2718 classes matched your search criteria.

Summer 2021  |  PA 1401 Section 001: Public Affairs: Community Organizing Skills for Public Action (83017)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/07/2021 - 07/30/2021
Tue, Thu 09:00AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Public affairs work, roles of citizens in democratic way of life. Community organizing skills, their importance for public affairs. Negotiations among diverse audiences, understanding different interests, mapping power relationships. Relevant public affairs and governance theory.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?donov013+PA1401+Summer2020
Class Description:

*meets University of Minnesota Liberal Education requirement for Citizenship/Public Ethics Theme"


This course is a hands-on introduction for undergraduate students wanting to develop the skills, confidence, and knowledge to become empowered agents of change.This course involves an examination of key concepts of citizenship, politics, ethics, and democracy, as well as hands-on experiential learning in problem solving skills and team work especially from the framework called Civic Studies, developed to address the challenge of collective action in a world of often radically different ethical frameworks.


The goal of this class is to:

1. Give students a hands on introduction to organizing skills such as public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings.

2. Enable students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives

3. To provide stages for students' public speaking

4. Open the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers

5, To acquaint students with the methods and outlook of community organizing tradition in America as a strand of the emerging "Civic Studies" field

6. To provide students with an introduction to the approach to ethics in Civic Studies, compared to other approaches. Such topics include: mass incarceration, racism, immigration, climate change, education, gender issues, etc.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students should take this class if they like classes that are co-created by students and instructor and are engaging. All disciplines and years are welcome. During this time in our history, people want to acquire knowledge and skills of how to solve public problems.. This course provides knowledge, skills and practice for creating change.
Learning Objectives:
This course will help students acquire skills for effective citizenship and life-long learning through the course goals of:
• Acquainting students with Civic Studies and the community organizing tradition in America and the distinctive ways in which this framework addresses questions of ethical pluralism
• Giving students a hands on introduction to organizing skills for civic agency, such as writing, public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings
• Enabling students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives
• Providing stages for students' public speaking
• Opening the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers
Grading:
40% Two Essays
20% Weekly Reflections on Readings
20% In-Class Participation
20% Public Work Project
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
Discussion based with some lecture. All are teachers and learners. You will learn how to become a change agent through active learning.
Workload:
50 Pages of Reading Per Week (average)
30-45 Pages of Individual Writing, Including Weekly Reading Reflections
3 Short Papers
1 Public Work Project Report
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83017/1215
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2020.docx (Fall 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 July 2020

Summer 2021  |  PA 3983 Section 001: Introduction to Election Security (83019)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5983 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/07/2021 - 07/30/2021
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will examine the history of cyberattacks on the United States and the American election system, with special attention to the 2016 election cycle. Students will explore the types of cybersecurity threats that exist and strategies to protect against them; understand the roles different levels of government can play in the process, and hear from key officials about the issues raised by the official response to election security threats at the federal, state and local levels as well as in related private sector communities.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83019/1215

Summer 2021  |  PA 5003 Section 001: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (83018)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kiedr003+PA5003+Summer2020.
Class Description:

The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good." In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of financial analysis and management.


This is an introductory course to financial analysis and management in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.


Learning Objectives:

By the end of the semester, students should be able:

  • To obtain basic knowledge and terminology of budgeting and financial management;

  • To summarize budgetary process, revenues, and expenditures of a public or nonprofit organization;

  • To apply basic tools of financial analysis, such as break-even analysis and marginal cost analysis, in making simple financial decisions;

  • To know how financial information is organized and reported in the accounting system;

  • To interpret data in financial statements and relate them with each other; and

  • To determine and calculate financial ratios to assess financial condition

Grading:
Each class there will be an assignment that you are to prepare and submiy via email (You may work with others in completing the assignments.). These will not be graded. You should actively participate in class discussions and class problem-solving. Class discussion, timely assignment completion, and on-line attendance count toward your participation grade. Participation represents 12 points of your grade.

There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course taken at the Humphrey School. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.

The final assignment is a group project in which you will review the financials of a real government or nonprofit organization and present your findings to the class in person. You will be assigned to groups in the second week of class. The group should submit a 5+ page paper of your findings at the last class. The group will also present a power point presentation (no more than 10 minutes) of the findings at the last class. The group should provide me a copy of the power points and any other information that would be helpful. This group paper (20 points) and presentation (8 points) are worth 28 points.

First Test 30 points Second Test 30 points Group Project 28 points Class Participation 12 points Total 100 points
Class Format:
This class is "flipped." Traditional lectures are videotaped and made available on Moodle. Also, students will be able to "attend" sessions in their own homes via a WebEx software system. Students will log into the WebEx system to participate in the problem-solving sessions. There are 8 class periods generally an hour and 45 minutes. Class time is used to review assignments, review additional videos and/or material, and take exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83018/1215
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Summer 2021  |  PA 5003 Section 002: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (83013)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/07/2021 - 07/30/2021
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Closed (0 of 0 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
Class Notes:
Meets 7/2 - 7/27/20 (Mon/Thu, 6:00-8:45). All students attend 7/13 and 7/27/20 in-person sessions (sec 1). Students will attend other sessions online synchronously (sec 2) OR in person (sec 3). Register for sec 2 or 3. You will be automatically enrolled into sec 1. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kiedr003+PA5003+Summer2020
Class Description:

The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good." In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of financial analysis and management.


This is an introductory course to financial analysis and management in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.


Learning Objectives:

By the end of the semester, students should be able:

  • To obtain basic knowledge and terminology of budgeting and financial management;

  • To summarize budgetary process, revenues, and expenditures of a public or nonprofit organization;

  • To apply basic tools of financial analysis, such as break-even analysis and marginal cost analysis, in making simple financial decisions;

  • To know how financial information is organized and reported in the accounting system;

  • To interpret data in financial statements and relate them with each other; and

  • To determine and calculate financial ratios to assess financial condition

Grading:
Each class there will be an assignment that you are to prepare and submiy via email (You may work with others in completing the assignments.). These will not be graded. You should actively participate in class discussions and class problem-solving. Class discussion, timely assignment completion, and on-line attendance count toward your participation grade. Participation represents 12 points of your grade.

There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course taken at the Humphrey School. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.

The final assignment is a group project in which you will review the financials of a real government or nonprofit organization and present your findings to the class in person. You will be assigned to groups in the second week of class. The group should submit a 5+ page paper of your findings at the last class. The group will also present a power point presentation (no more than 10 minutes) of the findings at the last class. The group should provide me a copy of the power points and any other information that would be helpful. This group paper (20 points) and presentation (8 points) are worth 28 points.

First Test 30 points Second Test 30 points Group Project 28 points Class Participation 12 points Total 100 points
Class Format:
This class is "flipped." Traditional lectures are videotaped and made available on Moodle. Also, students will be able to "attend" sessions in their own homes via a WebEx software system. Students will log into the WebEx system to participate in the problem-solving sessions. There are 8 class periods generally an hour and 45 minutes. Class time is used to review assignments, review additional videos and/or material, and take exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83013/1215
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Summer 2021  |  PA 5003 Section 003: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (83014)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Closed (0 of 0 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
Class Notes:
Meets 7/2 - 7/27/20 (Mon/Thu, 6:00-8:45). All students attend 7/13 and 7/27/20 in-person sessions (sec 1). Students will attend other sessions online synchronously (sec 2) OR in person (sec 3). Register for sec 2 or 3. You will be automatically enrolled into sec 1. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kiedr003+PA5003+Summer2020
Class Description:

The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good." In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of financial analysis and management.


This is an introductory course to financial analysis and management in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.


Learning Objectives:

By the end of the semester, students should be able:

  • To obtain basic knowledge and terminology of budgeting and financial management;

  • To summarize budgetary process, revenues, and expenditures of a public or nonprofit organization;

  • To apply basic tools of financial analysis, such as break-even analysis and marginal cost analysis, in making simple financial decisions;

  • To know how financial information is organized and reported in the accounting system;

  • To interpret data in financial statements and relate them with each other; and

  • To determine and calculate financial ratios to assess financial condition

Grading:
Each class there will be an assignment that you are to prepare and submiy via email (You may work with others in completing the assignments.). These will not be graded. You should actively participate in class discussions and class problem-solving. Class discussion, timely assignment completion, and on-line attendance count toward your participation grade. Participation represents 12 points of your grade.

There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course taken at the Humphrey School. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.

The final assignment is a group project in which you will review the financials of a real government or nonprofit organization and present your findings to the class in person. You will be assigned to groups in the second week of class. The group should submit a 5+ page paper of your findings at the last class. The group will also present a power point presentation (no more than 10 minutes) of the findings at the last class. The group should provide me a copy of the power points and any other information that would be helpful. This group paper (20 points) and presentation (8 points) are worth 28 points.

First Test 30 points Second Test 30 points Group Project 28 points Class Participation 12 points Total 100 points
Class Format:
This class is "flipped." Traditional lectures are videotaped and made available on Moodle. Also, students will be able to "attend" sessions in their own homes via a WebEx software system. Students will log into the WebEx system to participate in the problem-solving sessions. There are 8 class periods generally an hour and 45 minutes. Class time is used to review assignments, review additional videos and/or material, and take exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83014/1215
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Summer 2021  |  PA 5136 Section 001: Group Process Facilitation for Organizational and Public/Community Engagement (83015)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Group process facilitation components, theories, tools, techniques. Facilitator's role in group goals and processes. Facilitation in public policy. Cross-cultural challenges. Topics may include meeting management, group decision-making, conflict, participatory leadership, and other tools.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5136+Summer2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83015/1215

Summer 2021  |  PA 5983 Section 001: Introduction to Election Security (83020)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
PA 3983 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/07/2021 - 07/30/2021
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will examine the history of cyberattacks on the United States and the American election system, with special attention to the 2016 election cycle. Students will explore the types of cybersecurity threats that exist and strategies to protect against them; understand the roles different levels of government can play in the process, and hear from key officials about the issues raised by the official response to election security threats at the federal, state and local levels as well as in related private sector communities.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83020/1215

Summer 2021  |  PA 8081 Section 001: Capstone Workshop -- Leadership for Community and Organizational Change (83016)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (6 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 14 wk
 
05/17/2021 - 08/20/2021
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. A few in-person classes may be scheduled if the COVID-19 situation allows. Students enrolling into this course must have completed PA 5080, sec 1: Capstone Preparation Workshop in Spring 2020. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?rphinney+PA8081+Summer2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83016/1215

Summer 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 001: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (83006)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Independent/Directed Study
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/07/2021 - 07/30/2021
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
If you wish to register for a section of PA 8921, please contact MPP adviser Joel Mixon in the Humphrey School Student Services office.
Class Description:
Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83006/1215
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Summer 2021  |  PA 8922 Section 001: Master's Paper: Plan B (83012)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Masters of science in science, technology, and environmental policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Plan B. prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
If you wish to register for a section of PA 8922, please contact MPP adviser Joel Mixon in the Humphrey School Student Services office.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83012/1215
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Summer 2021  |  PA 8991 Section 001: Independent Study (82998)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits (6 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/07/2021 - 07/30/2021
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Notes:
Contact Stacey Grimes (grime004@umn.edu) to have an 8991 section set up with the faculty member with whom you wish to work after consulting your professional adviser.
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82998/1215
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Summer 2021  |  PA 8991 Section 002: Independent Study (82999)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Independent Study
Credits:
0.5-4 Credits (6 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Grade Sort
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/07/2021 - 07/30/2021
12:00AM - 12:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
Class Description:
Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82999/1215
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Spring 2021  |  PA 1401 Section 001: Public Affairs: Community Organizing Skills for Public Action (54133)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Freshman Full Year Registration
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 08:15AM - 09:30AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (13 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Public affairs work, roles of citizens in democratic way of life. Community organizing skills, their importance for public affairs. Negotiations among diverse audiences, understanding different interests, mapping power relationships. Relevant public affairs and governance theory.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?donov013+PA1401+Spring2021
Class Description:

*meets University of Minnesota Liberal Education requirement for Citizenship/Public Ethics Theme"


This course is a hands-on introduction for undergraduate students wanting to develop the skills, confidence, and knowledge to become empowered agents of change.This course involves an examination of key concepts of citizenship, politics, ethics, and democracy, as well as hands-on experiential learning in problem solving skills and team work especially from the framework called Civic Studies, developed to address the challenge of collective action in a world of often radically different ethical frameworks.


The goal of this class is to:

1. Give students a hands on introduction to organizing skills such as public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings.

2. Enable students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives

3. To provide stages for students' public speaking

4. Open the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers

5, To acquaint students with the methods and outlook of community organizing tradition in America as a strand of the emerging "Civic Studies" field

6. To provide students with an introduction to the approach to ethics in Civic Studies, compared to other approaches. Such topics include: mass incarceration, racism, immigration, climate change, education, gender issues, etc.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students should take this class if they like classes that are co-created by students and instructor and are engaging. All disciplines and years are welcome. During this time in our history, people want to acquire knowledge and skills of how to solve public problems.. This course provides knowledge, skills and practice for creating change.
Learning Objectives:
This course will help students acquire skills for effective citizenship and life-long learning through the course goals of:
• Acquainting students with Civic Studies and the community organizing tradition in America and the distinctive ways in which this framework addresses questions of ethical pluralism
• Giving students a hands on introduction to organizing skills for civic agency, such as writing, public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings
• Enabling students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives
• Providing stages for students' public speaking
• Opening the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers
Grading:
40% Two Essays
20% Weekly Reflections on Readings
20% In-Class Participation
20% Public Work Project
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
Discussion based with some lecture. All are teachers and learners. You will learn how to become a change agent through active learning.
Workload:
50 Pages of Reading Per Week (average)
30-45 Pages of Individual Writing, Including Weekly Reading Reflections
3 Short Papers
1 Public Work Project Report
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54133/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2020.docx (Fall 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 July 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 3001 Section 001: Changing the World: Contemporary Public Policy (54168)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (13 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Foundation for understanding the what, who, where, and how of public policy making. These components are explored from different perspectives while delving into questions such as: What is public policy good for? Who decides policy priorities? What effect does public policy actually have in solving public problems? How can we improve public policy making? After successfully completing this course, students will understand the process, structure, and context of policymaking; identify who, how, and what influences the policy process; and apply knowledge of public policy and the policymaking process to a specific policy issue. A strong understanding of the American political system is encouraged.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA3001+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54168/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 3003 Section 001: Nonprofit and Public Financial Management (54172)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
junior or senior
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Closed (25 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Concepts/tools for project/budget planning. Program analysis. Interpreting financial reports. Identifying/resolving organizational performance issues. Case studies, real-world exercises. prereq: Jr or sr
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will be taught using a mix of synchronous and asynchronous meetings. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?varsh011+PA3003+Spring2021
Class Description:
This is an introductory course designed for students who have some background in financial analysis but wish to gain a clearer understanding of managing the finances for a public/non-profit organization. The primary objective of this course is to help you make sense of and use financial information available from financial documents such as budgets, balance sheets, and activity statements, among others. We will use conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques to analyze real-world financial problems. By the end of this course, you will understand the important concepts required for managing the finances of nonprofit/public organizations.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the course, students will be able to:
Identify aspects of financial management as an integral part of nonprofit/public management
Define basic terminology and skills required in budgeting and accounting
Develop the capability to perform basic budget and financial analysis of nonprofit/public organizations
Analyze and prepare financial documents such as budgets, balance sheets, activity statements, cash flow statements, annual financial reports etc.
Compare various scenarios and recommend the one with best financial outcomes.
Improve communication and writing skills regarding financial matters.
Class Format:
We will follow a flipped learning model, where I will post pre-recorded lectures covering the class material each week at least 5 days in advance so that you can watch it before or during the Monday asynchronous class time. I expect you to come to the Wednesday class having watched these lectures so that we can use the synchronous class time on active learning activities. Prior feedback from students has shown that in-class group activities significantly improved their learning outcomes. Hence, I have incorporated several activities into the class structure. This classroom environment therefore relies on you to come to class prepared and ready to participate, and you will be expected to respect and value the opinions of your peers.

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Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54172/1213
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/varsh011_PA3003_Spring2021.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 November 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 3972 Section 001: Elections and the Law (54174)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Pre-Covid
Meets With:
PA 5972 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
12:00AM - 12:00AM
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (1 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theories and basic structure of the American legal system. Experience with basic tools and skills for using the law to understand and analyze issues facing election administrators across the nation. Use of election-related and non-election related materials to prepare election administrators for interacting with counsel, legislators and the courts in carrying out their responsibilities.
Class Notes:
Synchronous sessions will be required and will be added once the dates are finalized. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?choat024+PA3972+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54174/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 3973 Section 001: Strategic Management of Election Administration (54204)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Pre-Covid
Meets With:
MGMT 6035 Section 050
PA 5973 Section 001
LAW 6626 Section 001
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (1 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Strategic management for election administrators in the political environment. Election official tools and challenges. The role of the lawmaking process in budgeting and organizational planning.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ljacobs+PA3973+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54204/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 3975 Section 001: Election Design (66185)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Meets With:
PA 5975 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (1 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Election administration design principles, including ballot and polling place design and poll worker training materials. Application of principles of field.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wquesenb+PA3975+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66185/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/wquesenb_dchisnel_PA3975_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)

Spring 2021  |  PA 3976 Section 001: Voter Participation (54213)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Pre-Covid
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Election Administration cert
Meets With:
BIOC 8401 Section 001
GCD 8401 Section 001
PA 5976 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Voter participation issues and challenges including historical survey of voter participation in US and methods to increase voter turnout.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?aochoa+PA3976+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54213/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 3984 Section 001: Elections Security: How to Protect America's Elections (66463)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Pre-Covid
Meets With:
PA 5984 Section 001
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
"Elections Security" uses the Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election as a case study to identify the vulnerabilities of US elections (especially state voter registration databases) as well as catalogue new protections. Readings and discussion will focus on best practices and technology options available to the public (social media) and elections professionals (cybersecurity) in guarding against future influence efforts and assuring public confidence in election outcomes. Special focus will be given to describing how local election officials can protect their election technology, most notably those vulnerabilities associated with their voting system and voter registration database. "Elections Security" will draw heavily on concrete cases and challenges facing election professionals, using government and independent reports and an indepth analysis of new resources created by the US Department of Homeland Security and its collaborations with election professionals.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA3984+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66463/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 4101 Section 001: Nonprofit Management and Governance (54107)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon 05:30PM - 08:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (39 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Managing/governing nonprofit/public organizations. Theories, concepts, real-world examples. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of different funding environments, management of multiple constituencies.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?yang0248+PA4101+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54107/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5002 Section 001: Introduction to Policy Analysis (54104)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (17 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?linds301+PA5002+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the discipline of policy analysis and help you understand where policy analysis fits within the policy process. Members of the Humphrey School faculty have designed a set of exercises to help you acquire specific competencies: developing a problem context, problem structuring, developing alternative policy options, evaluation, forecasting, policy simulation, monitoring, and recommendation. We place special emphasis on the challenges of problem definition or structuring and communication because these are among the most challenging skills to learn.
Grading:
A1. Individual Problem Definition Memo(10%)

A2. Team Problem Definition Memo(10%)

A3. Team Evidence Memo (10%)

A4. Team Alternatives Memo (15%)

A5. Team Policy Poster (15%)

A6. Team Policy Brief (20% including self-and peer assessment)

A7. Individual Elevator Speech Video and Memo (20%)

Class Format:
This course will include a few lectures, discussion, individual and group practice, collaborative learning, and teamwork. PA 5002 historically has been taught as a lecture-discussion class. This year, we are moving more to a problem-based learning approach that involves "flipping" some elements of the class. For Example, you will observe several videos and mini-lectures that introduce topics, and we will explore their complexity in work-groups in class. Because research indicates students learn best when actively engaged in trying to solve problems, we will emphasize in-class exercises and professional practice, sometimes individually, but most often with classmates on assignments and your group project. We meet only seven times, so each week will be filled with activity.
Workload:
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54104/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA5002_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA5002_Spring2016.docx (Spring 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA5002_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 October 2015

Spring 2021  |  PA 5003 Section 002: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (54147)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-106
Enrollment Status:
Open (9 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered IN PERSON. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kiedr003+PA5003+Spring2021
Class Description:

The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good." In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of financial analysis and management.


This is an introductory course to financial analysis and management in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.


Who Should Take This Class?:
This course is required for MPP, MDP, and Nonprofit Certificate students. It is recommended for MPA students.
Learning Objectives:

By the end of the semester, students should be able:

  • To obtain basic knowledge and terminology of budgeting and financial management;

  • To summarize budgetary process, revenues, and expenditures of a public or nonprofit organization;

  • To apply basic tools of financial analysis, such as break-even analysis and marginal cost analysis, in making simple financial decisions;

  • To know how financial information is organized and reported in the accounting system;

  • To interpret data in financial statements and relate them with each other; and

  • To determine and calculate financial ratios to assess financial condition

Grading:
Each class there will be an assignment that you are to prepare and submiy via email (You may work with others in completing the assignments.). These will not be graded. You should actively participate in class discussions and class problem-solving. Class discussion, timely assignment completion, and on-line attendance count toward your participation grade. Participation represents 12 points of your grade.

There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course taken at the Humphrey School. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.

The final assignment is a group project in which you will review the financials of a real government or nonprofit organization and present your findings to the class in person. You will be assigned to groups in the second week of class. The group should submit a 5+ page paper of your findings at the last class. The group will also present a power point presentation (no more than 10
minutes) of the findings at the last class. The group should provide me a copy of the power points and any other information that would be helpful. This group paper (20 points) and presentation (8 points) are worth 28 points.

First Test 30 points Second Test 30 points Group Project 28 points Class Participation 12 points Total 100 points
Exam Format:
There will be a first exam (30 points) and a second exam (30 points) for this course. The first exam will be an analysis of a real budget and real financial statements of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam will be an analysis of real annual financial reports of nonprofit and public organizations, word questions, and financial problems. The second exam ONLY covers material from the second half of the course.
Class Format:
This is a "flipped" course. Students will watch normal lectures on videos at home. There are 8 class periods. Class time is used to review material, solve assignments, review additional videos and/or material, and take exams. Students in the online format will link-up through WebEx for all classes except for the 4th and 8th classes in which exams and presentations must occur in person.
Workload:
6 Homework Assignment(s).
2 Exams In person.
1 Group Presentation in person. Students indicate that the workload is similar to other Humphrey courses. Generally, 3-5 hours per class is required.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54147/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2020.docx (Spring 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2018.docx (Summer 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2018.docx (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2017.docx (Summer 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Spring2017.docx (Spring 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA5003_Summer2015.docx (Summer 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 March 2018

Spring 2021  |  PA 5011 Section 001: Management of Organizations (67374)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Closed (23 of 23 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Challenges facing higher-level managers in public and nonprofit organizations in mixed economy and democratic republic. Distinctive features of public and nonprofit management, skills necessary for effective management, manager's role as creator of public value. Lectures, case discussions.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Schedule has changed to Mon/Wed. Contact the instructor if you need a permission number. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?coelberg+PA5011+Spring2021
Class Description:

Organizations pervade human life. They are sites of power, innovation and social change but can also be places that discourage initiative and reinforce inequalities found in society. Effective organizational management and leadership are critical to achieving broadly beneficial social, economic, and public value. The task is difficult because of the complexity of human behavior in organizations, constrained resources, competing demands of many stakeholders outside of the organization, and pervasive changes in the world we live in. Most of you will work in some kind of organization when you graduate and many, if not most, of you will be managers and leaders during your careers. This course will help prepare you to be an organizational leader in this realm, focusing on empowering you with the courage to act under uncertainty in order to strengthen the effectiveness of your organization. Furthermore, it aims to provide both "the forest" and "the trees", and give you practice in thinking back and forth between the different levels so that when you are working and approach a problem at one of these levels, you have an awareness of the complexity of the situation at the alternative level.

To create that foundation, we focus on different ways to analyze organizations and develop sound recommendations for change - leaders and managers must understand organizational complexity in order to act.This course introduces students to some of the major theoretical approaches to organizational analysis, including concepts from public administration, sociology, political science, organizational psychology, and management. Learning to use multiple perspectives is critical because all perspectives contribute to understanding how to develop and sustain effective organizations and, ultimately, to how well individuals can help create public value. By gaining insight across different theoretical perspectives, students will develop an understanding of how theories provide distinctive windows into understanding behavior in complex social settings. Throughout, you will come to see that organizations provide opportunities and constraints as well as power and privilege within particular contexts.

Grading:
10% Participation
15% Reading Analysis Memos (2)
20% Oral Presentations (2)
10% In-Class Case Analyses (3)
45% Management Memos (4)
Class Format:
25% Lecture
30% Discussion
30% Small Group Activities
15% Student Presentations
Workload:
60-100 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
4 Organizational Management Memos
2 Reading Analysis Memos
1 Elevator Pitch
1 Group Oral Presentation
3 In-Class Case Analyses
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67374/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/coelberg_PA5011_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 November 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5012 Section 001: The Politics of Public Affairs (54171)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (37 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Stages of policy making from agenda setting to implementation. Role and behavior of political institutions, citizens, social movements, and interest groups. Concepts of political philosophy. Theories of state. Team taught, interdisciplinary course. Small discussion sections.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jbsoss+PA5012+Spring2021
Class Description:
Our challenge in this course is to get serious about questioning and sharpening the political perspectives we bring to bear on our work. All too often, our beliefs about politics are based on little more than civics-book platitudes, cynical clichés, and the commonsense views that prevail in our particular social circle. The purpose of this course is to unsettle such beliefs and invite students to think more critically and systematically about how to approach the political dimensions of their work. If you expect most of your future work to be technical - and therefore, "not political" - I'm especially hopeful that you will find opportunities in this course to question that assumption, as well as the politics that underlie it.
Learning Objectives:
This semester, we will work to develop a variety of political perspectives on public policy and public affairs. Toward these ends, we will organize our work around four concepts that guide any well-specified understanding of politics: power, institutions and organizations, discourse, and citizenship. We will ask how these elements of politics may be understood, how they operate in practice, why they matter, how they limit and enable political action, and how they can be engaged and navigated effectively.
Grading:
20% Class participation
80% Major Writing Assignments
- Power (20%)
- Institutions (20%)
- Political Discourse (20%)
- Democratic Citizenship (20%)
Your grade will depend, first and foremost, on the ways you engage, explain, critique, and apply ideas from our readings and class discussions.
Class Format:
Discussion and Lecture
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54171/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jbsoss_PA5012_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jbsoss_PA5012_Spring2016.doc (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5021 Section 001: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (54164)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Major or minor Public Policy or STEP major or minor or Human Rights major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (9 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5021+Spring2021
Class Description:
The required textbook for this class is Microeconomics by Pindyck and Rubinfeld, 9th edition (2018). The 8th or 7th editions would work also. Students do not need to purchase a study guide nor are special access codes needed.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Most of the students will be first year MPP students, but students in other graduate degree programs are welcome to enroll. Most students will have had a prior microeconomics course, but that is not required. The Humphrey School offers an online review program called Foundations for Success that some students might want to look into that helps students review some basic algebra.
Learning Objectives:
The objective of this course is for you to understand consumer and firm decisions and to understand when government intervention in the private market may be efficient and/or equitable. We will explore how resources are allocated in a market economy and we will investigate the role of government in a market economy (or mixed economy) such as the United States. We will focus most of our time developing the analytical microeconomic tools needed to discuss efficiency and fairness concerns and throughout the semester we will apply these tools to various relevant public policy examples.
This course contributes to several learning objectives for the MPP program, especially (3) "to analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve complex problems, and make decisions" and (4) to understand the role of government in a market economy.
Grading:
The course grade will be based on the homeworks ,in class exams,quizzes,and the cumulative final exam.
Exam Format:
The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, short one paragraph answers, and problems involving algebra and graphical analysis.
Class Format:
We'll be meeting online this year (Fall of 2020). We will meet in synchronous meetings (recorded for those not available to meet that day) and some additional content will be available asynchronously. Our TA Sangyoo Lee will provide some asynchronous lessons and meet in real time during the class discussion section.
Workload:
Look at syllabus for workload within course.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54164/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 August 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5021 Section 002: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (54165)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Thu 01:25PM - 02:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (9 of 30 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5021+Spring2021
Class Description:
The required textbook for this class is Microeconomics by Pindyck and Rubinfeld, 9th edition (2018). The 8th or 7th editions would work also. Students do not need to purchase a study guide nor are special access codes needed.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Most of the students will be first year MPP students, but students in other graduate degree programs are welcome to enroll. Most students will have had a prior microeconomics course, but that is not required. The Humphrey School offers an online review program called Foundations for Success that some students might want to look into that helps students review some basic algebra.
Learning Objectives:
The objective of this course is for you to understand consumer and firm decisions and to understand when government intervention in the private market may be efficient and/or equitable. We will explore how resources are allocated in a market economy and we will investigate the role of government in a market economy (or mixed economy) such as the United States. We will focus most of our time developing the analytical microeconomic tools needed to discuss efficiency and fairness concerns and throughout the semester we will apply these tools to various relevant public policy examples.
This course contributes to several learning objectives for the MPP program, especially (3) "to analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve complex problems, and make decisions" and (4) to understand the role of government in a market economy.
Grading:
The course grade will be based on the homeworks ,in class exams,quizzes,and the cumulative final exam.
Exam Format:
The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, short one paragraph answers, and problems involving algebra and graphical analysis.
Class Format:
We'll be meeting online this year (Fall of 2020). We will meet in synchronous meetings (recorded for those not available to meet that day) and some additional content will be available asynchronously. Our TA Sangyoo Lee will provide some asynchronous lessons and meet in real time during the class discussion section.
Workload:
Look at syllabus for workload within course.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54165/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 August 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5022 Section 001: Applications of Economics for Policy Analysis -- Stratification Economics (65443)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits (9 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon 01:00PM - 03:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (5 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Application of economic reasoning to a wide range of contemporary public policy issues. The following topically-focused courses also fulfill the MPP economics requirement: PA 5431: Public Policies on Work and Pay, PA 5503: Economics of Development, PA 5521: Development Planning and Policy Analysis, PA 5722: Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy, and PA 5805: Global Economics. prereq: 5021 or equiv
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?myers006+PA5022+Spring2021
Class Description:

"Stratification Economics and Public Policy"

PA5022 - Spring 2021

M: 1-3:45 pm

Stratification economics differs from conventional neoclassical economics and its related offspring of behavioral economics because it does not assume that the nature of inequality arises solely via rational choices made in competitive markets. Rather, it posits structural and historical processes that impede the ability of marginalized groups to gain access to markets. One of the key insights from stratification economics is that conventional policy mechanisms (e.g. deterrence policies in the criminal justice system) don't work because they fail to take account of the legacy of inequality (e.g. convict lease systems and vagrancy laws)

The arguments in favor of reparations, baby bonds, universal health care can be viewed and examined using the methods and techniques of stratification economics. This course introduces students to some new methodologies that complement their training in conventional economic analysis.

Topics:

· A review of conventional microeconomic approaches to policy analysis, including the core assumptions and key conclusions

· Summary and critique of the conventional microeconomic approach

· The historical backdrop to the evolution of "identity economics" and stratification economics for understanding racial disparities

· Core assumptions of stratification economics

· Applications: Housing markets and residential segregation; racial profiling; discrimination in labor markets.

· Policy Proposals based on Stratification economics -- reparations, baby bonds, universal income and health payments.


Please note that the previous syllabi listed in ClassInfo cover different topics and do not apply to Spring
2021.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65443/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/myers006_PA5022_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/myers006_PA5022_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 October 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5022 Section 002: Applications of Economics for Policy Analysis -- Cost-Benefit Analysis (65698)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
1.5 Credits (9 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (4 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Application of economic reasoning to a wide range of contemporary public policy issues. The following topically-focused courses also fulfill the MPP economics requirement: PA 5431: Public Policies on Work and Pay, PA 5503: Economics of Development, PA 5521: Development Planning and Policy Analysis, PA 5722: Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy, and PA 5805: Global Economics. prereq: 5021 or equiv
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY with one synchronous session and one asynchronous session per week. Instructor will provide class schedule. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5022+Spring2021
Class Description:
The required textbook is the 5th edition of Cost-Benefit Analysis by Boardman, Greenberg, Vining and Weinberg. Here is the link to the book on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Cost-Benefit-Analysis-Concepts-Anthony-Boardman/dp/1108401295/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=weimer+cost+benefit&qid=1598069121&sr=8-1

This class introduces students to methods used in cost-benefit analysis, the leading evidenced-based method for guiding decisions about whether a government project, program or policy improves the well-being of society. For Humphrey students, this course fulfills part of the economics core requirement (PA 5021-5022). For students who have already fulfilled that requirement, this course can be used to satisfy requirements in the Advanced Policy Analysis concentration. This course also can be used to satisfy requirements in Prevention Science graduate minors as well as the Early Childhood Policy graduate certificate.
Who Should Take This Class?:
The course counts toward the economics core requirement for the MPP program. MPP students and anyone interested in learning more about economic evaluations of public programs and policies are welcome. CBA increasingly is being used at the state and local levels of government as well as in nonprofits and philanthropic organizations and a number of Humphrey students have used their skills to obtain employment on projects involving economic assessment of program and policy impacts.
Learning Objectives:
Students will learn both the theory underlying cost-benefit analysis as well as become familiar with many applications in the areas of environmental, health, transportation, education, and social policies.
Class Format:
This is usually 7 week class meeting twice a week but this year the class will meet once a week for the entire semester. A prior course in microeconomics is expected for the MPP students but please see the instructor if you haven't had this prereq.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65698/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5022_Spring2019.doc (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5022_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5022_Spring2016.doc (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 August 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5022 Section 003: Applications of Economics for Policy Analysis -- Economics of Social Insurance Programs (65751)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits (9 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (14 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Application of economic reasoning to a wide range of contemporary public policy issues. The following topically-focused courses also fulfill the MPP economics requirement: PA 5431: Public Policies on Work and Pay, PA 5503: Economics of Development, PA 5521: Development Planning and Policy Analysis, PA 5722: Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy, and PA 5805: Global Economics. prereq: 5021 or equiv
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hanra003+PA5022+Spring2021
Class Description:

This class will introduce you to the Economics of Social Insurance Programs. It begins by introducing a framework to evaluate the efficiency and equity of social insurance programs. It then applies this framework to health insurance, unemployment insurance, workers' compensation, welfare and the EITC, and social security.


Application of economic reasoning to various public policy issues. Cost-benefit analysis, nonmarket valuation, and tax analysis. prereq:
[[5021 or equiv], public policy major] or instr consent Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Learning Objectives:

Students in this module will learn to:

understand and critique the main economic rationales for current social insurance programs,

understand trade-offs in the design of social insurance programs between providing risk protection and promoting efficient efforts to avoid losses,

read and evaluate current empirical research on the impacts of social insurance programs

construct written and oral arguments for specific policy reforms
Grading:
Class Attendance + Participation: It is important that you attend each class and make an effort to participate constructively in class discussion. Repeated absences from classes can have a negative effect on your overall grade.

Problem Sets (15%): I will assign three problem sets that cover the material in the first part of the class. You may work in groups on these problem sets, but you must write up the answers in your own. You will receive a grade of check, check minus, or check plus for these problem sets.

In-Class Quiz (25%): There will be an in-class quiz covering the material in the first part of the class.

In-Class Presentations: You will be asked to work in a group to lead class discussion of a current policy reform proposal in the areas of health insurance, unemployment insurance, welfare reform, and social security reform. These presentations will not be graded, but will help guide you in writing your policy memos. Failure to complete one of these presentations can have a negative impact on your grade.

Short policy memos (40%): You will write two short policy memos that present an argument for or against one of the proposals discussed in class. Each memo must be 3-5 pages, double spaced.

Final Group Projects (20%)

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65751/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5022_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5022_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5022_Spring2016.docx (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 November 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5032 Section 001: Applied Regression (54082)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Primarily Online
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
03/08/2021
Mon 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, East Bank
Virtual Rooms ROOM-TBA
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, East Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
Enrollment Status:
Open (40 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis, assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
Class Notes:
Class will be Blended. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Students will attend one in-person session tentatively on either Fri, 3/5 or Mon, 3/8. (Students who are unable to participate in the synchronous class sessions or the in-person session on 3/5 or 3/8 will be able to access the recorded class sessions and participate online in the in-person sessions. Contact the instructor to discuss.) http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5032+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54082/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5032 Section 002: Applied Regression (54083)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
03/05/2021
Fri 12:45PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, East Bank
Virtual Rooms ROOM-TBA
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Fri 12:45PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, East Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (40 of 48 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis, assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
Class Notes:
Class will be Blended. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Students will attend one in-person session tentatively on either Fri, 3/5 or Mon, 3/8. (Students who are unable to participate in the synchronous class sessions or the in-person session on 3/5 or 3/8 will be able to access the recorded class sessions and participate online in the in-person sessions. Contact the instructor to discuss.) http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5032+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54083/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5033 Section 001: Multivariate Techniques (54084)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 05:45PM - 07:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (2 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?klein002+PA5033+Spring2021
Class Description:
The class examines how statistical approaches can be used to examine public policies. This course is designed to help you read, understand, interpret, use and evaluate empirical work used in the social sciences and by policy analysts. To advance that goal, the class concentrates its attention on several quantitative techniques used by public policy researchers and advisors to policy makers.


Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54084/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/klein002_PA5033_Spring2019.doc (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2019

Spring 2021  |  PA 5033 Section 002: Multivariate Techniques (54101)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Wed 07:15PM - 08:05PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (2 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?klein002+PA5033+Spring2021
Class Description:
The class examines how statistical approaches can be used to examine public policies. This course is designed to help you read, understand, interpret, use and evaluate empirical work used in the social sciences and by policy analysts. To advance that goal, the class concentrates its attention on several quantitative techniques used by public policy researchers and advisors to policy makers.


Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54101/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/klein002_PA5033_Spring2019.doc (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2019

Spring 2021  |  PA 5033 Section 004: Multivariate Techniques (54095)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (7 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?klein002+PA5033+Spring2021
Class Description:
The class examines how statistical approaches can be used to examine public policies. This course is designed to help you read, understand, interpret, use and evaluate empirical work used in the social sciences and by policy analysts. To advance that goal, the class concentrates its attention on several quantitative techniques used by public policy researchers and advisors to policy makers.


Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54095/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/klein002_PA5033_Spring2019.doc (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2019

Spring 2021  |  PA 5033 Section 005: Multivariate Techniques (54096)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Fri 01:50PM - 02:40PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 004
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?klein002+PA5033+Spring2021
Class Description:
The class examines how statistical approaches can be used to examine public policies. This course is designed to help you read, understand, interpret, use and evaluate empirical work used in the social sciences and by policy analysts. To advance that goal, the class concentrates its attention on several quantitative techniques used by public policy researchers and advisors to policy makers.


Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54096/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/klein002_PA5033_Spring2019.doc (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2019

Spring 2021  |  PA 5033 Section 006: Multivariate Techniques (54099)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Fri 12:45PM - 01:35PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 004
Enrollment Status:
Open (7 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?klein002+PA5033+Spring2021
Class Description:
The class examines how statistical approaches can be used to examine public policies. This course is designed to help you read, understand, interpret, use and evaluate empirical work used in the social sciences and by policy analysts. To advance that goal, the class concentrates its attention on several quantitative techniques used by public policy researchers and advisors to policy makers.


Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54099/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/klein002_PA5033_Spring2019.doc (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2019

Spring 2021  |  PA 5041 Section 001: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (54139)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (19 of 28 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gfs+PA5041+Spring2021
Class Description:

The class involves two weekly class sessions that consist of lectures, discussion, presentations, and practical training. The course also includes a weekly 75-minute lab to workshop the different components involved in research design, learn data analysis, and code by hand or using the qualitative data analysis software package, NVivo.


Who Should Take This Class?:
Anyone interested in having a complete methodological toolbox.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the course, students should be able to:

Navigate the ethical and practical challenges of research with human subjects.


Determine when to use qualitative methodology.


Develop strong qualitative research design skills.



Design questions and protocols appropriate to each method.


Gather qualitative data via primary source documents and human subjects research.


Deploy a variety of interviewing techniques.


Use basic techniques to analyze data using Atlas qualitative data analysis software.

Grading:
Class Participation 5%
Reading quizzes 15%
Lecture quizzes 15%
Group reading response to ethics readings 5%
Research Assignments 30%
Research Proposal 15%
Final Project 20%
Exam Format:
There is no final exam. There is a final research project which is the results of running a research study with all its components
Workload:
This is a 4 credit class, expect and plan to spend more time in class, doing readings, and preparing research materials. The class is designed to give students the basic tools to run a research study from beginning to end.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54139/1213
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2021.docx
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 November 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5041 Section 002: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (54140)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (19 of 28 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gfs+PA5041+Spring2021
Class Description:

The class involves two weekly class sessions that consist of lectures, discussion, presentations, and practical training. The course also includes a weekly 75-minute lab to workshop the different components involved in research design, learn data analysis, and code by hand or using the qualitative data analysis software package, NVivo.


Who Should Take This Class?:
Anyone interested in having a complete methodological toolbox.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the course, students should be able to:

Navigate the ethical and practical challenges of research with human subjects.


Determine when to use qualitative methodology.


Develop strong qualitative research design skills.



Design questions and protocols appropriate to each method.


Gather qualitative data via primary source documents and human subjects research.


Deploy a variety of interviewing techniques.


Use basic techniques to analyze data using Atlas qualitative data analysis software.

Grading:
Class Participation 5%
Reading quizzes 15%
Lecture quizzes 15%
Group reading response to ethics readings 5%
Research Assignments 30%
Research Proposal 15%
Final Project 20%
Exam Format:
There is no final exam. There is a final research project which is the results of running a research study with all its components
Workload:
This is a 4 credit class, expect and plan to spend more time in class, doing readings, and preparing research materials. The class is designed to give students the basic tools to run a research study from beginning to end.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54140/1213
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2021.docx
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/frie0013_PA5041_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 November 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5042 Section 001: Urban and Regional Economics (54124)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Major/minor, Urb-Reg Planning
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (36 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Evaluation of city existence/growth using economics. Economic forces in development of cities. Economic analysis of urban areas/land market. Economic analysis of planning issues in land use, transportation, housing, environment. prereq: [Major or minor in urban and regional planning, microeconomics course] or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?marso056+PA5042+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Learning Objectives:
This course uses the principles of microeconomics to analyze urban/regional economic issues and problems. By the end of the course, students should be able to:
 Provide an economics-based explanation for why cities exist and what causes them to grow and shrink;
 Evaluate the importance of major economic forces in the development of cities;
 Conduct economic analysis of an urban area and its land markets;
 Use economic tools to analyze planning issues in different areas (land use, transportation, housing and environment) and to illustrate and address their impacts on the economy, social equity and environmental quality.
Grading:
Grades will be based on the following:
Homework assignments 48% (6 x 8%)
Pop-up Quizzes 12%
Final exam 30%
Participation 10%
Class Format:
The lectures will cover only the key concepts presented in the readings. Completing the readings before lectures is essential to maximize your learning. Attendance at lab sessions is mandatory. Your attendance and participation in lab activities will affect your participation score. Feel free to discuss homework problems with your peers. However, you are expected to finish your assignments individually. All homework needs to be typed (graphs are okay with handwriting). Any handwriting homework will not be graded.
Workload:
This class is demanding. It covers a lot of material at a pace that students describe as "relentless" or (more positively) "high energy." It requires considerable outside-of-class time. UM policy states that for each credit hour of a class, undergraduates are expected to work three hours - counting class time and study time - to achieve an average grade. If we apply that policy to this graduate-level class, that means a work load of 12 hours per week for this class, implying at least 8 hours per week outside of class. Count on it.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54124/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5042 Section 002: Urban and Regional Economics (54130)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Thu 02:30PM - 03:20PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (36 of 40 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Evaluation of city existence/growth using economics. Economic forces in development of cities. Economic analysis of urban areas/land market. Economic analysis of planning issues in land use, transportation, housing, environment. prereq: [Major or minor in urban and regional planning, microeconomics course] or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?marso056+PA5042+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Learning Objectives:
This course uses the principles of microeconomics to analyze urban/regional economic issues and problems. By the end of the course, students should be able to:
 Provide an economics-based explanation for why cities exist and what causes them to grow and shrink;
 Evaluate the importance of major economic forces in the development of cities;
 Conduct economic analysis of an urban area and its land markets;
 Use economic tools to analyze planning issues in different areas (land use, transportation, housing and environment) and to illustrate and address their impacts on the economy, social equity and environmental quality.
Grading:
Grades will be based on the following:
Homework assignments 48% (6 x 8%)
Pop-up Quizzes 12%
Final exam 30%
Participation 10%
Class Format:
The lectures will cover only the key concepts presented in the readings. Completing the readings before lectures is essential to maximize your learning. Attendance at lab sessions is mandatory. Your attendance and participation in lab activities will affect your participation score. Feel free to discuss homework problems with your peers. However, you are expected to finish your assignments individually. All homework needs to be typed (graphs are okay with handwriting). Any handwriting homework will not be graded.
Workload:
This class is demanding. It covers a lot of material at a pace that students describe as "relentless" or (more positively) "high energy." It requires considerable outside-of-class time. UM policy states that for each credit hour of a class, undergraduates are expected to work three hours - counting class time and study time - to achieve an average grade. If we apply that policy to this graduate-level class, that means a work load of 12 hours per week for this class, implying at least 8 hours per week outside of class. Count on it.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54130/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5043 Section 001: Economic and Demographic Data Analysis (54125)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
PA: Major/minor, Urb-Reg Planning
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (29 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Economic/demographic data analysis techniques for planning. Exposure to most important data sources. Conceptual understanding of range of methods/hands-on experience in applying these methods. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?assaad@umn.edu+PA5043+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course aims at developing quantitative data analysis skills in the areas of economic and demographic analysis of small geographic areas. The methods covered are used to analyze the structure of regional and local economies, such as location quotient analysis and the economic base model, and to analyze the structure of the population and project population change over time. Familiarity with Excel is assumed.
Learning Objectives:
Become familiar with, and able to search, the most important online public sources of quantitative economic and demographic data that provide information at the regional and local levels
Able to effectively download data from these sources and put them in a suitable format for analysis
Become comfortable with models and mathematical representations of reality, and be able to competently move back and forth from verbal to mathematical formulations of economic and demographic concepts.
Able to effectively manipulate data and conduct quantitative analyses using a spreadsheet program such as Excel.
Able to accurately interpret quantitative results
Understand the economic and demographic factors that underlie the growth of urban and regional economies
Able to evaluate the assumptions that underlie quantitative models and analyses and assess their limitations
Able to prepare clear, accurate and compelling reports using text, tables and graphics
Become intelligent consumers and critical readers of work that uses quantitative methods.
Be aware of the ethical dimensions of quantitative data analysis and interpretation and the various ways in which data can be manipulated to come up with the "right answer."

Grading:
Quizzes 20%, Team Projects 40% , Take-Home Final 40%
Exam Format:
Two in-class open-book, open-notes quizzes, Open-book, open-note take home final exam
Class Format:
67% lecture, 33% computer lab
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54125/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2018

Spring 2021  |  PA 5043 Section 002: Economic and Demographic Data Analysis (54126)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Fri 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Closed (20 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Economic/demographic data analysis techniques for planning. Exposure to most important data sources. Conceptual understanding of range of methods/hands-on experience in applying these methods. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?assaad@umn.edu+PA5043+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course aims at developing quantitative data analysis skills in the areas of economic and demographic analysis of small geographic areas. The methods covered are used to analyze the structure of regional and local economies, such as location quotient analysis and the economic base model, and to analyze the structure of the population and project population change over time. Familiarity with Excel is assumed.
Learning Objectives:
Become familiar with, and able to search, the most important online public sources of quantitative economic and demographic data that provide information at the regional and local levels
Able to effectively download data from these sources and put them in a suitable format for analysis
Become comfortable with models and mathematical representations of reality, and be able to competently move back and forth from verbal to mathematical formulations of economic and demographic concepts.
Able to effectively manipulate data and conduct quantitative analyses using a spreadsheet program such as Excel.
Able to accurately interpret quantitative results
Understand the economic and demographic factors that underlie the growth of urban and regional economies
Able to evaluate the assumptions that underlie quantitative models and analyses and assess their limitations
Able to prepare clear, accurate and compelling reports using text, tables and graphics
Become intelligent consumers and critical readers of work that uses quantitative methods.
Be aware of the ethical dimensions of quantitative data analysis and interpretation and the various ways in which data can be manipulated to come up with the "right answer."

Grading:
Quizzes 20%, Team Projects 40% , Take-Home Final 40%
Exam Format:
Two in-class open-book, open-notes quizzes, Open-book, open-note take home final exam
Class Format:
67% lecture, 33% computer lab
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54126/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2018

Spring 2021  |  PA 5043 Section 003: Economic and Demographic Data Analysis (54127)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Fri 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (9 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Economic/demographic data analysis techniques for planning. Exposure to most important data sources. Conceptual understanding of range of methods/hands-on experience in applying these methods. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?assaad@umn.edu+PA5043+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course aims at developing quantitative data analysis skills in the areas of economic and demographic analysis of small geographic areas. The methods covered are used to analyze the structure of regional and local economies, such as location quotient analysis and the economic base model, and to analyze the structure of the population and project population change over time. Familiarity with Excel is assumed.
Learning Objectives:
Become familiar with, and able to search, the most important online public sources of quantitative economic and demographic data that provide information at the regional and local levels
Able to effectively download data from these sources and put them in a suitable format for analysis
Become comfortable with models and mathematical representations of reality, and be able to competently move back and forth from verbal to mathematical formulations of economic and demographic concepts.
Able to effectively manipulate data and conduct quantitative analyses using a spreadsheet program such as Excel.
Able to accurately interpret quantitative results
Understand the economic and demographic factors that underlie the growth of urban and regional economies
Able to evaluate the assumptions that underlie quantitative models and analyses and assess their limitations
Able to prepare clear, accurate and compelling reports using text, tables and graphics
Become intelligent consumers and critical readers of work that uses quantitative methods.
Be aware of the ethical dimensions of quantitative data analysis and interpretation and the various ways in which data can be manipulated to come up with the "right answer."

Grading:
Quizzes 20%, Team Projects 40% , Take-Home Final 40%
Exam Format:
Two in-class open-book, open-notes quizzes, Open-book, open-note take home final exam
Class Format:
67% lecture, 33% computer lab
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54127/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5043_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2018

Spring 2021  |  PA 5052 Section 001: Public Affairs Leadership in a Diverse World (54113)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Extended Regular Session
 
01/08/2021
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
01/09/2021
Sat 08:45AM - 04:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
02/05/2021
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
02/06/2021
Sat 08:45AM - 04:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
03/05/2021
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
03/06/2021
Sat 08:45AM - 04:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
04/09/2021
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
04/10/2021
Sat 08:45AM - 04:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
04/30/2021
Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
05/01/2021
Sat 08:45AM - 04:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (15 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Continues 5051. Leadership concepts, tools, and strategies in diverse settings for mid-career students. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5051-5052 must be taken in same academic yr
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. A few in-person sessions may be scheduled. 5052, 5054, and 5056 will meet on Jan 8-9, Feb 5-6, Mar 5-6, Apr 9-10 and Apr 30 - May 1 (Fri: 10:00 - 5:00, Sat: 8:45 - 4:30) http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksquick+PA5052+Spring2021
Class Description:
Continues 5051. Leadership development tools, and strategies for mid-career students. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or Publi Affairs Leadership (PAL) certificate; 5051-5052 must be taken in sequence in the same academic year. Students may contact the instructor or department for additional information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54113/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 June 2016

Spring 2021  |  PA 5054 Section 001: Program Design and Implementation Analysis (54114)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (15 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Continues 5053. Process of public policy and program analysis, including problem formulation, program design and implementation. Opportunity to draw upon published research and conduct field-based research to understand implementation conditions. Professional communications, including writing of memos, requests for proposals, and implementation briefs, are stressed. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5053-5054 must be taken in same academic yr
Class Notes:
5052, 5054, and 5056 will meet in person on Jan 8-9, Feb 5-6, Mar 5-6, Apr 9-10 and Apr 30 - May 1 (Fri: 10:00 - 5:00, Sat: 8:45 - 4:30) http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5054+Spring2021
Class Description:
Continues PA 5053. Process of public policy and program analysis, including program design and evaluation, implementation, and communication of findings. Use of multimedia mini-cases, including readings and contemporary policy cases. prereq: Major in Masters of Public Affairs (MPA) (cohort) or Public Affairs Leadership (PAL) certificate (cohort); 5053-5054 must be taken in same academic yr. Students may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54114/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 November 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5056 Section 001: Quantitative Research Methods and Analysis (54112)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
2 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (16 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Problem-based learning to analytical reasoning through social science research methods. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability, statistical inference. Hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation, analysis of variance, correlation. Simple regression analysis. prereq: Major in public affairs or public affairs certificate, [5055-5056 must be taken in same academic yr]
Class Notes:
5052, 5054, and 5056 will meet in person on Jan 8-9, Feb 5-6, Mar 5-6, Apr 9-10 and Apr 30 - May 1 (Fri: 10:00 - 5:00, Sat: 8:45 - 4:30). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5056+Spring2021
Class Description:
Continued PA 5055. Problem-based learning to analytical reasoning through social science research methods. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability, statistical inference. Hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation, analysis of variance, correlation. Simple regression analysis. prereq: Major in public affairs or public affairs certificate, [PA 5055-5056 must be taken in same academic yr]
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54112/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 November 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5080 Section 001: Capstone Preparation Workshop (54137)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/30/2021
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
03/30/2021 - 05/03/2021
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (6 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project management, qualitative research, and critical framework to complete Capstone course. Students write draft of client project group norms and client contract.
Class Notes:
3/30/2021 session will be REMOTE (synchronously online). All other work will be COMPLETELY ONLINE (asynchronously online). PA 5080:1 is required for students who will enroll in the Summer 2021 PA 8081. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5080+Spring2021
Class Description:
NOTE: THIS WORKSHOP IS DESIGNED FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE ALSO ENROLLED IN A SPRING 2018 CAPSTONE COURSE (PA 8081). STUDENTS MUST PLAN TO ATTEND THIS CAPSTONE PREPARATION WORKSHOP WITH YOUR CAPSTONE TEAMMATES, AS THE WORKSHOP ALLOWS FOR TEAM INTERACTION TO PLAN THEIR SPRING CAPSTONE PROJECT. The purpose of this Capstone Preparation Workshop is to provide information, resources, and tools to help Capstone teams successfully plan for and complete Capstone projects that they will complete during the Spring Capstone Workshop. The Capstone Preparation Workshop focuses on the elements of successful problem-solving, research design, project planning and management, group dynamics, communications, client relations, and ethical conduct and is designed to allow time for team members to engage more deeply with each other in understanding their Capstone project.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Only students who are simultaneously enrolled in a SPRING SEMESTER Capstone workshop (PA 8081).
Grading:
Other Grading Information: Grading is S/N
Class Format:
15% Lecture
75% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers This course will be run like a workshop, with limited lecture and maximum time allowed for teams to formulate their Capstone project.
Workload:
Much of the class time in this course will be offered for your Capstone team to complete work that will establish a plan and direction for your Capstone project.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54137/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ksgerdes_PA5080_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ksgerdes_PA5080_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ksgerdes_PA5080_Fall2015.doc (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 November 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5103 Section 001: Leadership and Change (54182)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Extended Regular Session
 
01/11/2021 - 01/14/2021
Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 09:00AM - 03:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (20 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Models of change/leadership. How leaders can promote personal, organizational, and societal change. Case studies, action research. Framework for leadership and change.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jacob818+PA5103+Spring2021
Class Description:
Change is constant. When we move with the flow of change and disrupt systems that impede its process, we can create the conditions conducive for embracing change.

What is the leader's role in change? Change is often built into definitions of leadership, and certainly many scholars and practitioners have written about how leaders can foster change in their organizations or communities. Putting these concepts into practice takes a close examination of one's own role and belief that change can actually happen.

In this course, we will use a living systems approach to probe the breakdown in design that is producing ineffective institutions and systems. We will explore lessons from nature that inform the way systems and institutions are organized, students will explore their own personal journey that has shaped their leadership and leadership development, and define for themselves what leadership looks like in the face of change.
Learning Objectives:
See learning goals in the syllabus.
Grading:
  1. Systems Mapping - 25 points
  2. Reflection Paper - 75 points

Exam Format:
There is no exam in this course.
Class Format:
The class format is a mixture of lecture, interactive discussion, and reflective writing time.
Workload:
This is a reading intensive course.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54182/1213
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jacob818_PA5103_Spring2021.docx
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jacob818_PA5103_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jacob818_PA5103_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 November 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5108 Section 001: Board leadership development (54138)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/23/2021
Sat 09:00AM - 04:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
02/19/2021
Fri 09:00AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
03/19/2021
Fri 09:00AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
04/16/2021
Fri 09:00AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (4 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Nonprofit board governance. Governance models, roles/responsibilities, ethics/dynamics. Current research/concepts along with students' current board experiences to illuminate challenges/explore solutions that build board leadership competencies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksbarr+PA5108+Spring2021
Class Description:
Instructor biography: Kate Barr is the President and CEO of Propel Nonprofits, a Minneapolis-based nonprofit whose mission is to fuel the impact and effectiveness of nonprofits with guidance, expertise, and capital. Kate leads Propel's team in developing and implementing innovative financing and programming and works with the board of directors to direct organizational planning and growth. She frequently presents workshops and presentations on nonprofit strategy and finance and is a sector level leader with articles, blogs, and policy papers. Prior to joining the organization in 2000, Kate was Senior Vice President of Riverside Bank in Minneapolis with a wide portfolio of strategic and business responsibilities. She began her professional life as business manager of a performing arts nonprofit. Kate holds an MA in Leadership from Hamline University. She has been on the adjunct faculty of both the Hamline University Masters in Nonprofit Management Program and the University of Minnesota Masters in Arts & Cultural Leadership program. She is an alumnus of the Humphrey School's Policy Fellows Program and the Shannon Institute. She currently serves on the boards of Borealis Philanthropy and the Jerome and Camargo Foundations.

Outside of work, Kate takes advantage of the Twin Cities' vibrant arts scene and amazing restaurants, diving into policy issues, and traveling with her husband. She has lived in seven states and is an enthusiastic transplant to Minnesota. Kate couldn't be prouder that her two adult children both work at nonprofits.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54138/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ksbarr_PA5108_Fall2019.docx (Fall 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 June 2018

Spring 2021  |  PA 5113 Section 001: State and Local Public Finance (54132)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (20 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theory/practice of financing. Providing public services at state/local level of government. Emphasizes integrating theory/practice, applying materials to specific policy areas, and documenting wide range of institutional arrangements across/within the 50 states. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?zrzhao+PA5113+Spring2021
Class Description:
Most government services that affect everyday life are provided and largely financed by state and local governments. In this course, we will explore how state and local governments make decisions about what services to provide and decisions about how to finance them. There is increasing demand for state and local government to manage their finances well while providing quality services. Governments are pressured to "do more with less". In order to meet these challenges, it is important that leaders, managers, and analysts of state and local government possess fundamental understandings of how revenues are derived and what expenditures are made.
Grading:

Student grades will be determined based on final exam (30%), two individual assignments (35%), one group assignment (25%), and participation through the course (10%)

Class Format:
Lecture, group discussion, in-class exercise, and student presentation
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54132/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/zrzhao_PA5113_Spring2019.doc (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/zrzhao_PA5113_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/zrzhao_PA5113_Spring2017.doc (Spring 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/zrzhao_PA5113_Spring2016.doc (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 November 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5123 Section 001: Philanthropy in America: History, Practice, and Trends (54191)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Wed 05:45PM - 08:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (14 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theory/practice of philanthropy. Foundation/corporate/ individual giving. History/economic structure/dynamics. Models of philanthropy, components of grant making/seeking. Current debates, career options.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jreedy+PA5123+Spring2021
Class Description:
Jen Ford Reedy has been president of the Bush Foundation since September 2012. The Bush Foundation invests in great ideas and the people who power them in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and 23 Native Nations. The Foundation was established in 1953 by Archibald Bush, a 3M executive who played a key role in growing 3M into one of the world's leading companies.

Prior to joining the Foundation, Jen served as chief of staff and vice president of strategy for St. Paul and Minnesota Foundation, where she led the creation of GiveMN.org, Give to the Max Day, and the Minnesota Idea Open. Jen was also a consultant with McKinsey and Company for nine years and was the first director of the Itasca Project, a CEO-led regional civic initiative in the Twin Cities. Her current community service includes board work with Region's Hospital, GHR Foundation and Independent Sector.

Jen has a bachelor's degree from the University of Kansas and a master's degree from the University of Chicago. She has been honored as a "40 Under 40" leader by the Minneapolis-Saint Paul Business Journal, as one of the "100 Minnesotans You Should Know" by Twin Cities Business Magazine, and as a NextGen Fellow by Independent Sector.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54191/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 December 2019

Spring 2021  |  PA 5136 Section 001: Group Process Facilitation for Organizational and Public/Community Engagement (54222)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
04/17/2021
Sat 09:00AM - 04:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-108
 
05/01/2021
Sat 09:00AM - 04:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-108
Enrollment Status:
Open (13 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Group process facilitation components, theories, tools, techniques. Facilitator's role in group goals and processes. Facilitation in public policy. Cross-cultural challenges. Topics may include meeting management, group decision-making, conflict, participatory leadership, and other tools.
Class Notes:
Class will be held In Person. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bravo047+PA5136+Spring2021
Class Description:
A work team seeks to create a strategic plan to guide work for 3-5 years. A city seeks to create a new policy with input from various stakeholders. A family seeks to plan an enormous annual reunion. Each scenario involves people with individual opinions, values, motivations, and feelings about the task at hand. The alignment of their positions can range from synched and complementary to completely opposed and contentious.
To guide groups of diverse thought towards collective decisions, the facilitator plays a key role in driving a process for the collection, evaluation, and synthesis of ideas and feedback. In this course, students will be introduced to the art of facilitation: philosophy, tools, and methodology. We will examine case studies that illustrate approaches and problem-solving scenarios and end our course with hands-on practice.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54222/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 May 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5137 Section 001: Project Management in the Public Arena (54151)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (10 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Project management and leadership strategies for implementing public policy, including new or revised government programs, public works, and regulations. Use of project management concepts, principles, and tools, including project definition, scoping, planning, scheduling (using the critical path method), budgeting, monitoring, staffing, and managing project teams. Application of "agile" and "extreme" project management in situations of complexity and uncertainty, including those due to the scrutiny and expectations of elected officials, the media, citizens, and other stakeholders.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?lars0021+PA5137+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54151/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5145 Section 001: Civic Participation in Public Affairs (54200)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/MS-STEP/MURP/Ph.D.-Public Affairs
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (46 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Critique/learn various approaches to civic participation in defining/addressing public issues. Readings, cases, classroom discussion, facilitating/experiencing engagement techniques. Examine work of practitioner, design engagement process.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksquick+PA5145+Spring2021
Class Description:
Critique/learn various approaches to civic participation in defining/addressing public issues. Readings, cases, classroom discussion, facilitating/experiencing engagement techniques. Examine work of practitioner, design engagement process.
Grading:
Readings & weekly reading notes - 20%
Attendance and active classroom participation - 20%
Facilitation practice (leading classroom exercises) - 15%
Short paper: Observing & analyzing a civic participation effort - 15%
Short paper: Interviewing a practitioner and assembling & analyzing their methods - 15%
Final poster plus paper: Designing an engagement process - 15%

Refer to syllabus for more detail
Exam Format:
There are no exams in this class
Class Format:
10% Lecture
15% Discussion
45% Laboratory
20% Small Group Activities
5% Field Trips
5% Guest Speakers
"Laboratory" refers to experiential, practicum sessions in which students experiment with different facilitation and engagement methods in the classroom.
Workload:
100 Pages Reading Per Week, plus weekly required reading notes prior to class
2 Short papers 1. observing & analyzing a civic participation effort; 2. Assembling & analzying a practitioner account;
1 poster + accompanying paper: Designing an engagement process
Co-facilitating 2 types of classes: 1) Participation / facilitation methods exercise; 2) Reading / concept discussion (twice)
Active participation in class
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54200/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ksquick_PA5145_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ksquick_PA5145_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 July 2016

Spring 2021  |  PA 5162 Section 001: Public Service Redesign Workshop (54169)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Enrollment Requirements:
PA 5161
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2021
Fri 08:30AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
02/05/2021
Fri 08:30AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
02/19/2021
Fri 08:30AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
03/05/2021
Fri 08:30AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
03/19/2021
Fri 08:30AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
04/02/2021
Fri 08:30AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
04/16/2021
Fri 08:30AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
04/30/2021
Fri 08:30AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (4 of 16 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Public service delivery innovation and redesign in health and human services fields to improve outcomes. Study and application of theories of organizational development, leadership, and system change. Social system dynamics analysis. Engaging diverse stakeholders. Effects and influence of implicit bias on current and redesigned efforts. Models and tools for public service redesign.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Some content may be delivered asynchronously. PA 5161 is the prerequisite for PA 5162. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ongxx068+PA5162+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course supports professionals working in the health and human services sectors in altering organizational conditions so that day-to-day operations yield better outcomes for the people who receive services and for society as a whole.

In this workshop, we are actively conducting public service redesign in health and human services.
In Minnesota, there are significant disparities in health and human services outcomes between racial and ethnic groups. People of color also are disproportionately found in punitive parts of the system such as juvenile justice, child protection, temporary financial assistance, and remedial employment training. This course is focused on trying to uncover the sources of some of these disparities and enable leaders to experiment with introducing solutions that narrow the disparities in public service experiences. This course is the second core course required as part of the University of Minnesota's Certificate in Human Services Leadership. Non-certificate students may participate, but PA 5161 Human-Centered Service Redesign is a pre-requisite course.


PA 5162 is classified as an alternative course for PA 8081 - Capstone Workshop, and fulfills the Capstone requirement for degree completion.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students enrolled in the Human Services Leadership Certificate or those who have taken PA 5161 Human-Centered Design
Learning Objectives:
1) Experience introducing and implementing innovation in service delivery in a public or nonprofit organization or service delivery network;
2) Analyze social system dynamics in real time, adjusting strategies and actions appropriately;
3) Interrogate how implicit racial bias influences current operations and affects the viability of system redesign efforts;
4) Authentically engage diverse stakeholders to further enhance design of an innovative idea in publicly funded human services systems;
5) Build the skill of focusing upon outcomes that improve public value.
Exam Format:
Semester-long project
Class Format:
Hybrid course, combining face-to-face sessions, project meetings, and virtual engagement
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54169/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/sandf002_ongxx068_PA5162_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 December 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5190 Section 001: Topics in Public and Nonprofit Leadership and Management -- Designing Change for Public Sector Problem Solving (65592)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (9 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
02/13/2021 - 02/20/2021
Sat 09:00AM - 01:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Science Teaching Student Svcs 432
 
03/20/2021
Sat 09:00AM - 01:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Science Teaching Student Svcs 432
 
04/24/2021
Sat 09:00AM - 01:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Science Teaching Student Svcs 432
 
03/06/2021
Sat 09:00AM - 01:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Science Teaching Student Svcs 432
Enrollment Status:
Open (3 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be In Person. "Designing Change for Public Sector Problem Solving." http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wood0704+PA5190+Spring2021
Class Description:

How can public and nonprofit sectors address society's most intransigent problems? How can we ensure that solutions are relevant, and flexible enough to adapt to changing needs? This course is an intensive deep dive into the intersection of human-centered design and the need for innovative, sustainable solutions in the public and non-profit sector. You can expect case studies and practical examples; guest speakers who will share how design thinking has impacted their work; and the opportunity to apply the human-centered design approach to a real-world project. This approach - often referred to as "design thinking" - has risen to prominence as a problem-solving method that builds on the strengths of design practice. Featuring iterative phases and the emphasis on understanding and engaging the people and context at the center of every problem we encounter, it can lead to more meaningful and effective outcomes.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65592/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2019

Spring 2021  |  PA 5204 Section 001: Urban Spatial and Social Dynamics (54106)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Urban/Regional Planning major/minor or Public Affairs PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (34 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Behavioral theories of internal spatial arrangement, functioning, characteristics of cities at macro level/how they produce system of cities. Factors influencing urban spatial structure over time. Urban form, land use/rent. Spatial expression of economic, social, political forces. prereq: urban/regional planning Major/minor in or public affairs PhD or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time.. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elkha030+PA5204+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54106/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5213 Section 001: Introduction to Site Planning (54144)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (15 of 34 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Analyzing/preparing graphic plans for development or redevelopment of property. Site planning issues, process, opportunities, details, and techniques. Hands-on preparation of a site plan. Site visits, lectures, research, presentations, exam, in-class exercises. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hfburga+PA5213+Spring2021
Class Description:
Analyzing/preparing graphic plans for development or redevelopment of property. Site planning issues, process, opportunities, details, and techniques. Hands-on preparation of a site plan. Site visits, lectures,research, presentations, exam, in-class exercises. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54144/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hfburga_PA5213_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hfburga_PA5213_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2015

Spring 2021  |  PA 5221 Section 001: Private Sector Development (54086)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (12 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Roles of various participants in land development. Investment objectives, effects of regulation. Overview of development process from private/public perspective.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. If weather and COVID permit, there may be a walking tour or site visit later in the semester. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?brow1804+PA5221+Spring2021 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gunde208+PA5221+Spring2021
Class Description:
The course will provide students with a framework that integrates theory and practice into a developer's-eye-view of urban real estate development. Students will gain an understanding of the development process, real estate markets and products, the project cycle, and the developer's motivations and decision-making process. In completing this course, students will achieve the following three objectives:

- Overview of the Real Estate Development Business

- Develop a general understanding of the real estate development business including products, markets, and actors, with an emphasis on developers and particularly their personalities, motivations, and interests.

- Tools and Skills: Develop an understanding of the quantitative and qualitative tools used to evaluate a real estate opportunity and the skills required to build and use those tools.

Students will learn how to create and manipulate their own "pro forma" economic models and use them to evaluate the economics and finances of an investment or business.

Generalization to Urban Development: With this new knowledge, tools, and analytical skills, students will be able to generalize across a broad spectrum of urban development activities from the perspectives of a variety of actors ranging from developers, investors, and lenders to city planners, elected officials, and community members.

With this combination of knowledge, tools, and skills, students will also be prepared to work in the real estate development industry and will be able to confidently tell prospective employers, "I know how to create a proforma."

More information about Peter Brown's projects, teaching, and writing can be found at http://www.peterhendeebrown.com/.
Who Should Take This Class?:
See the syllabus
Learning Objectives:
See the syllabus
Grading:
30% Case study write-ups
20% Homework exercises and quizzes
15% Book review
15% Market research project
20% Final exam
Exam Format:
Take-home final exam. See syllabus for details.
Class Format:
30% Lecture
5% Film/Video
40% Discussion
10% Student Presentations
15% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
1 Book Report(s)
2 Homework Assignment(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: 7 Case Studies including write-ups
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54086/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gunde208_brow1804_PA5221_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gunde208_brow1804_PA5221_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/brow1804__PA5221_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 November 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5234 Section 001: Urban Transportation Planning and Policy (54208)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (15 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will integrate key theories and practices, traditional and emerging policy instruments, and techniques for urban and transportation planning. The goal is to introduce students to essential concepts, influential thinkers, and important debates associated with the land use-transportation connection as a foundation for both professional and academic work. By the end of the course, students will be able to comprehend urban transportation planning process and demand forecasting; the theories and empirical evidence on land use and transportation interactions; land use and transportation policy instruments and their effectiveness; and land use and transportation planning in developing countries.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?taotao+PA5234+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54208/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5242 Section 001: Environmental Planning, Policy, and Decision Making (54159)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (9 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theory and practice. Ethical, legal, and institutional frameworks relative to a range of environmental issues. Innovative environmental decision making informed by collaboration, conflict resolution, adaptive management, and resilience thinking. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?fayolaj+PA5242+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54159/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5243 Section 001: Environmental Justice in Urban Planning & Public Policy (66258)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (21 of 30 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Environmental racism can be defined as policies and practices that result in communities of Black, Indigenous and other people of color (BIPoC communities) being overexposed to environmental harms and being denied access to environmental goods. The environmental justice (EJ) movement in the United States was birthed in the 1980s with the aim of ending environmental racism. Early EJ activism was led by Black rural communities protesting the disproportionate presence of toxic waste facilities in their neighborhoods and Latinx migrant farmworkers who were overexposed to harmful pesticides. Central to the course is the understanding that structural racism, in the form of social, political, and economic forces, has denied BIPoC individuals and communities their rights to live in clean environments and access natural resources that allow communities to build and maintain their physical, mental, emotion, and fiscal health. Although the course focuses on race and racism, it takes as axiomatic that racism is intertwined with other systems of oppression including, but not limited to, sexism, classism, ableism, homophobia, and transphobia. The course begins by tracing the history of the EJ movement and unpacking the terms "racism" and "justice." The main body of the course will focus on a series of issues that EJ scholars and activists address including pollution, greening, transportation, disasters, and climate change. The course ends with discussions and reflections on our roles, responsibilities and possibilities as public policy and planning scholars, researchers and practitioners to work towards ending environmental racism and achieving EJ for all. The required "readings" for the course will include academic journal articles, news stories, governmental policies, podcasts, videos, poetry, and short stories. This will allow us to understand the theoretical and methodological approaches to EJ activism and research and explore popular and creative forms of knowledge abo
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?fayolaj+PA5243+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66258/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5261 Section 001: Housing Policy (54103)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
HSG 5463 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (14 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Institutional/environmental setting for housing policy in the United States. Competing views of solving housing problems through public intervention in the market. Federal/local public sector responses to housing problems. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?damia025+PA5261+Spring2021
Class Description:

This course will explore the institutional, political, and economic context for the making of housing policy in the United States. We will examine competing ideas about solving the nation's housing problems through public intervention in the market focusing on the shift from social welfare to neoliberal policy approaches. In so doing, we will evaluate federal and local public sector responses to housing problems in this country, the different approaches taken by successive federal administrations in the U.S., and regional approaches to affordable housing. Special emphasis will be given to recent initiatives to increase the residential mobility of subsidized housing residents and to deconcentrate poverty by dispersing subsidized housing throughout metropolitan regions, and to the foreclosure crisis.


Institutional/environmental setting for housing policy in the United States. Competing views of solving housing problems through public intervention in the market. Federal/local public sector responses to housing problems.
Grading:

Term Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35% of final grade

Mid-term exam . . . . . . . . . . . . 25% of final grade

Final exam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30% of final grade

Class participation . . . . . . . . . 10% of final grade

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54103/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/damia025_PA5261_Spring2018.docx (Spring 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5271 Section 001: Geographic Information Systems: Applications in Planning and Policy Analysis (54128)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Urban/Regional Planning, major and minor or PA PhD
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (16 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to GIS. Applications in public planning and policy analysis. Operational skills in GIS software. Mapping analysis of U.S. Census material. Local/state government management/planning. Spatial statistical analysis for policy/planning. prereq: Major in urban/regional planning or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Contact Geoff Maas (maas0021@umn.edu) regarding permission numbers. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?maas0021+PA5271+Spring2021
Class Description:

GIS Applications in Planning and Policy Analysis is intended for the planning and public policy student who desires a fundamental working knowledge of the core concepts of GIS. Students can expect to work with geospatial data in a lab environment, develop core skills in working with, manipulating and understanding geospatial data. Lectures explore the data types, origins, uses and limitations.


Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are an important supportive technology for the fields of planning and public policy. Both fields involve exploring location-based issues and GIS facilitates spatial visualization of phenomena such as crime, poverty, pollution, health, land use, economics, environmental conditions and many others. GIS - a discipline in its own right - is now firmly woven into the fabric of government and many business operations. It is vital that planning and public policy students have a fundamental knowledge of the concepts, usage, processes and potential of GIS technology.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in working with spatial data, making maps, presenting and communicating spatial data.
Learning Objectives:
Development of foundational skills in GIS, understanding of the various uses and limits of the technology and how it can be applied to the work of urban planning, public policy, public health and urban studies.
Grading:
10 Lab Assignments using GIS Software (55% of grade)
Class Attendance (10% of grade)
Final Project (25% of grade)
Final Exam (10% of grade)
Exam Format:
Final Exam: Cumulative, written exam for core concepts covered in the class.
Class Format:
Tuesday Evenings: 6:00 PM - 8:45 PM
Workload:
Emphasis is on topical lectures, in-class lab exercises and assignments. Students will leave the course with a firm command of core GIS and geospatial concepts, tools, processes and methods and their applicability to the fields of urban and regional planning and policy analysis.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54128/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/maas0021_PA5271_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5290 Section 001: Topics in Planning -- Financing Affordable Multi-Family Rental Hsg in US (65628)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (12 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Fri 01:00PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-108
Enrollment Status:
Open (8 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered In Person. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5290+Spring2021
Class Description:
Financing affordable multifamily housing in the United States is a complicated endeavor that requires more than just a command of financial principles and analysis but also an appreciation for the nuances and fluidity of policy, public-private-partnership and public discourse. This course will demystify the financial drivers and consequences in our affordable housing delivery system.

This course will simultaneously build participants' confidence in basic financial modeling of affordable housing using common capital structures, while also exploring the relationship of finance with policy and regulation, real estate and urban planning objectives, design, and program limitations.

While the course will focus on current US programs, some historical context and occasional discussion of non-US examples will allow participants to understand the evolution of finance and policy in the US and to form a broader view on, and opinion of, our system.

Subject matter of the course will include, but not be limited to: definitions of affordability and target populations; rationale for intervention by government; subsidy and tax incentive programs at Federal, State and Local levels; role and motivations of various actors (government, quasi-governmental, non-profit, for-profit and philanthropic); the power and place of capital subsidies vs. operating subsidies; efficacy of financial tools for social engineering and outcomes.
Class Format:
This course will include a variety of teaching methods to introduce and reinforce concepts and to appeal to different learning styles. These methods will include lectures, guest speakers / panels, class discussion, financial modeling exercises, short essay and opinion papers and an optional site visit.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65628/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/schm0023_PA5290_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/schm0023_PA5290_Spring2016.docx (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2015

Spring 2021  |  PA 5290 Section 002: Topics in Planning -- Rural Planning and Policy (65449)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (12 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (5 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?linds301+PA5290+Spring2021
Class Description:
Rural Planning and Policy is an introduction to the opportunities and challenges associated with planning to meet the needs of rural populations. The course introduces common approaches and problems in defining rural areas, provides an overview of global and local processes of leading to economic restructuring and populations changes in rural areas, and explores substantive issues in policy and planning, including governance, health care, rural environments and climate change, and rural livability. Students work in teams and individually to define a rural problem, prepare a strategy memo, and write an Op-Ed suitable for submission to a media outlet.

Learning Objectives:
PA 5290 has seven learning objectives.

1. Describe and explain different concepts of rurality and the complexities of differentiating rural and urban.


2. Describe major global and societal trends that are changing rural economies and populations.


3. Describe challenges and opportunities facing rural populations in areas of governance, transportation, the environment and climate change, health care and social services, and livability, recreation, and the arts.


4. Use Census and other data to quantify the magnitude and severity of a problem or challenge facing a rural population.


5. Write a clear, short evidence-based policy brief that summarizes options available to a rural population to address a policy problem.


6. Write an editorial about a policy option suitable for submission to a newspaper or online news website.


7. Work effectively with a teammate to prepare policy memos.




Grading:
Student Option grade basis.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65449/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA5290_Spring2020.docx (Spring 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA5290_Summer2018.docx (Summer 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 December 2019

Spring 2021  |  PA 5290 Section 003: Topics in Planning -- Data and Tools for Planning (66283)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (12 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (4 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Title: Data and Tools for Planning. Hui Kong will be instructor. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kongh+PA5290+Spring2021
Class Description:

Cities are becoming smarter: they are using data to optimize services, infrastructure operation, and urban planning. Government agencies, nonprofits, consulting firms, and startups all recognize the importance of leveraging data to create effective public policy and urban plans. This course teaches students systematic approaches to collecting, analyzing, visualizing, and interpreting quantitative data to inform urban planning practice and policy making. Students will be introduced to theories and techniques in urban data science and analytics, with particular focus placed on spatial data analytics.


In this course, student will (1) explore some of the major data sources for urban analytics (e.g. census, economic, transportation data); (2) get familiar with methods for basic data collection, processing, and analysis; (3) explore the visualization and cartography techniques in urban planning; (4) learn a set of spatial data analysis approaches in the context of urban studies and planning. This course will be delivered in a combined format of lecture and laboratory sessions. In the labs, students will learn to use GeoDa, a software that has all basic functions to deal with spatial data (similar to ArcGIS and QGIS but easier to learn).
Learning Objectives:
- get familiar with data sources for urban studies/planning
- learn the basic principles and approaches in data cleaning, exploratory data analysis, mapping
- learn basic statistical models (linear regression, spatial autoregression)
- get to know the spatial analytic approaches and basic urban models
- learn to use GeoDa, a user-friendly software for basic mapping and spatial analysis
Class Format:
This course will be delivered in a combined format of lecture and laboratory sessions.
Workload:
5 labs (in class) and one final project
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66283/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 November 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5290 Section 004: Topics in Planning -- Emerging Trends in Transportation (65629)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (12 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (9 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Emerging Trends in Transportation. Instructor: Hui Kong. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kongh+PA5290+Spring2021
Class Description:

What will the future of transportation look like? As technology advances, recent years have witnessed dramatic changes in urban transportation. As the transportation world evolves, we're faced with big questions. How do we create, innovate, and implement emerging technologies in the transportation sector? What impact do they have on the city and the society? What public policies are appropriate regarding these emerging trends in transportation?


This course will examine the current state of technology that is present in the transportation field and look ahead to developing technologies. Topics include but are not limited to smart cities, connected and automated vehicles, shared mobility, electric vehicles, micro-mobility, information and communication technologies, etc. In this course, we will critically evaluate the pros and cons of emerging technologies in the transportation sector, identify the social and ethical dimensions of them, and discuss the potential policies preparation for the implementation of the emerging transportation technologies. The course will be offered in the format of lecture and discussions.
Class Format:
Lectures, student presentations, and in-class discussions
Workload:
Students need to complete some reading assignments and a term essay.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65629/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 November 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5290 Section 005: Topics in Planning -- Local Leadership: Municipal Governance and Policy (66118)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (12 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Wed 05:30PM - 08:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (4 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5290+Spring2021
Class Description:
Explore the expanding and unique role of the city in today's world and our increasing reliance on cities and metropolitan areas to solve big policy problems. As residents' trust in federal and state government is at an all time low, the "municipalist" movement is taking hold in cities around the world. Cities have had an increased role in visibly addressing wicked problems and implementing policy to improve local economies, the environment, worker protections, transit, and other areas that have lacked investment from state and federal government for years if not decades. At the same time, the environment for city policy-making is rapidly changing, with the influence of social movements and protest, higher levels of engagement with city government, and use of a race equity lens to redefine the priorities of public entities.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate school students; others with permission.
Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the basic structure of local government and the roles of stakeholders inside and outside of government.
  • Identify and analyze pressures on local government and individuals in local government.
  • Engage with those who seek to influence local government decisions, such as community advocates, lobbyists, elected officials and city staff, and explore their motivations and objectives.
  • Understand the policy making process at the local government level and how to impact that process
Grading:

A = 100%-90%

B = 89%-79%

C = 78%-68%

D = 68%-59%

F = less than 59%

Class Format:
Class lecture and discussion; frequent guest speakers.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66118/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/glid0004_PA5290_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 July 2018

Spring 2021  |  PA 5290 Section 006: Topics in Planning -- Urban Food Systems Planning and Policy (66612)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (12 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon 11:15AM - 01:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (3 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021, Mondays, 11:15 a.m. - 1:45 p.m. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hfburga+PA5290+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66612/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5290 Section 007: Topics in Planning -- Urban Planning Zoning and Development Review (67357)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit (12 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
02/03/2021 - 03/03/2021
Wed 06:30PM - 09:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (8 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?brand493+PA5290+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67357/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5311 Section 001: Program Evaluation (54199)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Wed 02:30PM - 05:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (11 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Principal methods, primary applications of evaluation research as applied to policies/programs in health/human services, education, or the environment. Conducting evaluations. Becoming a critical consumer of studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. It will meet synchronously the first week and every other week after. The other weeks will be asynchronous. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5311+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course provides an overview to program evaluation in public affairs. It explores the complexities and realities of conducting program evaluation studies in community-based settings, such as public agencies, schools, non-profit organizations, and collaborative initiatives. The overall purpose of this course is to provide students with a theoretical framework and practical strategies for conducting community-based evaluation studies.
Grading:
50% Program Evaluation Field Work

25% Reports/Papers/Memos

15% Student Presentations

10% Participation
Class Format:

30% Lecture

20% Small Group Activities

20% Student Presentations

15% Discussion

10% Laboratory

5% Guest Speakers
Workload:

50 Pages Reading Per Week

2 Reports/Papers/Memos

1 Presentation

1 Special Project
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54199/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 August 2015

Spring 2021  |  PA 5414 Section 001: Child Human Rights: Work and Education (54201)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Closed (0 of 0 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
International child labor issues. Options for improving child well-being, including policies/programs that have potential to affect the lives of millions of children. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
In Spring 2020, Professor Levison and Professor Maynes will teach GCC 3035/5035: Child Labor: Work, Education, and Human Rights in Global Historical Perspective instead of PA 4414/5414. It will meet Tu/Th, 1:00-2:15.
Class Description:
SEE NOTES ABOVE - SEE GCC 5035 IN SPRING 2021. This course is designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students. In the last decade, there has been a great upsurge of interest in child labor - from advocates, international organizations, and country-level policy-makers as well as researchers. Questions to be explored include: When is work bad (or good) for children? Can children be removed from situations in which they do hazardous work, or can the work be made less hazardous? Is it enough to provide high-quality public education, to draw children into schools and out of work? What if schools are bad; should children still be required to attend? When children work for their parents, how does that affect policy solutions? Are consumer boycotts good or bad for child workers and their families? How do trade barriers affect child labor? How such questions are addresses in policies and programs has the potential to affect millions of children. This course does not spend much time on on what are known as the 'Worst Forms' of child labor; prostitution, child pornography, children working in mines, child soldiers, etc. Almost everyone agrees that the 'Worst Forms' are abhorrent and should be eliminated. Instead, the course focuses on the kinds of work done by the vast majority of child workers, work which may have both bad and good aspects for children; also how formal education and work are interrelated; and related topics.
Class Format:
40% Lecture
30% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
20% Guest Speakers
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54201/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5415 Section 001: Economics of Early Childhood Development (65702)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (2 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Early childhood development (ECD) is examined from an economic perspective. Course focuses on the role of government in helping to promote ECD for purposes of social welfare and economic growth. Readings include studies of brain development as well as longitudinal studies of ECD. Students will become familiar with the importance of rigorous impact evaluations and the use of cost-benefit analysis as a tool for efficient resource allocation of child policies.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5415+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65702/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5421 Section 001: Racial Inequality and Public Policy (54157)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Sat 09:00AM - 11:45AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (22 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Historical roots of racial inequality in American society. Contemporary economic consequences. Public policy responses to racial inequality. Emphasizes thinking/analysis that is critical of strategies offered for reducing racism and racial economic inequality. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?myers006+PA5421+Spring2021
Class Description:
This seminar explores the historical roots of racial inequality in American society and the economic consequences for contemporary times. Focus will be placed on public policy developments and intellectual debates in the "Post-Civil Rights Era," i.e., recent years when race-based strategies for reduction of economic disparities no longer are politically feasible and the "Post-Racialism Era" when race itself is no longer considered an explanation for inequality. The first half of the course explores the various causes and the empirical evidence on racial and ethnic economic inequality. The second half the course introduces the methods and techniques for assessing the effectiveness of alternative remedies to inequality. Some consideration is given to the problem of race and racial inequality in a comparative perspective, even though the main focus of much of the course is on the United States. Special attention is paid to changing notions of race and federal and state responses to rapid demographic changes. The seminar will provoke open debate and discourse about public policy responses to racial inequality. The emphasis is on stimulating seminar participants to think about and to analyze critically the range of strategies offered for reducing racism and racial and ethnic economic inequality.

This course fulfills a requirement for the 7-credit Health Disparities Interdisciplinary Concentration. For more information on the concentration and a full list of requirements, please visit http://www.sph.umn.edu/academics/ic/disparities/.

Grading:

Individual Assignments 60%

10 Reflective Essays 10%
5 Online Forum Essays 10%
Quiz #1 20%
Quiz #2 20%

Team Assignments 40%

Team Reading Response Paper 5%
Peer Evaluation of Team-Led Discussion 5%
Problem Statement 5%
Policy Brief 10%
Peer Evaluation of Team Policy Brief Presentation 5%
Within-Group Peer Evaluation 10%


TOTAL 100%
Exam Format:

There will be two timed, computer graded quizzes. The format will include multiple-choice and true-false questions as well as matching and completion formats. These quizzes will be based largely on the lectures and required and recommended readings. The quizzes will be posted online. Study guides will be distributed two weeks before each quiz.
Class Format:

Class sessions will be devoted to highlighting some of the central issues that confound theoretical and empirical assessments of racism and racial and ethnic inequality. These central issues are developed extensively in the required readings, which cover a broad range of scholarly and popular perspectives and approaches. The sessions will include lectures, group activities, discussions, and films.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54157/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/myers006_PA5421_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/myers006_PA5421_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/myers006_PA5421_Spring2016.docx (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 October 2018

Spring 2021  |  PA 5426 Section 001: Community-Engaged Research and Policy with Marginalized Groups (54161)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Delivery Mode
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Wed 04:00PM - 06:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (3 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Marginalized populations tend to be viewed as objects of social policy, passive victims, or a cause of social problems. Processes of marginalization we will explore in this class include: structural racism, colonization, economic exclusion and exploitation, gender bias, and more. Policy and research are typically driven by mainstream/dominant society members with little direct knowledge about the real lives of people on the margins. This can lead to misguided actions, misunderstandings, paternalism, unintended negative consequences, and further marginalization and/or stigmatization. In this course, we will learn about community-engaged research methodologies such as participatory action research (PAR) and community-based participatory research (CPBR). We will use case studies of sex trafficking, housing, and youth work to explore the challenges, rewards, and ethical implications of these community-engaged approaches to research and policy-making. Instructors and students in the course will work together on a real-world research and policy challenge so that students contribute to ongoing work in the field in real-time.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?melan108+PA5426+Spring2021
Class Description:
Marginalized populations tend to be viewed as objects of social policy, passive victims, or a cause of social problems. Processes of marginalization we will explore in this class include: structural racism, colonization, economic exclusion and exploitation, and gender bias. All of these processes are involved in sex trading, prostitution and sex trafficking. Policy and research are typically driven by mainstream/dominant society members with little direct knowledge about the real lives of people on the margins. This can lead to misguided actions, misunderstandings, paternalism, unintended negative consequences and further marginalization and/or stigmatization. In this course we explore these issues in depth and review and develop ethical research and policy-making through a case study of sex trading and trafficking. Instructors and students in the course will work together on a real-world research and policy challenge so that students contribute to ongoing work in the field in real-time.
This course meets the requirement as an elective course for the Health Equity Minor. The Health Equity Minor is a graduate minor that allows students to specialize in studying health disparities and inequalities.
Learning Objectives:
After completing the course, students should be able to:

Analyze sensitive public policy problems using reflexive and/or feminist methodologies, discourse analysis, critical legal theories and legal realism


Design ethical research protocols on sensitive topics for use with marginalized communities


Understand and be able to use community engaged research approaches


Analyze implications and develop legislative strategy with demonstrated sensitivity, awareness, and involvement of marginalized communities


Develop ethical advocacy plans on sensitive topics involving marginalized communities



Engage in real world problem solving at the intersection of theory and practice



Demonstrate a nuanced understanding of the complex and multifaceted topic of commercial sex and the individuals involved in that marketplace.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54161/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 November 2019

Spring 2021  |  PA 5490 Section 001: Topics in Social Policy -- Reparations: Policy, History, & Theory (66756)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (12 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (15 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Humphrey School students may register without a permission number. All others will require a permission number. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?will5638+PA5490+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66756/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5490 Section 002: Topics in Social Policy -- Restorative Practices: Policymaking & Activism (67137)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (12 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
S-N or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
02/09/2021
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
03/02/2021
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
03/30/2021
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
04/27/2021
Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (7 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY five Tuesday evenings from 6:00-8:45. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Instructor will be Prof. Raj Sethuraju of Metro State.http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sethu028+PA5490+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67137/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5521 Section 001: Development Planning and Policy Analysis (54105)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (12 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Techniques of development planning/policy analysis at national, regional, and project levels. Effects of external shocks and government interventions on national/regional economies. Macroeconomic modeling, input-output analysis, social accounting matrices/multipliers, project evaluation. prereq: 5031 or equiv recommended or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. MPP requires 3 or more credits from 5022, 5431, 5503, 5521, 5722, or 5805. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?assaad+PA5521+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course examines the techniques and assumptions of development planning and policy analysis at the national, program and project levels. The course focuses on modeling techniques and policy applications rather than on theory. It consists of three parts. First, you will learn how to analyze and interpret macroeconomic data in the context of an open macroeconomy model. Second, you will learn how to conduct financial and economic cost-benefit analyses and will apply what you learn to a real world project for a client. Third, you will become familiar with experimental and quasi-experimental impact evaluation techniques for development projects and programs. Students are assumed to have some background in the theories of economic development and to have had previous preparation in quantitative methods. While the focus will be on developing countries, many of the techniques covered will also have applications in the U.S. context.
Learning Objectives:
Provide and introduction to some widely used quantitative modeling techniques.

-
Build an appreciation of the promise and pitfalls of quantitative modeling.

-
Acquire a specific set of modeling and interpretation skills through hands-on application.

-
Develop an ability to describe the macroeconomic context of a country based on an analysis of time series data on major economic variables.

-
Learn to conduct financial and economic cost-benefit analyses of public and non-profit development interventions and programs and learn how to manage the complexities of real-world projects.

-
Become effective and critical consumers of experimental and non-experimental impact evaluation studies of development programs and interventions

Grading:
15% Midterm Exam; 85% Special Projects
Exam Format:
short essay, short answer
Class Format:
67% Lecture
33% Laboratory
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Exam(s)
Other Workload: Three 15 page project reports done in groups
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54105/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5521_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5521_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2018

Spring 2021  |  PA 5521 Section 002: Development Planning and Policy Analysis (54109)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Laboratory
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Fri 08:15AM - 09:30AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Auto Enrolls With:
Section 001
Enrollment Status:
Open (12 of 30 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Techniques of development planning/policy analysis at national, regional, and project levels. Effects of external shocks and government interventions on national/regional economies. Macroeconomic modeling, input-output analysis, social accounting matrices/multipliers, project evaluation. prereq: 5031 or equiv recommended or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. MPP requires 3 or more credits from 5022, 5431, 5503, 5521, 5722, or 5805. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?assaad+PA5521+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course examines the techniques and assumptions of development planning and policy analysis at the national, program and project levels. The course focuses on modeling techniques and policy applications rather than on theory. It consists of three parts. First, you will learn how to analyze and interpret macroeconomic data in the context of an open macroeconomy model. Second, you will learn how to conduct financial and economic cost-benefit analyses and will apply what you learn to a real world project for a client. Third, you will become familiar with experimental and quasi-experimental impact evaluation techniques for development projects and programs. Students are assumed to have some background in the theories of economic development and to have had previous preparation in quantitative methods. While the focus will be on developing countries, many of the techniques covered will also have applications in the U.S. context.
Learning Objectives:
Provide and introduction to some widely used quantitative modeling techniques.

-
Build an appreciation of the promise and pitfalls of quantitative modeling.

-
Acquire a specific set of modeling and interpretation skills through hands-on application.

-
Develop an ability to describe the macroeconomic context of a country based on an analysis of time series data on major economic variables.

-
Learn to conduct financial and economic cost-benefit analyses of public and non-profit development interventions and programs and learn how to manage the complexities of real-world projects.

-
Become effective and critical consumers of experimental and non-experimental impact evaluation studies of development programs and interventions

Grading:
15% Midterm Exam; 85% Special Projects
Exam Format:
short essay, short answer
Class Format:
67% Lecture
33% Laboratory
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Exam(s)
Other Workload: Three 15 page project reports done in groups
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54109/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5521_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/assaad_PA5521_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2018

Spring 2021  |  PA 5590 Section 001: Topics in Economic and Community Development -- Transforming Development (67505)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (9 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (5 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gfs+PA5590+Spring2021
Class Description:

We have seldom seen global acts of solidarity and political will such as the one generated by the COVID19
pandemic. The expansion of social distancing policies has slowed consumption and has resulted in sharp reductions of CO2 emissions among other positive environmental benefits, which were until recently, impossible to achieve. The infusion of financial resources into medical systems and social safety nets is evidence of the availability of resources when there is political will. Yet, there is little recognition in international policy arenas that the ultimate drivers of the world's looming existential crises, including that of emerging infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance, climate change, and the accelerated loss of species and habitats, lies in our dominant definition and the historical foundations of development. COVID19 has required an unprecedented shift in paradigms, forcing many to reconsider long-held historical ideologies and approaches to development.
The pandemic has also laid bare the ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities in the ways societies across the globe lead lives, proving to be a "justice" thermometer of sorts: ethnic and racial minorities across the world are over represented among those who have been sick or have died from Covid: African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans in the United States and Amerindians in South America. Across the globe, women are juggling paid work, parenting responsibilities and caring for the elderly. Larger numbers of people in the informal sector in the global have food and housing insecurity. The list goes on.

These social and environmental challenges are global and local in scale and challenge us to consider poverty alleviation not as an "international" issue and only of concern for low resourced communities and countries, but one in need of attention in every country in the world. Two key ingredients to any economic system, the natural world and the caring labor that support social and physical reproduction, continue to be invisible in the dominant model of development. Similar factors that lead to social inequities lead to unsustainable development.



Various theoretical/policy frameworks across multiple disciplinary fields, provide paths on redefining development, and reframing our economy taking into account the natural world and care, the latter understood as the values, attitudes and practices that sustain all life. We will explore current scholarly and applied definitions of sustainable development and study how it differs (or not) from green growth. We will study different models loosely framed under what is currently known as the pluriverse, models intending to transform development: community economies, solidarity movement, degrowth, transition design. Gender, class/caste, ad ethnicity will be mainstreamed throughout the course.



For students who have taken PA5501, this course is a deep dive and expansion of the last week of class covering "the right side of the board."



Who Should Take This Class?:
Anyone interested in: international development, understanding the connections between high resources countries and poor resources countries, the environment , gender equity
Learning Objectives:

By the end of the course students should be able to:


· Understand the definition of sustainable development from a scholarly perspective


· To understand the scope of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the inherent contradictions among the various goals


· Understand current alternative proposals to economic development: green growth; degrowth;
community economies; and proposals under the pluriverse umbrella.


· Understand the policy formulations for sustainable development and how they differ from green growth and degrowth.


· Understand the importance of theory and measurement in policy formulation and implementation.


· Develop a verbal and conceptual vocabulary on transform development.


· Recognize and understand the importance of gender, ethnic and class/caste perspectives in the context of transforming development theory, policy, and implementation.


· Develop the analytical skills to sort context specific (one size does not fit all), gender specific (there is no such thing as gender neutral); and class/caste (the rising boat does not lift all equally) development challenges.


· Recognize that transforming development is anchored in ethics and based on justice for all beings and the systems that support life.


Class Format:
This class is seminar style.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67505/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 November 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5623 Section 001: GAINS: Gender and Intersectional Network Series, Leadership Workshop II (65428)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/29/2021
Fri 02:15PM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
02/26/2021
Fri 02:15PM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
03/19/2021
Fri 02:15PM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
04/16/2021
Fri 02:15PM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (8 of 24 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
GAINS: Gender and Intersectional Network Series, Leadership Workshop prepares students with the skills to lead effectively and challenge institutional norms and practices that perpetuate disparities based on gender, race and other structural inequalities. Women, racially marginalized individuals, and LGBTI-identified individuals are still disproportionately underrepresented in leadership roles in public, private, and nonprofit institutions in spite of high rates of educational attainment and equal opportunity legislation. Women of color and indigenous women face even greater obstacles to advancement compared to white women. Barriers to diverse leadership today stem less from overt discrimination and more from "second generation" forms of bias - often invisible but still powerful cultural beliefs as well as workplace structures and practices. Achieving leadership parity thus entails individual, collective and institutional change. Course pedagogy includes case studies, group discussions, self-reflection and simulations that have been proven to have a lasting impact on individual leaders in developing their own leadership capacity. Guest speakers offer potential role models and share their leadership perspectives. The workshop and two-semester format of the course allows students to benefit from a cohort model of learning and develop their own network of practice. Moreover, GAINS focuses not just on individual leadership development, but also organizational and systems level change. Students of all genders interested in addressing personal and institutional barriers to advancement that are rooted in gender inequalities and their intersections with race and other forms of inequality are welcome to enroll. To get the most out of the network and cohort development aspects of this course, students are encouraged to participate for two semesters.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cewig+PA5623+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65428/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5683 Section 001: Gender, Race and Political Representation (65563)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
PA 8683 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (2 of 20 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Explores intersection of gender, race and political issues to identify best practices for strengthening roles of under-represented groups in governance. Individual, structural and institutional factors attributed to increasing the election and appointment of under-represented groups. Theories of citizen representation. Global approach with cross-national evidence and comparative country studies.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cewig+PA5683+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65563/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5690 Section 001: Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy -- LGBTQ Politics & Policy (65595)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (9 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (7 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Brian Harrison can be reached at bfh@umn.edu. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5690+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65595/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5715 Section 001: Survey of Current Issues in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (54110)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (15 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Current topics in science, technology, and environmental policy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kelle644+PA5715+Spring2021
Class Description:
This class is run as a guided book club with students regularly taking responsibility for leading the discussion of the assigned book. It is a seminar style rather than a lecture class. The policy-related subjects we are likely to cover in Spring 2016 are social psychology and neuroscience, chemicals of emerging concern, climate change, environmental justice, information and communications technology, and food. For example, the lead book will be The Righteous Mind by Jonathan Haidt. For some sessions, we will have guests who may give short presentations but will then engage in discussion with the class. The goals for students are that you will: Gain an understanding of current "hot" topics in science, technology and environmental policy; develop critical thinking skills; develop facilitation and discussion skills; understand the social and historical contexts of current issues; and become a discerning participant/observer in science, technology and environmental policy. Evaluations are based on short papers and class participation.
Learning Objectives:
The objective of this course is to explore current topics at the interface of science, technology and public policy. Specific learning objectives for students include gaining an understanding of current "hot" topics in science, technology and environmental policy; developing critical thinking skills; developing oral presentation and discussion skills; and understanding the social and historical contexts that have led to the current topics. The class will be taught in a seminar style, with the expectation that there will be significant student participation, including students conducting discussion.
Gain an understanding of current "hot" topics in science, technology and environmental policy;
 Develop critical thinking skills;
 Develop oral presentation and discussion skills;
 Understand the social and historical contexts; and
 Become a discerning participant/observer in science, technology and environmental policy.
Grading:
30% overall participation
10% class group facilitation
60% essays
Class Format:
The course is structured in six modules of two class sessions, with an introductory session and two synthesis sessions in addition to the modules. Each module is centered on a single book which students will be asked to read in its entirety by the first session of the module. Students will be assigned to groups and asked to lead the discussion in the first session of each module. Students will write brief reflections on each book for the first session of each module.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54110/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kelle644_PA5715_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kelle644_PA5715_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2021  |  PA 5721 Section 001: Energy Systems and Policy (65707)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 08:15AM - 09:30AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (13 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Impact of energy production/consumption choices on environmental quality, sustainable development, and other economic/social goals. Emphasizes public policy choices for energy/environment, linkages between them.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?edwar369+PA5721+Spring2021
Class Description:
This class will give a broad overview of energy systems in modern society, the social and environmental implications of current technology choices, and the market and policy structures that govern energy production and use. Topics will include state and federal regulatory jurisdictions, utility business models, oil and gas markets, local government policy, electrification, renewable and distributed energy, and consumer end-use trends. The focus will largely be on the US domestic context, though some material will be dedicated to international case studies.

This class will provide a core understanding of the physical constraints that underlie modern energy systems,and the policy tools used to manage the social and environmental impacts of those systems. The first half of the course will be a survey of different energy systems, their environmental impact, and associated policy frameworks (e.g. different regulatory structures and jurisdictions). The second half will focus on cross cutting themes and case studies.

Learning Objectives:
1. Gain a working knowledge of the physical constraints that underlie energy systems and the life cycle environmental impact of different energy sources.

2.Understand the historical context for why and how different energy systems are regulated, and the major levers of policy change

3. Understand the different market forces at work that govern energy supply and demand

4. Consider how values of energy access and equity are represented in current policy

5. Understand how choices in scientific analysis (especially modeling) and the structure of stakeholder input impact policy outcomes

6. Gain experience in writing and critical thinking around energy issues to more effectively communicate with key decisionmakers

Grading:
Grading for this course will be based on class participation, four assignments throughout the semester, and an 8-10 minute final presentation. All assignments will be completed individually (no group projects) although collaboration is encouraged. Class participation will assess quality of individual contributions to the class discussion and completion of weekly readings.

The below grading breakdown is tentative and will be confirmed by the first day of instruction.

- 15% Class Participation

- 60% Four Homework Assignments (15% each)

- 25% Final Presentation
Exam Format:
No Exams
Class Format:
Lecture with class discussion

Workload:
The workload for this course will primarily be reading, writing, and in-class discussion. Readings will be assigned for every class. There will be one quantitative problem set, three short writing assignments, and a final presentation.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65707/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/edwar369_PA5721_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 June 2018

Spring 2021  |  PA 5731 Section 001: Emerging Sciences and Technologies: Policy, Ethics and Law (65773)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (5 of 30 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
This interdisciplinary course will examine issues at the nexus of public policy, ethics, law, and emerging sciences and technologies (ES&T) including nanotechnology, genetic and biomedical engineering, synthetic biology, and artificial intelligence. Topics we will explore include the role of science and technology as both a tool for and the subject of policy and law; the policy, ethical, economic, and legal implications of ES&T research and development; environmental and human health risk analysis and regulation (e.g., EPA, FDA, OSHA, and state and local regulatory mechanisms); intellectual property issues; liability issues; and global impacts. Topics will be approached from the perspective of different stakeholders (e.g., federal agencies, industry, academic researchers, the environment, international organizations, and the public) and in the context of different application areas (e.g., drugs, devices, food, agriculture, energy, environmental remediation) using a variety of interdisciplinary approaches. Students with a broad range of interests are encouraged to enroll.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pcalow+PA5731+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65773/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5741 Section 001: Risk, Resilience and Decision Making (54129)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (19 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Interplay between risk analysis, decision making, and policy in the context of new and emerging technologies, environmental and human well-being, risk and resilience. Assessment methods; risk management processes, issues and methods; role/treatment of uncertainty; factors in decision making; risk-based rule making; public values; risk communication and perception. Scientific, technical, social, political, and ethical issues. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pcalow+PA5741+Spring2021
Class Description:
Interplay between risk assessment, decision making, and policy in the context of new and emerging technologies, environmental and human well-being, risk and resilience. Assessment methods; risk management processes, issues and methods; role/treatment of uncertainty; factors in decision making; risk-based rule making; public values; risk communication and perception. Scientific, technical, social, political, and ethical issues. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
This course embraces how risk assessment informs policy development and decision-making in a cross-disciplinary way by addressing core natural science issues on technological impacts and core social science issues on public values and perceptions of risk. It will cover important issues related to risk assessment, risk perception and risk communication.
Grading:
Grading will involve a combination of aspects covering attendance, essays, a quiz and a critical review of risk laws.

One essay (Assignment 3 is a practice and Assignment 5 is the one that will be graded) - worth 25%.
Quiz session 7 worth 25%.
Risk law policy assessments (Assignment 8) worth 30% (10% for presentations and 20% for written policy assessment).
Overall attendance and involvement worth 20%.
Class Format:
Classes will involve lectures from the instructor and interactive sessions where class members will express views based on readings. Risk principles will be translated into practice when the class divides into groups to critically assess risk laws.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54129/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/pcalow_PA5741_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/pcalow_PA5741_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/pcalow_PA5741_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2018

Spring 2021  |  PA 5743 Section 001: Social Innovation Design Lab: Making Your Idea a Reality (54166)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
jr or sr or grad student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue 04:00PM - 05:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Do you have an idea for an organization, initiative or venture that that could address a social or environmental problem? This course is designed to help aspiring social entrepreneurs and changemakers from all disciplines develop a viable proposal for social change. Course content includes an introduction to human-centered design thinking, change management, leadership skills, non-profit and for-profit business models, and social entrepreneurship frameworks. At the end of the course, students present their project to a panel of experts. Students will be prepared to compete in the Acara Challenge for funding if interested. Students or teams interested in this course should apply by emailing a 1-page resume and project description (1 paragraph to 1 page) of your project/idea to acara@umn.edu. The essay should address your motivation for taking the course, along with describing your idea, where you are with developing it, and what you need to take it forward.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. The permission numbers may be obtained by emailing loyda@umn.edu. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?adavila+PA5743+Spring2021 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?loyda+PA5743+Spring2021
Class Description:
How do you want to change the world? What is your big idea to address a social or environmental problem? This hands-on course is designed to help aspiring changemakers develop a viable proposal for social change. Course content includes human-centered design, change management, leadership skills, business models, and social entrepreneurship frameworks. At the end of the course, you will present your project to a panel of experts. You will be prepared to compete in the Acara Challenge for funding. Students or teams interested in this course should apply by emailing a one-page resume to Tony Loyd at loyda@umn.edu. Also, include a one-page description of your project. The project description should include the problem you're solving, who has the problem, and your proposed solution. Also, please include your motivation for taking the course, where you are with developing your idea, and what you need to take it forward. Undergraduates interested in this topic should register for GCC 5501. If you are unable to take GCC 5501, please e-mail acara@umn.edu and ask for permission to join this course.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54166/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 October 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5751 Section 001: Addressing Climate and Energy Challenges at the Local Scale (65974)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
02/25/2021
Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-102
 
03/18/2021
Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-102
 
04/01/2021
Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-102
 
04/29/2021
Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-102
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
Enrollment Status:
Open (11 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Examine energy and climate innovations at local and community scales. Understand how to implement local policies, projects, and programs with a diverse set of perspectives on energy issues. Develop professional and analytical skills that support solutions to energy and climate challenges.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered as a BLENDED class. It will meet in person on 2/25, 3/18, 4/1, and 4/29. Other sessions will be Remote. Instructor will be new faculty member Elise Harrington. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?eliseh+PA5751+Spring2021
Class Description:

Why is action by local organizations, governments, and communities critical for energy innovation in the face of climate change? What policies, programs, and technical solutions are being explored at sub-national levels and how are they implemented? This course examines energy and climate innovations at community and local scales to prepare you (students) for professional work on climate change and energy issues at local and community levels - key areas of activity for careers in sustainability, environmental policy, climate change, and resilience.


Students in this course will apply concepts, theories, and analytical skills to case studies and client-focused projects. As communities face the varying challenges of climate change, this course examines both mitigation and adaptation responses to climate change and asks students to think both critically and practically about how to innovate and respond to these local risks. There are many dimensions to climate change, but this course focuses primarily on energy, including renewable energy integration, responses in the electricity sector to changing climate conditions (e.g. wildfires), and infrastructure change. Each week we will explore issues of local and community energy and climate action and engage (when possible) with those responsible for planning and implementing case study projects. Course content will draw from policy instruments and programs (e.g. community choice aggregation, community solar, solarize), local and regional initiatives (e.g. green training programs, resilience hubs), local governments programs or policies (e.g. utility-municipal partnerships, benchmarking, and efficiency standards), and skills for working across diverse perspectives and positions on energy issues.


Assignments will include a client-based project focused on climate planning and local energy policy, developing a role play scenario, personal reflections, and response papers.

Class Format:
Note: In person days are tentative depending on COVID but included as days for role play scenario activities and a final class discussion
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65974/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2020

Spring 2021  |  PA 5761 Section 001: Environmental Systems Analysis at the Food-Energy-Water Nexus (65810)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (21 of 24 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Agricultural lands, water resources, and energy production and transport are interconnected systems with implications for policy and management at local to global scales. This course will explore contemporary issues at the nexus of food, energy, and water with a focus on Midwestern landscapes. Specific topics include farm policy, permitting of pipelines and energy production, mitigation of air and water pollution, and strategies to incentivize the conservation and restoration of landscapes. Students will develop professional skills in systems thinking, scenario analysis, science communication, facilitation, and collective leadership.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hende203+PA5761+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65810/1213

Spring 2021  |  PA 5814 Section 001: Global Diplomacy in a Time of Change (54150)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (7 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Taught by the Humphrey School's diplomat in residence, this course examines the changing world of twenty-first century global diplomacy and how state and nonstate actors are challenging the status quo. We look at the dynamics behind major international developments - with case studies including BREXIT, the Iran Agreement, climate negotiations, and China's global initiatives - placed in the context of an examination of how states operate in the international diplomatic sphere and how multilateral organizations enhance or challenge the concept of state sovereignty. Students gain knowledge about the complexities of diplomacy and negotiation through readings, classroom discussions, and guest speakers and develop professional skills through writing and presentation assignments.
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mtcurtin+PA5814+Spring2021
Class Description:

This course will examine the theory, practice and profession of twenty-first century diplomacy in bilateral and multilateral environments. While the successful negotiation in 2015 of the Iran nuclear deal and the Paris climate agreement drew more attention to how nations large and small use diplomacy to advance their interests, political shifts ranging from the 2016 U.S. elections to Brexit to Russian actions have raised questions about how nations and non-state actors engage one another to achieve their goals in a complex world. In addition, while international organizations, including the United Nations, and regional organizations, such as the European Union, the Organization of American States, and the African Union, have become not just venues for multilateral diplomacy, but also diplomatic players in their own right, seeking to negotiate resolutions to regional problems, their functioning is being challenged by resurgent nationalism.


During the course of the semester, we will examine the history of diplomacy, and its norms and practices, including its international legal bases, and how modern technology and changing cultural norms have impacted the way that diplomats operate. Through readings, classroom discussions and simulations, students will come to understand the ways in which major powers, and medium and small states use bilateral and multilateral diplomacy to achieve their own goals and work with friends and allies to achieve regional and global objectives. Students will also examine the way in which nations come together in formal and informal blocs to advance regional goals, and look at how non-state actors operate in the diplomatic sphere to achieve their objectives, and at how governments and non-governmental organizations seek to resolve conflicts through Track II processes.

Grading:

Students will be graded on an A-F basis. Grading will be as follows:

  • 30%--Overall Class participation--Students are expected to attend all classes unless excused, to complete all the readings, and to be prepared to participate in the classroom discussion. Students will be separately graded on classroom simulation exercises. Students will be assigned once during the semester to present one of the readings in a ten minute briefing. There will be a sign up sheet for this.

  • 10%--Short (400-600) word diplomatic report from an embassy to a home government foreign ministry (or State Department) on an issue, summarizing events, the implication of those events for the home country, and recommendations on next moves or how to react.

  • 15%--Group Negotiating Exercise: Students will identify the specific issues to be negotiated, decide on tactics, and then negotiate a solution with the help of the mediator. In the final session, the group will present a briefing (with visual slides) showing the results of the negotiation.

  • 15%--UN Security Council Simulation: Students will be assigned a role to play in a mock UN Security Council or other multilateral meeting that addresses and seeks agreement on a critical issue.

  • 30%--A final 2,500-3,000 word research paper on an assigned topic.
  • Class Format:
    Combined lecture and discussions, with students expected to attend and actively participate in discussions and debates based on assigned reading and familiarity with relevant international events; two negotiation exercises in which students will role play; occasional virtual or in person class visits by professionals in the field.
    Workload:
    Readings 50-100 pages per session, plus assignments detailed above.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54150/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/mtcurtin_PA5814_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    27 November 2018

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5823 Section 001: Managing Humanitarian and Refugee Crises: Challenges for Policymakers & Practitioners (54170)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    03/19/2021
    Fri 03:00PM - 08:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    03/20/2021
    Sat 08:00AM - 04:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (19 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Examines response of governments, international organizations, NGOs, and others to global humanitarian and human rights challenges posed by civil conflict and other complex emergencies in places such as Syria, the Middle East region, South Sudan, Somalia, Burma, and elsewhere. Course will also consider and assess UN and other institutions established to address these issues (like UNOCHA and UNHCR). In addition, course will examine US policy toward humanitarian issues and refugees (including US refugee admissions).
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?eschwart+PA5823+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Former Humphrey School Dean Eric Schwartz will be teaching this course. He is now President of Refugees International in Washington, DC. Before serving as Dean of the Humphrey School from 2011 to 2017, Professor Schwartz served in the White House and the State Department in the Clinton and Obama Administrations, as well as the United Nations and with Human Rights Watch.

    This is a one credit course that will meet on Friday, March 19, 2021 from 3 pm to 8 pm, and on Saturday, March 20, 2021, from 8 am to 4 pm.

    Whether in Burma (Myanmar), Syria, Iraq, Somalia, South Sudan or the countries of Central America, repression, human rights abuses, civil conflict and complex emergencies, which principally impact populations in the global south, pose compelling challenges to the capacities of governments, NGOs and international organizations to prevent and alleviate suffering and promote recovery. This course, which will involve lecture, guest lecture from practitioners and policy-makers (including refugees who are working in the field), and class discussion, will examine the efforts of governments, international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and others to respond to humanitarian, recovery and reconstruction challenges posed by persecution, human rights abuses, civil conflict and complex emergencies.

    The course will also examine the role and institutions of the United States government--in terms of its practices and policies involving overseas humanitarian assistance, U.S. refugee admissions, and asylum in the United State. We will also consider the implications of the advent of the U.S. presidential administration that will have assumed office on January 20, 2021.

    This one-credit course will take a broad and integrated approach, designed to give students a wide understanding of the lay of the humanitarian land and the questions with which advocates, policy makers and policy practitioners grapple.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Students interests in human rights, refugees, asylum in the United States, international humanitarian response, multilateral humanitarian organizations and U.S. foreign policy
    Learning Objectives:
    Students will gain a broad understanding of the policy issues that are involved in international refugee and humanitarian response - an understanding that will integrate concepts from a range of fields - as well as knowledge of the key international and U.S. institutions that define and impact policy and practice in this area. Students will also develop an appreciation of key dilemmas faced by policy-makers and practitioners involved in response to humanitarian crises, challenges to achieving policy and operational objectives, and strategies for success. We will also consider U.S. domestic issues involving refugee protection, including the U.S. refugee admissions program and asylum in the United States.

    Grading:
    NOTE: THIS COURSE IS GIVEN ON MARCH 29-30. The updated syllabus and assignments will be available by or before January 15.

    TO BE COMPLETED BEFORE CLASS
    (These may be subject to slight but not significant modification.)
    33% -- a short paper responding to about 12 assigned questions drawn from the readings for the course. Each response in this paper should be about two paragraphs, and the exercise is designed to ensure students have considered the readings carefully before the two class sessions. There will be about 10-15 hours of readings, in total, for the course.

    TO BE COMPLETED DURING THE CLASS
    33% -- class participation, possibly to include participation in a short in-class presentation (5-10 minutes) developed during the course of the two days of class.

    TO BE COMPLETED AFTER CLASS (DUE BY OR BEFORE MARCH 4)
    33% -- a 2-3 page thought paper on a humanitarian policy of your choice, with your perspectives drawn from information learned in class.
    Exam Format:
    No exam
    Class Format:
    Combination of lecture, guest lecture and class discussion.
    Workload:
    Workload outside of class will include --
    1. A short paper on the assigned readings.
    2. A 2-3 page paper on a humanitarian policy issue of your choosing, in which you offer your perspectives and integrate information learned in class.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54170/1213
    Syllabus:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5823_Spring2021.pdf
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5823_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5823_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5823_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eschwart_PA5823_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    6 November 2020

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5825 Section 001: Crisis Management in Foreign Affairs (54173)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/21/2021
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-102
     
    02/04/2021
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-102
     
    02/18/2021
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-102
     
    03/04/2021
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-102
     
    03/18/2021
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-102
     
    04/01/2021
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-102
     
    04/15/2021
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-102
     
    04/29/2021
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-102
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (10 of 25 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Crisis decision making in foreign policy. Examination of the organization and structure of crisis decision-making within U.S. national security apparatus. Analysis of in-depth four foreign policy crises (Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam Tet, Iraq, and a current crisis). Crisis simulation with students in the role of national security leaders.
    Class Notes:
    Meets In Person on alternating Thursdays. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?andre104+PA5825+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    ·
    This course will analyze crisis decision making in foreign policy. Students will:

    o Examine the organization and structure of crisis decision-making within the U.S. national security apparatus;

    o Analyze in depth four foreign policy crises: the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962); Vietnam - Tet (1968); Iraq (2006-2008) and a Current Events Crisis (2016).

    o Put themselves in the position of national security leaders as part of a crisis simulation; and

    o Write an analysis of a historical foreign policy crisis.


    Four books will be required for this course and will be available through the UM Bookstores:

    o Allison, Graham T., and Zelikow, Philip D., "Essence of Decision: Explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis" (2nd edition), Pearson Longman (January 1999).

    o Stern, Sheldon M., "The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis (Stanford Nuclear Age Series)" (Paperback) Stanford University Press (January 18, 2005).

    o McMaster, H.R., "Dereliction of Duty," Harper Perennial; Reprint Edition (Paperback), (May 8, 1998).

    o Harris, David, "The Crisis: The President, the Prophet, and the Shah - 1979 and the Coming of Militant Islam," Little, Brown and Company (Paperback) (2004).

    Grading:
    Grades will be based on oral participation and a written foreign policy crisis analysis.

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54173/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/andre104_PA5825_Spring2020.docx (Spring 2020)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/andre104_PA5825_Spring2018.docx (Spring 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/andre104_PA5825_Spring2017.docx (Spring 2017)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    21 February 2018

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5887 Section 001: Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar II (54149)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA 5886
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021
    Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
     
    02/02/2021
    Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
     
    02/16/2021
    Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
     
    03/02/2021
    Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
     
    03/16/2021
    Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
     
    03/30/2021
    Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
     
    04/13/2021
    Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
     
    04/27/2021
    Tue 02:30PM - 04:25PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (18 of 21 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    The Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar is a required course for all first-year MHR students. The course is intended to create a cohort group and ensure that all MHR students have an opportunity to work together to explore current issues related to human rights practice, focusing on emerging events or crises, and debates over policy, practice, or theory and for direct contact with and networking particularly with counterparts in the Global South. This course is in a series with, and taken after, PA 5886.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walsh912+PA5887+Spring2021
    Class Description:

    The Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar provides a space for students to:


    • Build relationships with each other, and connect with members of past MHR cohorts;

    • Prepare in practical ways for human rights internships and careers;

    • Reflect on your purpose and values as human rights professionals;

    • Focus on racial justice and apply an anti-racist lens to human rights work and studies; and

    • Connect with and learn from human rights advocates, especially those in the Twin Cities.

    Class Format:
    Hy-Flex
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54149/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    6 November 2020

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5890 Section 001: Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs -- Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights (65502)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (15 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (5 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Selected topics.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?WALSH912+PA5890+Spring2021
    Class Description:

    This is a 3-credit course that meets for the full semester.


    This course will familiarize you with core principles and techniques for human rights fact-finding, focusing especially on interview skills. You will learn what fact-finding is and how it is used to advance human rights. You'll also learn how to plan and prepare for fact-finding; coordinate with partners and others; navigate security challenges; conduct interviews with survivors, witnesses, officials, and others; conduct remote interviews; minimize the risk of retraumatization and vicarious trauma; and adapt fact-finding interview approaches for challenging contexts (e.g., emergency or conflict settings, detention facilities, or refugee camps). Readings, discussions and exercises will address specific considerations when interviewing LGBTQI survivors, children, people with disabilities, older people, and other groups.


    You will practice interview techniques through many in-class role play simulations. Students in this course should be comfortable with role-plays as a learning method.


    While there are many possible approaches to fact-finding, this course will focus heavily on one-on-one interviews. We will touch briefly on other forms of fact-finding, including through the use of various technologies.


    The course will draw heavily on my experience conducting fact-finding interviews and training staff at Human Rights Watch. Bear in mind that this is just one of many approaches to investigating the realization or denial of human rights.


    This elective course should be considered a supplement to other courses on research methods, not a replacement. I strongly encourage students to take courses on qualitative research methods and social science perspectives on human rights. The approach taught in this course is more like investigative journalism paired with advocacy than like social science research.

    Who Should Take This Class?:

    Graduate Students

    This course qualifies as an elective for the Master of Human Rights and the Human Rights Graduate Minor at the U.

    Learning Objectives:

    Through this course, you will understand what fact-finding is, and how it is used in the human rights field. More specifically, you will have developed skills and knowledge that will enable you to:

    • Adhere to core standards and ethical considerations for human rights interviews

    • Interview survivors of human rights abuses, and understand best practices for interviewing specific populations

    • Interview government officials

    • Navigate remote interviews

    • Assess and handle security risks for interviews

    • Obtain data and information from official sources

    • Understand and mitigate risks of retraumatization and vicarious trauma

    Grading:
    Grades are based on class participation and on written and verbal assignments and exercises. Grade basis can be A-F or S/N.
    Exam Format:

    No exams. Assignments will be practical, aimed at developing skills for planning and executing fact-finding.

    Class Format:

    Seminar style. Remote instruction with synchronous and some asynchronous sessions.

    Workload:

    Comparable to other graduate courses.

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65502/1213
    Syllabus:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/walsh912_PA5890_Spring2021.pdf
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/walsh912_PA5890_Fall2020.pdf (Fall 2020)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    13 November 2020

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5890 Section 002: Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs -- Politics & Law of Conflict Mgmt & Intervention (66484)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (15 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (12 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Selected topics.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be REMOTE. Lectures will be delivered synchronously and asynchronously throughout the semester. Both lectures in Week 1 (January 19 and January 21, 2021) will be SYNCHRONOUS. A schedule that shows whether sessions are synchronous or asynchronous will be provided to students. Full title: "Politics & Law of Conflict Mgmt & Intervention." Some knowledge of international relations will be useful as a basis for this course. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mukho017+PA5890+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    This course will invite students to consider the ways in which politics and law inform, undermine, and bypass one another in the realm of conflict management and military intervention. We will draw from a rich set of cases across time and space to examine the notion of "threats to peace and security" as it has evolved. We will, then, turn to the basket of instruments that make up contemporary intervention and conflict-management, starting with prevention and the right to exercise self-defense. We will, then, move into the space of military interventions that have been framed (both strictly and loosely) as means of keeping or restoring the peace. From here, we will enter the arena of more aggressive interventions, those that aim at the breaking, making, or remaking of states. Finally, we will consider the newest frontiers of intervention, those that have been charted in the last decade. Shadowy threats and elusive enemies have led to a variety of new, often controversial campaigns. New kinds of technology that could only have been imagined a few decades ago have made possible unprecedented forms of stealth and interference. And, yet, some of the world's most powerful states find themselves struggling on and off the battlefield. This is the conundrum we will consider in this final section of the course. Even as we consider the politics and geopolitics at hand, we will situate our empirical analysis of each case and/or phenomenon within the larger context of key legal doctrines, debates, and dilemmas. Unlike other survey courses on conflict management, we will not approach the material as a chronological catalog of interventions. Instead, we will engage the material thematically, juxtaposing more contemporary cases with historical ones in order to understand the various evolutions in political, legal, and operational thought.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66484/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 November 2020

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5920 Section 001: Skills Workshop -- Stakeholder Analysis Tools (66189)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    0.5 Credits (48 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    02/27/2021
    Sat 08:00AM - 05:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (11 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Topics on public policy or planning skills. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jacob818+PA5920+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66189/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jacob818_PA5927_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jacob818_PA5920_Spring2016.docx (Spring 2016)

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5920 Section 002: Skills Workshop -- Tribal-State Relations Workshop (66524)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    0.5 Credits (48 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    01/30/2021
    Sat 08:30AM - 05:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    02/20/2021
    Sat 08:30AM - 05:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (23 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Topics on public policy or planning skills. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
    Class Notes:
    Remote instruction (synchronous sessions via Zoom, asynchronous assignments via Canvas). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jkb+PA5920+Spring2021 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?taddjohn+PA5920+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Minnesota is home to 11 sovereign Indian nations and c120,000 American Indian people. Tribes are among the top 20 employers in the state, and tribal jurisdiction impacts thousands of acres of land in Minnesota both within and beyond reservation boundaries. While tribes share prominent nation-to-nation diplomatic relationships with the U.S. federal government, tribal relationships with state agencies are increasingly significant. Since the administration of Governor Jesse Ventura, each Minnesota governor has implemented an executive order focused on state relations with Indian nations. Under current Governor Tim Walz, Executive Order 19-24 provides a considerable mandate for state agencies to develop and implement tribal consultation policies and to build associated partnerships.

    This half-credit workshop will introduce participants to the legal and policy contexts in which contemporary tribal-state relations occur. We will explore the shifting history of federal Indian policy, the often contentious past of tribal-state interactions, current emphases on building government-to-government relationships, and potential future trends. Participants will consider how their own civic and professional trajectories may connect to Indian nations, and we will collaboratively draw conceptual and practical links between tribal affairs and other areas of study in the Humphrey School.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66524/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    15 April 2020

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5926 Section 001: Presentation Skills: How to Inspire Your Audience and Change the World (54155)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit (2 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
    Thu 05:30PM - 07:10PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (8 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Learn techniques for making effective, persuasive presentations to different kinds of audiences. Practice is essential to improve speaking skills and reduce anxiety. Students practice by recording brief weekly presentations and making class presentations in a supportive environment. Techniques for using Powerpoint to create effective slides are practiced. Course components include presentation assignments; peer reviews; readings/videos and reflections; and class participation. May be repeated once.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?fandrey+PA5926+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Please see syllabus: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1VHS-G5aENGoz3yUsCYq_5kQXs-3Na8W0UAiqpNr72gs/edit#heading=h.6s07iudyh5ty
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54155/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    3 November 2019

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5926 Section 002: Presentation Skills: How to Inspire Your Audience and Change the World (54156)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit (2 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021
    Tue 04:00PM - 05:40PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    02/02/2021
    Tue 04:00PM - 05:40PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    02/16/2021
    Tue 04:00PM - 05:40PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    03/02/2021
    Tue 04:00PM - 05:40PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    03/16/2021
    Tue 04:00PM - 05:40PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    03/30/2021
    Tue 04:00PM - 05:40PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    04/13/2021
    Tue 04:00PM - 05:40PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    04/27/2021
    Tue 04:00PM - 05:40PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (1 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Learn techniques for making effective, persuasive presentations to different kinds of audiences. Practice is essential to improve speaking skills and reduce anxiety. Students practice by recording brief weekly presentations and making class presentations in a supportive environment. Techniques for using Powerpoint to create effective slides are practiced. Course components include presentation assignments; peer reviews; readings/videos and reflections; and class participation. May be repeated once.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dlevison+PA5926+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Professor Deborah Levison is an experienced teacher (10 teaching awards); she creates a welcoming, non-threatening class environment for practicing presentation skills.

    Participants learn techniques for making effective, persuasive presentations to different kinds of audiences. They record themselves doing a short (2-10 minute) presentation every week; sometimes they also give this presentation in class. This practice is essential to overcome anxiety about public speaking. Participants use PowerPoint software to create effective slides. There are no tests. Grading is mainly check (did it), check-minus (problems/minimal effort) or zero; it is easy to get an A by completing all assignments. Students are graded on completing presentation assignments, readings/videos, reflections and peer reviews, and class participation. Attendance at each class is required. Students may take this 7-week class once or twice. Twice is recommended for presenters with speaking anxiety. Graduate students from different colleges and UM staff are welcome. Advanced students, given the opportunity to produce a group presentation on a topic of their choice, chose the following topic to encourage their colleagues.

    WATCH THIS VIDEO!
    Grading:
    15% Reflection Papers
    50% In-class Presentations
    10% Class Participation
    25% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: 25% - feedback to other students
    Exam Format:
    No exams.
    Class Format:
    10% Lecture
    40% Discussion
    50% Student Presentations
    Workload:
    20-70 Pages Reading Per Week
    12 Pages Writing Per Term
    6 Presentation(s)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54156/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dlevison_PA5926_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    19 August 2016

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5927 Section 001: Effective Grantwriting for Nonprofit Organizations (54181)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Wed 05:45PM - 08:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (19 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Grantwriting skills, processes, problem,s and resources for nonprofit organizations. Researching and seeking grants. Communication with potential funders and generating financial support. Collaborating effectively with the organization and clients to create substantive, fundable proposals.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mitc0432+PA5927+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54181/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5928 Section 001: Data Management and Visualization with R (65618)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/MS-STEP/MURP/Ph.D.-Public Affairs
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (11 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to R Studio software. Use of R Studio to carry out R file and related database management functions. Tools and techniques for data analysis and statistical programming in quantitative research or related applied areas. Topics include data selection, data manipulation, and data and spatial visualization (including charts, plots, histograms, maps, and other graphs). Prerequisite knowledge: Introductory statistics; ability to create bar graphs, line graphs, and scatter plots in MS Excel; and familiarity with principles of data visualization.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?taotao+PA5928+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    This course is intended for students who are looking to improve their data analysis (including data management and visualization) skills with R programming language. The emphasis of the course will be on learning tools and techniques which are useful to students who will be doing data analysis and/or statistical programming in quantitative research or related applied areas.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Use R Studio to carry out R file and related database management

    2. Use R to work with different types of databases and conduct basic data management

    3. Use R to visualize data with different types of plots

    Class Format:
    Meets once a week for ten weeks of the semester. About half of the class time is spent in lecture and the remaining for doing in-class exercise.

    Workload:
    An in-class exercise will be assigned during each class for the students to practice what they have learned (each exercise is worth 6% of final grade);
    Students will use the knowledge from this course to complete a final project (data analysis for an interested research question and write a short report which is no more than five pages about it, 30% of final grade).
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65618/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/taotao_PA5928_Fall2019.docx (Fall 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    6 June 2019

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5929 Section 001: Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers (54152)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    02/06/2021
    Sat 10:00AM - 01:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (29 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Tools for communicating quantitative information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way. Topics covered include 1) writing and speaking about data; 2) data management in Excel in order to prepare data for charting; 3) understanding and ability to deploy core concepts in of design, layout, typography and color to maximize the impact of their data visualizations 4) determining which types of statistical measures are most effective for each type of data and message; 5) determining which types of design to use for communicating quantitative information; and 6) designing graphs and tables that are intelligent and compelling for communicating quantitative information.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dorelien+PA5929+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    The class will have a practical approach, combining discussion and practical exercises. The course is designed to be like a walk-through, starting from collecting and organizing data and ending with advanced graph designs.

    The course in the spring will use Excel and Tableau. There will be additional modules available for more advance Excel users and those who want to go beyond the basics in Tableau. I will not teach R as part of the class but will make available the R modules and handouts for students that are interested in learning R.
    Learning Objectives:
    Learn to make better tables- see example below
    ClearOffTheTableMd
    Learn to make better figures
    Grading:
    Please note that it is possible to audit the course or take the course S/N. I encourage students that are already taking a full load of classes to sign up for this class S/N, that way you can focus on learning the material and not on the letter grade.

    4 Problem Sets (each problem set is worth 15% of final grade). The problem sets will be due one week after being assigned and will need to be uploaded to Moodle before the start of class.
    1 Final Report (30% of final grade)
    Class Format:
    Meets twice a week for first half the semester. The majority of class time is spent doing in-class exercises.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54152/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA5929_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    9 November 2020

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5929 Section 002: Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers (54163)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    03/27/2021
    Sat 10:00AM - 01:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (21 of 25 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Tools for communicating quantitative information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way. Topics covered include 1) writing and speaking about data; 2) data management in Excel in order to prepare data for charting; 3) understanding and ability to deploy core concepts in of design, layout, typography and color to maximize the impact of their data visualizations 4) determining which types of statistical measures are most effective for each type of data and message; 5) determining which types of design to use for communicating quantitative information; and 6) designing graphs and tables that are intelligent and compelling for communicating quantitative information.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dorelien+PA5929+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    The class will have a practical approach, combining discussion and practical exercises. The course is designed to be like a walk-through, starting from collecting and organizing data and ending with advanced graph designs.

    The course in the spring will use Excel and Tableau. There will be additional modules available for more advance Excel users and those who want to go beyond the basics in Tableau. I will not teach R as part of the class but will make available the R modules and handouts for students that are interested in learning R.
    Learning Objectives:
    Learn to make better tables- see example below
    ClearOffTheTableMd
    Learn to make better figures
    Grading:
    Please note that it is possible to audit the course or take the course S/N. I encourage students that are already taking a full load of classes to sign up for this class S/N, that way you can focus on learning the material and not on the letter grade.

    4 Problem Sets (each problem set is worth 15% of final grade). The problem sets will be due one week after being assigned and will need to be uploaded to Moodle before the start of class.
    1 Final Report (30% of final grade)
    Class Format:
    Meets twice a week for first half the semester. The majority of class time is spent doing in-class exercises.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54163/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/dorelien_PA5929_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    9 November 2020

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5951 Section 001: Humphrey Fellows Global Commons Seminar (66324)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Humphrey Institute Fellow
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Tue, Thu 09:00AM - 12:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-105
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 14 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This seminar will introduce Humphrey International Fellows to the public policy, law, and human rights landscape of Minnesota and provide opportunities for professional growth and development in accordance with the goals of the Hubert H. Humphrey International Fellows Program. Through a series of lectures, presentations, trainings and site visits, fellows will be exposed to professional development opportunities, skill building, cultural education, leadership training and networking opportunities. Fellows will also have the opportunity to hear from experts in their fields of expertise, and learn best practices and strategies in public policy, law, and human rights advocacy.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?aowusuba+PA5951+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66324/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5962 Section 001: State Governing and Legislating: Working the Process (54179)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (8 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    The Minnesota Capitol and rules and reality of state governance and legislating. Classroom discussions, high-profile guest speakers (including legislators, lobbyists and potentially the governor), and an extensive State Capitol practicum to explore state politics and policies.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Some sessions may meet In Person if it seems prudent to do so. A practicum in Spring 2021 is part of the course requirements. Students must contact the instructor, Briana Bierschbach, at brianabierschbach@gmail.com by December 14, 2020 to obtain a permission number and to arrange a practicum. More info at http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bier0136+PA5962+Spring2021
    Class Description:

    Using the Minnesota Capitol as our laboratory, this course will dive into the rules and reality of state governance and legislating. The course will include classroom discussions, guest speakers and a significant State Capitol practicum to give you a deep look into state politics and policies.

    This is a praxis-oriented course, not a theoretical course. You are expected to be active learners, absorbing readings, lectures, guest speakers' talks and your practicums to become equipped to understand and operate within the state decision-making process.

    The goal of this class: If you participate fully and complete this course, by the end, you should be prepared to approach a job or issue in state government with an understanding of the role you can play and the roles of those around you.

    Briana Bierschbach is a veteran Minnesota political reporter who covers politics for the Star-Tribune. She has also worked for Minnesota Public Radio. She has covered state politics and campaigns for nearly a decade with publications like the Associated Press, Politics in Minnesota and MinnPost. She's been twice named one of the top political journalists in Minnesota by the Washington Post and was the Society of Professional Journalists' 2015 Young Journalist of the Year.

    Note: A practicum in Spring 2020 is part of the course requirements. Students must contact the instructor, Briana Bierschbach, at bier0136@umn.edu by December 14, 2019 to obtain a permission number and to arrange a practicum. More info at http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bier0136+PA5962+Spring2020


    Learning Objectives:
    ● Identify and analyze the pressures on state government and individuals in state government.

    ● Explore the real world relationship between elected officials, lobbyists, interests groups, voters and the public.

    ● Gain the ability to interact with powerful decision-makers, by listening with respect and questioning with authority.

    ● Improve public speaking skills through practice.

    ● Develop the tools to build relationships within state government and have a network of resources to tap.

    Grading:
    Final paper - 30%

    Practicum - 30%

    Class participation -- 16%

    Other assignments -- 12%

    Question memos -- 12%

    There is no extra credit in this class.


    A = 100% - 90%

    B = 89% - 79%

    C = 78% - 69%

    D = 68% - 59%

    F = less than 59%

    Exam Format:
    No exams
    Class Format:
    Discussions/guest speakers
    Workload:
    8 hours per week practicum at the Capitol

    Three monthly reports from the practicum

    Weekly question memos/short readings to prepare for speakers

    Active participation in class

    Final project on issue/bill and mid-semester memo outlining project

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54179/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bier0136_PA5962_Spring2019.docx (Spring 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    30 December 2019

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5972 Section 001: Elections and the Law (54146)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Pre-Covid
    Meets With:
    PA 3972 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (3 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Theories and basic structure of the American legal system. Experience with basic tools and skills for using the law to understand and analyze issues facing election administrators across the nation. Use of election-related and non-election related materials to prepare election administrators for interacting with counsel, legislators and the courts in carrying out their responsibilities.
    Class Notes:
    Synchronous sessions will be required and will be added once the dates are finalized. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?choat024+PA5972+Spring2020
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54146/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5973 Section 001: Strategic Management of Election Administration (54205)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Pre-Covid
    Meets With:
    MGMT 6035 Section 050
    PA 3973 Section 001
    LAW 6626 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (4 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Strategic management for election administrators in the political environment. Election official tools and challenges. The role of the lawmaking process in budgeting and organizational planning.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ljacobs+PA5973+Spring2020
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54205/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5975 Section 001: Election Design (66187)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Meets With:
    PA 3975 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (4 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Election administration design principles, including ballot and polling place design and poll worker training materials. Application of principles of field.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wquesenb+PA5975+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    An innovative course on design principles and their application to the election administration field (2.0 credits). At the end of this course, students will be able to:
    ● Identify good and bad design in election materials and use that knowledge to review materials or provide input to people creating election materials.
    ● Practice basic election design including plain language, layout, and design as applied to common election materials such as voter information, how-to- vote instructions, poll worker and candidate manuals, forms, and ballots.
    ● Apply design principles to real election materials within typical time, financial, and legislative constraints.
    ● Evaluate the usability of election materials for voters and other users, using a variety of techniques.

    Why take this course?

    1. Every election official is really an election designer. Every time you write a notice, share news on social media, or update a form, you are designing. This course will help you be a more intentional designer and communicate more clearly. It's a good career move.

    2. It's practical.
    There are no papers to write. No long journal articles to read. The entire course is structured around practical exercises based in real problems in election administration. We encourage students to work on materials from their own experience, and to collaborate with others.

    ● If you are already working in an election department, you can get a jump start on improving the design of anything (or everything) in your office.
    ● If you want to work in an election department, you'll leave the course with a portfolio that will make your resume shine.
    ● If you are a designer who wants to know more about election design, you'll leave with a strong understanding of the constraints and opportunities - knowledge you can put to use in any civic design project.

    3. You'll learn with and from others.
    Remote learning doesn't have be lonely. We encourage positive sharing, learning from others, and collaboration. All the class materials are online, and so is our class discussion, so you can be part of the class community no matter what time zone you live in.

    4. Usability testing!
    Admit it. You love the idea, but have never been able to give it a try. We spend 2 units to get you started, supporting you all the way. Gathering input from users (voters, candidates, and others) is part of all the assignments, so you'll have plenty of chances to build your skills. You'll leave the course with confidence because you'll get guidance and practice. You'll be a usability testing champ.

    5. Teachers you can talk to.
    You'll have two super-experienced election designers (that's us) teaching the course and leading you through the material, with feedback every week. The topics and materials are drawn from our years of work in commercial user experience and election design in dozens of states, with plenty of examples. We love teaching. We also love learning from our students.

    Course outline
    Week 1: Election design and the voter journey
    Week 2-3: Plain language and writing instructions
    Weeks 4-5: Introduction to usability testing
    Week 6: Accessibility
    Week 7: Course project: select your project
    Week 8: Designing election department websites
    Week 9: Election guides and voter education
    Week 10: Creating forms and legal notices
    Week 11: Designing ballots and polling places
    Week 12: Communicating with voters
    Weeks 13-15: Course project: revise, test, revise
    Week 16: Course wrap up

    Grading:
    ● Participation in class discussions contribute to 30% of your final grade
    ● Written Assignments contribute to 40% of your final grade
    ● The final Election Design course project, including a VoiceThread presentation and peer feedback video discussion contributes to 30% of your final grade.

    Exam Format:
    There is no exam
    Class Format:
    This is an online course, with regular support from your instructors. Each module includes background reading, thoughtful self-directed exercises, and an assignment. There is a forum to discuss your work with instructors and fellow students - and collaboration is encourage.
    Workload:
    There are readings and assignments each week, so the work in this course requires steady participation. There are also project weeks, when you can catch up (or get ahead).
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66187/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/wquesenb_dchisnel_PA3975_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/wquesenb_dchisnel_PA5975_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    16 November 2017

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5976 Section 001: Voter Participation (54214)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Pre-Covid
    Meets With:
    BIOC 8401 Section 001
    GCD 8401 Section 001
    PA 3976 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    03/09/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (7 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Voter participation issues and challenges including historical survey of voter participation in US and methods to increase voter turnout.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?aochoa+PA5976+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54214/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5984 Section 001: Elections Security: How to Protect America's Elections (66464)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Pre-Covid
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Meets With:
    PA 3984 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (1 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    "Elections Security" uses the Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election as a case study to identify the vulnerabilities of US elections (especially state voter registration databases) as well as catalogue new protections. Readings and discussion will focus on best practices and technology options available to the public (social media) and elections professionals (cybersecurity) in guarding against future influence efforts and assuring public confidence in election outcomes. Special focus will be given to describing how local election officials can protect their election technology, most notably those vulnerabilities associated with their voting system and voter registration database. "Elections Security" will draw heavily on concrete cases and challenges facing election professionals, using government and independent reports and an indepth analysis of new resources created by the US Department of Homeland Security and its collaborations with election professionals.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5984+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66464/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 5990 Section 001: Topics: Public Affairs - General Topics -- Crisis Management in Today's Media (65621)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (18 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Carlson School of Management 1-147
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (3 of 19 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    General topics in public policy.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?koch0098+PA5990+Spring2021 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jmorillo+PA5990+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    This course explores the dynamics of public crisis in all; political, corporate, and private citizens becoming public. It will focus on six cases (two of which, the instructors played a central role), defining each crisis, examining media coverage, dissecting response and outcomes. At the end of the course, students will be able to critically evaluate a crisis situation and respond effectively.
    About the instructors:

    Amy Koch is the former Minnesota Senate Republican Majority Leader, the first woman of any party to hold the position of Leader. Under her leadership, Republicans shocked the Minnesota political establishment by winning control of the state Senate for the first time in 40 years. Since leaving elected office, Koch has been a small business owner, a political consultant and lobbyist at the Capitol. She appears regularly as a conservative political commentator on local television and radio shows, and is one o f the co-hosts of the premier podcast of Minnesota politics,
    "Wrong About Everything," a fun irreverent and bipartisan look at Minnesota and national politics.

    Javier Morillo-Alicea is the ​ president of Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 26, which unites close to 6,000 property service workers in the Twin Cities metro area. He is also recognized in Minnesota as a political strategist who has worked on multiple candidate and issue campaigns. A progressive opinion leader in Minnesota, he is a regular political commentator on public broadcasting's political talk show "Almanac" as well as ABC's local affiliate Sunday morning show, "At Issue." He is the creator and co-host of the weekly podcast "Wrong About Everything."
    Learning Objectives:
    1. Students will learn to recognize, dissect and take action steps to defuse a crisis, using real world examples to imagine alternative scenarios for how various public relations crises could have been handled by actors involved.
    2. Students will learn how to create or utilize a scandal to drive action, and how to develop protocols to guard against a crisis.
    3. Future leaders in the non-profit, public or private business sector will benefit from exposure to professionals in the field of crisis management, in the form of the two instructors as well as invited guests.
    Grading:
    Students will be graded on two projects: 1. In groups, students will be assigned hypothetical crisis management scenarios, prepare a presentation on how they would handle it and then stage a mock press conference where local reporters pepper spokespeople with questions. 2. A final paper on a real public scandal. The paper should include a timeline of events, complete analysis of the response and outcomes, and present alternative scenarios for the crisis might have been handled.
    Workload:
    Course readings:
    So You've Been Publicly Shamed. Jon Ronson, 2015.

    Case studies:
    - National Political Scandal: Anthony Weiner, U.S. Congressman, NYC Mayoral Candidate, 2011-2016
    - Private Citizen Turns Public: Walter Palmer/Cecil the Lion, 2015
    - #Pointergate and the People of the Internet: Tracking a crisis from multiple angles and in real time, via social media
    - Creating/Utilizing a Crisis: ACORN 2009/Planned Parenthood 2015
    - Corporate Scandal: Wells Fargo, 2016
    - MN Political Scandal: Amy Koch, MN Senate Majority Leader, 2011

    Each case study will include popular press and academic articles.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65621/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    22 June 2017

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8004 Section 001: Integrative Doctoral Seminar in Public Affairs II (54141)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Public Affairs PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Tue 11:30AM - 02:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (3 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Continues PA 8003. Lays foundation for doctoral-level study of public affairs through introduction of key concepts, literature, research questions of public affairs. Critically examines paradigms/methodologies through readings, discussions, writing assignments, research presentations. Facilitates development of dissertation research ideas. prereq: Public Affairs doctoral student
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jbsoss+PA8004+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54141/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8005 Section 001: Doctoral Research Seminar in Public Affairs (54148)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Public Affairs PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Wed 09:05AM - 11:50AM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (3 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Conduct of research, including ethics. Students develop and refine their research ideas. Facilitates development of dissertation research prospectus. prereq: Public Affairs doctoral student
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Occasional in-person sessions may be scheduled. The starting time for some of the sessions may shift to 8:30 due to faculty meetings. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?linds301+PA8005+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54148/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8006 Section 001: Current Research in Public Affairs: Topics, Approaches, and Cultures (54167)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Public Affairs PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Mon 11:15AM - 12:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (4 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students participate in research seminars exploring current topics, approaches, and cultures in public affairs. Students responsible for discussion, presentation, and evaluation of research, including peer review of papers and presentations. Discussion of research ethics and skills, including literature reviews, research design, data visualization, public engagement, presentation, and project management.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?yingling+PA8006+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54167/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8081 Section 004: Capstone Workshop -- Social Policy (65785)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Tue 02:30PM - 05:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (4 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Fall 2020 PA 5080: Capstone Prep Workshop is required. Proficiency in quantitative and/or qualitative analytical tools. Contact instructor at hanra003@umn.edu for further information. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hanra003+PA8081+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65785/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA8081_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA8081_Spring2016.docx (Spring 2016)

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8081 Section 006: Capstone Workshop -- Urban Planning (65450)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (18 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY (synchronously-online) during Spring 2021. All-class sessions will be held periodically. Team meetings will be held as needed during regularly scheduled class time or at other times agreed to by team members. Fall 2020 PA 5080: Capstone Prep Workshop is required. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?linds301+PA8081+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65450/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA8081_Spring2016.docx (Spring 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA8081_Fall2015.docx (Fall 2015)

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8081 Section 008: Capstone Workshop -- Global Policy (65786)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Fri 12:05PM - 02:50PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (9 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Prerequisite: Fall 2020 PA 5080: Capstone Prep Workshop is required. Enrollment for this 8081 section is by permission number only (instructor permission). This capstone will allow students to learn by doing on projects commissioned by faculty from client governmental, for-profit, or nonprofit organizations engaged in foreign and security policy, human rights, humanitarianism and other global issues. Some projects in this capstone may offer students an opportunity to travel in the US or abroad with some support and/or at their own expense. Client projects for Spring 2021 will be announced in September 2020 and with teams formed prior to November 2020, when PA 5080 Capstone Prep Workshop will operate. Client-team project planning will begin in that preparatory workshop and project work will be done between January and May 2021. Only students assigned to teams in the Fall may register for this section. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mtcurtin+PA8081+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65786/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jamesr_mtcurtin_PA8081_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8081 Section 011: Capstone Workshop -- Transportation Planning and Policy (65787)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 01/26/2021
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
     
    02/09/2021
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
     
    04/20/2021 - 04/27/2021
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
     
    02/02/2021 - 04/13/2021
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (7 of 14 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class will be BLENDED. Class will meet In Person for approximately five weeks throughout the semester. All other weeks will be delivered remotely. If students have specific situations that require them to be remote for the entire semester, that can be accommodated. Fall 2020 PA 5080: Capstone Prep Workshop is required. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?leit0056+PA8081+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65787/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/leit0056_PA8081_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/leit0056_PA8081_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8081 Section 012: Capstone Workshop -- Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (65752)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Fri 09:05AM - 11:50AM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (11 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Fall 2020 PA 5080: Capstone Prep Workshop is required. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?linds301+PA8081+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65752/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA8081_Spring2016.docx (Spring 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/linds301_PA8081_Fall2015.docx (Fall 2015)

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8081 Section 013: Capstone Workshop -- Program Evaluation (65768)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (4 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. It will be a mixture of synchronous and asynchronous online. Most weeks will be asynchronous, but first (1/25/2021) and last (5/3/2021) weeks will be synchronous. Prereqs: PA 5311: Program Evaluation or equivalent course and Fall 2020 PA 5080: Capstone Prep Workshop. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kaln0003+PA8081+Spring2021
    Class Description:

    The Program Evaluation Capstone builds upon PA 5311: Program Evaluation (which is a requirement for taking this Section), by enabling students to work directly with clients to revise and implement program evaluation plans in community-based settings, such as public agencies, schools, non-profit organizations, and collaborative initiatives. Class sessions and a select number of readings will encourage students to further enhance their understanding of the purpose and best practices of program evaluation in public policy and program delivery as well as best practices in navigating the consultant and client relationship. Students are encouraged to arrange times early in the semester to meet with their groups to successfully implement their evaluation plans and to navigate the client relationship.

    As a part of the revised Capstone Project selection process, all students were able to rank their choices from interested clients. The list of possible clients included current clients participating in the 2020 Fall and previous 2020 Spring PA 5311 course that agreed to allow students enrolled in this Capstone course to implement the evaluation plans (after additional feedback and modifications) at their organization. This semester our clients will include: Capitol River District Council, Hands Across the World, and the Minnesota Zoo. While students were assigned to their first or second choice project this semester, the goal is for students to be able to learn from each of the group projects, in order to develop a deeper understanding of the breadth of program evaluation, and to further the client and consultant best practices.
    Learning Objectives:

    1. Demonstrate the importance of using best practices in program evaluation in order to effectively refine, develop, and implement a program evaluation plan for a specific public or nonprofit program or initiative.

    2. Demonstrate effectively working collaboratively with a team of fellow evaluators to successfully implement the evaluation plan, analyses, and reporting.

    3. Analyze, synthesize, think critically, and solve problems in program evaluation using quantitative and qualitative methods.

    4. Demonstrate effectively working with external partners or clients in order to meet their needs and expectations for the evaluation plan and report.

    5. Present findings in clear and relevant outlets, including a summative evaluation report and professional presentation of the program evaluation for the community partner; a short professional presentation for fellow classmates.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65768/1213
    Syllabus:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kaln0003_PA8081_Spring2021.pdf
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kaln0003_PA8081_Spring2020.docx (Spring 2020)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    13 November 2020

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8081 Section 014: Capstone Workshop -- Human Rights (65753)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (5 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class will be delivered asynchronously. Fall 2020 PA 5080: Capstone Prep Workshop is required. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?shin0148+PA8081+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65753/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8081 Section 015: Capstone Workshop -- Public Engagement (65788)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (8 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Fall 2020 PA 5080: Capstone Prep Workshop is required. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?baraj001+PA8081+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65788/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8081 Section 016: Capstone Workshop -- Leadership and Management (65442)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Thu 02:30PM - 05:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (11 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Fall 2020 PA 5080: Capstone Prep Workshop is required. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?zrzhao+PA8081+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65442/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8331 Section 001: Economic Demography (65606)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Mon 04:40PM - 07:25PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (4 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Classical theory, advanced econometric methods, recent empirical work, and available datasets for research in economic demography. Topics include the economics of mortality, fertility, migration, marriage, women's labor supply, intra-family bargaining, and age structure. Students develop critical analysis and academic discourse skills through in-depth discussions and replications of papers, presentations, referee-style writing assignments, and a term paper. prereq: Grad-level economic theory (PA 5021 or equiv) and econometrics (PA 5033 or equiv) and instructor permission
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jannaj+PA8331+Spring2021
    Class Description:

    This course will expose you to the major economic theories in demography, including those of migration, mortality, fertility, marriage, family formation, and others. We will also discuss recent empirical work on these same topics and explore the difficulties of causal inference in demography. You will have the opportunity to lead discussions and prepare lectures on demographic topics of your choice.

    This course is targeted toward PhD students and master's students considering a PhD. As it is a small seminar-style class, course participation and attendance is mandatory. Contact the instructor with questions.

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65606/1213
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jannaj_PA8331_Spring2017.pdf (Spring 2017)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    20 October 2016

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8444 Section 001: FTE: Doctoral (54153)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    No Grade Associated
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Advanced Doctoral Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (1 of 200 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    FTE: Doctoral prereq: Doctoral student, adviser and DGS consent
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54153/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8683 Section 001: Gender, Race and Political Representation (65564)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Meets With:
    PA 5683 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (1 of 3 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Explores intersection of gender, race and political issues to identify best practices for strengthening roles of under-represented groups in governance. Individual, structural and institutional factors attributed to increasing the election and appointment of under-represented groups. Theories of citizen representation. Global approach with cross-national evidence and comparative country studies.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cewig+PA8683+Spring2021
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65564/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8777 Section 001: Thesis Credits: Master's (54094)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-18 Credits (50 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    No Grade Associated
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Grade Sort
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 200 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    (No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]
    Class Description:
    (No description) prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 10 cr total required [Plan A only]. Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54094/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    20 October 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8888 Section 001: Thesis Credit: Doctoral (54154)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-24 Credits (100 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    No Grade Associated
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA PhD and ETCR or Doct
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (2 of 100 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Doctoral thesis credit. prereq: [Max 18 cr per semester or summer], 24 cr required
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54154/1213

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 001: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (54115)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (1 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Notes:
    If you wish to register for a section of PA 8921, please contact MPP adviser Joel Mixon in the Humphrey School Student Services office.
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54115/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 002: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (54117)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Notes:
    If you wish to register for a section of PA 8921, please contact MPP adviser Joel Mixon in the Humphrey School Student Services office.
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54117/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 003: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (54118)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (2 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54118/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 004: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (54119)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (1 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54119/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 005: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (54120)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (1 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54120/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 006: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (54121)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (1 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54121/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 007: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (54122)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (1 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54122/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 008: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (54123)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (1 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54123/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 009: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (67257)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (1 of 0 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67257/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 010: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (67258)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (1 of 0 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67258/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 011: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (67259)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (1 of 0 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67259/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 012: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (67260)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (1 of 0 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67260/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8921 Section 013: Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (67261)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (1 of 0 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Class Description:
    Masters of public policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67261/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8922 Section 001: Master's Paper: Plan B (54145)

    Instructor(s)
    No instructor assigned
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    1-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    UMTC, East Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Masters of science in science, technology, and environmental policy majors work under guidance of paper adviser to complete their Plan B. prereq: instr consent
    Class Notes:
    If you wish to register for a section of PA 8922, please contact Joel Mixon.
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54145/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8991 Section 001: Independent Study (54087)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    0.5-4 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (1 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
    Class Notes:
    Contact your professional adviser regarding having an 8991 section set up with the faculty member with whom you wish to work.
    Class Description:
    Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54087/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8991 Section 002: Independent Study (54088)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    0.5-4 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
    Class Description:
    Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54088/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Spring 2021  |  PA 8991 Section 003: Independent Study (54102)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Independent Study
    Credits:
    0.5-4 Credits (6 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Independent/Directed Study
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
    12:00AM - 12:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (0 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Independent study. Limit of 6 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or post-baccalaureate certificate program.
    Class Description:
    Independent study. prereq: Limit of 3 credits applied toward a Humphrey School of Public Affairs degree or certificate program, instr consent
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54102/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 November 2015

    Fall 2020  |  PA 1401 Section 001: Public Affairs: Community Organizing Skills for Public Action (20695)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (36 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Public affairs work, roles of citizens in democratic way of life. Community organizing skills, their importance for public affairs. Negotiations among diverse audiences, understanding different interests, mapping power relationships. Relevant public affairs and governance theory.
    Class Notes:
    PA 1401 will be REMOTE. It will meet synchronously online during the scheduled time, Tuesdays/Thursdays, 1:00 - 2:15 p.m. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?donov013+PA1401+Fall2020
    Class Description:

    *meets University of Minnesota Liberal Education requirement for Citizenship/Public Ethics Theme"


    This course is a hands-on introduction for undergraduate students wanting to develop the skills, confidence, and knowledge to become empowered agents of change.This course involves an examination of key concepts of citizenship, politics, ethics, and democracy, as well as hands-on experiential learning in problem solving skills and team work especially from the framework called Civic Studies, developed to address the challenge of collective action in a world of often radically different ethical frameworks.


    The goal of this class is to:

    1. Give students a hands on introduction to organizing skills such as public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings.

    2. Enable students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives

    3. To provide stages for students' public speaking

    4. Open the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers

    5, To acquaint students with the methods and outlook of community organizing tradition in America as a strand of the emerging "Civic Studies" field

    6. To provide students with an introduction to the approach to ethics in Civic Studies, compared to other approaches. Such topics include: mass incarceration, racism, immigration, climate change, education, gender issues, etc.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Students should take this class if they like classes that are co-created by students and instructor and are engaging. All disciplines and years are welcome. During this time in our history, people want to acquire knowledge and skills of how to solve public problems.. This course provides knowledge, skills and practice for creating change.
    Learning Objectives:
    This course will help students acquire skills for effective citizenship and life-long learning through the course goals of:
    • Acquainting students with Civic Studies and the community organizing tradition in America and the distinctive ways in which this framework addresses questions of ethical pluralism
    • Giving students a hands on introduction to organizing skills for civic agency, such as writing, public speaking, power mapping, collective problem solving and one on one relational meetings
    • Enabling students to examine their own values and commitments in the context of their own public narratives
    • Providing stages for students' public speaking
    • Opening the door to new civic possibilities in their own work and careers
    Grading:
    40% Two Essays
    20% Weekly Reflections on Readings
    20% In-Class Participation
    20% Public Work Project
    Exam Format:
    No exams.
    Class Format:
    Discussion based with some lecture. All are teachers and learners. You will learn how to become a change agent through active learning.
    Workload:
    50 Pages of Reading Per Week (average)
    30-45 Pages of Individual Writing, Including Weekly Reading Reflections
    3 Short Papers
    1 Public Work Project Report
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20695/1209
    Syllabus:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2020.docx
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/donov013_PA1401_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    14 July 2020

    Fall 2020  |  PA 3002 Section 001: Basic Methods of Policy Analysis (20673)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/14/2020
    Mon 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
     
    09/21/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Mon 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Willey Hall 125
     
    09/16/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (26 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to policy analysis. Theoretical foundations/practical methods of analysis. Tools for problem definition, data collection/analysis, presentation techniques, implementation strategies. Multidisciplinary case-study approach.
    Class Notes:
    PA 3002 will be a BLENDED class. Class will be REMOTE (synchronously online) through 9/14. It will meet IN PERSON on Mondays, 9/21 - 11/23. It will meet REMOTELY every Wednesday, on 9/14, and on Mondays AFTER Thanksgiving break. (All classes after Thanksgiving will be REMOTE.) http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kiedr003+PA3002+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    The complex economic, political and social issues that define our world are not easily solved. PA 3002 teaches students to apply the methods and techniques of the social science discipline to address these multifaceted challenges that increasingly confront public agencies and nonprofit organizations.


    PA 3002 is designed for students who share an interest in quantitative techniques to analyze issues of public policy. This multidisciplinary course is appropriate for students from various undergraduate majors, including economics, political science, business and other social sciences. In particular, this introductory course provides a firm academic and technical background for students preparing for graduate studies and careers in public and nonprofit organizations at the local, state, national and international levels.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Students interested in learning more about formulating public policy positions. This course can be used for the CSOM major or minor in Public and Nonprofit Management.
    Learning Objectives:
    • Understand how the social science discipline explores interrelationships among individuals, institutions and systems, and allows individuals to shape their cultural, social, economic and political worlds through sound public policy analysis
    • Understand basic policy analysis concepts and practical techniques, and develop the capability to define, prepare and present effective policy analyses for nonprofit organizations and public agencies
    • Master basic knowledge,terminology and applied skills in problem formulation, primary, secondary and web-based research, quantitative and qualitative data analysis, economic analysis, policy selection, implementation and monitoring, and
    • Improve explanatory and persuasive communication skills for diverse audiences to effectively implement recommended policy strategies.
    Grading:

    Participation points (1 per class), which represent 27% of the total grade.

    Graded Assignments (worth 32 points), must be printed, and are due at the beginning of the assigned class period, since the assignment will be discussed during the class. Case presnetations involve actual comprehensive policy analyses, and allow students to demonstrate their mastery of the analytical and communication skills they have learned. These case studies constitute 30% of the final grade. Groups and cases will be assigned half way through the course. There are 2 pop quizzes each 4 points during the semester. Finally, each student will be expected to present an issue using power points and the defined methodology.


    Participation 27 points
    Pop Quizzes 8
    Issue Presentation 3 points
    Graded Assignments 32 points
    Group Presentation 30 points
    Total 100 points


    An I (Incomplete) may be assigned at the instructor's discretion if, due to extraordinary circumstances, the student was unavoidably prevented from completing course work on time. An Incomplete requires a written agreement between the instructor and the student specifying the time and manner in which the student will complete the unfinished work
    Exam Format:
    There are two "pop quizzes".
    Class Format:
    Class time is approximately 40 percent lecture, 30 percent interactive discussion and
    30 percent small group activity.
    Workload:
    Workload averages about 30 pages of reading per week, thirteen graded assignments, one individual issue presentation, one group case presentation, all of which are designed to help students apply the policy concepts and practical techniques learned in class.

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20673/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA3002_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/kiedr003_PA3002_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jmgunyou_PA3002_Fall2016.doc (Fall 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    9 July 2018

    Fall 2020  |  PA 3003 Section 001: Nonprofit and Public Financial Management (20657)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    junior or senior
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Thu 04:40PM - 07:25PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (38 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Concepts/tools for project/budget planning. Program analysis. Interpreting financial reports. Identifying/resolving organizational performance issues. Case studies, real-world exercises. prereq: Jr or sr
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020 during the scheduled time (Thursdays, 4:40 - 7:25).See ClassInfo for further information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?varsh011+PA3003+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20657/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/varsh011_PA3003_Spring2021.pdf (Spring 2021)

    Fall 2020  |  PA 3969 Section 001: Survey of Election Administration (20710)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Pre-Covid
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Election Administration cert
    Meets With:
    PA 5971 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (3 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Survey of building blocks of election administration, from voter registration to recounts.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wils2343+PA3969+Fall2019
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20710/1209

    Fall 2020  |  PA 3982 Section 001: Data Analysis for Election Administration (34060)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Meets With:
    PA 5982 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (2 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Evidence-based election administration. Collection and analysis of quantitative data to solve problems and identify opportunities for improvement. Emphasis on pre-election forecasting for planning purposes and post-election auditing of election results.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tpatrick+PA3982+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34060/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/tpatrick_PA3982_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)

    Fall 2020  |  PA 3983 Section 001: Introduction to Election Security (20718)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Pre-Covid
    Meets With:
    PA 5983 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    09/08/2020 - 10/26/2020
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (15 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course will examine the history of cyberattacks on the United States and the American election system, with special attention to the 2016 election cycle. Students will explore the types of cybersecurity threats that exist and strategies to protect against them; understand the roles different levels of government can play in the process, and hear from key officials about the issues raised by the official response to election security threats at the federal, state and local levels as well as in related private sector communities.
    Class Notes:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dchapin+PA3983+Fall2019
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20718/1209

    Fall 2020  |  PA 4101 Section 001: Nonprofit Management and Governance (20658)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Tue 05:30PM - 08:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (38 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Managing/governing nonprofit/public organizations. Theories, concepts, real-world examples. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of different funding environments, management of multiple constituencies.
    Class Notes:
    PA 4101 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020, Tuesdays, 5:30 - 8:15 p.m. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?yang0248+PA4101+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20658/1209

    Fall 2020  |  PA 4200 Section 001: Urban and Regional Planning (20652)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Carlson School of Management 1-147
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (23 of 22 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Fundamental principles of urban/regional land-use planning. Introduction to planning theory and its applications. Political-economic context of urban/regional planning.
    Class Notes:
    PA 4200 will be offered as "HyFlex." Students may choose to either attend In Person or Remotely (synchronously online). Exception: The first two weeks of class will be REMOTE (synchronously online). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?douma002+PA4200+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    This course is geared toward upper division undergraduates who are curious about a career in urban and regional planning, or simply want to know how planning works and affects our lives. It provides an introductory overview of planning theory and practice, with primary attention to current issues in planning practice in the U.S. The content covers land use, urban design, transportation, community development, housing, and environmental planning problems within the broader context of the historic development of cities, political processes, and regional and national economic forces. Attention to the planning process, or how planning actually occurs, represents a constant theme in the course. The first half of the class is largely lecture based, to provide a common foundation for the class, culminating in the mid-term exam. The 2nd half is a small group exercise where small groups of students create draft comprehensive plans for hypothetical urban areas, and present them to a guest jury. After this course, you will be expected to: Identify how major social, political, and economic forces have shaped urban development in the U.S.; Understand the primary tenets of the urban planning profession; Describe approaches for examining urban form and function; Discuss whose interests are served (and not served) by urban planners and plans; and Evaluate and suggest responses to current policy and planning challenges affecting U.S. urban areas, with a particular focus on the Twin Cities. Over the course of the semester, you will gain an appreciation for the complexity of urban areas and an understanding of what urban planners do and the possibilities and limitations that they face. In summary, if you have any interest in knowing how cities and metropolitan areas develop and function the way they do, you should find the class interesting, and engaging, and perhaps even enjoyable!
    Grading:
    20% Midterm Exam
    30% Reports/Papers
    10% Reflection Papers
    20% In-class Presentations
    10% Class Participation
    10% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: "other" 10% is grading from small group peers
    Exam Format:
    In class: multiple choice, short answer and essay
    Class Format:
    30% Lecture
    25% Discussion
    25% Small Group Activities
    10% Guest Speakers
    10% Service Learning
    Workload:
    20 Pages Reading Per Week
    20 Pages Writing Per Term
    1 Exam(s)
    2 Paper(s)
    1 Presentation(s)
    1 Special Project(s)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20652/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/douma002_PA4200_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/douma002_PA4200_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/douma002_PA4200_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    16 March 2015

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5002 Section 001: Introduction to Policy Analysis (20653)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    09/08/2020 - 10/26/2020
    Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (24 of 25 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020, first half of the semester - Mondays, 6:00 - 8:45 p.m. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?myers006+PA5002+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    This 5002 section will have a special emphasis on diversity policies, including disability policies, ADA ramp requirements, gender-neutral bathrooms, racial profiling in traffic stops, and diversity in sports.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20653/1209
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    18 July 2019

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5002 Section 002: Introduction to Policy Analysis (20684)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    10/27/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (23 of 25 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020, second half of the semester - Mondays, 6:00 - 8:45 p.m. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?myers006+PA5002+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    This 5002 section will have a special emphasis on diversity policies, including disability policies, ADA ramp requirements, gender-neutral bathrooms, racial profiling in traffic stops, and diversity in sports.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20684/1209
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    18 July 2019

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5003 Section 001: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (20639)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
    Times and Locations:
    First Half of Term
     
    09/08/2020 - 10/26/2020
    Wed 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (27 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    PA 5003-1 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020 (1st half), Wednesdays, 6:00 - 8:45 This class will also be offered in Spring 2021. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?zrzhao+PA5003+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Understanding how public and nonprofit organizations manage financial resources is vitally important to understanding their health and where they place their priorities. Being able to budget will give you an advantage in securing resources. Being able to read a financial statement of a nonprofit will assist you in understanding the net worth of a nonprofit. Being able to analyze the financial statements of a government will suggest to you the economic vitality of the community. The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good". In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers and employees of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of budgeting and financial analysis. This is an introductory course to budgeting and financial analysis in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.
    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of the course, students should be able:

    Understand financial management as an integral part of nonprofit/public management

    Obtain basic knowledge, terminology, and skills in nonprofit/public budgeting, accounting, and financial statements

    Develop the capability to perform basic budget and financial analysis of nonprofit/public organizations

    Improve communication and writing skills regarding financial matters
    Grading:

    Grading will be based on a mid-term exam (25%), a final exam (30%),three individual assignments (15%), a group project (20%), and on class participation (10%).

    Exam Format:
    Class Format:
    Lectures, group discussions, in-class exercises, and student presentations
    Workload:
    Required Textbook: Financial Management in the Public Sector: Tools, Applications, and Cases (3rd E)Author: Xiaohu Wang; Publisher: ISBN-13:978-0765636898
    (Look to syllabus for specific assignments or more information on work load.)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20639/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/zrzhao_PA5003_Spring2017.doc (Spring 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/zrzhao_PA5003_Spring2016.doc (Spring 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/zrzhao_PA5003_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    21 February 2017

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5003 Section 002: Introduction to Financial Analysis and Management (20640)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Pub Pol Major/Minor, Grad Major Dev Prac, Pub Aff, Lib Stud, NPM Cert
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    10/27/2020
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-106
     
    11/10/2020
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-106
     
    11/24/2020
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-106
     
    12/08/2020
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-106
     
    10/27/2020 - 12/16/2020
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (11 of 34 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Finance/accounting concepts/tools in public/nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting. Balance sheet/income statement analysis. Cash flow analysis. Public/nonprofit sector budgeting processes. Lectures, discussions. Cases. prereq: Public policy major/minor or major in development practice, public affairs or liberal studies or grad nonprofit mgmt cert or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Class meets in person on Oct 27, Nov 10, and Nov 24. Lectures will be held synchronously online on the other weeks and after Thanksgiving break. PA 5003 will also be offered in Spring 2021. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?zrzhao+PA5003+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Understanding how public and nonprofit organizations manage financial resources is vitally important to understanding their health and where they place their priorities. Being able to budget will give you an advantage in securing resources. Being able to read a financial statement of a nonprofit will assist you in understanding the net worth of a nonprofit. Being able to analyze the financial statements of a government will suggest to you the economic vitality of the community. The financial environments for public and nonprofit organizations are changing. Governments are pressured to "do more with less" and nonprofit organizations are expected to "do better at doing good". In order to meet these challenges, it is important that managers and employees of public and nonprofit organizations possess the fundamentals of budgeting and financial analysis. This is an introductory course to budgeting and financial analysis in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. The primary learning objective of this course is how to obtain accurate financial information to make sound management decisions through the analyses of financial documents such as budgets and financial statements. The processes of producing such documents will be introduced but are not the focus of this course. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques will be emphasized and applied to analyze real-world financial problems.
    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of the course, students should be able:

    Understand financial management as an integral part of nonprofit/public management

    Obtain basic knowledge, terminology, and skills in nonprofit/public budgeting, accounting, and financial statements

    Develop the capability to perform basic budget and financial analysis of nonprofit/public organizations

    Improve communication and writing skills regarding financial matters
    Grading:

    Grading will be based on a mid-term exam (25%), a final exam (30%),three individual assignments (15%), a group project (20%), and on class participation (10%).

    Exam Format:
    Class Format:
    Lectures, group discussions, in-class exercises, and student presentations
    Workload:
    Required Textbook: Financial Management in the Public Sector: Tools, Applications, and Cases (3rd E)Author: Xiaohu Wang; Publisher: ISBN-13:978-0765636898
    (Look to syllabus for specific assignments or more information on work load.)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20640/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/zrzhao_PA5003_Spring2017.doc (Spring 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/zrzhao_PA5003_Spring2016.doc (Spring 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/zrzhao_PA5003_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    21 February 2017

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5004 Section 001: Introduction to Planning (20638)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Urban/Regional Planning, major and minor or PA PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (44 of 48 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    History/institutional development of urban planning as profession. Intellectual foundations, planning theory. Roles of urban planners in U.S./international settings. Scope, legitimacy, limitations of planning/planning process. Issues in planning ethics/settings of diverse populations/stakeholders. prereq: Major/minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    PA 5004 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020, Mondays/Wednesdays, 9:45 - 11:00. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?allen650+PA5004+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    History, institutional development of urban planning as a profession. Intellectual foundations, planning theory. Roles of urban planners in U.S./international settings. Scope, legitimacy, limitations of planning and of planning process. Issues in planning ethics and in planning in settings of diverse populations/stakeholders.
    Learning Objectives:

    After this course, you will be able to:

    1. Identify how major social, political, and economic forces have shaped urban development in the U.S.;

    2. Locate the urban planning profession in the U.S. within the historical context of urbanization;

    3. Describe and compare theoretical approaches used by urban planners in their work;

    4. Discuss ethics in urban planning and whose interests are served (and not served) by urban planners and plans;

    5. Evaluate and generate responses to current policy and planning challenges affecting urban areas in the United States and abroad; and

    6. Demonstrate skills of written and oral analysis and communication.


    The goals and expectations of this course are ambitious, but no one will finish this course ready to become a practicing urban planner. Instead, over the course of the semester, you will gain a deeper appreciation for the complexity of urban areas and an understanding of what planners do and the possibilities and limitations that they face

    Grading:

    Participation 50 points (5%)

    Reading Responses 200 points (20%)

    Planning Meeting 50 points (5%)

    Planning Memo #1 200 points (20%)

    Planning Memo #2 250 points (25%)

    Final Exam 250 points (25%)

    Total Points 1,000 points (100%)
    Class Format:
    45% Lecture
    30% Discussion
    15% Small Group Activities
    10% Guest Speakers
    Workload:
    80-100 Pages of Reading per Week
    3 Memos
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20638/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/allen650_PA5004_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/allen650_PA5004_Fall2015.docx (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    17 October 2017

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5011 Section 001: Management of Organizations (20636)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020
    Tue 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Science Teaching Student Svcs 330
     
    09/15/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Tue 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
     
    09/10/2020 - 09/24/2020
    Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Science Teaching Student Svcs 330
     
    10/22/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
     
    10/01/2020 - 10/15/2020
    Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-102
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (27 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Challenges facing higher-level managers in public and nonprofit organizations in mixed economy and democratic republic. Distinctive features of public and nonprofit management, skills necessary for effective management, manager's role as creator of public value. Lectures, case discussions.
    Class Notes:
    Class will meet face-to-face on Tues, Sept 8 and Thur, Sept 10, Sept 17 and 24, and October 1, 8, and 15. The rest of the class sessions will either be asynchronous or synchronous (REMOTE during scheduled class session). Class will include asynchronous recorded lectures and virtual reading forums/threads. Instructor will notify students once the schedule has been finalized. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sandf002+PA5011+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Managers and leaders today are constantly confronted with new challenges brought about by the global economy, pressures to improve performance, and demands to do more with less. Organizations are downsizing, merging, forming alliances, and experiencing unstable revenue flows. How are managers and leaders to make sense of all of these changes? How are they to make choices among the `quick fixes' promised by popular management books and high paid consultants? How are they to act effectively? This course is designed to provide students a foundation of knowledge about public and nonprofit organizations so they can better grapple with these questions. This course focuses on the management and leadership of public and nonprofit organizations. Through active participation, you will become acquainted with the basic concepts, competencies and skills needed to manage and lead organizations involved in making and carrying out public policy. The course moves through the various levels of organizational life. We begin with your own skills and consider how to use those skills to work effectively in groups. We then consider the elements of organizations and the character of the larger environment which shapes what happens within them. Throughout, you will come to see that organizations operate as systems within particular contexts that provide opportunities for and constrain effectiveness. This is a survey course, serving as a gateway into other classes offered in the Public and Nonprofit Leadership concentration at the Humphrey Institute. Specific learning objectives: - Grapple with the potential and limitations of public/ nonprofit management and leadership given the complexities of democracy and struggle for legitimate public action in the early 21st century; - Improve public and nonprofit organizational effectiveness through analysis using multiple perspectives; - Explore policy tools and organizational partnerships necessary for policy implementation; - Enhance management and leadership skills including memo writing, team work, oral communication (including professional presentations), stakeholder analysis, and policy field analysis.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20636/1209
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    7 October 2010

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5011 Section 002: Management of Organizations (33022)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (26 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Challenges facing higher-level managers in public and nonprofit organizations in mixed economy and democratic republic. Distinctive features of public and nonprofit management, skills necessary for effective management, manager's role as creator of public value. Lectures, case discussions.
    Class Notes:
    Fall 2020's PA 5011-2 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online on Thursdays, 9:45 - 11:00 a.m. The Tuesday lecture will be ASYNCHRONOUS. Students will be expected to view it prior to the following Thursday. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cheng838+PA5011+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33022/1209

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5012 Section 001: The Politics of Public Affairs (20662)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (27 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Stages of policy making from agenda setting to implementation. Role and behavior of political institutions, citizens, social movements, and interest groups. Concepts of political philosophy. Theories of state. Team taught, interdisciplinary course. Small discussion sections.
    Class Notes:
    Remote delivery. Class will meet synchronously online on Tuesday/Thursday, 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ljacobs+PA5012+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    America has witnessed four massive surges of protests and political organizing over the past decade: The Tea Party (started in 2010), Occupy Wall Street (occurred in September 2011), grassroots resistance following President Trump's election in 2016, and the ongoing demonstrations sparked by George Floyd's killing in Minneapolis on May 25, 2020. Each promised deep, enduring political change -- but what normative and legal impacts did they produce?

    Sophisticated agents of change appreciate that there are "varieties of politics," which offer discrete and interconnected avenues. Elections, legislation, and administrative and legal accountability - along with protests and community organizing - are used by political activists and policy entrepreneurs to produce or thwart change. Each modality of politics is distinctive, varying in terms of the types of actors involved; the resources that are required; the scope of political debate; the visibility of the policy design; and their potential consequences. If political change is the objective, which variety of politics is most feasible and potentially impactful?

    Time is a critical - often overlooked - dimension in politics. President Barack Obama's health reform and the conservative movement's attack on estate taxes not only produced change at one point in time but also influenced subsequent politics by generating new public expectations, interest groups, and government agencies committed to ongoing implementation. Politically astute reformers design progressive and conservative policies to secure change in the first instance and then to influence politics downstream.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.
    Grading:
    Paper, Two Group Projects, Final Examination, and 5 short discussion reports.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20662/1209
    Syllabus:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ljacobs_PA5012_Fall2020.pdf
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ljacobs_monda006_PA5012_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ljacobs_monda006_PA5012_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    25 August 2020

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5013 Section 001: Law and Urban Land Use (20635)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Major/minor, Urb-Reg Planning
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    10/27/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (33 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Role of law in regulating/shaping urban development, land use, environmental quality, local/regional governmental services. Interface between public/private sector. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    PA 5013 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020, Tuesdays, 6:00 - 8:45 p.m. (2nd half of semester). Please contact the instructor at jcoleman@crplanning.com with questions. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jlcolema+PA5013+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    This 1.5 credit course is offered Fall semester every year. The course covers the role of law and its influence on the planning profession. Specifically, it addresses the role of law in regulating and shaping urban development, land use, environmental quality, and local/regional governmental services, and the interface between the public and private sector in land use changes.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20635/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jlcolema_PA5013_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jlcolema_PA5013_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jlcolema_PA5013_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jlcolema_PA5013_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    5 May 2017

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5021 Section 001: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (20685)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Major or minor Public Policy or STEP major or minor or Human Rights major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (13 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
    Class Notes:
    PA 5021, sections 1/2 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020, Mon/Wed, 1:00-2:15 (lecture) and Fri, 12:45-1:35 (recitation). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5021+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    The required textbook for this class is Microeconomics by Pindyck and Rubinfeld, 9th edition (2018). The 8th or 7th editions would work also. Students do not need to purchase a study guide nor are special access codes needed.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Most of the students will be first year MPP students, but students in other graduate degree programs are welcome to enroll. Most students will have had a prior microeconomics course, but that is not required. The Humphrey School offers an online review program called Foundations for Success that some students might want to look into that helps students review some basic algebra.
    Learning Objectives:
    The objective of this course is for you to understand consumer and firm decisions and to understand when government intervention in the private market may be efficient and/or equitable. We will explore how resources are allocated in a market economy and we will investigate the role of government in a market economy (or mixed economy) such as the United States. We will focus most of our time developing the analytical microeconomic tools needed to discuss efficiency and fairness concerns and throughout the semester we will apply these tools to various relevant public policy examples.
    This course contributes to several learning objectives for the MPP program, especially (3) "to analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve complex problems, and make decisions" and (4) to understand the role of government in a market economy.
    Grading:
    The course grade will be based on the homeworks ,in class exams,quizzes,and the cumulative final exam.
    Exam Format:
    The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, short one paragraph answers, and problems involving algebra and graphical analysis.
    Class Format:
    We'll be meeting online this year (Fall of 2020). We will meet in synchronous meetings (recorded for those not available to meet that day) and some additional content will be available asynchronously. Our TA Sangyoo Lee will provide some asynchronous lessons and meet in real time during the class discussion section.
    Workload:
    Look at syllabus for workload within course.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20685/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    21 August 2020

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5021 Section 002: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (20686)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Fri 12:45PM - 01:35PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (13 of 35 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
    Class Notes:
    PA 5021, sections 1/2 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020, Mon/Wed, 1:00-2:15 (lecture) and Fri, 12:45-1:35 (recitation). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5021+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    The required textbook for this class is Microeconomics by Pindyck and Rubinfeld, 9th edition (2018). The 8th or 7th editions would work also. Students do not need to purchase a study guide nor are special access codes needed.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Most of the students will be first year MPP students, but students in other graduate degree programs are welcome to enroll. Most students will have had a prior microeconomics course, but that is not required. The Humphrey School offers an online review program called Foundations for Success that some students might want to look into that helps students review some basic algebra.
    Learning Objectives:
    The objective of this course is for you to understand consumer and firm decisions and to understand when government intervention in the private market may be efficient and/or equitable. We will explore how resources are allocated in a market economy and we will investigate the role of government in a market economy (or mixed economy) such as the United States. We will focus most of our time developing the analytical microeconomic tools needed to discuss efficiency and fairness concerns and throughout the semester we will apply these tools to various relevant public policy examples.
    This course contributes to several learning objectives for the MPP program, especially (3) "to analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve complex problems, and make decisions" and (4) to understand the role of government in a market economy.
    Grading:
    The course grade will be based on the homeworks ,in class exams,quizzes,and the cumulative final exam.
    Exam Format:
    The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, short one paragraph answers, and problems involving algebra and graphical analysis.
    Class Format:
    We'll be meeting online this year (Fall of 2020). We will meet in synchronous meetings (recorded for those not available to meet that day) and some additional content will be available asynchronously. Our TA Sangyoo Lee will provide some asynchronous lessons and meet in real time during the class discussion section.
    Workload:
    Look at syllabus for workload within course.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20686/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    21 August 2020

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5021 Section 003: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (20654)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: Major or minor Public Policy or STEP major or minor or Human Rights major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (21 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
    Class Notes:
    PA 5021, sections 3 and 4 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020. Lec: M/W, 9:45-11:00. Recitation: Fri, 11:15 a.m. - 12:05 p.m. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hanra003+PA5021+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy: intermediate microeconomics, macroeconomics, concepts of international trade. Both this section and the class taught be Judy Temple will be at a similar level. We will teach how to calculate derivatives, but will not have more calculus required beyond this. This approach will make it easier to understand class concepts and will not be much more challenging than standard applications using algebra.
    Grading:

    Homework assignments (15% of class grade)

    Short Memo and In-Class Debate (15% of grade)

    Two Quizzes (20% each; 40% of class grade)

    Final Exam (30% of class grade)


    (There must be class participation and reactions (look towards syllabus for more information on participation and reactions.))

    Exam Format:

    FINAL EXAM:

    10:30-12:30 Saturday December 19
    Class Format:

    Lecture MW 9:45-11:00AM Blegen 415

    Lab F 11:15-12:05AM Blegen 415
    Workload:
    The text for this class is:Robert S. Pindyck and Daniel L. Rubinfeld,Microeconomics, 8th Edition, Pearson Education Inc, 2013 You can purchase an earlier versions of the text, or can buy an online version at roughly half the cost of the text version.Additional readings will also be available on the course web site. Look at syllabus for more information on course work.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20654/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    1 September 2016

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5021 Section 004: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (20655)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Fri 11:15AM - 12:05PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 003
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (21 of 35 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
    Class Notes:
    PA 5021, sections 3 and 4 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020. Lec: M/W, 9:45-11:00. Recitation: Fri, 11:15 a.m. - 12:05 p.m. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hanra003+PA5021+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Introduction to tools useful for public policy: intermediate microeconomics, macroeconomics, concepts of international trade. Both this section and the class taught be Judy Temple will be at a similar level. We will teach how to calculate derivatives, but will not have more calculus required beyond this. This approach will make it easier to understand class concepts and will not be much more challenging than standard applications using algebra.
    Grading:

    Homework assignments (15% of class grade)

    Short Memo and In-Class Debate (15% of grade)

    Two Quizzes (20% each; 40% of class grade)

    Final Exam (30% of class grade)


    (There must be class participation and reactions (look towards syllabus for more information on participation and reactions.))

    Exam Format:

    FINAL EXAM:

    10:30-12:30 Saturday December 19
    Class Format:

    Lecture MW 9:45-11:00AM Blegen 415

    Lab F 11:15-12:05AM Blegen 415
    Workload:
    The text for this class is:Robert S. Pindyck and Daniel L. Rubinfeld,Microeconomics, 8th Edition, Pearson Education Inc, 2013 You can purchase an earlier versions of the text, or can buy an online version at roughly half the cost of the text version.Additional readings will also be available on the course web site. Look at syllabus for more information on course work.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20655/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hanra003_PA5021_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    1 September 2016

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5022 Section 001: Applications of Economics for Policy Analysis -- Cost-Benefit Analysis (33221)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Discussion
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits (9 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Mon 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (7 of 13 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Application of economic reasoning to a wide range of contemporary public policy issues. The following topically-focused courses also fulfill the MPP economics requirement: PA 5431: Public Policies on Work and Pay, PA 5503: Economics of Development, PA 5521: Development Planning and Policy Analysis, PA 5722: Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy, and PA 5805: Global Economics. prereq: 5021 or equiv
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020 during the scheduled time, Mo 11:15AM - 12:30PM. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jtemple+PA5022+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    The required textbook is the 5th edition of Cost-Benefit Analysis by Boardman, Greenberg, Vining and Weinberg. Here is the link to the book on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Cost-Benefit-Analysis-Concepts-Anthony-Boardman/dp/1108401295/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=weimer+cost+benefit&qid=1598069121&sr=8-1

    This class introduces students to methods used in cost-benefit analysis, the leading evidenced-based method for guiding decisions about whether a government project, program or policy improves the well-being of society. For Humphrey students, this course fulfills part of the economics core requirement (PA 5021-5022). For students who have already fulfilled that requirement, this course can be used to satisfy requirements in the Advanced Policy Analysis concentration. This course also can be used to satisfy requirements in Prevention Science graduate minors as well as the Early Childhood Policy graduate certificate.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    The course counts toward the economics core requirement for the MPP program. MPP students and anyone interested in learning more about economic evaluations of public programs and policies are welcome. CBA increasingly is being used at the state and local levels of government as well as in nonprofits and philanthropic organizations and a number of Humphrey students have used their skills to obtain employment on projects involving economic assessment of program and policy impacts.
    Learning Objectives:
    Students will learn both the theory underlying cost-benefit analysis as well as become familiar with many applications in the areas of environmental, health, transportation, education, and social policies.
    Class Format:
    This is usually 7 week class meeting twice a week but this year the class will meet once a week for the entire semester. A prior course in microeconomics is expected for the MPP students but please see the instructor if you haven't had this prereq.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33221/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5022_Spring2019.doc (Spring 2019)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5022_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jtemple_PA5022_Spring2016.doc (Spring 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    21 August 2020

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5022 Section 002: Applications of Economics for Policy Analysis -- Labor Market Consequences of the COVID-19 Pandemic (34634)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Discussion
    Credits:
    3 Credits (9 Credits max.)
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Public Policy major and minor or Human Rights major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Mon 01:00PM - 03:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (16 of 30 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Application of economic reasoning to a wide range of contemporary public policy issues. The following topically-focused courses also fulfill the MPP economics requirement: PA 5431: Public Policies on Work and Pay, PA 5503: Economics of Development, PA 5521: Development Planning and Policy Analysis, PA 5722: Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy, and PA 5805: Global Economics. prereq: 5021 or equiv
    Class Notes:
    Class will be offered REMOTELY. It will meet synchronously-online on Mondays, 1:00-3:45. Title: Labor Market Consequences of the COVID-19 Pandemic http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kleiner+PA5022+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34634/1209

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5031 Section 001: Statistics for Public Affairs (20632)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Dev prac or Human Rights major or Pub Pol or STEP ng major or minor or PA PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (78 of 100 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
    Class Notes:
    Fall 2020's PA 5031 will be offered REMOTELY and will meet synchronously-online. Lecture section is scheduled for Tuesdays/Thursdays, 11:15 - 12:30. Labs are scheduled for Fridays, 9:45-11, 11:15-12:30, and 12:45-2:00. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5031+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis. Sampling and survey
    Learning Objectives:
    This course is intended to provide familiarity with statistical terminology used on an everyday basis in the policy arena as well as the popular media; to provide an understanding of the methodology behind the numbers; to enable students to use basic statistical techniques in the course of research or policy analysis; to teach students to critically interpret statistical results; and to encourage students to think about implicit assumptions about numbers that affect our work, public policy decisions, and our lives. In particular, I want students to think about how statistics can be used to shed light on (or hide) and enhance positions of power and privilege in societies.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20632/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 July 2018

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5031 Section 002: Statistics for Public Affairs (20633)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Fri 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (33 of 40 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
    Class Notes:
    Fall 2020's PA 5031 will be offered REMOTELY and will meet synchronously-online. Lecture section is scheduled for Tuesdays/Thursdays, 11:15 - 12:30. Labs are scheduled for Fridays, 9:45-11, 11:15-12:30, and 12:45-2:00. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5031+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis. Sampling and survey
    Learning Objectives:
    This course is intended to provide familiarity with statistical terminology used on an everyday basis in the policy arena as well as the popular media; to provide an understanding of the methodology behind the numbers; to enable students to use basic statistical techniques in the course of research or policy analysis; to teach students to critically interpret statistical results; and to encourage students to think about implicit assumptions about numbers that affect our work, public policy decisions, and our lives. In particular, I want students to think about how statistics can be used to shed light on (or hide) and enhance positions of power and privilege in societies.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20633/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 July 2018

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5031 Section 003: Statistics for Public Affairs (20634)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Fri 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (26 of 40 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
    Class Notes:
    Fall 2020's PA 5031 will be offered REMOTELY and will meet synchronously-online. Lecture section is scheduled for Tuesdays/Thursdays, 11:15 - 12:30. Labs are scheduled for Fridays, 9:45-11, 11:15-12:30, and 12:45-2:00. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5031+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis. Sampling and survey
    Learning Objectives:
    This course is intended to provide familiarity with statistical terminology used on an everyday basis in the policy arena as well as the popular media; to provide an understanding of the methodology behind the numbers; to enable students to use basic statistical techniques in the course of research or policy analysis; to teach students to critically interpret statistical results; and to encourage students to think about implicit assumptions about numbers that affect our work, public policy decisions, and our lives. In particular, I want students to think about how statistics can be used to shed light on (or hide) and enhance positions of power and privilege in societies.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20634/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 July 2018

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5031 Section 004: Statistics for Public Affairs (20729)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Fri 12:45PM - 02:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (19 of 20 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
    Class Notes:
    Fall 2020's PA 5031 will be offered REMOTELY and will meet synchronously-online. Lecture section is scheduled for Tuesdays/Thursdays, 11:15 - 12:30. Labs are scheduled for Fridays, 9:45-11, 11:15-12:30, and 12:45-2:00. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?arfertig+PA5031+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis. Sampling and survey
    Learning Objectives:
    This course is intended to provide familiarity with statistical terminology used on an everyday basis in the policy arena as well as the popular media; to provide an understanding of the methodology behind the numbers; to enable students to use basic statistical techniques in the course of research or policy analysis; to teach students to critically interpret statistical results; and to encourage students to think about implicit assumptions about numbers that affect our work, public policy decisions, and our lives. In particular, I want students to think about how statistics can be used to shed light on (or hide) and enhance positions of power and privilege in societies.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20729/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/arfertig_PA5031_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 July 2018

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5041 Section 001: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (20665)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    PA: major or minor in Public Policy or Science/Technology/Environmental Policy or PA PhD or Human Rights major or Development Practice major
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (22 of 28 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be REMOTE. Lectures and labs will be delivered synchronously and asynchronously throughout the semester. Both lectures and the lab in Week 1 (Sept 8 - Sept 10) will be SYNCHRONOUS. A schedule that shows whether sessions are synchronous or asynchronous will be provided to students. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mukho017+PA5041+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20665/1209

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5041 Section 002: Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (20666)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (22 of 28 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
    Class Notes:
    Class will be REMOTE. Lectures and labs will be delivered synchronously and asynchronously throughout the semester. Both lectures and the lab in Week 1 (Sept 8 - Sept 10) will be SYNCHRONOUS. A schedule that shows whether sessions are synchronous or asynchronous will be provided to students. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mukho017+PA5041+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20666/1209

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5045 Section 001: Statistics for Public Affairs, Accelerated (20719)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Dev prac or Human Rights major or Pub Pol or STEP ng major or minor or PA PhD
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Fri 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (23 of 34 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduces a range of quantitative tools that are commonly used to inform issues in public affairs. The course provides an introduction to descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference, with an emphasis on the ways in which quantitative tools are applied to a diverse range of practical policy questions. PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031.
    Class Notes:
    5045 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020 - Lecture on Tu/Th, 11:15 - 12:30 and Fri, 9:45-11:00. Lab on Fri, 8:15 - 9:30. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gabechan+PA5045+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Lab section for PA 5045. See course description for PA 5045 Section 001.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031. PA 5045 moves at a more rapid pace and spends more time on policy applications and advanced topics. While neither PA 5031 or PA 5045 have enforced prerequisites, PA 5045 is recommended for students with prior statistical coursework or for students without prior coursework but a strong interest in pursuing a quantitatively oriented career and a willingness to work hard during the semester. PA 5045 is recommended (but not required) for students planning on enrolling in PA 5044 (Applied Regression, Accelerated) in the Spring.

  • have taken at least one prior course in statistics covering topics such as: basic probability rules, conditional probability, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals
  • scored above the 80th percentile on the quantitative GRE
  • have professional experience applying statistical techniques in a public affairs context
  • anticipate a career that will require extensive application and consumption of quantitative analysis
  • Learning Objectives:
    Develop an appreciation for the applicability and limitations of the tools of probability and statistics to inform real-world situations and courses of action in public affairs;

    Apply quantitative reasoning to inform contemporary issues in public affairs by beginning with a policy question, identifying a data set, determining appropriate statistical analysis techniques, conducting such analysis using software, identifying the most salient findings and patterns emerging from the data, and presenting your findings in an effective manner to a decision maker;

    Critically consume and critique policy analysis in which statistical analysis and quantitative reasoning is used;

    Develop confidence in learning new statistical techniques, approaching quantitative data, and synthesizing empirical evidence.
    Grading:
    Final class grades will be based on the following criteria:

    10% - Problem sets (9 total)

    10% - Class participation

    15% - Final exercise

    15% - Midterm 1

    15% - Midterm 2

    5% - Stata quiz

    30% - Final Exam

    Exam Format:
    There will be two midterms and a final exam. These will be closed book/notes and a formula sheet will be provided. Calculators may be used, but statistical functions on them may not. Calculators that allow text storage are not permitted.
    Class Format:
    Class instruction will be delivered in two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab.

    The required textbook for the class is OpenIntro Statistics (3rd Edition) by David Diez, Christopher Barr, and Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel, developed by the OpenIntro 501(c)(3) nonprofit. This textbook is available immediately and for free online in regular PDF and tablet-friendly PDF (you may also purchase a hard copy for $15-25 on Amazon): https://www.openintro.org/stat/textbook.php

    Software is an integral part of conducting statistical analysis. This semester, you will conduct analysis in two software packages, Microsoft Excel and Stata. Labs will teach you key software skills, and problem sets will contain exercises designed to get you to practice the basics of both software packages. The Humphrey School's computer labs have Stata installed and you are not required to purchase Stata. You will learn the key Excel and Stata skills necessary for the course in lecture and labs.

    mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin;
    mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">We'll also be making use of the in-class polling platform, Poll Everywhere. To participate, you will need to bring an internet-connected device (i.e. smartphone, tablet, or laptop) or phone to every class.

    Workload:
    PA 5045 requires concurrent enrollment in a lab section and is a 4-credit course. Under UMN policy, it is expected that the academic work required of graduate and professional school students will exceed three hours per credit per week. Therefore, you should expect a workload of at least 12 hours per week. Each week there will be two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab. Therefore, you should expect approximately 7 hours per week of work outside of scheduled class.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20719/1209
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    11 July 2018

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5045 Section 002: Statistics for Public Affairs, Accelerated (20720)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Fri 08:15AM - 09:30AM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Auto Enrolls With:
    Section 001
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (23 of 34 seats filled)
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introduces a range of quantitative tools that are commonly used to inform issues in public affairs. The course provides an introduction to descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference, with an emphasis on the ways in which quantitative tools are applied to a diverse range of practical policy questions. PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031.
    Class Notes:
    5045 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020 - Lecture on Tu/Th, 11:15 - 12:30 and Fri, 9:45-11:00. Lab on Fri, 8:15 - 9:30. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gabechan+PA5045+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Lab section for PA 5045. See course description for PA 5045 Section 001.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031. PA 5045 moves at a more rapid pace and spends more time on policy applications and advanced topics. While neither PA 5031 or PA 5045 have enforced prerequisites, PA 5045 is recommended for students with prior statistical coursework or for students without prior coursework but a strong interest in pursuing a quantitatively oriented career and a willingness to work hard during the semester. PA 5045 is recommended (but not required) for students planning on enrolling in PA 5044 (Applied Regression, Accelerated) in the Spring.

  • have taken at least one prior course in statistics covering topics such as: basic probability rules, conditional probability, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals
  • scored above the 80th percentile on the quantitative GRE
  • have professional experience applying statistical techniques in a public affairs context
  • anticipate a career that will require extensive application and consumption of quantitative analysis
  • Learning Objectives:
    Develop an appreciation for the applicability and limitations of the tools of probability and statistics to inform real-world situations and courses of action in public affairs;

    Apply quantitative reasoning to inform contemporary issues in public affairs by beginning with a policy question, identifying a data set, determining appropriate statistical analysis techniques, conducting such analysis using software, identifying the most salient findings and patterns emerging from the data, and presenting your findings in an effective manner to a decision maker;

    Critically consume and critique policy analysis in which statistical analysis and quantitative reasoning is used;

    Develop confidence in learning new statistical techniques, approaching quantitative data, and synthesizing empirical evidence.
    Grading:
    Final class grades will be based on the following criteria:

    10% - Problem sets (9 total)

    10% - Class participation

    15% - Final exercise

    15% - Midterm 1

    15% - Midterm 2

    5% - Stata quiz

    30% - Final Exam

    Exam Format:
    There will be two midterms and a final exam. These will be closed book/notes and a formula sheet will be provided. Calculators may be used, but statistical functions on them may not. Calculators that allow text storage are not permitted.
    Class Format:
    Class instruction will be delivered in two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab.

    The required textbook for the class is OpenIntro Statistics (3rd Edition) by David Diez, Christopher Barr, and Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel, developed by the OpenIntro 501(c)(3) nonprofit. This textbook is available immediately and for free online in regular PDF and tablet-friendly PDF (you may also purchase a hard copy for $15-25 on Amazon): https://www.openintro.org/stat/textbook.php

    Software is an integral part of conducting statistical analysis. This semester, you will conduct analysis in two software packages, Microsoft Excel and Stata. Labs will teach you key software skills, and problem sets will contain exercises designed to get you to practice the basics of both software packages. The Humphrey School's computer labs have Stata installed and you are not required to purchase Stata. You will learn the key Excel and Stata skills necessary for the course in lecture and labs.

    mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin;
    mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">We'll also be making use of the in-class polling platform, Poll Everywhere. To participate, you will need to bring an internet-connected device (i.e. smartphone, tablet, or laptop) or phone to every class.

    Workload:
    PA 5045 requires concurrent enrollment in a lab section and is a 4-credit course. Under UMN policy, it is expected that the academic work required of graduate and professional school students will exceed three hours per credit per week. Therefore, you should expect a workload of at least 12 hours per week. Each week there will be two 75-minute lectures, an optional 75-minute recitation led by TAs, and a 75-minute lab. Therefore, you should expect approximately 7 hours per week of work outside of scheduled class.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20720/1209
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    11 July 2018

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5051 Section 001: Public Affairs Leadership (20668)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
    Times and Locations:
    Extended Regular Session
     
    08/27/2020 - 08/29/2020
    Thu, Fri, Sat 08:45AM - 04:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    09/25/2020
    Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    09/26/2020
    Sat 08:45AM - 04:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    10/23/2020
    Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    10/24/2020
    Sat 08:45AM - 04:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    11/20/2020
    Fri 10:00AM - 05:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    11/21/2020
    Sat 08:45AM - 04:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    12/04/2020
    Fri 08:45AM - 04:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (32 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Leadership concepts, tools, and strategies in a personal, community, and organizational context for mid-career students. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5051-5052 must be taken in same academic yr
    Class Notes:
    Students should register for PA 5051, 5053, and 5055. Remote delivery. Class will meet synchronously-online during scheduled times:Aug 27-29 (Thu, Fri, Sat 8:45 - 4:30); Sep 25-26/Oct 23-24/Nov 20-21 (F: 10:00 - 5:00, S: 8:45 - 4:30); and Dec 4 (8:45 - 4:30). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5051+Fall2020
    Class Description:

    The Public Affairs Leadership Cohort is a unique offering at the Humphrey School that is designed for mid-career professionals that integrates adult learning methodologies in a schedule that accommodates working adults. Three core (required) courses are offered in an integrated format and students can either apply the cohort experience to a U of Mn Regent's approved graduate certificate in Public Affairs Leadership (PAL) or towards the Masters in Public Affairs (MPA) degree. The three courses integrated into the MPA cohort are: 1) Cohort Leadership I & II, 2) Cohort Policy and Program Analysis I & II, and 3) Cohort Research Methods & Analysis I & II.


    The cohort program focuses on developing a range of skills essential in public affairs through an intensive learning community. A theoretical framework emphasizing transformational leadership guides us and creates awareness that leadership is demonstrated through acts undertaken by many people, not just by those in formal authority positions. Leaders must have skills to address both technical and adaptive challenges and the content of these courses highlights those most critical to public policy and public affairs.


    Exam Format:
    No final exam.
    Workload:
    There are required textbooks. (Look at syllabus for required text.)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20668/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/sandf002_ksgerdes_PA5051_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    7 June 2016

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5053 Section 001: Policy Analysis in Public Affairs (20669)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (32 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Process of public policy and program analysis, including problem formulation, program design and implementation. Opportunity to draw upon published research and conduct field-based research to understand implementation conditions. Professional communications, including writing of memos, requests for proposals, and implementation briefs, are stressed. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5053-5054 must be taken in same academic yr
    Class Notes:
    Students should register for PA 5051, 5053, and 5055. Remote delivery. Class will meet synchronously online during scheduled times:Aug 27-29 (Thu, Fri, Sat 8:45 - 4:30); Sep 25-26/Oct 23-24/Nov 20-21 (F: 10:00 - 5:00, S: 8:45 - 4:30); and Dec 4 (8:45 - 4:30). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5051+Fall2020.
    Class Description:

    The Public Affairs Leadership Cohort is a unique offering at the Humphrey School that is designed for mid-career professionals that integrates adult learning methodologies in a schedule that accommodates working adults. Three core (required) courses are offered in an integrated format and students can either apply the cohort experience to a U of Mn Regent's approved graduate certificate in Public Affairs Leadership (PAL) or towards the Masters in Public Affairs (MPA) degree. The three courses integrated into the MPA cohort are: 1) Cohort Leadership I & II, 2) Cohort Policy and Program Analysis I & II, and 3) Cohort Research Methods & Analysis I & II.


    The cohort program focuses on developing a range of skills essential in public affairs through an intensive learning community. A theoretical framework emphasizing transformational leadership guides us and creates awareness that leadership is demonstrated through acts undertaken by many people, not just by those in formal authority positions. Leaders must have skills to address both technical and adaptive challenges and the content of these courses highlights those most critical to public policy and public affairs.


    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20669/1209
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    7 June 2016

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5055 Section 001: Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis (20670)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Laboratory
    Credits:
    2 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Stdnt is in MPA/PAL Cohort Mod
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (32 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Problem-based learning of analytical reasoning through social science research methods. Systematic review and literature review. Qualitative research including interviews, focus groups, and analysis. Research proposal. prereq: Major in public affairs or public affairs certificate, [5055-5056 must be taken in same academic yr]
    Class Notes:
    Students should register for PA 5051, 5053, and 5055. Remote delivery. Class will meet synchronously online during scheduled times:Aug 27-29 (Thu, Fri, Sat 8:45 - 4:30); Sep 25-26/Oct 23-24/Nov 20-21 (F: 10:00 - 5:00, S: 8:45 - 4:30); and Dec 4 (8:45 - 4:30). http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5051+Fall2020.
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20670/1209

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5080 Section 001: Capstone Preparation Workshop (20704)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    11/06/2020
    Fri 02:00PM - 04:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
     
    11/06/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (104 of 120 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Project management, qualitative research, and critical framework to complete Capstone course. Students write draft of client project group norms and client contract.
    Class Notes:
    PA 5080 will be offered remotely (synchronously online) on November 6, 2020 from 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. There will be additional asynchronous online work. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksgerdes+PA5080+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    NOTE: THIS WORKSHOP IS DESIGNED FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE ALSO ENROLLED IN A SPRING 2018 CAPSTONE COURSE (PA 8081). STUDENTS MUST PLAN TO ATTEND THIS CAPSTONE PREPARATION WORKSHOP WITH YOUR CAPSTONE TEAMMATES, AS THE WORKSHOP ALLOWS FOR TEAM INTERACTION TO PLAN THEIR SPRING CAPSTONE PROJECT. The purpose of this Capstone Preparation Workshop is to provide information, resources, and tools to help Capstone teams successfully plan for and complete Capstone projects that they will complete during the Spring Capstone Workshop. The Capstone Preparation Workshop focuses on the elements of successful problem-solving, research design, project planning and management, group dynamics, communications, client relations, and ethical conduct and is designed to allow time for team members to engage more deeply with each other in understanding their Capstone project.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Only students who are simultaneously enrolled in a SPRING SEMESTER Capstone workshop (PA 8081).
    Grading:
    Other Grading Information: Grading is S/N
    Class Format:
    15% Lecture
    75% Small Group Activities
    10% Guest Speakers This course will be run like a workshop, with limited lecture and maximum time allowed for teams to formulate their Capstone project.
    Workload:
    Much of the class time in this course will be offered for your Capstone team to complete work that will establish a plan and direction for your Capstone project.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20704/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ksgerdes_PA5080_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ksgerdes_PA5080_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/ksgerdes_PA5080_Fall2015.doc (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    20 November 2017

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5081 Section 001: Working in Teams: Crossing Disciplines and Learning from Difference (20680)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    0.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Extended Regular Session
     
    08/28/2020
    Fri 08:30AM - 04:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (27 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Principles and skills necessary to create high-performing multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
    Class Notes:
    Remote delivery. Class will meet online-synchronously on Fri, 8/28/20 (8:30-4:00) Pre-reading will be required. Waitlist inactive after 8/6/2020. Please contact Stacey Grimes (grime004@umn.edu) for permission number. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bloom004+PA5081+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    "We will not solve our biggest societal challenges by working in silos. The future will require leaders who understand the need to work across disciplines, across cultures, and across ideological boundaries to craft solutions together." At the Humphrey School we believe in the value of teams and learning from differences among colleagues. Because of this, students have multiple opportunities to work in teams both inside and outside of classes. We offer PA5180 Working in Teams: Crossing Disciplines and Learning from Difference for ALL incoming Humphrey students because we want students to be well prepared to lead, participate, manage, learn from, and thrive in these experiences. In this active, "hands-on" class students will review principles and practice skills necessary to thrive in high-performing multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
    Grading:
    S/N
    Exam Format:
    There is no final exam for this .5 credit class
    Class Format:
    40% Discussion
    40% Small Group Activities
    20% Lecture
    Workload:
    Except for some pre-reading (3 short articles) and a brief (2-3 page) final written reflection due a week after the class, all work is completed within the class. Additional reading and activities are provided, but optional.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20680/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bloom004_eiden026_PA5081_Fall2019.pdf (Fall 2019)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bloom004_PA5081_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bloom004_PA5081_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bloom004_PA5081_Fall2015.doc (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    15 August 2016

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5081 Section 002: Working in Teams: Crossing Disciplines and Learning from Difference (20679)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    0.5 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    S-N only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    MDP/MHR/MPA/MPP/STEP/MURP major
    Times and Locations:
    Extended Regular Session
     
    09/04/2020
    Fri 08:30AM - 04:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (23 of 42 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Principles and skills necessary to create high-performing multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
    Class Notes:
    Remote delivery. Class will meet online-synchronously on Fri, 9/4/20 (8:30-4:00). Pre-reading will be required. Waitlist inactive after 8/6/2020. Please contact Stacey Grimes (grime004@umn.edu) for permission number. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bloom004+PA5081+Fall2019.
    Class Description:
    "We will not solve our biggest societal challenges by working in silos. The future will require leaders who understand the need to work across disciplines, across cultures, and across ideological boundaries to craft solutions together." At the Humphrey School we believe in the value of teams and learning from differences among colleagues. Because of this, students have multiple opportunities to work in teams both inside and outside of classes. We offer PA5180 Working in Teams: Crossing Disciplines and Learning from Difference for ALL incoming Humphrey students because we want students to be well prepared to lead, participate, manage, learn from, and thrive in these experiences. In this active, "hands-on" class students will review principles and practice skills necessary to thrive in high-performing multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
    Grading:
    S/N
    Exam Format:
    There is no final exam for this .5 credit class
    Class Format:
    40% Discussion
    40% Small Group Activities
    20% Lecture
    Workload:
    Except for some pre-reading (3 short articles) and a brief (2-3 page) final written reflection due a week after the class, all work is completed within the class. Additional reading and activities are provided, but optional.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20679/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bloom004_eiden026_PA5081_Fall2019.pdf (Fall 2019)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bloom004_PA5081_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bloom004_PA5081_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bloom004_PA5081_Fall2015.doc (Fall 2015)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    15 August 2016

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5101 Section 001: Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations (20712)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Thu 05:45PM - 08:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (31 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Theories, concepts, and real world examples of managerial challenges. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of funding environments, management of multiple constituencies. Types of nonprofits using economic/behavioral approaches. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    PA 5101 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020, Thursdays, 5:45 - 8:30 p.m. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?davi1315+PA5101+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    Theories, concepts, and real world examples of managerial challenges. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of funding environments, management of multiple constituencies. Types of nonprofits using economic/behavioral approaches.
    Learning Objectives:
    This course focuses on distinctive features of leading/managing and governing nonprofit organizations and draws on current theories, concepts, and real-world examples to explore management changes. This course is designed to provide current and future nonprofit managers and leaders with an overview of a range of nonprofit management concerns and practices. Course projects and discussions expand learners' management skills, analytical tools, and knowledge. In this course learners are asked to take the perspectives of nonprofit leaders/managers, volunteers, board members, policy makers, donors, and clients.
    Grading:
    15% Classroom Participation
    20% Memo #1
    20% Memo #2
    20% Op Ed Piece
    25% Reflective essay
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20712/1209
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/davi1315_PA5101_Fall2019.pdf (Fall 2019)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/davi1315_PA5101_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    21 August 2019

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5105 Section 001: Integrative Leadership: Leading Across Sectors to Address Grand Challenges (20732)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option No Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Meets With:
    LAW 6623 Section 001
    MGMT 6402 Section 060
    OLPD 6402 Section 001
    PUBH 6702 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Thu 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (10 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Examines how challenges can be addressed through the shared leadership of government, business, and nonprofit sectors. Multi-sector leadership and related governance and management challenges explored from a variety of perspectives. The lens of the course moves to the collaboration itself after a focus on the individual, looking at techniques and qualities of successful teams, including those composed of diverse individuals or organizations. Students apply what they learn individually and in teams through in-class exercises and a final team project. Taught by a team of interdisciplinary faculty and considers different contexts, forms and specific examples of multisector leadership to enable transformative action to tackle significant societal issues and achieve lasting change.
    Class Notes:
    Fall 2020's PA 5105 will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Fall 2020, Thursdays, 6:00 - 8:45 p.m. If all class sections are full, please contact Samantha Silker at the Center for Integrative Leadership (sbsilker@umn.edu) for a permission number. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ksquick+PA5105+Fall2020 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dweerts+PA5105+Fall2020
    Class Description:
    This is an interdisciplinary, 3-credit seminar led by co-instructors from multiple schools of the university. Students will: a) learn to recognize and diagnose integrative leadership challenges and opportunities; b) build their own capacities to practice integrative leadership through group work in individualized peer-to-peer coaching in diverse teams and through being exposed to a range of boundary work practices; and c) gain better knowledge of the leadership contexts within their own profession and in other sectors. We emphasize contexts for integrative leadership at five basic levels: within individuals, within and across groups, within and across organizations, within and across sectors, and at the societal scale. Learning occurs through reading foundational materials, personal leadership coaching, engaging extensively with examples from guest speakers and case materials, developing a group capstone project on integrative leadership, and iteratively co-producing an understanding of what integrative leadership is. This course is sponsored by four departments. If PA 5105 shows as full, please check for space under the other departments - MGMT 6402, OLPD 6402, and PubH 6702. They are all for the same class, with the same instructors, meeting at the same time. Every section in all four schools must be filled before any over-ride permission numbers are issued. If all class sections are full, please contact Samantha Silker at the Center for Integrative Leadership (sbsilker@umn.edu) for a permission number.
    Grading:
    30% Reports/Papers
    30% Reflection Papers
    20% Class Participation
    20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: Participation in class-based learning and discussion - 20% Biweekly reading notes and biweekly reflection notes - 30% Team case study project research, presentation, and report - 30% Integrative leadership peer-to-peer coaching: 20%
    Class Format:
    15% Lecture
    20% Discussion
    25% Small Group Activities
    10% Student Presentations
    15% Guest Speakers
    15% Web Based
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20732/1209
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    9 April 2020

    Fall 2020  |  PA 5135 Section 001: Managing Conflict: Negotiation (20696)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
    Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (21 of 34 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Theories and frameworks used in negotiations. Navigating diverse audiences and an increasingly complex world. Negotiation in various arenas. Opportunities to practice skills and learn from experts. Structured exercises on issues such as compensation, union conflicts and international dev