing and speaking about data; 2) data management in Excel in order to prepare data for charting; 3) understanding and ability to deploy core concepts in of design, layout, typography and color to maximize the impact of their data visualizations 4) determining which types of statistical measures are most effective for each type of data and message; 5) determining which types of design to use for communicating quantitative information; and 6) designing graphs and tables that are intelligent and compelling for communicating quantitative information.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dorelien+PA5929+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    The class will have a practical approach, combining discussion and practical exercises. The course is designed to be like a walk-through, starting from collecting and organizing data and ending with advanced graph designs.

    The course in the spring will use Excel and Tableau. There will be additional modules available for more advance Excel users and those who want to go beyond the basics in Tableau. I will not teach R as part of the class but will make available the R modules and handouts for students that are interested in learning R.
    Learning Objectives:
    Learn to make better tables- see example below
    ClearOffTheTableMd
    Learn to make better figures
    Grading:
    Please note that it is possible to audit the course or take the course S/N. I encourage students that are already taking a full load of classes to sign up for this class S/N, that way you can focus on learning the material and not on the letter grade.

    4 Problem Sets (each problem set is worth 15% of final grade). The problem sets will be due one week after being assigned and will need to be uploaded to Canvas before the start of class.

    If you are satisfied with your grades from the first 3 assignments, you do not have to turn in assignment 4. If you are not, you should turn in assignment 4 and I will drop the lowest of your assignment grades.


    1 Final Report (40% of final grade)
    Class Format:
    Meets twice a week for first half the semester. The majority of class time is spent doing in-class exercises.

    Modifications for online mode

    The fall 2021 class will be taught online while the two spring semester sessions will be in person. The motivation is to accommodate students who are not able to be vaccinated or who would otherwise have trouble making it to an in-person session of the class.

    · This will be a live synchronous class. All classes will be recorded, and recordings will be posted the next day.

    · During the in-class exercise portion of the class, two break-out rooms will be created. One breakout room is for advanced students who wish to go at their own pace and not follow along with the professor. The second breakout room is a place that students who need extra help can go to quickly get help from the TA and then rejoin the main room.

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57593/1233
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA5929_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 May 2021

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5929 Section 002: Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers (57597)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Tools for communicating quantitative information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way. Topics covered include 1) writing and speaking about data; 2) data management in Excel in order to prepare data for charting; 3) understanding and ability to deploy core concepts in of design, layout, typography and color to maximize the impact of their data visualizations 4) determining which types of statistical measures are most effective for each type of data and message; 5) determining which types of design to use for communicating quantitative information; and 6) designing graphs and tables that are intelligent and compelling for communicating quantitative information.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be REMOTE (synchronously online during the scheduled class time). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dorelien+PA5929+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    The class will have a practical approach, combining discussion and practical exercises. The course is designed to be like a walk-through, starting from collecting and organizing data and ending with advanced graph designs.

    The course in the spring will use Excel and Tableau. There will be additional modules available for more advance Excel users and those who want to go beyond the basics in Tableau. I will not teach R as part of the class but will make available the R modules and handouts for students that are interested in learning R.
    Learning Objectives:
    Learn to make better tables- see example below
    ClearOffTheTableMd
    Learn to make better figures
    Grading:
    Please note that it is possible to audit the course or take the course S/N. I encourage students that are already taking a full load of classes to sign up for this class S/N, that way you can focus on learning the material and not on the letter grade.

    4 Problem Sets (each problem set is worth 15% of final grade). The problem sets will be due one week after being assigned and will need to be uploaded to Canvas before the start of class.

    If you are satisfied with your grades from the first 3 assignments, you do not have to turn in assignment 4. If you are not, you should turn in assignment 4 and I will drop the lowest of your assignment grades.


    1 Final Report (40% of final grade)
    Class Format:
    Meets twice a week for first half the semester. The majority of class time is spent doing in-class exercises.

    Modifications for online mode

    The fall 2021 class will be taught online while the two spring semester sessions will be in person. The motivation is to accommodate students who are not able to be vaccinated or who would otherwise have trouble making it to an in-person session of the class.

    · This will be a live synchronous class. All classes will be recorded, and recordings will be posted the next day.

    · During the in-class exercise portion of the class, two break-out rooms will be created. One breakout room is for advanced students who wish to go at their own pace and not follow along with the professor. The second breakout room is a place that students who need extra help can go to quickly get help from the TA and then rejoin the main room.

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57597/1233
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA5929_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 May 2021

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5933 Section 001: Survey Methods: Designing Effective Questionnaires (57642)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Mon 04:00PM - 05:40PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Applied (hands-on) introduction to survey questionnaire design. Student teams design a questionnaire for a real or imaginary client, typically a non-profit/NGO or governmental agency. For example, students may draft and revise questions about respondents' demographics and employment; life histories; knowledge, use, and opinions about services; and anxiety and well-being. The class will spend two weeks on each module, actively engaging in class about draft questions, and through that practice, learning how to improve them. Survey questions will be entered into SurveyToGo, an app used offline on Windows devices to collect data, and questionnaire will be tested on a small number of volunteers. Students will learn: - The process of questionnaire design in a team - Basic pitfalls of survey design - names, definitions, examples. - How to use Excel to track questions, coded responses, and prompts for interviewers - How to use interviewing software SurveyToGo This class is not a substitute for a comprehensive survey research class or a statistical course on sampling and weighting.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dlevison+PA5933+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This 2-credit full-semester class provides an applied (hands-on) introduction to designing survey questionnaires. Students will learn:

    ·How to design a questionnaire in a team
    ·Best practices for survey and question design.
    ·Basic pitfalls of survey design - names, definitions,examples.
    ·How to use Google Sheets to track questions, coded responses, and prompts for interviewers
    ·Some of us may learn to program survey software Qualtrics

    This class is not the equivalent of a comprehensive survey research class (e.g. EPSY 5244 or PubH 6810) or a statistical course on sampling and weighting (e.g. STAT 5201). Instead, it takes a learning-by-doing approach to one part of the survey process: designing questions for a questionnaire.

    Each time it is taught, student teams will design a questionnaire for a client. In 2020 the client was a UMN doctoral student studying Black women who obtained PhDs in the US while raising biological, adoptive or foster children. In 2022 the client will be the Humphrey School, which needs an exit survey for graduating masters students.


    The syllabus will evolve depending in part on the needs of the client. A full syllabus will not be available at the beginning of class for this reason. The 2020 syllabus (final) is attached, but note that readings related to understanding respondents will be lighter in 2022.

    The class will spend two weeks on each module, actively engaging in class about draft questions and through that practice learning how to improve them. Students will not conduct the survey, apart from test interviews.


    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Any graduate student.
    Grading:
    Grade break-down (approximate, to be revised slightly):

    60% Teams: ten items by @ 6% each - first drafts; second drafts with tracked changes. (#1-10)
    5% Teams: turn in final questionnaire in Excel (#11)
    5% Individual: cognitive interviewing memo re: pilot test of survey questions
    15% Individual: posts & mini-quizzes
    15% Class participation, including group members grading each other
    Exam Format:
    None
    Class Format:
    Mini-lectures & discussions. The class is expected to take place in-person. It is possible that a small number of sessions will be remote.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57642/1233
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dlevison_PA5933_Spring2022.pdf (Spring 2022)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    31 October 2021

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5962 Section 001: State Governing and Legislating: Working the Process (57605)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    The Minnesota Capitol and rules and reality of state governance and legislating. Classroom discussions, high-profile guest speakers (including legislators, lobbyists and potentially the governor), and an extensive State Capitol practicum to explore state politics and policies.
    Class Notes:
    Note: A practicum in Spring 2022 is part of the course requirements. Students must contact the instructor, Briana Bierschbach, at brianabierschbach@gmail.com by December 14, 2021 to obtain a permission number and to arrange a practicum. More info at http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bier0136+PA5962+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    Using the Minnesota Capitol as our laboratory, this course will dive into the rules and reality of state governance and legislating. The course will include classroom discussions, guest speakers and a significant State Capitol practicum to give you a deep look into state politics and policies.

    This is a praxis-oriented course, not a theoretical course. You are expected to be active learners, absorbing readings, lectures, guest speakers' talks and your practicums to become equipped to understand and operate within the state decision-making process.

    The goal of this class: If you participate fully and complete this course, by the end, you should be prepared to approach a job or issue in state government with an understanding of the role you can play and the roles of those around you.

    Briana Bierschbach is a veteran Minnesota political reporter who covers politics for the Star-Tribune. She has also worked for Minnesota Public Radio. She has covered state politics and campaigns for nearly a decade with publications like the Associated Press, Politics in Minnesota and MinnPost. She's been twice named one of the top political journalists in Minnesota by the Washington Post and was the Society of Professional Journalists' 2015 Young Journalist of the Year.

    Note: A practicum in Spring 2022 is part of the course requirements. Students must contact the instructor, Briana Bierschbach, at bier0136@umn.edu by December 14, 2021 to obtain a permission number and to arrange a practicum. More info at http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bier0136+PA5962+Spring2022


    Learning Objectives:
    ● Identify and analyze the pressures on state government and individuals in state government.

    ● Explore the real world relationship between elected officials, lobbyists, interests groups, voters and the public.

    ● Gain the ability to interact with powerful decision-makers, by listening with respect and questioning with authority.

    ● Improve public speaking skills through practice.

    ● Develop the tools to build relationships within state government and have a network of resources to tap.

    Grading:
    Final paper - 30%

    Practicum - 30%

    Class participation -- 16%

    Other assignments -- 12%

    Question memos -- 12%

    There is no extra credit in this class.


    A = 100% - 90%

    B = 89% - 79%

    C = 78% - 69%

    D = 68% - 59%

    F = less than 59%

    Exam Format:
    No exams
    Class Format:
    Discussions/guest speakers
    Workload:
    8 hours per week practicum at the Capitol

    Three monthly reports from the practicum

    Weekly question memos/short readings to prepare for speakers

    Active participation in class

    Final project on issue/bill and mid-semester memo outlining project

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57605/1233
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bier0136_PA5962_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    3 November 2021

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5972 Section 001: Elections and the Law (57588)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Meets With:
    PA 3972 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Theories and basic structure of the American legal system. Experience with basic tools and skills for using the law to understand and analyze issues facing election administrators across the nation. Use of election-related and non-election related materials to prepare election administrators for interacting with counsel, legislators and the courts in carrying out their responsibilities.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?choat024+PA5972+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57588/1233

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5975 Section 001: Election Design (57630)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Meets With:
    PA 3975 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Election administration design principles, including ballot and polling place design and poll worker training materials. Application of principles of field.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wquesenb+PA5975+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    An innovative course on design principles and their application to the election administration field (2.0 credits). At the end of this course, students will be able to:
    ● Identify good and bad design in election materials and use that knowledge to review materials or provide input to people creating election materials.
    ● Practice basic election design including plain language, layout, and design as applied to common election materials such as voter information, how-to- vote instructions, poll worker and candidate manuals, forms, and ballots.
    ● Apply design principles to real election materials within typical time, financial, and legislative constraints.
    ● Evaluate the usability of election materials for voters and other users, using a variety of techniques.

    Why take this course?

    1. Every election official is really an election designer. Every time you write a notice, share news on social media, or update a form, you are designing. This course will help you be a more intentional designer and communicate more clearly. It's a good career move.

    2. It's practical.
    There are no papers to write. No long journal articles to read. The entire course is structured around practical exercises based in real problems in election administration. We encourage students to work on materials from their own experience, and to collaborate with others.

    ● If you are already working in an election department, you can get a jump start on improving the design of anything (or everything) in your office.
    ● If you want to work in an election department, you'll leave the course with a portfolio that will make your resume shine.
    ● If you are a designer who wants to know more about election design, you'll leave with a strong understanding of the constraints and opportunities - knowledge you can put to use in any civic design project.

    3. You'll learn with and from others.
    Remote learning doesn't have be lonely. We encourage positive sharing, learning from others, and collaboration. All the class materials are online, and so is our class discussion, so you can be part of the class community no matter what time zone you live in.

    4. Usability testing!
    Admit it. You love the idea, but have never been able to give it a try. We spend 2 units to get you started, supporting you all the way. Gathering input from users (voters, candidates, and others) is part of all the assignments, so you'll have plenty of chances to build your skills. You'll leave the course with confidence because you'll get guidance and practice. You'll be a usability testing champ.

    5. Teachers you can talk to.
    You'll have two super-experienced election designers (that's us) teaching the course and leading you through the material, with feedback every week. The topics and materials are drawn from our years of work in commercial user experience and election design in dozens of states, with plenty of examples. We love teaching. We also love learning from our students.

    Course outline
    Week 1: Election design and the voter journey
    Week 2-3: Plain language and writing instructions
    Weeks 4-5: Introduction to usability testing
    Week 6: Accessibility
    Week 7: Course project: select your project
    Week 8: Designing election department websites
    Week 9: Election guides and voter education
    Week 10: Creating forms and legal notices
    Week 11: Designing ballots and polling places
    Week 12: Communicating with voters
    Weeks 13-15: Course project: revise, test, revise
    Week 16: Course wrap up

    Grading:
    ● Participation in class discussions contribute to 30% of your final grade
    ● Written Assignments contribute to 40% of your final grade
    ● The final Election Design course project, including a VoiceThread presentation and peer feedback video discussion contributes to 30% of your final grade.

    Exam Format:
    There is no exam
    Class Format:
    This is an online course, with regular support from your instructors. Each module includes background reading, thoughtful self-directed exercises, and an assignment. There is a forum to discuss your work with instructors and fellow students - and collaboration is encourage.
    Workload:
    There are readings and assignments each week, so the work in this course requires steady participation. There are also project weeks, when you can catch up (or get ahead).
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57630/1233
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/wquesenb_dchisnel_PA3975_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/wquesenb_dchisnel_PA5975_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    16 November 2017

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5976 Section 001: Voter Participation (57614)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Meets With:
    PA 3976 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    03/14/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Voter participation issues and challenges including historical survey of voter participation in US and methods to increase voter turnout.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?aochoa+PA5976+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57614/1233

    Spring 2023  |  PA 5984 Section 001: Elections Security: How to Protect America's Elections (57620)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Meets With:
    PA 3984 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    01/17/2023 - 03/13/2023
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    "Elections Security" uses the Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election as a case study to identify the vulnerabilities of US elections (especially state voter registration databases) as well as catalogue new protections. Readings and discussion will focus on best practices and technology options available to the public (social media) and elections professionals (cybersecurity) in guarding against future influence efforts and assuring public confidence in election outcomes. Special focus will be given to describing how local election officials can protect their election technology, most notably those vulnerabilities associated with their voting system and voter registration database. "Elections Security" will draw heavily on concrete cases and challenges facing election professionals, using government and independent reports and an indepth analysis of new resources created by the US Department of Homeland Security and its collaborations with election professionals.
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57620/1233

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8004 Section 001: Integrative Doctoral Seminar in Public Affairs II (57585)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Public Affairs PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Tue 11:30AM - 02:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 173
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Continues PA 8003. Lays foundation for doctoral-level study of public affairs through introduction of key concepts, literature, research questions of public affairs. Critically examines paradigms/methodologies through readings, discussions, writing assignments, research presentations. Facilitates development of dissertation research ideas. prereq: Public Affairs doctoral student
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jbsoss+PA8004+Spring2023
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57585/1233

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8005 Section 001: Doctoral Research Seminar in Public Affairs (57590)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Public Affairs PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Wed 08:15AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 8 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Conduct of research, including ethics. Students develop and refine their research ideas. Facilitates development of dissertation research prospectus. prereq: Public Affairs doctoral student
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?linds301+PA8005+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57590/1233

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8006 Section 001: Current Research in Public Affairs: Topics, Approaches, and Cultures (57598)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Public Affairs PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Mon 12:05PM - 01:20PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students participate in research seminars exploring current topics, approaches, and cultures in public affairs. Students responsible for discussion, presentation, and evaluation of research, including peer review of papers and presentations. Discussion of research ethics and skills, including literature reviews, research design, data visualization, public engagement, presentation, and project management.
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57598/1233

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8082 Section 001: Professional Paper-Writing Seminar (57643)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Wed 08:15AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 12 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Facilitates completion of research paper on current issues in public policy, management, and science, technology and environment. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives studied in core courses. Written report includes analysis of issue, policy recommendations. All topics accepted. Plan A students welcome. prereq: completion of core courses, or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dlevison+PA8082+Spring2023
    Class Description:
    Course objective: to help 2nd+ year masters students finish high-quality, well-written individual Professional Papers or Plan A Papers by the end of the semester.

    This seminar provides a supportive environment in which students can make regular progress on papers, but it does not dictate how that should happen. The seminar avoids a one-size-fits-all approach to paper-writing. There does not exist one correct series of tasks to produce an excellent paper. Different projects require quite different starting points and different processes.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Required for Humphrey masters students writing professional papers in Spring semester. Space permitting, PhD students may join the group to write dissertation papers.
    Learning Objectives:
    Graduate school is a time when students are expected to gain substantial knowledge about topics within their areas of expertise and demonstrate their ability to conduct analysis of such topics. Conceptualizing, planning, producing, and polishing a professional paper or Plan A thesis not only train students how to do a substantial in-depth study but also demonstrates this ability to future employers. Other objectives of this seminar include (1) improved writing skills and (2) improved ability to give feedback to others.
    Grading:
    Students who complete each requirement for each week, in a timely manner, will get an A
    or A- in the class. The two hardest things to do are (1) make progress each and every week; and (2) give high-quality feedback to your classmates.
    Exam Format:
    No exams.
    Class Format:
    In-person seminar format.
    Workload:
    Students are expected to:

    Attend every meeting of the seminar. Anyone who cannot attend due to illness should contact the instructor via email before class begins. Unexcused absences and systematic lateness will lower your grade.

    Complete assigned reading, such as Howard Becker's Writing for Social Scientists (which is fun reading, believe it or not, as well as being useful). Because you will be reading extensively in the area of your paper topic, I assign relatively little additional reading - but I expect you to do it before the class for which it is assigned. We will discuss assigned reading in class.

    Report-in at each class. Questions asked each week include: What goals did you have for today? Did you meet them or not? What are reasonable goals for next week? Are those goals consistent with your work plan for the semester?

    Post a each week, including brief responses to the reporting-in questions; expect to elaborate on them in class. Consider bringing the draft version of next week's worksheet to class for your own notes.

    Post your latest (an outline, some written pages, a table, a figure, etc.) for volunteers who will give you feedback on them.

    mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";
    mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">• Review short drafts (e.g., outlines, text, tables, figures) and provide high-quality mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";
    mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">
    mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";
    mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">for 1 or 2 other students (which ones will be decided in class), before the next meeting, with a goal of making supportive suggestions and clarifying edits.

    Give verbal feedback to group members at each meeting, including questions and suggestions.

    In one class, make a brief (2 minute) presentation summarizing the most important points in the assigned reading(s), and lead a short discussion about them. I will help to lead the discussion, but you should think of two questions or issues that would be helpful to discuss as a group.

    Make regular and substantial progress on professional papers. Doing no work on the paper for three weeks then working hard for one week is unacceptable. Effort is expected to be regular, even if progress is sporadic. Sporadic effort will lower your grade even if the final product is good.• Produce grammatically correct writing. If you have trouble with grammar, you will need to ask someone to help you make corrections. Your classmates will help you to some extent if you ask them, but typically not enough to catch all the problems. You may need to get help from someone outside of class. UM's Center for Writing may be of assistance: http://writing.umn.edu/sws/index.htm, but they will not edit your paper for you. They will help you learn how to write better, however.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57643/1233
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dlevison_PA8082_Spring2022.docx (Spring 2022)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    31 October 2021

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8331 Section 001: Economic Demography (57628)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    Mon 04:40PM - 07:25PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Classical theory, advanced econometric methods, recent empirical work, and available datasets for research in economic demography. Topics include the economics of mortality, fertility, migration, marriage, women's labor supply, intra-family bargaining, and age structure. Students develop critical analysis and academic discourse skills through in-depth discussions and replications of papers, presentations, referee-style writing assignments, and a term paper. prereq: Grad-level economic theory (PA 5021 or equiv) and econometrics (PA 5033 or equiv) and instructor permission
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jannaj+PA8331+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    This course will expose you to the major economic theories in demography, including those of migration, mortality, fertility, marriage, family formation, and others. We will also discuss recent empirical work on these same topics and explore the difficulties of causal inference in demography. You will have the opportunity to lead discussions and prepare lectures on demographic topics of your choice.

    This course is targeted toward PhD students and master's students considering a PhD. As it is a small seminar-style class, course participation and attendance is mandatory, and a permission number is required for enrollment. Please contact the instructor with any questions, and to receive a permission number.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    PhD students interested in demographic topics, regardless of degree program, and Master's students thinking about continuing their academic training in demographic-related fields
    Exam Format:
    No exams are given in this course.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57628/1233
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jannaj_PA8331_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    5 November 2021

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8444 Section 001: FTE: Doctoral (57594)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    No Grade Associated
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Advanced Doctoral Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 200 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    FTE: Doctoral prereq: Doctoral student, adviser and DGS consent
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57594/1233

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8777 Section 001: Thesis Credits: Master's (57543)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-18 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    50 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    No Grade Associated
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 200 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    (No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]
    Class Description:
    (No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]. Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57543/1233
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    20 October 2015

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8888 Section 001: Thesis Credit: Doctoral (57595)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-24 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    100 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    No Grade Associated
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA PhD and ETCR or Doct
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 100 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Doctoral thesis credit. prereq: [Max 18 cr per semester or summer], 24 cr required
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57595/1233

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8921 Section 001: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (57562)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Notes:
    If you wish to register for a section of PA 8921, please contact MPP adviser Joel Mixon in the Humphrey School Student Services office.
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57562/1233
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8922 Section 001: Master's Paper: Plan B (57587)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Masters of science in science, technology, and environmental policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Plan B. prereq: instr consent
    Class Notes:
    If you wish to register for a section of PA 8922, please contact Joel Mixon.
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57587/1233
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8991 Section 001: Independent Study (57536)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    0.5-4 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
    Class Notes:
    Contact Stacey Grimes (grime004@umn.edu) to have an 8991 section set up with the faculty member with whom you wish to work after consulting your professional adviser.
    Class Description:
    Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57536/1233
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8991 Section 002: Independent Study (57537)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    0.5-4 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
    Class Notes:
    "Collaborative Initiatives Consulting Project - Leveraging Cross-Sector Engagement to Enhance the Teacher of Color Pipeline in Minnesota" 4 credits with Kathy Quick. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksquick+PA8991+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Title: Collaborative Initiative Consulting Project - Leveraging Cross-Sector Engagement to Enhance the Teacher of Color Pipeline in Minnesota - 4 cr.
    This course presents graduate students from diverse professional and graduate schools with the opportunity to participate in the development and launch of a cross-sector collaborative initiative, to work on a complex, important issue in our state, and to make connections with rising leaders from the Minnesota Young American Leaders Program and the senior leader who is mentoring their initiative. This project focuses on utilizing intentional and coordinated cross-sector collaboration to enhance the early stages of the teacher of color and indigenous teacher pipeline. More details can be found here.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57537/1233
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    18 November 2021

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8991 Section 003: Independent Study (57550)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    0.5-4 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
    Class Description:
    Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57550/1233
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2023  |  PA 8991 Section 010: Independent Study (57542)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    0.5-4 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
    Class Notes:
    This section is for students taking a regular Independent Study section with Professor Kathy Quick.
    Class Description:
    Title: Collaborative Initiative Consulting Project - Leveraging Cross-Sector Engagement to Enhance the Teacher of Color Pipeline in Minnesota - 4 cr.
    This course presents graduate students from diverse professional and graduate schools with the opportunity to participate in the development and launch of a cross-sector collaborative initiative, to work on a complex, important issue in our state, and to make connections with rising leaders from the Minnesota Young American Leaders Program and the senior leader who is mentoring their initiative. This project focuses on utilizing intentional and coordinated cross-sector collaboration to enhance the early stages of the teacher of color and indigenous teacher pipeline. More details can be found here.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57542/1233
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    18 November 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 1401 Section 001: Public Affairs: Community Organizing Skills for Public Action (23791)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 36 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Public affairs work, roles of citizens in democratic way of life. Community organizing skills, their importance for public affairs. Negotiations among diverse audiences, understanding different interests, mapping power relationships. Relevant public affairs and governance theory.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?donov013+PA1401+Fall2022
    Class Description:

    *meets University of Minnesota Liberal Education requirement for Citizenship/Public Ethics Theme"


    This course is a hands-on introduction for undergraduate students wanting to develop the skills, confidence, and knowledge to become empowered agents of change.This course involves an examination of key concepts of citizenship, politics, ethics, and democracy, as well as hands-on experiential learning in problem solving skills and team work especially from the framework called Civic Studies, developed to address the challenge of collective action in a world of often radically different ethical frameworks.


    The goal of this class is to:

    1. Give students a hands on introduction to organizing skills such as public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings.

    2. Enable students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives

    3. To provide stages for students' public speaking

    4. Open the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers

    5, To acquaint students with the methods and outlook of community organizing tradition in America as a strand of the emerging "Civic Studies" field

    6. To provide students with an introduction to the approach to ethics in Civic Studies, compared to other approaches. Such topics include: mass incarceration, racism, immigration, climate change, education, gender issues, etc.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Students should take this class if they like classes that are co-created by students and instructor and are engaging. All disciplines and years are welcome. During this time in our history, people want to acquire knowledge and skills of how to solve public problems.. This course provides knowledge, skills and practice for creating change.
    Learning Objectives:
    This course will help students acquire skills for effective citizenship and life-long learning through the course goals of:
    • Acquainting students with Civic Studies and the community organizing tradition in America and the distinctive ways in which this framework addresses questions of ethical pluralism
    • Giving students a hands on introduction to organizing skills for civic agency, such as writing, public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings
    • Enabling students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives
    • Providing stages for students' public speaking
    • Opening the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers
    Grading:
    40% Two Essays
    20% Weekly Reflections on Readings
    20% In-Class Participation
    20% Public Work Project
    Exam Format:
    No exams.
    Class Format:
    Discussion based with some lecture. All are teachers and learners. You will learn how to become a change agent through active learning.
    Workload:
    50 Pages of Reading Per Week (average)
    30-45 Pages of Individual Writing, Including Weekly Reading Reflections
    3 Short Papers
    1 Public Work Project Report
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23791/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2020.docx (Fall 2020)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    14 July 2020

    Fall 2022  |  PA 3001 Section 001: Changing the World: Contemporary Public Policy (23841)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Foundation for understanding the what, who, where, and how of public policy making. These components are explored from different perspectives while delving into questions such as: What is public policy good for? Who decides policy priorities? What effect does public policy actually have in solving public problems? How can we improve public policy making? After successfully completing this course, students will understand the process, structure, and context of policymaking; identify who, how, and what influences the policy process; and apply knowledge of public policy and the policymaking process to a specific policy issue. A strong understanding of the American political system is encouraged.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online in Fall 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bfh+PA3001+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23841/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 3002 Section 001: Basic Methods of Policy Analysis (23775)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to policy analysis. Theoretical foundations/practical methods of analysis. Tools for problem definition, data collection/analysis, presentation techniques, implementation strategies. Multidisciplinary case-study approach.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be taught synchronously REMOTE during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?diazx141+PA3002+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    The complex economic, political and social issues that define our world are not easily solved. PA 3002 teaches students to apply the methods and techniques of the social science discipline to address these multifaceted challenges that increasingly confront public agencies and nonprofit organizations.


    PA 3002 is designed for students who share an interest in quantitative techniques to analyze issues of public policy. This multidisciplinary course is appropriate for students from various undergraduate majors, including economics, political science, business and other social sciences. In particular, this introductory course provides a firm academic and technical background for students preparing for graduate studies and careers in public and nonprofit organizations at the local, state, national and international levels.

    Grading:
    Ungraded Assignments, which must be printed (typed and/or printed spreadsheets, some of which are provided), and brought to the class for the lecture and discussion. These assignments will not be graded, but will be collected at the end of the class. The problems and case studies will be solved together in class, so students should be prepared to actively participate in these joint class discussions and problem-solving.

    Participation points (1 per class), which represent 30% of the total grade.

    Graded Assignments, must be printed, and are due at the beginning of the assigned class period, since the assignment will be discussed during the class. involve actual comprehensive policy analyses, and allow students to demonstrate their mastery of the analytical and communication skills they have learned. These case studies constitute 40% of the final grade. Groups and cases will be assigned half way through the course.


    Participation 30 points
    Graded Assignments 30 points
    Group Presentation 40 points
    Total 100 points

    Points for Grades
    90.0 & Above
    87.5-89.9
    83.5-87.4
    80.0-83.4
    77.5-79.9
    73.5-77.4
    70.0-73.4
    67.5-69.9
    63.5-67.4
    60.0-63.4
    59.9 & Below

    An I (Incomplete) may be assigned at the instructor's discretion if, due to extraordinary circumstances, the student was unavoidably prevented from completing course work on time. An Incomplete requires a written agreement between the instructor and the student specifying the time and manner in which the student will complete the unfinished work
    Exam Format:
    There are no exams.
    Class Format:
    Class time is approximately 40 percent lecture, 30 percent interactive discussion and
    30 percent small group activity.
    Workload:
    Workload averages about 30 pages of reading per week, seven ungraded assignments, six graded assignments, one group case presentation, all of which are designed to help students apply the policy concepts and practical techniques learned in class.

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23775/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    15 June 2016

    Fall 2022  |  PA 3969 Section 001: Survey of Election Administration (23803)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Election Administration cert
    Meets With:
    PA 5971 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Survey of building blocks of election administration, from voter registration to recounts.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wils2343+PA3969+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23803/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 3973 Section 001: Strategic Management of Election Administration (23843)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Meets With:
    DDS 6431 Section 001
    DT 5430 Section 001
    PA 5973 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    09/06/2022 - 10/24/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Strategic management for election administrators in the political environment. Election official tools and challenges. The role of the lawmaking process in budgeting and organizational planning.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ljacobs+PA3973+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23843/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 3982 Section 001: Data Analysis for Election Administration (23845)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Meets With:
    PA 5982 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Evidence-based election administration. Collection and analysis of quantitative data to solve problems and identify opportunities for improvement. Emphasis on pre-election forecasting for planning purposes and post-election auditing of election results.
    Class Notes:
    Remote sessions will be held on 9/8/21, 11/2/21, and 11/30/21 from 5:00-6:00 p.m. Centrail Time. All other work will be asynchronous. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA3982+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23845/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/tpatrick_PA3982_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)

    Fall 2022  |  PA 3985 Section 001: Physical Election Security (23847)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Meets With:
    PA 5985 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    10/25/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    U.S. Homeland Security designated election security as a "critical infrastructure" after threats from foreign governments, and collaborates with states in detecting and responding to foreign interference. This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of the current security context and best practices and processes for physically safeguarding elections based on 2016 and 2020. Students will learn the difference between physical and cyber threats to U.S. systems; tangible steps to protect election offices and their equipment; the use of audits to ensure the accuracy of elections; the integration of security into vendor relationships; and the connection between physical election security and citizen trust in elections. Content will be explored through readings (including government documents and studies), videos, discussions, and writing assignments.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?choat024+PA3985+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23847/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 4101 Section 001: Nonprofit Management and Governance (23761)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue 05:30PM - 08:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Managing/governing nonprofit/public organizations. Theories, concepts, real-world examples. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of different funding environments, management of multiple constituencies.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?yang0248+PA4101+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23761/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 4200 Section 001: Urban and Regional Planning (23757)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Fundamental principles of urban/regional land-use planning. Introduction to planning theory and its applications. Political-economic context of urban/regional planning.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?douma002+PA4200+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This course is geared toward upper division undergraduates who are curious about a career in urban and regional planning, or simply want to know how planning works and affects our lives. It provides an introductory overview of planning theory and practice, with primary attention to current issues in planning practice in the U.S. The content covers land use, urban design, transportation, community development, housing, and environmental planning problems within the broader context of the historic development of cities, political processes, and regional and national economic forces. Attention to the planning process, or how planning actually occurs, represents a constant theme in the course. The first half of the class is largely lecture based, to provide a common foundation for the class, culminating in the mid-term exam. The 2nd half is a small group exercise where small groups of students create draft comprehensive plans for hypothetical urban areas, and present them to a guest jury. After this course, you will be expected to: Identify how major social, political, and economic forces have shaped urban development in the U.S.; Understand the primary tenets of the urban planning profession; Describe approaches for examining urban form and function; Discuss whose interests are served (and not served) by urban planners and plans; and Evaluate and suggest responses to current policy and planning challenges affecting U.S. urban areas, with a particular focus on the Twin Cities. Over the course of the semester, you will gain an appreciation for the complexity of urban areas and an understanding of what urban planners do and the possibilities and limitations that they face. In summary, if you have any interest in knowing how cities and metropolitan areas develop and function the way they do, you should find the class interesting, and engaging, and perhaps even enjoyable!
    Grading:
    20% Midterm Exam
    30% Reports/Papers
    10% Reflection Papers
    20% In-class Presentations
    10% Class Participation
    10% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: "other" 10% is grading from small group peers
    Exam Format:
    In class: multiple choice, short answer and essay
    Class Format:
    30% Lecture
    25% Discussion
    25% Small Group Activities
    10% Guest Speakers
    10% Service Learning
    Workload:
    20 Pages Reading Per Week
    20 Pages Writing Per Term
    1 Exam(s)
    2 Paper(s)
    1 Presentation(s)
    1 Special Project(s)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23757/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/douma002_PA4200_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/douma002_PA4200_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/douma002_PA4200_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    16 March 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5002 Section 001: Introduction to Policy Analysis (23758)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    09/06/2022 - 10/24/2022
    Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 33 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5002+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    (updated July 21, 2021)
    Policy analysis is a central component of our MPP program. In this course, students read the classic text by Eugene Bardach (with new coauthor Eric Patashnik) called A Practical Guide for Policy Analysis: the Eightfold Path to More Effective Problem Solving. The most recent edition is the 6th from 2019, but students can purchase older versions instead. Without listing each of the 8 steps here, note that we will start with an emphasis on problem definition: what is the problem we are trying to solve? We will discuss criteria that will allow us to think about the desirability of various policy options. Discussion will emphasize the role of evidence. What information do we need and where do policymakers get their knowledge about policies?


    TWO IMPORTANT POINTS about this class in Fall of 2021:

    1) This course does NOT need to be taken in the first semester of the MPP program. Ideally students in the MPP program will enroll in this course before the final semester as it will be of great use for the capstone project.


    2) The required textbook costs about $25 and students may be able to find a used copy (or a previous edition) for less. Required textbook: A Practical Guide for Policy Analysis: the Eight Fold Path to More Effective Problem Solving by Eugene Bardach and Eric Patashnik, 6th edition (2019). The 5th or 4th editions are also fine.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    MPP students and others interested in learning about policy analysis. Permission of instructor required if not enrolled in a Humphrey School degree graduate program in which PA 5002 is a required course. Priority given to students who require course to graduate.
    Learning Objectives:
    Students will engage in activities that satisfy many of the learning objectives of our MPP program. These include (1) using diverse sources of quantitative and qualitative evidence to define and structure policy problems, develop criteria for selecting among policy options, and make consise policy recommendations that convey tradeoffs among alternatives; (2) explain the limitations of evidence and the implications of uncertainty for policy making; (3) write clear, short and pervasive policy briefs for audiences with varying backgrounds and (4) make clear, short and pervasive presentations.
    Grading:
    Grades will be based on a variety of individual and group assignments and projects. No final exam.
    Class Format:
    Class time will include lecture, discussions by class, and work in groups.
    Workload:
    The university's policy titled "Expected student academic work per credit" indicates that at least two additional hours of work per week is expected for each hour of class time.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23758/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 July 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5002 Section 002: Introduction to Policy Analysis (23782)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    10/25/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5002+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    (updated July 21, 2021)
    Policy analysis is a central component of our MPP program. In this course, students read the classic text by Eugene Bardach (with new coauthor Eric Patashnik) called A Practical Guide for Policy Analysis: the Eightfold Path to More Effective Problem Solving. The most recent edition is the 6th from 2019, but students can purchase older versions instead. Without listing each of the 8 steps here, note that we will start with an emphasis on problem definition: what is the problem we are trying to solve? We will discuss criteria that will allow us to think about the desirability of various policy options. Discussion will emphasize the role of evidence. What information do we need and where do policymakers get their knowledge about policies?


    TWO IMPORTANT POINTS about this class in Fall of 2021:

    1) This course does NOT need to be taken in the first semester of the MPP program. Ideally students in the MPP program will enroll in this course before the final semester as it will be of great use for the capstone project.


    2) The required textbook costs about $25 and students may be able to find a used copy (or a previous edition) for less. Required textbook: A Practical Guide for Policy Analysis: the Eight Fold Path to More Effective Problem Solving by Eugene Bardach and Eric Patashnik, 6th edition (2019). The 5th or 4th editions are also fine.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    MPP students and others interested in learning about policy analysis. Permission of instructor required if not enrolled in a Humphrey School degree graduate program in which PA 5002 is a required course. Priority given to students who require course to graduate.
    Learning Objectives:
    Students will engage in activities that satisfy many of the learning objectives of our MPP program. These include (1) using diverse sources of quantitative and qualitative evidence to define and structure policy problems, develop criteria for selecting among policy options, and make consise policy recommendations that convey tradeoffs among alternatives; (2) explain the limitations of evidence and the implications of uncertainty for policy making; (3) write clear, short and pervasive policy briefs for audiences with varying backgrounds and (4) make clear, short and pervasive presentations.
    Grading:
    Grades will be based on a variety of individual and group assignments and projects. No final exam.
    Class Format:
    Class time will include lecture, discussions by class, and work in groups.
    Workload:
    The university's policy titled "Expected student academic work per credit" indicates that at least two additional hours of work per week is expected for each hour of class time.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23782/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 July 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5003 Section 001: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (23744)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    09/06/2022 - 10/24/2022
    Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 36 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kiedr003+PA5003+Fall2021
    Class Description:

    The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good." In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of financial analysis and management.


    This is an introductory course to financial analysis and management in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.


    Who Should Take This Class?:
    This course is required for MPP, MDP, and Nonprofit Certificate students. It is recommended for MPA students.
    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the semester, students should be able:

    • To obtain basic knowledge and terminology of budgeting and financial management;

    • To summarize budgetary process, revenues, and expenditures of a public or nonprofit organization;

    • To apply basic tools of financial analysis, such as break-even analysis and marginal cost analysis, in making simple financial decisions;

    • To know how financial information is organized and reported in the accounting system;

    • To interpret data in financial statements and relate them with each other; and

    • To determine and calculate financial ratios to assess financial condition

    Grading:
    Each class there will be an assignment that you are to prepare and submiy via email (You may work with others in completing the assignments.). These will not be graded. You should actively participate in class discussions and class problem-solving. Class discussion, timely assignment completion, and on-line attendance count toward your participation grade. Participation represents 12 points of your grade.

    There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course taken at the Humphrey School. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.

    The final assignment is a group project in which you will review the financials of a real government or nonprofit organization and present your findings to the class in person. You will be assigned to groups in the second week of class. The group should submit a 5+ page paper of your findings at the last class. The group will also present a power point presentation (no more than 10
    minutes) of the findings at the last class. The group should provide me a copy of the power points and any other information that would be helpful. This group paper (20 points) and presentation (8 points) are worth 28 points.

    First Test 30 points Second Test 30 points Group Project 28 points Class Participation 12 points Total 100 points
    Exam Format:
    There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.
    Class Format:
    This is a "flipped" course. Students will watch normal lectures on videos at home. There are 8 class periods. Class time is used to review material, solve assignments, review additional videos and/or material, and take exams.
    Workload:
    6 Homework Assignment(s).
    2 Exams In person.
    1 Group Presentation in person. Students indicate that the workload is similar to other Humphrey courses. Generally, 3-5 hours per class is required.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23744/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2020.docx (Spring 2020)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2018.docx (Summer 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2018.docx (Spring 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2017.docx (Summer 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2017.docx (Spring 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2015.docx (Summer 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    10 November 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5003 Section 002: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (23745)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    10/25/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kiedr003+PA5003+Fall2021
    Class Description:

    The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good." In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of financial analysis and management.


    This is an introductory course to financial analysis and management in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.


    Who Should Take This Class?:
    This course is required for MPP, MDP, and Nonprofit Certificate students. It is recommended for MPA students.
    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the semester, students should be able:

    • To obtain basic knowledge and terminology of budgeting and financial management;

    • To summarize budgetary process, revenues, and expenditures of a public or nonprofit organization;

    • To apply basic tools of financial analysis, such as break-even analysis and marginal cost analysis, in making simple financial decisions;

    • To know how financial information is organized and reported in the accounting system;

    • To interpret data in financial statements and relate them with each other; and

    • To determine and calculate financial ratios to assess financial condition

    Grading:
    Each class there will be an assignment that you are to prepare and submiy via email (You may work with others in completing the assignments.). These will not be graded. You should actively participate in class discussions and class problem-solving. Class discussion, timely assignment completion, and on-line attendance count toward your participation grade. Participation represents 12 points of your grade.

    There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course taken at the Humphrey School. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.

    The final assignment is a group project in which you will review the financials of a real government or nonprofit organization and present your findings to the class in person. You will be assigned to groups in the second week of class. The group should submit a 5+ page paper of your findings at the last class. The group will also present a power point presentation (no more than 10
    minutes) of the findings at the last class. The group should provide me a copy of the power points and any other information that would be helpful. This group paper (20 points) and presentation (8 points) are worth 28 points.

    First Test 30 points Second Test 30 points Group Project 28 points Class Participation 12 points Total 100 points
    Exam Format:
    There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.
    Class Format:
    This is a "flipped" course. Students will watch normal lectures on videos at home. There are 8 class periods. Class time is used to review material, solve assignments, review additional videos and/or material, and take exams.
    Workload:
    6 Homework Assignment(s).
    2 Exams In person.
    1 Group Presentation in person. Students indicate that the workload is similar to other Humphrey courses. Generally, 3-5 hours per class is required.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23745/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2020.docx (Spring 2020)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2018.docx (Summer 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2018.docx (Spring 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2017.docx (Summer 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2017.docx (Spring 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2015.docx (Summer 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    10 November 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5004 Section 001: Introduction to Planning (23743)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Urban/Regional Planning, major and minor or PA PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 48 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    History/institutional development of urban planning as profession. Intellectual foundations, planning theory. Roles of urban planners in U.S./international settings. Scope, legitimacy, limitations of planning/planning process. Issues in planning ethics/settings of diverse populations/stakeholders. prereq: Major/minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?allen650+PA5004+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    History, institutional development of urban planning as a profession. Intellectual foundations, planning theory. Roles of urban planners in U.S./international settings. Scope, legitimacy, limitations of planning and of planning process. Issues in planning ethics and in planning in settings of diverse populations/stakeholders.
    Learning Objectives:

    After this course, you will be able to:

    1. Identify how major social, political, and economic forces have shaped urban development in the U.S.;

    2. Locate the urban planning profession in the U.S. within the historical context of urbanization;

    3. Describe and compare theoretical approaches used by urban planners in their work;

    4. Discuss ethics in urban planning and whose interests are served (and not served) by urban planners and plans;

    5. Evaluate and generate responses to current policy and planning challenges affecting urban areas in the United States and abroad; and

    6. Demonstrate skills of written and oral analysis and communication.


    The goals and expectations of this course are ambitious, but no one will finish this course ready to become a practicing urban planner. Instead, over the course of the semester, you will gain a deeper appreciation for the complexity of urban areas and an understanding of what planners do and the possibilities and limitations that they face

    Grading:

    Participation 50 points (5%)

    Reading Responses 200 points (20%)

    Planning Meeting 50 points (5%)

    Planning Memo #1 200 points (20%)

    Planning Memo #2 250 points (25%)

    Final Exam 250 points (25%)

    Total Points 1,000 points (100%)
    Class Format:
    45% Lecture
    30% Discussion
    15% Small Group Activities
    10% Guest Speakers
    Workload:
    80-100 Pages of Reading per Week
    3 Memos
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23743/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/allen650_PA5004_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/allen650_PA5004_Fall2015.docx (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    17 October 2017

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5011 Section 001: Management of Organizations (23742)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 37 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Challenges facing higher-level managers in public and nonprofit organizations in mixed economy and democratic republic. Distinctive features of public and nonprofit management, skills necessary for effective management, manager's role as creator of public value. Lectures, case discussions.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be REMOTE (synchronously online during the scheduled time). Students may contact Stacey Grimes (grime004@umn.edu) regarding registration. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hurk0002+PA5011+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23742/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5012 Section 001: The Politics of Public Affairs (23765)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 70 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Stages of policy making from agenda setting to implementation. Role and behavior of political institutions, citizens, social movements, and interest groups. Concepts of political philosophy. Theories of state. Team taught, interdisciplinary course. Small discussion sections.
    Class Notes:
    PA 5012 will be delivered REMOTELY. It will meet synchronously online at the scheduled time. Students may use Blegen 150 to participate in this REMOTE class. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ljacobs+PA5012+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    America has witnessed four massive surges of protests and political organizing over the past decade: The Tea Party (started in 2010), Occupy Wall Street (occurred in September 2011), grassroots resistance following President Trump's election in 2016, and the ongoing demonstrations sparked by George Floyd's killing in Minneapolis on May 25, 2020. Each promised deep, enduring political change -- but what normative and legal impacts did they produce?

    Sophisticated agents of change appreciate that there are "varieties of politics," which offer discrete and interconnected avenues. Elections, legislation, and administrative and legal accountability - along with protests and community organizing - are used by political activists and policy entrepreneurs to produce or thwart change. Each modality of politics is distinctive, varying in terms of the types of actors involved; the resources that are required; the scope of political debate; the visibility of the policy design; and their potential consequences. If political change is the objective, which variety of politics is most feasible and potentially impactful?

    Time is a critical - often overlooked - dimension in politics. President Barack Obama's health reform and the conservative movement's attack on estate taxes not only produced change at one point in time but also influenced subsequent politics by generating new public expectations, interest groups, and government agencies committed to ongoing implementation. Politically astute reformers design progressive and conservative policies to secure change in the first instance and then to influence politics downstream.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.
    Grading:
    Paper, Two Group Projects, Final Examination, and 5 short discussion reports.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23765/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ljacobs_PA5012_Fall2020.pdf (Fall 2020)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ljacobs_monda006_PA5012_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ljacobs_monda006_PA5012_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    25 August 2020

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5013 Section 001: Law and Urban Land Use (23741)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Major/minor, Urb-Reg Planning
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    10/25/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Role of law in regulating/shaping urban development, land use, environmental quality, local/regional governmental services. Interface between public/private sector. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?rock0084+PA5013+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23741/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5021 Section 001: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (23783)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Major or minor Public Policy or STEP major or minor or Human Rights major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5021+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    The required textbook for this class is Microeconomics by Pindyck and Rubinfeld, 9th edition (2018). The 8th edition would work also. Students do not need to purchase a study guide nor are special access codes needed. Please try to find a good deal on this textbook so you don't have to pay full price!

    NEW INFO on textbook (updated August 16, 2021)

    The publisher (Pearson) has just offered a special price of $29 for the electronic version available through the U bookstore. If you purchase this ebook, you will find it waiting for you in Canvas (as I have been told!). This is a new option. You don't need to purchase any study guides or other accompanying materials.

    Here is the Bookstore info page on Inclusive Access. Per the page, "Upon enrolling in a course using Inclusive Access, students are considered opted in, and will be charged for the cost of the digital materials through their student account. Students will either receive access to their content through Canvas, along with a welcome email from noreply@verbasoftware.com, or in a separate email from the U of MN Bookstores by the first day of class.

    If students do not want to receive the digital course materials through Inclusive Access, they can opt out via the emailed link, or by emailing inclusiveaccess@umn.edu with their course information and requesting to opt out before the deadline. After this, a refund for the initial Inclusive Access charge will be issued, and the student will be considered opted out, meaning they will lose access to the Inclusive Access digital content."
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Most of the students will be first year MPP students, but students in other graduate degree programs are welcome to enroll. Most students will have had a prior microeconomics course, but that is not required. The Humphrey School offers an online review program called Foundations for Success that some students might want to look into that helps students review some basic algebra.
    Learning Objectives:
    The objective of this course is for you to understand consumer and firm decisions and to understand when government intervention in the private market may be efficient and/or equitable. We will explore how resources are allocated in a market economy and we will investigate the role of government in a market economy (or mixed economy) such as the United States. We will focus most of our time developing the analytical microeconomic tools needed to discuss efficiency and fairness concerns and throughout the semester we will apply these tools to various relevant public policy examples.
    This course contributes to several learning objectives for the MPP program, especially (3) "to analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve complex problems, and make decisions" and (4) to understand the role of government in a market economy.
    Grading:
    The course grade will be based on the homeworks ,in class exams,quizzes,and the cumulative final exam.
    Exam Format:
    The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, short one paragraph answers, and problems involving algebra and graphical analysis.
    Class Format:
    We'll be meeting in person this fall unless university directives change.
    Workload:
    The university's policy titled "Expected student academic work per credit" indicates that at least two additional hours of work per week is expected for each hour of class time for graduate students.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23783/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    17 August 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5021 Section 002: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (23849)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Discussion
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Fri 12:45PM - 01:35PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5021+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    The required textbook for this class is Microeconomics by Pindyck and Rubinfeld, 9th edition (2018). The 8th edition would work also. Students do not need to purchase a study guide nor are special access codes needed. Please try to find a good deal on this textbook so you don't have to pay full price!

    NEW INFO on textbook (updated August 16, 2021)

    The publisher (Pearson) has just offered a special price of $29 for the electronic version available through the U bookstore. If you purchase this ebook, you will find it waiting for you in Canvas (as I have been told!). This is a new option. You don't need to purchase any study guides or other accompanying materials.

    Here is the Bookstore info page on Inclusive Access. Per the page, "Upon enrolling in a course using Inclusive Access, students are considered opted in, and will be charged for the cost of the digital materials through their student account. Students will either receive access to their content through Canvas, along with a welcome email from noreply@verbasoftware.com, or in a separate email from the U of MN Bookstores by the first day of class.

    If students do not want to receive the digital course materials through Inclusive Access, they can opt out via the emailed link, or by emailing inclusiveaccess@umn.edu with their course information and requesting to opt out before the deadline. After this, a refund for the initial Inclusive Access charge will be issued, and the student will be considered opted out, meaning they will lose access to the Inclusive Access digital content."
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Most of the students will be first year MPP students, but students in other graduate degree programs are welcome to enroll. Most students will have had a prior microeconomics course, but that is not required. The Humphrey School offers an online review program called Foundations for Success that some students might want to look into that helps students review some basic algebra.
    Learning Objectives:
    The objective of this course is for you to understand consumer and firm decisions and to understand when government intervention in the private market may be efficient and/or equitable. We will explore how resources are allocated in a market economy and we will investigate the role of government in a market economy (or mixed economy) such as the United States. We will focus most of our time developing the analytical microeconomic tools needed to discuss efficiency and fairness concerns and throughout the semester we will apply these tools to various relevant public policy examples.
    This course contributes to several learning objectives for the MPP program, especially (3) "to analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve complex problems, and make decisions" and (4) to understand the role of government in a market economy.
    Grading:
    The course grade will be based on the homeworks ,in class exams,quizzes,and the cumulative final exam.
    Exam Format:
    The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, short one paragraph answers, and problems involving algebra and graphical analysis.
    Class Format:
    We'll be meeting in person this fall unless university directives change.
    Workload:
    The university's policy titled "Expected student academic work per credit" indicates that at least two additional hours of work per week is expected for each hour of class time for graduate students.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23849/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    17 August 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5021 Section 003: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (23759)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Major or minor Public Policy or STEP major or minor or Human Rights major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hanra003+PA5021+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy: intermediate microeconomics, macroeconomics, concepts of international trade. Both this section and the class taught be Judy Temple will be at a similar level. We will teach how to calculate derivatives, but will not have more calculus required beyond this. This approach will make it easier to understand class concepts and will not be much more challenging than standard applications using algebra.
    Grading:

    Homework assignments (15% of class grade)

    Short Memo and In-Class Debate (15% of grade)

    Two Quizzes (20% each; 40% of class grade)

    Final Exam (30% of class grade)


    (There must be class participation and reactions (look towards syllabus for more information on participation and reactions.))

    Exam Format:

    FINAL EXAM:

    10:30-12:30 Saturday December 19
    Class Format:

    Lecture MW 9:45-11:00AM Blegen 415

    Lab F 11:15-12:05AM Blegen 415
    Workload:
    The text for this class is:Robert S. Pindyck and Daniel L. Rubinfeld,Microeconomics, 8th Edition, Pearson Education Inc, 2013 You can purchase an earlier versions of the text, or can buy an online version at roughly half the cost of the text version.Additional readings will also be available on the course web site. Look at syllabus for more information on course work.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23759/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    1 September 2016

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5021 Section 004: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (23850)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Discussion
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Fri 11:15AM - 12:05PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 003
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hanra003+PA5021+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy: intermediate microeconomics, macroeconomics, concepts of international trade. Both this section and the class taught be Judy Temple will be at a similar level. We will teach how to calculate derivatives, but will not have more calculus required beyond this. This approach will make it easier to understand class concepts and will not be much more challenging than standard applications using algebra.
    Grading:

    Homework assignments (15% of class grade)

    Short Memo and In-Class Debate (15% of grade)

    Two Quizzes (20% each; 40% of class grade)

    Final Exam (30% of class grade)


    (There must be class participation and reactions (look towards syllabus for more information on participation and reactions.))

    Exam Format:

    FINAL EXAM:

    10:30-12:30 Saturday December 19
    Class Format:

    Lecture MW 9:45-11:00AM Blegen 415

    Lab F 11:15-12:05AM Blegen 415
    Workload:
    The text for this class is:Robert S. Pindyck and Daniel L. Rubinfeld,Microeconomics, 8th Edition, Pearson Education Inc, 2013 You can purchase an earlier versions of the text, or can buy an online version at roughly half the cost of the text version.Additional readings will also be available on the course web site. Look at syllabus for more information on course work.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23850/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    1 September 2016

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5031 Section 001: Statistics for Public Affairs (23738)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Dev prac or Human Rights major or Pub Pol or STEP ng major or minor or PA PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 90 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
    Class Notes:
    If you are a mjr or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights mjr, you should be able to register without a permission number. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5031+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis. Sampling and survey
    Learning Objectives:
    This course is intended to provide familiarity with statistical terminology used on an everyday basis in the policy arena as well as the popular media; to provide an understanding of the methodology behind the numbers; to enable students to use basic statistical techniques in the course of research or policy analysis; to teach students to critically interpret statistical results; and to encourage students to think about implicit assumptions about numbers that affect our work, public policy decisions, and our lives. In particular, I want students to think about how statistics can be used to shed light on (or hide) and enhance positions of power and privilege in societies.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23738/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 July 2018

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5031 Section 002: Statistics for Public Affairs (23739)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Fri 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
    Class Notes:
    If you are a mjr or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights mjr, you should be able to register without a permission number. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5031+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis. Sampling and survey
    Learning Objectives:
    This course is intended to provide familiarity with statistical terminology used on an everyday basis in the policy arena as well as the popular media; to provide an understanding of the methodology behind the numbers; to enable students to use basic statistical techniques in the course of research or policy analysis; to teach students to critically interpret statistical results; and to encourage students to think about implicit assumptions about numbers that affect our work, public policy decisions, and our lives. In particular, I want students to think about how statistics can be used to shed light on (or hide) and enhance positions of power and privilege in societies.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23739/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 July 2018

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5031 Section 003: Statistics for Public Affairs (23740)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Fri 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
    Class Notes:
    If you are a mjr or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights mjr, you should be able to register without a permission number. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5031+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis. Sampling and survey
    Learning Objectives:
    This course is intended to provide familiarity with statistical terminology used on an everyday basis in the policy arena as well as the popular media; to provide an understanding of the methodology behind the numbers; to enable students to use basic statistical techniques in the course of research or policy analysis; to teach students to critically interpret statistical results; and to encourage students to think about implicit assumptions about numbers that affect our work, public policy decisions, and our lives. In particular, I want students to think about how statistics can be used to shed light on (or hide) and enhance positions of power and privilege in societies.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23740/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 July 2018

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5031 Section 004: Statistics for Public Affairs (23808)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Fri 12:45PM - 02:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
    Class Notes:
    If you are a mjr or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights mjr, you should be able to register without a permission number. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5031+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis. Sampling and survey
    Learning Objectives:
    This course is intended to provide familiarity with statistical terminology used on an everyday basis in the policy arena as well as the popular media; to provide an understanding of the methodology behind the numbers; to enable students to use basic statistical techniques in the course of research or policy analysis; to teach students to critically interpret statistical results; and to encourage students to think about implicit assumptions about numbers that affect our work, public policy decisions, and our lives. In particular, I want students to think about how statistics can be used to shed light on (or hide) and enhance positions of power and privilege in societies.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23808/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 July 2018

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5041 Section 001: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (23768)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon 04:00PM - 05:50PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 33 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mukho017+PA5041+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23768/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5041 Section 002: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (23769)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Wed 04:40PM - 05:40PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 33 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mukho017+PA5041+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23769/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5045 Section 001: Statistics for Public Affairs, Accelerated (23809)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Dev prac or Human Rights major or Pub Pol or STEP ng major or minor or PA PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Fri 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 34 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduces a range of quantitative tools that are commonly used to inform issues in public affairs. The course provides an introduction to descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference, with an emphasis on the ways in which quantitative tools are applied to a diverse range of practical policy questions. PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gabechan+PA5045+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Lab section for PA 5045. See course description for PA 5045 Section 001.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031. PA 5045 moves at a more rapid pace and spends more time on policy applications and advanced topics. While neither PA 5031 or PA 5045 have enforced prerequisites, PA 5045 is recommended for students with prior statistical coursework or for students without prior coursework but a strong interest in pursuing a quantitatively oriented career and a willingness to work hard during the semester. PA 5045 is recommended (but not required) for students planning on enrolling in PA 5044 (Applied Regression, Accelerated) in the Spring.

  • have taken at least one prior course in statistics covering topics such as: basic probability rules, conditional probability, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals
  • scored above the 80th percentile on the quantitative GRE
  • have professional experience applying statistical techniques in a public affairs context
  • anticipate a career that will require extensive application and consumption of quantitative analysis
  • Learning Objectives:
    Develop an appreciation for the applicability and limitations of the tools of probability and statistics to inform real-world situations and courses of action in public affairs;

    Apply quantitative reasoning to inform contemporary issues in public affairs by beginning with a policy question, identifying a data set, determining appropriate statistical analysis techniques, conducting such analysis using software, identifying the most salient findings and patterns emerging from the data, and presenting your findings in an effective manner to a decision maker;

    Critically consume and critique policy analysis in which statistical analysis and quantitative reasoning is used;

    Develop confidence in learning new statistical techniques, approaching quantitative data, and synthesizing empirical evidence.
    Grading:
    Final class grades will be based on the following criteria:

    10% - Problem sets (9 total)

    10% - Class participation

    15% - Final exercise

    15% - Midterm 1

    15% - Midterm 2

    5% - Stata quiz

    30% - Final Exam

    Exam Format:
    There will be two midterms and a final exam. These will be closed book/notes and a formula sheet will be provided. Calculators may be used, but statistical functions on them may not. Calculators that allow text storage are not permitted.
    Class Format:
    Class instruction will be delivered in two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab.

    The required textbook for the class is OpenIntro Statistics (3rd Edition) by David Diez, Christopher Barr, and Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel, developed by the OpenIntro 501(c)(3) nonprofit. This textbook is available immediately and for free online in regular PDF and tablet-friendly PDF (you may also purchase a hard copy for $15-25 on Amazon): https://www.openintro.org/stat/textbook.php

    Software is an integral part of conducting statistical analysis. This semester, you will conduct analysis in two software packages, Microsoft Excel and Stata. Labs will teach you key software skills, and problem sets will contain exercises designed to get you to practice the basics of both software packages. The Humphrey School's computer labs have Stata installed and you are not required to purchase Stata. You will learn the key Excel and Stata skills necessary for the course in lecture and labs.

    mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin;
    mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">We'll also be making use of the in-class polling platform, Poll Everywhere. To participate, you will need to bring an internet-connected device (i.e. smartphone, tablet, or laptop) or phone to every class.

    Workload:
    PA 5045 requires concurrent enrollment in a lab section and is a 4-credit course. Under UMN policy, it is expected that the academic work required of graduate and professional school students will exceed three hours per credit per week. Therefore, you should expect a workload of at least 12 hours per week. Each week there will be two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab. Therefore, you should expect approximately 7 hours per week of work outside of scheduled class.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23809/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    11 July 2018

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5045 Section 002: Statistics for Public Affairs, Accelerated (23810)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Fri 08:15AM - 09:30AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 33 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduces a range of quantitative tools that are commonly used to inform issues in public affairs. The course provides an introduction to descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference, with an emphasis on the ways in which quantitative tools are applied to a diverse range of practical policy questions. PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gabechan+PA5045+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Lab section for PA 5045. See course description for PA 5045 Section 001.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031. PA 5045 moves at a more rapid pace and spends more time on policy applications and advanced topics. While neither PA 5031 or PA 5045 have enforced prerequisites, PA 5045 is recommended for students with prior statistical coursework or for students without prior coursework but a strong interest in pursuing a quantitatively oriented career and a willingness to work hard during the semester. PA 5045 is recommended (but not required) for students planning on enrolling in PA 5044 (Applied Regression, Accelerated) in the Spring.

  • have taken at least one prior course in statistics covering topics such as: basic probability rules, conditional probability, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals
  • scored above the 80th percentile on the quantitative GRE
  • have professional experience applying statistical techniques in a public affairs context
  • anticipate a career that will require extensive application and consumption of quantitative analysis
  • Learning Objectives:
    Develop an appreciation for the applicability and limitations of the tools of probability and statistics to inform real-world situations and courses of action in public affairs;

    Apply quantitative reasoning to inform contemporary issues in public affairs by beginning with a policy question, identifying a data set, determining appropriate statistical analysis techniques, conducting such analysis using software, identifying the most salient findings and patterns emerging from the data, and presenting your findings in an effective manner to a decision maker;

    Critically consume and critique policy analysis in which statistical analysis and quantitative reasoning is used;

    Develop confidence in learning new statistical techniques, approaching quantitative data, and synthesizing empirical evidence.
    Grading:
    Final class grades will be based on the following criteria:

    10% - Problem sets (9 total)

    10% - Class participation

    15% - Final exercise

    15% - Midterm 1

    15% - Midterm 2

    5% - Stata quiz

    30% - Final Exam

    Exam Format:
    There will be two midterms and a final exam. These will be closed book/notes and a formula sheet will be provided. Calculators may be used, but statistical functions on them may not. Calculators that allow text storage are not permitted.
    Class Format:
    Class instruction will be delivered in two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab.

    The required textbook for the class is OpenIntro Statistics (3rd Edition) by David Diez, Christopher Barr, and Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel, developed by the OpenIntro 501(c)(3) nonprofit. This textbook is available immediately and for free online in regular PDF and tablet-friendly PDF (you may also purchase a hard copy for $15-25 on Amazon): https://www.openintro.org/stat/textbook.php

    Software is an integral part of conducting statistical analysis. This semester, you will conduct analysis in two software packages, Microsoft Excel and Stata. Labs will teach you key software skills, and problem sets will contain exercises designed to get you to practice the basics of both software packages. The Humphrey School's computer labs have Stata installed and you are not required to purchase Stata. You will learn the key Excel and Stata skills necessary for the course in lecture and labs.

    mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin;
    mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">We'll also be making use of the in-class polling platform, Poll Everywhere. To participate, you will need to bring an internet-connected device (i.e. smartphone, tablet, or laptop) or phone to every class.

    Workload:
    PA 5045 requires concurrent enrollment in a lab section and is a 4-credit course. Under UMN policy, it is expected that the academic work required of graduate and professional school students will exceed three hours per credit per week. Therefore, you should expect a workload of at least 12 hours per week. Each week there will be two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab. Therefore, you should expect approximately 7 hours per week of work outside of scheduled class.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23810/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    11 July 2018

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5051 Section 001: Leadership Foundations (23771)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
    Times and Locations:
    Extended Regular Session
     
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Leadership concepts, tools, and strategies in a personal, community, and organizational context for mid-career students. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5051-5052 must be taken in same academic yr
    Class Notes:
    Students should register for PA 5051, 5053, and 5055. Class meets 8:30-4:30 on Aug 26-28 (Thu, Fri, Sat). And on Sep 24-25/Oct 15-16/Nov 12-13, and Dec 3 (Fridays, 10:00-5:00 and Saturdays, 8:30-4:30.) http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5051+Fall2021
    Class Description:

    The Public Affairs Leadership Cohort is a unique offering at the Humphrey School that is designed for mid-career professionals that integrates adult learning methodologies in a schedule that accommodates working adults. Three core (required) courses are offered in an integrated format and students can either apply the cohort experience to a U of Mn Regent's approved graduate certificate in Public Affairs Leadership (PAL) or towards the Masters in Public Affairs (MPA) degree. The three courses integrated into the MPA cohort are: 1) Cohort Leadership I & II, 2) Cohort Policy and Program Analysis I & II, and 3) Cohort Research Methods & Analysis I & II.


    The cohort program focuses on developing a range of skills essential in public affairs through an intensive learning community. A theoretical framework emphasizing transformational leadership guides us and creates awareness that leadership is demonstrated through acts undertaken by many people, not just by those in formal authority positions. Leaders must have skills to address both technical and adaptive challenges and the content of these courses highlights those most critical to public policy and public affairs.


    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23771/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    7 June 2016

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5053 Section 001: Policy Analysis in Public Affairs (23772)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Process of public policy and program analysis, including problem formulation, program design and implementation. Opportunity to draw upon published research and conduct field-based research to understand implementation conditions. Professional communications, including writing of memos, requests for proposals, and implementation briefs, are stressed. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5053-5054 must be taken in same academic yr
    Class Notes:
    Students should register for PA 5051, 5053, and 5055. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5051+Fall2021
    Class Description:

    The Public Affairs Leadership Cohort is a unique offering at the Humphrey School that is designed for mid-career professionals that integrates adult learning methodologies in a schedule that accommodates working adults. Three core (required) courses are offered in an integrated format and students can either apply the cohort experience to a U of Mn Regent's approved graduate certificate in Public Affairs Leadership (PAL) or towards the Masters in Public Affairs (MPA) degree. The three courses integrated into the MPA cohort are: 1) Cohort Leadership I & II, 2) Cohort Policy and Program Analysis I & II, and 3) Cohort Research Methods & Analysis I & II.


    The cohort program focuses on developing a range of skills essential in public affairs through an intensive learning community. A theoretical framework emphasizing transformational leadership guides us and creates awareness that leadership is demonstrated through acts undertaken by many people, not just by those in formal authority positions. Leaders must have skills to address both technical and adaptive challenges and the content of these courses highlights those most critical to public policy and public affairs.


    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23772/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    7 June 2016

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5055 Section 001: Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis (23773)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Problem-based learning of analytical reasoning through social science research methods. Systematic review and literature review. Qualitative research including interviews, focus groups, and analysis. Research proposal. prereq: Major in public affairs or public affairs certificate, [5055-5056 must be taken in same academic yr]
    Class Notes:
    Students should register for PA 5051, 5053, and 5055. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5051+Fall2021.
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23773/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5080 Section 001: Capstone Preparation Workshop (23799)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    10/25/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 100 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Project management, qualitative research, and critical framework to complete Capstone course. Students write draft of client project group norms and client contract.
    Class Notes:
    PA 5080 will be offered remotely (synchronously online) on November 5, 2021 from 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. There will be additional asynchronous online work. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5080+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23799/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5101 Section 001: Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations (23805)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Thu 05:45PM - 08:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Theories, concepts, and real world examples of managerial challenges. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of funding environments, management of multiple constituencies. Types of nonprofits using economic/behavioral approaches. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?davi1315+PA5101+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Theories, concepts, and real world examples of managerial challenges. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of funding environments, management of multiple constituencies. Types of nonprofits using economic/behavioral approaches.
    Learning Objectives:
    This course focuses on distinctive features of leading/managing and governing nonprofit organizations and draws on current theories, concepts, and real-world examples to explore management changes. This course is designed to provide current and future nonprofit managers and leaders with an overview of a range of nonprofit management concerns and practices. Course projects and discussions expand learners' management skills, analytical tools, and knowledge. In this course learners are asked to take the perspectives of nonprofit leaders/managers, volunteers, board members, policy makers, donors, and clients.
    Grading:
    15% Classroom Participation
    20% Memo #1
    20% Memo #2
    20% Op Ed Piece
    25% Reflective essay
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23805/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/davi1315_PA5101_Fall2019.pdf (Fall 2019)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/davi1315_PA5101_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    21 August 2019

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5105 Section 001: Integrative Leadership: Leading Across Sectors to Address Grand Challenges (23820)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Meets With:
    LAW 6623 Section 001
    MGMT 6402 Section 060
    OLPD 6402 Section 001
    PUBH 6702 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Are you interested in working across government, business, and the non-profit sector for public good? Are you wondering how you can create sustainable shared leadership on challenges that can best be addressed together? This course explores multi-sector leadership and related governance and management challenges from a variety of perspectives and provides an opportunity for students to work together to apply what they are learning individually and in teams through in-class exercises and a final team project. The course is taught by a team of interdisciplinary faculty and considers different contexts, forms, and specific examples of multisector leadership that can enable transformative action to tackle a significant societal issue and achieve lasting change. Credit will be not be granted if credit has been received for GCC 5023, OLPD 6402, PUBH 6702, MGMT 6402, PA 5130, LAW 6623.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksquick+PA5105+Fall2021 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?laird005+PA5105+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23820/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5135 Section 001: Managing Conflict: Negotiation (23792)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Theories and frameworks used in negotiations. Navigating diverse audiences and an increasingly complex world. Negotiation in various arenas. Opportunities to practice skills and learn from experts. Structured exercises on issues such as compensation, union conflicts and international development. Culture, emotions, gender and ethics in negotiation.
    Class Notes:
    PA 5135 will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ande0844+PA5135+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This course will introduce you to the theories and frameworks used in negotiations, and provide ample opportunities to test and practice your skills. Conceptual frameworks will help you in preparing and analyzing negotiations, thus increasing your effectiveness.
    Grading:
    20% Participation
    10% Reading reflections
    15% Goal-setting memo
    30% Negotiator journals and prep forms
    25% Individual negotiation memo
    Class Format:
    Case analysis, discussion, review of reading materials, negotiation exercises
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23792/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ande0844_PA5135_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ande0844_PA5135_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    7 October 2016

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5161 Section 001: Redesigning Human Services (23855)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MPA or Human Svcs Ldrship cert
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course provides an in-depth examination of the history and institutions delivering human services in the United States, with an emphasis on how human-centered design can help improve service provision and outcomes. It explores how public, nonprofit, and philanthropic structures create unique operational realities and cultures that must be navigated to lead change across institutional boundaries. It also systematically investigates contributors to disparities in the human services system, particularly race. The use of frameworks such as human-centered design, human services value curve, and an equity lens will help us on this exploration. Course learning materials take students through a design process to highlight strategies for systems change and improvement grounded in outcomes. Design processes are iterative and involve understanding and engaging the people and context in problem solving. Through project-based learning approach, students will understand the various constraints that need to be navigated in design: feasibility, viability, and desirability. Students gain experience using design to help appreciate these constraints and develop strategies for overcoming them.
    Class Notes:
    Some class sessions will be face-to-face, others will be in synchronous, virtual meetings. There will also be asynchronous recorded lectures, videos, podcasts and readings, as well as virtual reading forums/threads to support the learning. Instructor will notify students once the schedule has been finalized. In-person sessions of PA 5161 will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?herna939+PA5161+Fall2021 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cmlabine+PA5161+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23855/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5205 Section 001: Statistics for Planning (23811)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Urban/Regional Planning major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis in urban and regional planning, including descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, elementary probability theory, research design and sampling, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution, correlation, and simple/multiple regression analysis.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cao+PA5205+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23811/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5205 Section 002: Statistics for Planning (23812)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis in urban and regional planning, including descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, elementary probability theory, research design and sampling, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution, correlation, and simple/multiple regression analysis.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cao+PA5205+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23812/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5205 Section 003: Statistics for Planning (23813)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 85
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis in urban and regional planning, including descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, elementary probability theory, research design and sampling, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution, correlation, and simple/multiple regression analysis.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cao+PA5205+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23813/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5206 Section 001: The City of White Supremacy (23856)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Urban/Regional Planning major
    Meets With:
    PA 5290 Section 002
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    The title of this course is meant to signal the objective of scrutinizing how systems of white supremacy have shaped the American city and how the American city functions in ways that reproduce and reinforce white supremacy. The colonization of the Americas coincided with the fabrication of racial identities that set the terms for membership in what became a white supremacist/racial state wherein all things, including spatial thinking and design, conformed to a racial calculus. As Lipsitz (2007: 12) tells us, "The lived experience of race has a spatial dimension, and the lived experience of space has a racial dimension." The core of this class will, however, focus on later developments characteristic of the period of rapid urbanization from the Jim Crow era through the New Deal and Civil Rights periods to today. The first section of the course will focus on frameworks for understanding white supremacy generally, and as it relates to urban development specifically. The second section considers specific domains of urban policy and planning using white supremacy as the analytic framework. In these weeks we examine how white supremacy has been expressed across a range of urban development issue areas, including housing, transportation, the urban environment, education, criminal justice, and urban design, and how policies and planning practice have maintained or disrupted systems of white supremacy.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?egoetz+PA506+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23856/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5211 Section 001: Land Use Planning (23763)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Major/minor, Urb-Reg Planning
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 34 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Physical/spatial basis for land use planning at community/regional level. Role of public sector in guiding private development. Land use regulations, comprehensive planning, growth management, innovative land use planning/policies. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hfburga+PA5211+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    PA 5211 provides an introduction to the theory, practice, and innovation of land use policy in American cities and beyond. Land use regulations are an essential facet of rural, suburban and urban life across municipalities, unincorporated areas and natural preserves in the United States. As residents of these communities we encounter the consequences of land use regulation on a daily basis. The rules and conventions of land use define where we live, how we move, and why places develop in particular ways according to pre-­‐established legal mandates and the imperative of the public interest. Indeed, our future as healthy, just and sustainable communities is contingent upon innovations in land use that will shape the environments of the places we call home.
    Grading:
    20% Corridor Zoning Analysis
    10% White Space Reflection
    20% Urban Frameworks Analysis
    40% Proposal
    10% Final Markups Submission
    Exam Format:
    no final exam, but final presentations
    Workload:
    6.5-7 hours of assigned exercises outside of class including site visits, archival research, data collection and visualization, graphic board layout design, printing and practice presentations with team members.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23763/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hfburga_PA5211_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hfburga_PA5211_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    11 October 2016

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5214 Section 001: Planning & Design for the Urban Public Realm (23857)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    The Great Inversion, or what former Minneapolis Mayor RT Rybak called "the flight to the city," has been ongoing for two decades, and to preserve and enhance the quality of life in our cities, we must continue to invest in our urban public realm. Cities must maintain and improve older parks, plazas and streets, but they must also provide new public spaces in developing areas that never had them before - waterfronts, industrial sites, rail yards, and acres of surface parking. Perhaps most important yet easily overlooked is the re-envisioning of the public right-of-way - the street - as a place that accommodates not just cars but multiple transportation modes including buses, rail, bicycles, and scooters and other forms of personal transport, all integrated into an accessible, pedestrian-friendly, safe, and green environment. The greening of city streets is critical for the creation of lush and livable places while also producing social, economic, and environmental benefits. Since the start of the Covid 19 pandemic in March 2020, our collective experience of the urban public realm and its meaning and value to us have changed dramatically. Our use of public places has increased as parkways once dominated by cars were closed off and filled with pedestrians, cyclists, skateboarders, roller skaters, roller skiers, and people on all other sorts of wheeled conveyances. Park spaces that were once often largely empty filled with people getting exercise, enjoying nature, visiting playgrounds, meeting friends, social-distance dating, taking walking happy hours, having picnics, playing spike ball, hula-hooping, and in the case of the homeless, camping out to avoid the dangers of shelters, to socially distance themselves, and in some cases, both. Following the May 2020 death of George Floyd in police custody, our experience of the public realm changed again to include protests, marches, riots, property damage, the creation of new public art, the erection of new monuments,
    Class Notes:
    Class runs from 09/17/2021 to 11/05/2021. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?brow1804+PA5214+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23857/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5231 Section 001: Transit Planning and Management (32564)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Principles/techniques related to implementing transit systems. Historical perspective, characteristics of travel demand, demand management. Evaluating/benchmarking system performance. Transit-oriented development. Analyzing alternative transit modes. System design/finance. Case studies, field projects. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cao+PA5231+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Principles/techniques related to implementing transit systems. Historical perspective, characteristics of travel demand, demand management. Evaluating/benchmarking system performance. Transit-oriented development. Analyzing alternative transit modes. System design/finance. Case studies. Field projects.
    Grading:
    25% Final project (individual work)
    10% Capacity analysis exercise (team work)
    10% Participation (individual work)
    15% Route scheduling exercise (team work)
    10% Review (individual work)
    2 x 10% Case study memos (team work)
    5 + 5% Case study presentation (team work)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32564/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cao_CEGE5213_Fall2016.doc (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cao_PA5231_Fall2015.doc (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 May 2017

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5232 Section 001: Transportation Policy, Planning, and Deployment (23839)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    sr or grad
    Meets With:
    CEGE 5212 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Development of transportation policy, making of transportation plans, deployment of transportation technologies. Lectures, interactive case studies, role playing.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kongh+PA5232+Fall2021 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?douma002+PA5232+Fall2021
    Class Description:

    This course aims to provide the students with an introduction to the nature and history of transportation problems, policy issues and transportation deployment. The goal is to help students understand transportation problems and how they might be solved. The class is organized as lectures and seminars, and active participation is emphasized. Lectures will cover theoretical concepts and information. Students will be asked to participate in class discussions, debates, and other in-class activities. After this course, students will develop a worldview on transportation (not necessarily the same as the instructors), and have an appreciation for the merits and demerits of various points of view on transportation issues.

    In this course, students will learn

    • The fundamentals of how people travel and the theories developed to explain travel behavior.

    • The linkages between transportation and other aspects of the urban and regional fabric.

    • The basic transportation models and the approaches to measure accessibility.

    • The principles of both democratic governance and public management to transportation policy questions.

    • The history of public transportation and its role in contemporary metropolitan areas

    • Models for future urban mobility.

    • The nature of selected specific transportation problems, including energy and environmental impacts, and potential solutions.

    • Develop and test original hypotheses with original data about transportation systems.

    Grading:
    50% Assignments
    10% In-class debates
    10% Mid-term literature presentation
    10% Final project presentation
    15% Final project report
    5% Attendance and participation
    Exam Format:
    Mid-term literature presentation and individual final project.
    Class Format:
    Traditional lectures with a mix of interactive learning through case studies, in-class discussions, and debates.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23839/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    25 May 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5242 Section 001: Environmental Planning, Policy, and Decision Making (23837)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Theory and practice. Ethical, legal, and institutional frameworks relative to a range of environmental issues. Innovative environmental decision making informed by collaboration, conflict resolution, adaptive management, and resilience thinking. prereq: Grad or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?fayolaj+PA5242+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23837/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5243 Section 001: Environmental Justice in Urban Planning & Public Policy (23838)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Environmental racism can be defined as policies and practices that result in communities of Black, Indigenous and other people of color (BIPoC communities) being overexposed to environmental harms and being denied access to environmental goods. The environmental justice (EJ) movement in the United States was birthed in the 1980s with the aim of ending environmental racism. Early EJ activism was led by Black rural communities protesting the disproportionate presence of toxic waste facilities in their neighborhoods and Latinx migrant farmworkers who were overexposed to harmful pesticides. Central to the course is the understanding that structural racism, in the form of social, political, and economic forces, has denied BIPoC individuals and communities their rights to live in clean environments and access natural resources that allow communities to build and maintain their physical, mental, emotion, and fiscal health. Although the course focuses on race and racism, it takes as axiomatic that racism is intertwined with other systems of oppression including, but not limited to, sexism, classism, ableism, homophobia, and transphobia. The course begins by tracing the history of the EJ movement and unpacking the terms "racism" and "justice." The main body of the course will focus on a series of issues that EJ scholars and activists address including pollution, greening, transportation, disasters, and climate change. The course ends with discussions and reflections on our roles, responsibilities and possibilities as public policy and planning scholars, researchers and practitioners to work towards ending environmental racism and achieving EJ for all. The required "readings" for the course will include academic journal articles, news stories, governmental policies, podcasts, videos, poetry, and short stories. This will allow us to understand the theoretical and methodological approaches to EJ activism and research and explore popular and creative forms of knowledge abo
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?fayolaj+PA5243+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23838/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5262 Section 001: Neighborhood Revitalization Theories and Strategies (23824)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Policymaking/politics of planning in housing, community development, social policy. Connecting policy to local/regional politics. Role of institutional decision-making structures on policy outcomes. Importance of citizens, social movements, interest groups in policymaking process.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?delan120+PA5262+Fall2021 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?smith399+PA5262+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23824/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5271 Section 001: Geographic Information Systems: Applications in Planning and Policy Analysis (23762)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Urban/Regional Planning, major and minor or PA PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to GIS. Applications in public planning and policy analysis. Operational skills in GIS software. Mapping analysis of U.S. Census material. Local/state government management/planning. Spatial statistical analysis for policy/planning. prereq: Major in urban/regional planning or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Non-MURP students should contact Stacey Grimes (grime004@umn.edu) regarding the waiting list/permission numbers. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?allow001+PA5271+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23762/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5301 Section 001: Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South (23807)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic demographic measures/methodology. Demographic transition, mortality, fertility. Perspectives on nonmarital fertility, marriage, divorce, cohabitation. Cultural differences in family structure, aging, migration, refugee movements, population policies. Discussion of readings. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hacke010+PA5301+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23807/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5311 Section 001: Program Evaluation (23806)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/09/2022
    Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    09/23/2022
    Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    10/07/2022
    Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    10/21/2022
    Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    11/04/2022
    Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    11/18/2022
    Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    12/02/2022
    Fri 12:30PM - 03:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Principal methods, primary applications of evaluation research as applied to policies/programs in health/human services, education, or the environment. Conducting evaluations. Becoming a critical consumer of studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class will meet in person during the scheduled class times. There will be asynchronous work during the weeks class is not scheduled. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bern0201+PA5311+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    This course provides an overview to program evaluation in public affairs. It explores the complexities and realities of conducting program evaluation studies in community-based settings, such as public agencies, schools, non-profit organizations, and collaborative initiatives. The overall purpose of this course is to provide students with a theoretical framework and practical strategies for conducting community-based evaluation studies.
    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of the term students will: (a) Understand the purposes and uses of program evaluation in public policy and program delivery; (b) Be familiar with common program evaluation terminology and professional practices and ethics, (c) be able to design and implement an evaluation plan for a specific public or nonprofit program or initiative that is focused on engaging primary stakeholders in using the plan to answer important questions; (d) Recognize the cultural and power dynamics at play in evaluation-related efforts.

    Grading:
    65% Program evaluation field work

    10% Reflection papers

    10% Team presentation

    10% Exam
    5% Contribution to collective learning process
    Class Format:

    35% Small Group Activities

    35% Large group Discussion

    20% Lecture

    5% Student Presentations

    5% Individual reflection


    Workload:

    50 Pages Reading Per Week

    1 Group Project (Semester-long)

    1 Memo

    1 Exam

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23806/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bern0201_PA5311_Fall2018.pdf (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bern0201_PA5311_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    7 November 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5401 Section 001: Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy (23764)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 04:35PM - 05:50PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Nature/extent of poverty/inequality in the United States, causes/consequences, impact of government programs/policies. Extent/causes of poverty/inequality in other developed/developing countries. prereq: Grad or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hanra003+PA5401+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Nature/extent of poverty/inequality in the United States, causes/consequences, impact of government programs/policies. Extent/causes of poverty/inequality in other developed/developing countries.
    Grading:

    - Reaction Paragraphs (15% of grade)

    - Class Presentation and Class Participation (10% of grade)

    - Short Memo on Poverty Measurement (10% grade)

    - Policy Memos (40% grade)

    - Final Group Project: (25% grade)

    -Late work will receive penalty in grading.

    Exam Format:
    No exams, the assignments are your grades. There will be a final group paper and presentations. (Look to syllabus for more information)
    Workload:
    Look at syllabus below to see work load within course.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23764/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5401_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5401_Fall2015.docx (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    17 November 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5413 Section 001: Early Childhood and Public Policy (23825)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5-3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Grad or Law student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    State/federal/int'l policies/legislation touching first 5 years of child's life. Family, community, institutional roles in promoting children's social/cognitive/emotional development. Health, mental health, poverty, special needs, economic/social justice. Part of Early Childhood Pol cert. prereq: Grad or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Several class sessions will be held remotely (synchronously online). The instructor will provide the dates of those remote sessions once they are confirmed. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pinto102+PA5413+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Early Childhood & Public Policy examines state and federal policies relating to the first five years of life, the process by which such policies are developed, and the skills of policy advocacy on behalf of young children and their families. There is a particular emphasis on the policy context in Minnesota. The course is taught by State Representative Dave Pinto, the chair of the Minnesota House Early Childhood Finance & Policy committee and the founder of the Prenatal to Three Policy Forums. This course is part of the early childhood policy certificate.

    Dave Pinto represents the southwest neighborhoods of St. Paul in the Minnesota House of Representatives, where he chairs the Early Childhood committee. Outside the Legislature, he serves as a prosecutor of gender violence with the Ramsey County Attorney's Office. For several years, he was the Director of Statewide Training and Protocol Development for Safe Harbor, Minnesota's system for addressing the sex trafficking of young people. In that role, he trained thousands of people statewide in identifying and responding to this crime. He is a recipient of the Excellence in Diversity Award from the Ramsey County Bar Association, as well as awards and recognitions from the Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women, Children's Hospitals Minnesota, Innocence Project of Minnesota, and League of Minnesota Cities, among many others. He earned an undergraduate degree from Harvard College and a law degree and MBA from the University of Virginia, where he was a recipient of the Raven Award, that University's highest student honor.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Graduate students from a wide variety of disciplines who have an interest in the course content are welcome to enroll. There is no prerequisite.
    Class Format:
    Weekly seminar
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23825/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    29 June 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5431 Section 001: Public Policies on Work and Pay (23804)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Meets With:
    HRIR 5655 Section 060
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Public policies affecting employment, hours of work, and institutions in labor markets. Public programs impacting wages, unemployment, training, collective bargaining, job security, and workplace governance. Policy implications of the changing nature of work. prereq: [[PA 5031 or equiv], grad student] or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class will be REMOTE (synchronously online during the scheduled time). MPP requires 3 or more credits from 5022, 5431, 5503, 5521, 5722, or 5805. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?klein002+PA5431+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23804/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5442 Section 001: Education Law and Policy (23840)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Meets With:
    LAW 6159 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Education law and policy with focus on elementary/secondary. Topics include governance; interplay of federal, state and local law and policy; education redesign; intersection with workforce development; reform efforts; desegregation; achievement gap; role of teacher unions; and finance. Early childhood education discussed in connection with K-12 issues. Case studies include recently enacted legislation in multiple states.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kelle644+PA5442+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    LAW 6159/PA 5442 Education Law and Policy:

    Should schools be prohibited from teaching critical race theory? Should transgender women be excluded from high school sports? Can schools police what students say online? This course explores these questions and the combined roles of law and policy in the design of America's system of public preK-12 education and its institutions. In 2021, we will focus extra attention on issues of equity, diversity and inclusion. We also will discuss the process of education law and policy change, including school integration, the inclusion of students with disabilities, educational standards, testing, and current calls for education reform. As we recover from the pandemic, I hope we will also be able to identify lessons learned from school lockdowns and remote learning. Materials from other cultures, including indigenous cultures, and countries will help us think about education law and policy in a broader context. Course readings will include judicial decisions, statutes, policy analyses, scholarly articles, and journalistic accounts of education and human development issues. Classes will consist of active student discussion of legal and policy design issues, presentations by guest speakers who are active practitioners and advocates in education law and policy and presentation of group research projects.

    Steve Kelley served in the Minnesota Legislature for 14 years, chaired the Minnesota Senate Education Committee and served recently as Minnesota's Commerce Commissioner. He also serves on the boards of education non-profit organizations.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Any graduate student who is interested in the legal and public policy issues that influence U.S. public education
    Grading:
    60% Reports/Memos
    10% Homework/Written Reflections
    15% Group Presentation
    5% Interview of Education Policymaker
    10% Participation
    Class Format:
    70% Discussion
    20% Guest Speakers
    5% Lecture
    5% Small Group Activities
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23840/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kelle644_PA5442_Fall2015.docx (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    28 June 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5480 Section 001: Topics in Race, Ethnicity, and Public Policy -- Indigenous/ethnic rights intersectionality wkshop (32604)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    9 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    jr or sr or grad student
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (0 of 0 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Link between race/ethnicity and public policy. How to identify/measure racial/ethnic disparities and their historical/cultural origins and policy impacts and to craft politically feasible remedies. Topics may include criminal justice, housing, child welfare, and education. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32604/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5490 Section 001: Topics in Social Policy -- Restorative Practices: Policymaking & Activism (32581)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    12 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    S-N or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Grad or Masters or Law
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    09/27/2022
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    10/18/2022
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    11/15/2022
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    12/13/2022
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Selected topics.
    Class Notes:
    Full title of class: Restorative Practices: Policymaking & Activism. Class will be offered five Tuesday evenings from 6:00-8:45; however, there will be asynchronous work over the entire semester. Instructor will be dr. raj sethuraju of Metro State.http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sethu028+PA5490+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Restorative Practices are a way of being. Together we will explore and experience the depths of this indigenous practice. Our exploration will involve classroom gatherings, online discussions, community participation, engaging with practitioners, and developing a restorative practices position paper for policy work.

    You!!! The student scholar will examine the historical, sociological, criminological, psychological, educational, and religious perspectives about Restorative Practices. Together, we will explore topics around:

    • Trauma and healing
    • Conflict and transformation
    • Racial Justice
    • Indigeneity of Restorative Practices
    • Internal colonialism

    This course is designed to allow students to develop a working understanding and knowledge of Restorative Practices. Restorative Practices looks at the concept of justice through nontraditional and alternative viewpoints. Rather than focus on "what are the issues at hand, who committed or is responsible and what should the outcome be," Restorative Practices focuses on "who has been harmed/affected, what was the impact, and who is responsible for repairing the harm and addressing the impact." Students will examine Restorative Practices from historical, sociological, criminological, psychological, and educational perspectives. Throughout the course, a wide range of specific "restorative practices" will be studied, reviewed, and analyzed. Some of the concepts the course will explore are trauma and healing, conflict transformation, issues related to education, educational institutions, and alternative processes such as Repairing Harm and the Circle Process.
    Tentative Expectations:
    • Expect both asynchronous and synchronous engagement
    • Only 5 synchronous engagements - Tuesday 6 to 9 pm.
    • 30 hours of Service Learning with community, school, and other agencies
    • Weekly online discussions.

    Questions about the course? Email raj.sethuraju@metrostate.edu. Need a class permission number? Email Stacey Grimes at grime004@umn.edu.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Students who want to learn, articulate, and practice the philosophical and practical constructs of restorative justice and the movement of restorative practices.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32581/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    21 December 2020

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5501 Section 001: Theories and Policies of Development (23800)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 28 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    What makes some countries wealthier than others, one group of people healthier and more educated than another? How does the behavior of rich nations affect poor nations? Origins of development thought, contemporary frameworks and policy debates. Economic, human, and sustainable development. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?voll0144+PA5501+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23800/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5503 Section 001: Economics of Development (23779)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA 5501 or &5501
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 28 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Economic growth, inequality, poverty, rural/urban labor markets, risk/insurance. Investments in human capital, credit markets, gender/household economics, governance/institutional issues. Microfinance, conditional cash transfers, labor/education policies. prereq: PA 5501 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in PA 5501
    Class Notes:
    PA 5503 will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). MPP requires 3 or more credits from 5022, 5431, 5503, 5521, 5722, or 5805. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?assaad+PA5503+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Grading:

    Homework Assignments and Written Reflections

    Participation

    Midterm Exam

    Final Exam
    Class Format:

    80% Lecture

    20% Discussion
    Workload:

    60 Pages Reading Per Week

    12 Homework Assignments

    12 Reflections on Readings

    2 Exams
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23779/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5503_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5503_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5503_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    15 May 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5511 Section 001: Community Economic Development (23821)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Contexts/motivations behind community economic development activities. Alternative strategies for organizing/initiating economic development projects. Tools/techniques for economic development analysis/planning (market analysis, feasibility studies, development plans). Implementation at local level. prereq: Grad or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Contact the instructor at streetarbob@gmail.com with questions. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?rstreeta+PA5511+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    If you wish to contact the instructor, please contact him at streetarbob@gmail.com
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23821/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    11 October 2019

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5601 Section 001: Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy (23828)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Meets With:
    PA 8690 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to the key concepts and tools necessary for gender policy analysis. Survey of the major findings in the field of gender and public policy in policy areas such as poverty alleviation, health, international security, environment and work-family reconciliation. Scope includes local, national, and global policy arenas as well as exploration of gender and the politics of policy formulation.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cewig+PA5601+Fall2021
    Class Description:

    • What are the implications of providing paid sick days to poor, working women in the US - for themselves, their kids and the broader US economy?


    • Does providing "daddy leave" to German fathers lead to more engaged fathers that also help out with the housework?


    • Is providing a cash subsidy to poor moms in Latin America if their daughters attend school empowering or patronizing?


    • How is climate change impacting gender power relations in Ghana?


    • What are the proven tactics for achieving policies that address gender inequalities?


    • How can public policies address gender inequalities that vary as they intersect with race, class, disability and other factors?


    These are just some of the questions that we will tackle in this course. Students will learn the tools of gender public policy analysis through examination of a range of policies from around the world. In the first section of the course, students will become familiar with the key concepts necessary for gender policy analysis including how gender operates as a social structure and its intersectional relationship to other social structures such as race, class and disability. The second section of the course focuses on specific policy areas where gender policy analysis has been applied. Exploration of specific policy areas allows students to become familiar with the some of the major findings in the field of gender and public policy as well as offers an opportunity to examine, learn from and critique how gender policy analyses have been carried out in a variety of contexts and topic areas. Given the global scope of the course and the fact that students come to the course with both local and global policy interests, we will consider policy issues and case studies from the US alongside and, in comparison to, issues and case studies from other countries. Specific policy areas covered this semester include equality policies, poverty policies, work/family reconciliation, health policy, climate change and international security. In section three, students will learn how gender is embedded in the politics of the policy making process, including in the specific behavior of political actors, the organization of institutions, and in the political discourses employed. This section of the course will allow students to assess what strategies have been more or less effective in promoting more gender-equitable public policies and the challenges of achieving policies attentive to intersectional inequalities.


    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Student interested in developing a foundation in gender and policy analysis should take this course. Students interested in the Gender and Public Policy Concentration must take this course.
    Learning Objectives:
    Grading:
    A-F
    Class Format:
    Seminar-style course based primarily on discussion.
    Workload:
    The course reading load will range from between 100 and 150 pages a week, generally four to five book chapters or journal articles per week. The course materials blend feminist theory with empirical case studies of policy implementation and formulation. Assignments include regular written responses to the readings, a gender policy in practice assignment and a gender policy research paper.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23828/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cewig_PA5601_Fall2021.pdf (Fall 2021)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cewig_PA5601_Fall2018.pdf (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cewig_PA5601_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    30 June 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5711 Section 001: Science, Technology & Environmental Policy (23766)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Interplay of science, technology, the environment, and society. Approaches from across the social sciences will cover how science and technology can create new environmental pressures as well as policy challenges in a range of spheres from climate change to systems of intellectual property and international development.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?eliseh+PA5711+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    This course will investigate, from a variety of perspectives, the ways in which human society is transforming (and being transformed by) science, technology, and the environment. Drawing on ideas from a wide spectrum of the social sciences, this course will prepare students to grapple with contemporary policy issues in arenas such as systems for intellectual property, global climate change, public health, technology for development, the science and engineering workforce, innovation, and regulation of emerging technologies. Special emphasis will be given to policies at the intersection of science, technology, and the environment. No student is expected to have a sophisticated understanding of the full range of disciplinary perspectives and topical issues we will explore; all of us will bring some relevant experience, expertise, or perspective to the table, and to integrate it with that of their classmates through discussion and teamwork. The focus of the course is public policy in the United States, but several class sessions will cover issues related to globalization and international development.
    Grading:
    Grading for this course will have four major components. The first component is participation, which will be evaluated based on your participation in classroom discussions, role as reading discussant, and participation in class debates and cases (debates and cases also include a reflection component). Second is a policy memo on R&D policy due on October 6. Third is a policy memo on environmental regulation due on October 22. Finally, you will complete an individual final project. Evaluation of the final project will be based on a written paper, policy memo, oral presentation to the class, and your thoughtfulness as a discussant of one of your peer's project.

    The breakdown of final grades will be as follows: Policy Memo 1 (10%), Policy Memo 2 (10%), Final Project (40%), Case/Debate (25%), Participation & Reading Discussant (15%)
    Exam Format:
    No Exams
    Class Format:
    For Fall 2020, this course meets synchronously twice per week (from 4:00-5:15pm) on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Generally, Tuesdays will focus on readings and Thursdays will focus on a case or debate.
    Broadly, we will spend the first four weeks focused on science and technology policy (with some examples drawn from the environmental sphere). The next four weeks will focus on environmental policy (with some examples and connections drawn to science and technology issues). The final four weeks examine cross-cutting issues across science, technology, and environmental policy, which will include student presentations on a cross-cutting topic of choice.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23766/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    31 July 2020

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5721 Section 001: Energy Systems and Policy (23767)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon 05:30PM - 08:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Impact of energy production/consumption choices on environmental quality, sustainable development, and other economic/social goals. Emphasizes public policy choices for energy/environment, linkages between them.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5721+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23767/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5722 Section 001: Economics of Environmental Policy (23833)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to economic principles and methods as they apply to environmental issues such as climate change, biodiversity conservation, and water quality. Course will cover benefit-cost analysis, methods of environmental valuation, as well as critiques of market-based solutions to environmental challenges.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?keeler+PA5722+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This course will introduce students to core concepts in economics that underlie policy and decision-making related to the environment and conservation. These include cost-benefit assessment, valuation of non-market goods and services, the role of the market and the state in addressing externalities, and decision tools commonly used in negotiating the tradeoffs that are inevitable in managing scarce resources. The course will explore and debate real-world applications of economic principles, as well as critiques of key assumptions in economic models and frontiers in behavioral economics, ecological economics, and issues of power, justice, and equity.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    The course is open to any student, regardless of previous experience in economics. The focus of the course is on conceptual applications of economic theory to environmental policy and management. Assignments include review and critique of cost benefit assessments, position papers, and presentation and application of core concepts to contemporary environmental problems.
    Grading:
    student choice
    Class Format:
    In person, on campus
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23833/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/keel0041_PA5722_Fall2021.docx (Fall 2021)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/keel0041_PA5722_Fall2020.pdf (Fall 2020)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/keel0041_PA5722_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 April 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5724 Section 001: Climate Change Policy (23832)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Existing and proposed approaches to mitigate and adapt to climate change through policies that cross scales of governance (from local to global) and impact a wide range of sectors. Exploration of climate change policy from a variety of disciplinary approaches and perspectives, emphasizing economic logic, ethical principles, and institutional feasibility. How policy can be shaped in the face of a variety of competing interests to achieve commonly desired outcomes. Students develop a deep knowledge of climate change in particular countries through a team final project. prereq: Intro microecon (such as Econ 1101 or equiv)
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gabechan+PA5724+Fall2022
    Class Description:

    Global climate change poses perhaps the most significant environmental challenge of this generation with responses and impacts falling unevenly across the globe now and well into the future. The response to climate challenge spans grassroots movements to coordinated international policy. As policies to mitigate and adapt to climate change continue to take shape, what do decision makers, advocates, and analysts need to know to take effective action? This course will investigate climate change policy from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, emphasizing economic logic, ethical principles, and institutional feasibility.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Graduate students from across the university with interests in climate policy, including students in policy degrees, science and engineering degrees, and in the humanities. Exceptional undergraduates may seek permission to enroll from the instructor.
    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of the course, my hope is that you will achieve the following learning goals:
    • Gain a substantive understanding of the climate change problem, including trends and drivers of greenhouse gas emissions, the effectiveness of existing and proposed policies, and the range and likelihood of impacts;
    • Gain a holistic understanding of climate change policies and how they fit together so that new developments in climate policy at the local, national, and international stages can be situated in the context of decades of climate policy development;
    • Develop a familiarity with major environmental policy theories and frameworks and how they apply to climate change policy accounting for the differing positions of a wide array of public and private actor groups;
    • Build an expanded capability to apply multiple lenses to understand and evaluate climate policies, bridging economic, ethical, institutional, and environmental dimensions;
    • Practice writing memos and briefs that support the policy-making process;
    • Gain experience working through complex policy arenas in teams while developing a greater openness to receiving constructive feedback from your peers and improved skills in providing feedback yourself;
    • Develop a deepened curiosity in climate change policy that inspires future coursework, research, professional development, and learning.
    Grading:
    Grading for this course will have four major components. First is participation, which will be evaluated based on your participation in classroom activities and evidence that you have completed the readings. Second is a policy memo on climate stabilization. Third is a climate campaign platform. Finally, you will complete a group project where you will be challenged to develop and defend a national climate strategy. Evaluation of the final project will be based on a written paper, oral presentation to the class, and your engagement with other project teams.
    Exam Format:
    No Exams
    Workload:
    Readings will be assigned for every class. You should expect around 50-70 pages of reading (or equivalent) per week drawn from books, scholarly publications, popular articles, and other forms of media (e.g. videos). Each week, students will be given a list of required and optional readings.
    Students are expected to come to class having completed readings and prepared to engage in discussion.

    Brief descriptions of the assignments are detailed below. More specific guidelines will be distributed in class well before the deadlines. Assignments are subject to change but will be finalized by the first class.


    Stabilization wedges memo: In this memo you will use design a comprehensive technical solution to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions based on the stabilization wedge logic of Pacala and Socolow. After presenting the technical components of your climate stabilization strategy, pick the three wedges you believe will pose the greatest policy challenges and explain the nature of these challenges. How can policies be designed to overcome these challenges. Your audience is a general group of international stakeholders concerned with overall global strategic directions.

    Campaign platform: Choose a real or imaginary candidate running for a political office and draft a campaign platform on climate change. What kind of authority does your chosen candidate seek and what kind of tangible impact on climate change mitigation and adaptation would this candidate be able to have? Consider that the audience for the campaign platform consists of likely voters, so take care to describe your candidate's position in a politically favorable way.

    Final project: Working in groups of 3-4 students, you will develop a comprehensive national climate strategy for an assigned country. Identify the key government agencies in your country with authority on climate-related issues. Summarize the key interests of domestic groups with a stake in climate policy, and then identify the key areas for policy reform. Grounded in your analysis of domestic conditions, develop an international negotiating position for your country to take into multilateral negotiations. How is your outward facing position informed by internationally agreed upon norms and what are negotiating strategies and coalitions that are likely to yield favorable outcomes for your country? You will prepare a written report of your analysis and present the key findings of your research in class. Following presentations of all groups, we will have an in-class simulation-style debate where you will take on your country's negotiating position and hash out a path forward for multilateral action with other project teams.

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23832/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    7 May 2020

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5813 Section 001: US Foreign Policy: Issues and Institutions (23795)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Taught by the Humphrey School diplomat in residence, this course helps students develop a deep understanding of how US foreign policy institutions function, how that is being challenged, and the broader global implications of those changes. Through readings, class discussions, and guest lectures, we look at the institutions and processes involved in developing and managing US foreign policy, and use case studies to advance students' knowledge, including of how the Department of State works, and the expanding role of the Department of Defense, the National Security Council, and intelligence agencies. We examine how economic instruments like sanctions are used to advance policy; and how American citizens, lobbyists, and foreign governments influence policy. We incorporate discussions of current events into each class. Students develop writing and presentation skills critical to foreign policy careers.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mtcurtin+PA5813+Fall2021
    Class Description:

    This course will examine the institutions that shape, influence and manage U.S. foreign policy. Through a combination of readings, classroom lectures and discussions, and policy-making simulations, it will provide students with a foundation of knowledge about the institutions, their origins, and culture. During the semester, the instructor, a 25-year veteran of the Foreign Service, will guide students as they delve into the way key foreign policy institutions work. We will examine the changing role of the State Department and the Foreign Service, including its decision-making and planning processes; the role of foreign assistance and USAID in foreign policy; and the emergence of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) as a leader in trade and economic policy. Through readings and discussions we look at the role of the Department of Defense and examine the argument that there has been a growing "militarization" of foreign policy, as well as look at how intelligence agencies have been used by presidents in foreign policy and have themselves impacted policy. We will examine, with a close linkage to the 2016 presidential elections, how the National Security Council has grown from a coordinating body to a foreign policy leader, and examine academic and policy critiques of and recommendations for these institutions, with a particular eye to the transition preparations the newly elected president will put into place in November. The course will also look at the role played by Congress in making and carrying out foreign policy; and examine non-governmental forces that seek to influence policy, including the media, think tanks, non-governmental organizations and lobbying groups, and the public as they seek to influence foreign policy. Students will have the opportunity several times during the semester to meet virtually with Washington policy-makers who will join the class via Skype to provide their insights on real time iss and institutional realities. The impact of the 2016 election will be woven into the course, in particular with regard to the transition process.


    The goal of the course is to develop in students interested in global careers an understanding of how the Washington foreign policy process works and an opportunity to think critically about those processes. Students will have the chance to engage in practical writing and negotiating exercises that will deepen their understanding of policy processes, including learning to think and write critically about the competing priorities and interests policy-makers must grapple with.
    Grading:

    Students will be graded on an A-F basis. Grading will be as follows:


    10% Short Policy Memo (300-500 words) summarizing an assigned issue. Examples will be given and reviewed before the assignment..

    15% Negotiation and Policy Memo Writing Exercise (3 class periods) Over three class periods, the class will write a consensus policy memo to the newly elected president on a complex major foreign policy issue on which there are differences among departments (eg., China). Students will write one paragraph as the contribution of their assigned bureau or department; negotiate with other students consensus language and assist in writing a consensus memo; and orally brief their bureau's recommendation.

    45% Class Participation - Students will be expected to attend participate fully in class discussions, offering their own informed opinions, role playing, and making formal presentations as required. Students must complete the assigned reading and remain abreast of key foreign policy developments.

    30% Final Paper--A final paper, 2,500-3,000 words, with research footnoted, will be due on December 15. Students must meet with professor by November 1 to discuss the topic of their paper, which must address either a policy or institutional foreign policy issue.

    Class Format:
    Lecture and discussion, based on assigned readings and current events. There will be practical writing exercises, and one simulation exercise with a negotiation, presentation, and writing component.
    Workload:
    In addition to writing exercises above, there is about 50-100 pages of reading per session, in addition to an expectation that students will keep up on events in U.S. foreign policy.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23795/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/mtcurtin_PA5813_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    25 August 2016

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5826 Section 001: National Security Policy (23823)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course will analyze U.S. national security policy and process from the viewpoint of the National Security Council staff. Students will examine the organization and structure of the U.S. national security apparatus and the national security decision-making process, including individual and political factors; assess central threats to U.S. and international security and develop and discuss policy options to deal with those threats; undertake a major policy review on a specific national security challenge facing the United States, including analysis and recommendations; produce products, both written and oral, crucial to national security policy making (e.g., concise information and action memorandum), and put themselves in the position of national security leaders as part of a policy simulation. Grades will be based on oral participation, papers, and class reports.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?andre104+PA5826+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23823/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/andre104_PA5826_Fall2020.docx (Fall 2020)

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5885 Section 001: Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors (23822)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 29 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Politics of human rights issue emergence; relevant international, regional, and domestic norms; correlates of state repression; measurement of human rights abuse and remedies; human rights promotion by states, political parties, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, faith-based organizations, and providers of international development assistance.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?shin0148+PA5885+Fall2021
    Class Description:

    This is a graduate-level introductory course on human rights policy, issues, actors and mechanisms. Human Rights is generally understood to refer to the ways in which states treat their citizens and not the relationship between private citizens. For example, the difference between a murder committed by the police (extrajudicial killing) and the murder of one civilian by another (homicide). In this course, we will spend the majority of our time exploring the International Human Rights System, including the United Nations, International Civil Society, and International Justice mechanisms. We will also explore the United States policy system and human rights policy, both domestic and foreign.


    This course will cover many topics, in many cases we will merely scratch the surface of the wealth of information available on these topics. The assignments will ask you to explore in-depth a topic that is of particular interest to you.


    The syllabus is available here https://docs.google.com/document/d/1WzRcRzForqgvDRZ593pcCtds7Cd2nQiIkem1liBgAXw/edit?usp=sharing

    Learning Objectives:

    As a result of completing this course and the assigned readings, activities, papers, and projects you will be able to:

    • Understand the international human rights context and mechanism and how these standards affect governments and individuals

    • Distinguish the difference between U.S. domestic rights and how these intersect with international human rights.

    • Identify human rights issues and place them within the larger human rights framework.

    • Identify and analyze international and domestic human rights actors.

    • Effectively communicate, through a variety of media, a specific human rights issue, and policy recommendations.

    Grading:

    This course has two major assignments, which will be broken down into a number of steps, and a number of smaller assignments throughout the semester. In addition, each person is expected to sign up to lead one discussion session. This section of the syllabus will provide an overview of the two large assignments and the expectations for the discussion leaders. Additional information will be available through the Canvas site.

    The assignments will carry the following weight for your final grade:

    • Story Map - 50%

    • Interview -20%

    • Discussion Group Leader - 15%

    • Participation - 15%


    Each assignment will be graded on a 100 point scale and then weighted as indicated above. Letter grades are assigned as follows. 97-100=A+, 94-96=A, 90-93=A-, 87-89=B+, 84-86=B, 80-83=B-, and so on. Unless prior arrangements have been made, late assignments will be penalized three points immediately and then again for every 24 hours that pass after the due date/time.

    Exam Format:
    This course does not contain any exams.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23822/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jamesr_PA5885_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    16 August 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5886 Section 001: Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar I (23796)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Human Rights M H R
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 22 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    The Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar is a required course for all first-year MHR students. The course is intended to create a cohort group and ensure that all MHR students have an opportunity to work together to explore current issues related to human rights practice, focusing on emerging events or crises, and debates over policy, practice, or theory and for direct contact with and networking particularly with counterparts in the Global South. This course is in a series with, and taken before, PA 5887. prereq: First-year MHR
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walsh912+PA5886+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23796/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5910 Section 001: Developing Your Public Service Career (23760)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    S-N or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA majors: Development Practice; Human Rights; Public Policy; Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy; or Urban and Regional Affairs
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students investigate/analyze interests, skills, and abilities and combine them in a career plan. Develop tools to demonstrate abilities, document experiences/knowledge, and explore public service career options.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?eiden026+PA5910+Fall2021
    Class Description:

    Want to meet alumni working in the Public Affairs field and learn about their careers? Want to learn strategies for your job or internship search? Please consider registering for PA 5910: Developing Your Public Service Career, our one-credit class developed especially for you!
    Students find this class is a great way to keep themselves accountable to work on their networking or job/internship searches throughout the semester. Since Steph is arranging a number of alumni panels, you will also end the class with more than 15 alumni contacts and advice from each of them. This class is appropriate for both first-year and second-year Humphrey students.
    Feedback from previous students who have taken the course!

    • This class is definitely worth taking. You'll make connections with professionals in the field and learn how to nail the job application process. I think everyone should take a course like this.
    • This class includes a ton of helpful resources, tips, and skills for professional development and thinking deliberately about how to further your career.
    • This class was helpful in preparing me for my future career. I now feel more confident reaching out to others in my field, applying for jobs, and nailing interviews.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Humphrey students in the MDP, MHR, MURP, MS-STEP or MPP degree who are searching for internships or in the beginning stages of launching their public service careers.
    Learning Objectives:
    This course provides Humphrey students with the knowledge to manage their own career development. You will:

    • Analyze and articulate your own interests and skills

    • Explore multiple public service career paths

    • Demonstrate knowledge of effective approaches to job/internship searches

    • Create a personal plan and timeline for exploring and reaching career goals

    Grading:
    S/N
    Exam Format:
    There is no final exam for this 1 credit class.
    Class Format:
    Lecture, Discussion/Activity, Career Panels
    Workload:
    Students report spending less than 3 hours per week on outside of classwork.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23760/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 July 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5920 Section 004: Skills Workshop -- Tribal-State Relations Workshop (32541)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    0.5 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    48 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Grad or Masters or Law
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    09/17/2022
    Sat 08:30AM - 05:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    10/01/2022
    Sat 08:30AM - 05:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Topics on public policy or planning skills. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be held REMOTELY (syncronously online). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jkb+PA5920+Fall2022 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?taddjohn+PA5920+Fall2022
    Class Description:

    Minnesota is home to 11 sovereign Indian nations and about 120,000 American Indian people. Tribes are among the top 20 employers in the state, and tribal jurisdiction impacts thousands of acres of land in Minnesota both within and beyond reservation boundaries. While tribes share prominent nation-to-nation diplomatic relationships with the U.S. federal government, tribal relationships with state agencies are increasingly significant. Since the administration of Governor Jesse Ventura, each Minnesota governor has implemented an executive order focused on state relations with Indian nations. Under current Governor Tim Walz, Executive Order 19-24 provides a considerable mandate for state agencies to develop and implement tribal consultation policies and to build associated partnerships.


    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32541/1229

    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    4 November 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5926 Section 001: Presentation Skills: How to Inspire Your Audience and Change the World (31656)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 11/09/2022
    Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Learn techniques for making effective, persuasive presentations to different kinds of audiences. Practice is essential to improve speaking skills and reduce anxiety. Students practice by recording brief weekly presentations and making class presentations in a supportive environment. Techniques for using Powerpoint to create effective slides are practiced. Course components include presentation assignments; peer reviews; readings/videos and reflections; and class participation. May be repeated once.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?free0303+PA5926+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Learn techniques for making effective, persuasive presentations to different kinds of audiences. Students practice by recording brief weekly presentations and making class presentations in a supportive environment. Techniques for creating effective slides are practiced. Course components include presentation assignments; peer reviews; readings/videos and reflections; and class participation. May be repeated once.
    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the course, students should be able to:


    • speak publicly with greater confidence


    • present more persuasively


    • create effective, high-impact slides


    • tailor presentations to audiences

    Grading:
    Course can be taken either as Pass/Fail or on an A-F basis.

    50% Presentations
    25% Feedback to other students
    10% Completion of assigned readings/videos and reflections on them
    5% Reviewing and reflecting on your own presentations
    10% Class participation, including attendance, collegiality, being an audience
    Exam Format:
    This course does not have a final exam.
    Class Format:
    10% Lecture
    40% Discussion
    50% Student Presentations
    Workload:
    Workload for this class will comprise approximately three hours of work each week, including in-class and out-of-class time.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/31656/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/free0303_PA5926_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    16 July 2018

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5929 Section 001: Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers (23797)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    09/06/2022 - 10/24/2022
    Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 32 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Tools for communicating quantitative information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way. Topics covered include 1) writing and speaking about data; 2) data management in Excel in order to prepare data for charting; 3) understanding and ability to deploy core concepts in of design, layout, typography and color to maximize the impact of their data visualizations 4) determining which types of statistical measures are most effective for each type of data and message; 5) determining which types of design to use for communicating quantitative information; and 6) designing graphs and tables that are intelligent and compelling for communicating quantitative information.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be REMOTE (synchronously online during the scheduled time). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dorelien+PA5929+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    The class will have a practical approach, combining discussion and practical exercises. The course is designed to be like a walk-through, starting from collecting and organizing data and ending with advanced graph designs.

    The course in the spring will use Excel and Tableau. There will be additional modules available for more advance Excel users and those who want to go beyond the basics in Tableau. I will not teach R as part of the class but will make available the R modules and handouts for students that are interested in learning R.
    Learning Objectives:
    Learn to make better tables- see example below
    ClearOffTheTableMd
    Learn to make better figures
    Grading:
    Please note that it is possible to audit the course or take the course S/N. I encourage students that are already taking a full load of classes to sign up for this class S/N, that way you can focus on learning the material and not on the letter grade.

    4 Problem Sets (each problem set is worth 15% of final grade). The problem sets will be due one week after being assigned and will need to be uploaded to Canvas before the start of class.

    If you are satisfied with your grades from the first 3 assignments, you do not have to turn in assignment 4. If you are not, you should turn in assignment 4 and I will drop the lowest of your assignment grades.


    1 Final Report (40% of final grade)
    Class Format:
    Meets twice a week for first half the semester. The majority of class time is spent doing in-class exercises.

    Modifications for online mode

    The fall 2021 class will be taught online while the two spring semester sessions will be in person. The motivation is to accommodate students who are not able to be vaccinated or who would otherwise have trouble making it to an in-person session of the class.

    · This will be a live synchronous class. All classes will be recorded, and recordings will be posted the next day.

    · During the in-class exercise portion of the class, two break-out rooms will be created. One breakout room is for advanced students who wish to go at their own pace and not follow along with the professor. The second breakout room is a place that students who need extra help can go to quickly get help from the TA and then rejoin the main room.

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23797/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA5929_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 May 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5932 Section 001: Working with Data: Finding, Managing, and Using Data (23851)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    10/25/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Hands-on experience with common issues that arise when using secondary data sets. After successful completion of the course, students should be able to: 1. Determine where to find data and information about data (metadata) for policy-related topics. 2. Repurpose, manipulate, and/or clean data collected by someone else or for a different purpose in order to answer questions. 3. Determine appropriate units of analysis, weights, data structure, and variables of interest in order to answer policy-related questions. 4. Document workflow to allow reproducibility and protect the confidentiality of the data. 5. Conduct basic data manipulation tasks (making tables) using existing software including Excel and Stata. 6. Learn how to find answers for questions through online support. This course will focus on Excel and Stata equally. Previous experience in Stata is preferred, but the course will include a brief introduction to relevant skills.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wang8262+PA5932+Fall2021
    Class Description:


    Grading:
    Homework Assignments: 80%, Final Project: 20%
    Class Format:
    Lecture 40%, In-Class Exercise 60%
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23851/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/wang8262_PA5932_Fall2021.docx (Fall 2021)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    20 August 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5933 Section 001: Survey Methods: Designing Effective Questionnaires (31658)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon 11:15AM - 12:55PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Applied (hands-on) introduction to survey questionnaire design. Student teams design a questionnaire for a real or imaginary client, typically a non-profit/NGO or governmental agency. For example, students may draft and revise questions about respondents' demographics and employment; life histories; knowledge, use, and opinions about services; and anxiety and well-being. The class will spend two weeks on each module, actively engaging in class about draft questions, and through that practice, learning how to improve them. Survey questions will be entered into SurveyToGo, an app used offline on Windows devices to collect data, and questionnaire will be tested on a small number of volunteers. Students will learn: - The process of questionnaire design in a team - Basic pitfalls of survey design - names, definitions, examples. - How to use Excel to track questions, coded responses, and prompts for interviewers - How to use interviewing software SurveyToGo This class is not a substitute for a comprehensive survey research class or a statistical course on sampling and weighting.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dlevison+PA5933+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    This 2-credit full-semester class provides an applied (hands-on) introduction to designing survey questionnaires. Students will learn:

    ·How to design a questionnaire in a team
    ·Best practices for survey and question design.
    ·Basic pitfalls of survey design - names, definitions,examples.
    ·How to use Google Sheets to track questions, coded responses, and prompts for interviewers
    ·Some of us may learn to program survey software Qualtrics

    This class is not the equivalent of a comprehensive survey research class (e.g. EPSY 5244 or PubH 6810) or a statistical course on sampling and weighting (e.g. STAT 5201). Instead, it takes a learning-by-doing approach to one part of the survey process: designing questions for a questionnaire.

    Each time it is taught, student teams will design a questionnaire for a client. In 2020 the client was a UMN doctoral student studying Black women who obtained PhDs in the US while raising biological, adoptive or foster children. In 2022 the client will be the Humphrey School, which needs an exit survey for graduating masters students.


    The syllabus will evolve depending in part on the needs of the client. A full syllabus will not be available at the beginning of class for this reason. The 2020 syllabus (final) is attached, but note that readings related to understanding respondents will be lighter in 2022.

    The class will spend two weeks on each module, actively engaging in class about draft questions and through that practice learning how to improve them. Students will not conduct the survey, apart from test interviews.


    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Any graduate student.
    Grading:
    Grade break-down (approximate, to be revised slightly):

    60% Teams: ten items by @ 6% each - first drafts; second drafts with tracked changes. (#1-10)
    5% Teams: turn in final questionnaire in Excel (#11)
    5% Individual: cognitive interviewing memo re: pilot test of survey questions
    15% Individual: posts & mini-quizzes
    15% Class participation, including group members grading each other
    Exam Format:
    None
    Class Format:
    Mini-lectures & discussions. The class is expected to take place in-person. It is possible that a small number of sessions will be remote.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/31658/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dlevison_PA5933_Spring2022.pdf (Spring 2022)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    31 October 2021

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5934 Section 001: HPAR - Humphrey Public Affairs Review Board Seminar (23826)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course provides a seminar context for the work of members of the editorial board for the Humphrey Public Affairs Review (HPAR). It meets seven times over the course of Fall semester to provide logistical and technical guidance for the Board as it produces the online journal. Students engage in the various activities required to publish the journal. In the beginning of the semester, students conduct outreach to solicit submissions and discuss the selection criteria for submissions. They work closely with the conventions of APA style and citations, while developing their copyediting abilities. Central to journal production is engaging with the peer-review process, through providing feedback to authors and discussing critiques with editing teams. Finally, students submit their own pieces of writing to the journal for publication. As a result, students participate in peer-review as both an editor and an author.
    Class Notes:
    Class meets on alternating weeks. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dlevison+PA5934+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23826/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5951 Section 001: Humphrey Fellows Global Commons Seminar (23798)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Humphrey Institute Fellow
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 09:00AM - 12:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This seminar will introduce Humphrey International Fellows to the public policy, law, and human rights landscape of Minnesota and provide opportunities for professional growth and development in accordance with the goals of the Hubert H. Humphrey International Fellows Program. Through a series of lectures, presentations, trainings and site visits, fellows will be exposed to professional development opportunities, skill building, cultural education, leadership training and networking opportunities. Fellows will also have the opportunity to hear from experts in their fields of expertise, and learn best practices and strategies in public policy, law, and human rights advocacy.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walsh912+PA5951+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23798/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5971 Section 001: Survey of Election Administration (23801)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Meets With:
    PA 3969 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Survey of building blocks of election administration, from voter registration to recounts.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wils2343+PA5971+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23801/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5973 Section 001: Strategic Management of Election Administration (23844)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Meets With:
    DDS 6431 Section 001
    DT 5430 Section 001
    PA 3973 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    09/06/2022 - 10/24/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Strategic management for election administrators in the political environment. Election official tools and challenges. The role of the lawmaking process in budgeting and organizational planning.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ljacobs+PA5973+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23844/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5982 Section 001: Data Analysis for Election Administration (23846)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Meets With:
    PA 3982 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Evidence-based election administration. Collection and analysis of quantitative data to solve problems and identify opportunities for improvement. Emphasis on pre-election forecasting for planning purposes and post-election auditing of election results.
    Class Notes:
    Remote sessions will be held on 9/8/21, 11/2/21, and 11/30/21 from 5:00-6:00 p.m. Centrail Time. All other work will be asynchronous. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5982+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This course will highlight the importance of evidence-based election administration, which focuses on collection and analysis of quantitative data to solve problems and identify opportunities for improvement. There will be an emphasis on pre-election forecasting for planning purposes as well as post-election auditing of election results.

    Identify sources of data in the election process.

    Examine different methods to obtain data that informs policy decisions and administrative processes based on voting behavior and the architecture of voting systems.

    Use data to forecast turnout and other Election Day events to assist with pre-election planning.

    Apply data analysis techniques to post-election reviews as part of continuous improvement.

    Illustrate the story of an election by presenting data in a meaningful and persuasive way.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23846/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/tpatrick_PA3982_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    21 February 2017

    Fall 2022  |  PA 5985 Section 001: Physical Election Security (23848)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Meets With:
    PA 3985 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    10/25/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    U.S. Homeland Security designated election security as a "critical infrastructure" after threats from foreign governments, and collaborates with states in detecting and responding to foreign interference. This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of the current security context and best practices and processes for physically safeguarding elections based on 2016 and 2020. Students will learn the difference between physical and cyber threats to U.S. systems; tangible steps to protect election offices and their equipment; the use of audits to ensure the accuracy of elections; the integration of security into vendor relationships; and the connection between physical election security and citizen trust in elections. Content will be explored through readings (including government documents and studies), videos, discussions, and writing assignments.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?choat024+PA5985+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23848/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8003 Section 001: Integrative Doctoral Seminar in Public Affairs I (23781)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Public Affairs PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon 09:00AM - 11:45AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Lays foundation for doctoral-level study of public affairs through introduction of key concepts, literature, research questions of public affairs. Critically examines paradigms/methodologies through readings, discussions, writing assignments, research presentations. Facilitates development of dissertation research ideas. prereq: Public Affairs doctoral student
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cheng838+PA8003+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23781/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8006 Section 001: Current Research in Public Affairs: Topics, Approaches, and Cultures (23802)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Public Affairs PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon 12:05PM - 01:20PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students participate in research seminars exploring current topics, approaches, and cultures in public affairs. Students responsible for discussion, presentation, and evaluation of research, including peer review of papers and presentations. Discussion of research ethics and skills, including literature reviews, research design, data visualization, public engagement, presentation, and project management.
    Class Notes:
    Class will meet on Mondays, 12:05-1:20 p.m. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?yingling+PA8006+Fall2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23802/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8302 Section 001: Applied Policy Analysis (23793)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Mon 02:30PM - 04:25PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 34 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Design/evaluation of public policies. Emphasizes market/non-market contexts. Microeconomics and welfare economics of policy analysis. Econometric tools for measurement of policy outcomes. Applications to policy problems. prereq: Intermediate microeconomics, introduction to econometrics
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jannaj+PA8302+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23793/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8302 Section 002: Applied Policy Analysis (23794)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Wed 02:30PM - 04:25PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 34 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Design/evaluation of public policies. Emphasizes market/non-market contexts. Microeconomics and welfare economics of policy analysis. Econometric tools for measurement of policy outcomes. Applications to policy problems. prereq: Intermediate microeconomics, introduction to econometrics
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jannaj+PA8302+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23794/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8444 Section 001: FTE: Doctoral (23784)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    No Grade Associated
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Advanced Doctoral Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 100 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    FTE: Doctoral prereq: Doctoral student, adviser and DGS consent
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23784/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8461 Section 001: Global and U.S. Perspectives on Health and Mortality (23842)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Grad or Law student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    The health of populations in developing and developed countries is very different. Within countries, great health disparities exist between more advantaged and more disadvantaged populations. When crafting policies that aim to improve population health, it is crucial to know how to measure health and how to think about the health needs of the specific population in question. This course will provide an overview to the factors driving health, mortality, and aging across different populations. In addition, students will learn the best sources of data and measures to use to describe the health status of a population. They will also be able to assess policy options that address the health of their population.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dorelien+PA8461+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    COVID-19 Update: The current pandemic reminds us that demography matters. This is especially the case when trying to understand differences in case fatality rates between countries; or how differences in social mixing patterns between different age groups (ex Italy vs Germany) influences the epidemic. I will be modifying the syllabus to spend more time focused on emerging infectious diseases and also include some COVID-19 specific case studies throughout the syllabus (for instance when discussing factors to think about when trying to calculate diseases attributable mortality rates).
    The health of populations in developing and developed countries is very different. When crafting policies that aim to improve population health, it is crucial to know how to measure health and how to think about the health needs of the specific population in question. This course will provide an overview to the factors driving health, mortality, and aging across different populations. In addition, students will learn the best sources of data and measures to use to describe the health status of a population. Furthermore, students will be able to assess policy options that address the health of their population. At the end of the course, students will know answers to questions such as: What are the major causes of death in developed vs. developing nations? Why is life expectancy at birth often used to describe the health of a population? Will we continue to live longer or is there a limit to increases in life expectancy? And what are the implications of longer and healthier lives for the viability of social security and other public policies? Will women always live longer than men? Is socio-economic status positively correlated with health, worldwide?
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    This course is designed for both PhD and Masters students. It counts towards the completion of the Population Studies Minor, Training Program in Population Studies or Population Health. This course is also considered a course in the Global Policy Area.
    Grading:

    · Problem sets/ short responses (40%)

    · Leading class discussion (20%)

    · Final Paper Presentation (10%), Final Paper (30%)
    Exam Format:
    No final exam but there will be a final paper and presentation.
    Class Format:
    This fall the class will be taught online.

    Tuesday and Thursdays from 2:30 pm to 3:45pm.
    No Thursday class the week of Thanksgiving.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23842/1229
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA8461_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA8461_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    29 June 2020

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8777 Section 001: Thesis Credits: Master's (23756)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-18 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    50 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    No Grade Associated
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 200 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    (No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]
    Class Description:
    (No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]. Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23756/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    20 October 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8888 Section 001: Thesis Credit: Doctoral (23785)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-24 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    100 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    No Grade Associated
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA PhD and ETCR or Doct
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 100 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Doctoral thesis credit. prereq: [Max 18 cr per semester or summer], 24 cr required
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23785/1229

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8921 Section 001: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (23770)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Please contact adviser in Humphrey Student Services regarding scheduling a section of 8921 for a specific faculty member.
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23770/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8921 Section 002: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (23776)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23776/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8921 Section 003: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (23777)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23777/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8921 Section 004: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (23778)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23778/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8922 Section 001: Master's Paper: Plan B (23774)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Masters of science in science, technology, and environmental policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Plan B. prereq: instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Please contact adviser in Humphrey Student Services regarding scheduling a section of 8922 for a specific faculty member.
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23774/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8991 Section 001: Independent Study (23746)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    0.5-4 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
    Class Notes:
    Contact Stacey Grimes (grime004@umn.edu) to have an 8991 section set up with the faculty member with whom you wish to work after consulting your professional adviser.
    Class Description:
    Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23746/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8991 Section 002: Independent Study (23747)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    0.5-4 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
    Class Description:
    Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23747/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8991 Section 003: Independent Study (23748)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    0.5-4 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
    Class Description:
    Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/23748/1229
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Fall 2022  |  PA 8991 Section 004: Independent Study (23749)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    0.5-4 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered: