6 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2013  |  GLOS 3900 Section 001: Topics in Global Studies -- (Trans)Nationalism & the Postcolonial Imagination (59595)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 205
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Description:
Transnationalism, a broad concept that encompasses the myriad national allegiances and increased mobility typical of a world rendered smaller by globalization, challenges the fundamental compartmentalization of the globe brought about by early twentieth-century Imperialism. Colonialism and the different iterations of post-colonialism aided in reaffirming many of the structural divisions, such as First World-Third World, that pervaded imperialist mindsets. This course examines the conditions of possibility for the emergence of transnationalism through a study of texts, films, and visual art rooted in an array of geopolitical contexts. In so doing, we will examine the viability of traditional theories of Nationalism and discuss why the European Nation-State is poorly suited for the challenges that transnational realities present. We will thus be dealing with controversial questions: What are the inherent exclusions and false assumptions embedded within European Nationalism? What is the optimal political organization for a world defined by movement, multiplicity, and instability? Can the cognitive map radically separating the colonized and the colonizer finally be redrawn?
Grading:
10% Midterm Exam
10% Attendance
25% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 40% Essays, 15% Research Paper.
Exam Format:
Open ended essay questions.
Class Format:
35% Lecture
50% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
Workload:
100 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term Other Workload: occasional films to be viewed outside of class, 3 shorter essays and 1 larger research paper, occasional reader response papers.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~001&term=1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 October 2012

Spring 2013  |  GLOS 3900 Section 002: Topics in Global Studies -- The Politics of Human Rights in Mexico (68408)

Instructor(s)
Karina Ansolabehere
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
GLOS 5900 Section 002
SPAN 3510 Section 002
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
TAUGHT IN SPANISH
Class Description:
Mexican performance on human rights issues is not good, but it is an issue that has been in the public debate for at least the past two decades. This course seeks to help students understand contemporary human rights politics in Mexico from the local perspective. The focus of the course will be the politics of human rights in the country rather than human rights institutions or the human rights movement or organizations. Regarding that perspective, the analysis will be driven by the idea that human rights performance of the country is the result of the tension between two processes: the development of a robust human rights movement and the Mexican State's response to issues and claims about human rights. The course will focus exclusively on contemporary Mexico, from the late sixties to 2012, reflecting the emergence of human rights discourse in a sustained manner in Mexico since the Student Movement of 1968 and the repressive reaction of the State against socialist armed groups in the seventies. To analyse human rights politics we will look at several illustrative human rights conflicts of the last two decades. 1. The student movement and the socialist armed movement against human rights violations and the failed attempt at transitional justice.. 2. Indigenous rights: The Zapatista movement and the constitutionalization of indigenous rights. Incomplete recognition. 3. Women's rights, feminicide and the decriminalization of abortion. Impunity and progressive isolation. 4. Human Rights as public policy: The National Human Rights Program and the Office of the United Nations Human Rights High Commissioner. 5. The Criminal Justice system and torture: human rights organizations, judicial reform and impunity. 6. Victims? rights: Movimiento por la Paz con Justicia y Dignidad, national security, human rights reform and victims? law. The course will be taught in Spanish, so a proficient understanding of spoken and written Spanish is required. The required papers can be written in English or Spanish.
Grading:
20% In-class Presentations
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 60% papers (each paper is 30%); Graduate Students: 50% papers (each paper is 25%); 15% In-class Presentation; 20% Class Participation; 15% Special Project
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
30% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
10% Student Presentations
Workload:
50-60 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Presentation(s)
Other Workload: 2 papers
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~002&term=1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 November 2012

Spring 2013  |  GLOS 3900 Section 003: Topics in Global Studies -- Global Political Economy (68410)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
SOC 3090 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 245
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Description:
Manifestations of the new global economy are everywhere. From the jeans you buy at your favorite shopping mall to the placemats you purchase at Target, most of the items we consume here in the United States are made somewhere else. Global commodity networks link consumers of fresh green beans in Britain with farmers, pickers, and exporters in Zambia. And it isn't only products that have "gone global," it is also people. Thanks to immense economic inequalities, upper and even middle class families in Europe, Japan and the U.S. enjoy the cheap and plentiful labor of Eastern European, Filipino, and Honduran nannies, housecleaners, and gardeners. The location and character of work is also changing: no longer can a skilled Detroit autoworker or Minnesota aircraft mechanic expect to find work in the U.S.; rather, most of these jobs have relocated to Mexico, Brazil, or China, where equally skilled workers are employed at a fraction of the cost. How did this new global economy come to be and what forces are responsible for these changes? Course organization and requirements: This course is based on lectures, films, an occasional guest speaker and considerable in-class discussion. From the outset, I want you to know that (a) this course is very reading intensive, and (b) I expect you to do all of the readings all of the time. Active participation in this class is very important and counts for 15% of your grade. But more than how it "counts" -- participation in the form of engaging with the texts and other materials we use in class, and with your fellow students, is the best way for you to grasp the theoretical perspectives, empirical information and critical thinking skills that are the primary pedagogical goals of this class. In other words, well after this class is over, I want you to be able to utilize the perspectives and knowledge you have acquired during the course to understand changes in the global economy. In this course, we will focus on the changes that have taken place in the global economy over the last seventy years, and the economic theories, institutional changes, and technological developments that have undergirded them. Our mode of exploration will be both historical and contemporary. We will examine the movement away from the relatively regulated national economies of the 1940s and 1950s to a more fully integrated global economy; changing patterns and organization of production and consumption; and the rise of neoliberal ideology, policy and global governance institutions. Some of the substantive topics we will explore include the globalization of mass consumption, the transformation of work associated with new information technologies, and the cultures of the "new" capitalism.
Grading:
10% Attendance
10% Journal
10% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 24% Written Homework (commentaries), 16% Special Projects (2 exercises),30% Final take-home Exam
Class Format:
35% Lecture
10% Film/Video
30% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
80-100 Pages Reading Per Week
6-8 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
12 Homework Assignment(s)
Other Workload: 3 Special Projects
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~003&term=1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 November 2012

Spring 2013  |  GLOS 3900 Section 004: Topics in Global Studies (68412)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
HIST 3487 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Description:
Modern era from 1800. French conquest, bureaucratic, social, and economic changes. Vietnamese nationalism and adoption of communist ideologies. First Indochina War (1945-54) with France. Second Indochina War (1955-75) with US. US efforts to contain the spread of communism during Cold War paranoia. US intervention in the neighboring countries of Laos and Cambodia. Grading: Two midterms (30%), Discussions/Class Activities/Quizes (15%), 2 Movie Responses (15%), Research essay (20%), Final (20%).
Grading:
15% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Short answer, essay
Class Format:
50% Lecture
30% Discussion
20% Other Style videos
Workload:
60-70 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~004&term=1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 November 2012

Spring 2013  |  GLOS 3900 Section 005: Topics in Global Studies -- What is Equality? (68601)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
GLOS 5900 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Wed 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-149
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Description:
Claims to equality are constitutive of politics today. It is most often in the name of equality that groups struggle against economic and political disparities, or demand various rights. A certain equality is even institutionalized in modern democracies?all citizens are formally equal. And yet, equality is also one of the most difficult concepts of our times. This may be in part because it is simultaneously about difference and sharing. Difference: after all, where there is identity, as is presumed for example in a conservative understanding of the family, there is no need for any concept of equality. Sharing: where there is nothing in common, as is presumed for instance in the mainstream understanding of the terrorist, there is again no need for any concept of equality. Because of the difficulty of thinking sharing and difference together, the question of equality has occasioned the most intense debates. What is political equality, and can it be sustained by the democratic rights that we exercise as citizens? What is economic equality, and can it be sustained within a capitalist order? How else can we think of equality, if not in these terms? Where does our demand for equality spring from? How can we think of any equality between profoundly different entities?not just apples and oranges but, say, the human and the animal? How are conflicting demands for equality to be reconciled in a way that recognizes, to begin with, the equality of these demands? This course will attend to these and many other related questions through readings of modern thinkers and political actors?including but not limited to John Locke, Jean Jacques Roussseau, Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Mohandas Gandhi, Hannah Arendt, CLR James, Frantz Fanon, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Luce Irigaray, Jacques Derrida, and Jacques Ranciere. The course will be discussion based. Evaluation will be on the basis of participation in discussions, and one final essay.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~005&term=1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 November 2012

Spring 2013  |  GLOS 3900 Section 006: Topics in Global Studies -- History of Modern Israel/Palestine (69206)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
HIST 3512 Section 001
JWST 3512 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-109
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Topic Title: History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics
Class Description:
Beginning with a survey of Palestine in the nineteenth century, this course examines the origins of Zionism and Arab Nationalism, Arab-Jewish conflict in Palestine, the development of Jewish and Arab national cultures in the British Mandate, the formation of the Israeli nation after 1948, the Arab-Israeli wars, and the development of the Palestinian movement. Particular attention will be paid to the diversity of Israeli and Palestinian society and culture, and the relations between the diverse communities in Israel/Palestine in the 20th century. As one of the most controversial subjects of the modern world, students will confront many contested accounts and interpretations of history that often serve the political aims of one of the many sides in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Yet in understanding these opposing viewpoints and competing versions of history, students will be better equipped to analyze why the conflict in Israel/Palestine has remained so difficult to resolve.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~006&term=1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 November 2012

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