Fall 2024  |  SOC 8412 Section 001: Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (32300)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Thu 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (7 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
Class Notes:
Click these links for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC8412+Fall2024
Class Description:
This seminar introduces social network analysis to graduate students, emphasizing its theoretical, substantive, and methodological foundations. Our collective goal is to acquire a sufficient grasp of the contemporary network literatures to pursue independent advanced study, and ultimately, to contribute original research results to our disciplines. Specifically, we'll identify key network concepts and principles; examine data collection, measurement, and computer analysis techniques; and investigate applications in sociology, organization studies, political science, public administration, and related disciplines. Network analysis spans a diverse range of phenomena from ego-centric ties, to small work-team sociograms, to organizational relations, to trade and military alliances among nation states. Based on the summer survey of registered students' substantive interests, we'll concentrate on social capital, communication, personal networks, learning and innovation diffusion, intra- and interorganizational relations, social movements and collective action, political networks, international systems, and small world and Internet dynamics. About an hour of each class will be spent on network methodologies. The principles that students learn in this course will enable them to study advanced topics of their own choosing. Wasserman & Faust's encyclopedic Social Network Analysis provides our primary text, with required and background articles and chapters selected from the research literatures of several disciplines. Students will learn how to perform basic network analyses of previously collected datasets, using the UCINET computer package. We'll also explore network visualizations using spatial plotting programs.
Learning Objectives:
This seminar introduces social network analysis to graduate students, emphasizing its theoretical, substantive, and methodological foundations. Our collective goal is to acquire a sufficient grasp of the contemporary network literatures to pursue independent advanced study, and ultimately, to contribute original research results to our disciplines. Specifically, we'll identify key network concepts and principles; examine data collection, measurement, and computer analysis techniques; and investigate applications in sociology, organization studies, political science, public health, mass communication, public administration, economics, and other disciplines.

Network analysis spans all levels of analysis from egocentric ties, to small team sociograms, interorganizational relations, and trade and military alliances among nations. Based on the summer survey of registered students' substantive interests, we'll concentrate on network theories, communication, kinship & friendship, social capital, diffusion of innovations, Internet, Big Data & small worlds, health & support networks, markets & networks, intraorganizational networks, interorganizational relations, social movements & collective action, policy networks, and international relations. Articles and book chapters are assigned on these topics from the research literatures of many disciplines.

Grading:
Leading a class discussion (10%), preparing a discussion guide (10%), four best of five computer assignments (40%), course paper (40%).
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
60% Lecture
20% Discussion
20% Student Presentations
Workload:
75 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Paper
5 Computer assignments
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32300/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
31 October 2022

ClassInfo Links - Fall 2024 Sociology Classes

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