15 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2020  |  HIST 5910 Section 001: Topics in U.S. History -- Intersections of Native & African American History (34837)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1-4 Credits (20 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
AMST 5920 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
Thu 03:35PM - 05:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (11 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in a synchronous format. The course will meet online at the scheduled times.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34837/1209

Spring 2020  |  HIST 5910 Section 001: Topics in U.S. History -- Indigenous Histories (67408)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020
Mon 01:00PM - 03:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 317
Enrollment Status:
Open (5 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67408/1203

Spring 2019  |  HIST 5910 Section 001: Topics in U.S. History -- American Colonialism and Indigenous Histories (67684)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2019 - 05/06/2019
Wed 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 20
Enrollment Status:
Open (8 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Description:
American Colonialism and Indigenous Histories:
Colonialism, American Indian Studies, and indigenous studies have been, for the past twenty years, some of the most productive sites of scholarship in the humanities, including history. They are topics of study that demand by their very nature the bringing together of different fields of endeavor, different disciplines, and different questions. This semester we will be addressing a number of current literatures and questions: settler colonialism, questions of the intersection of discursive construction and material processes of domination (especially as regards land, sovereignty over land, and land alienation), gender and sexuality, performance and demands for/discourses of authenticity, religion, belief, spirituality, and missionization, and racialization and racial construction. In a number of cases, we will be approaching these issues through memory, textuality, book studies, literary history, archaeology, art history, and museum studies. These fields are all rich with productive ideas, which should make for provocative discussion across geographies and time periods. Of particular interest will be: what do these other fields have to offer the discipline of history, and what does the discipline of history bring to these other disciplines and interdisciplinary modes of analysis? This is a conversation that can bring us together on a common intellectual project, given the disparate graduate programs you come from as students.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67684/1193
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 August 2016

Spring 2018  |  HIST 5910 Section 001: Topics in U.S. History -- U.S. Immigration History (52761)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Walter W Heller Hall 1229
Enrollment Status:
Open (7 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52761/1183

Fall 2017  |  HIST 5910 Section 001: Topics in U.S. History -- Readings in African American History (35312)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Thu 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 220
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Description:
0A

This reading seminar in African American history offers an introduction to the major questions in African-American history from its beginnings, emancipation, Reconstruction, and Jim Crow to the Great Migrations, urbanization, rights movements, riots, and cultural and political debates of the late-twentieth century. We will analyze the African origins of black Americans; the world the slaves' made, the world of slave markets, and slave economies; and the continuities and discontinuities between the antebellum and postbellum freedom struggles. The first third of the course will examine the colonial and antebellum contexts. The remaining course readings are weighted towards the study of the period spanning from the first Reconstruction to the Second Reconstruction (1860-1980).

Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students and advanced undergraduates.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/35312/1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 April 2017

Spring 2017  |  HIST 5910 Section 001: Topics in U.S. History (69872)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
HIST 8910 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2017 - 05/05/2017
Tue 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 260
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Notes:
Food in History
Class Description:
American Colonialism and Indigenous Histories:
Colonialism, American Indian Studies, and indigenous studies have been, for the past twenty years, some of the most productive sites of scholarship in the humanities, including history. They are topics of study that demand by their very nature the bringing together of different fields of endeavor, different disciplines, and different questions. This semester we will be addressing a number of current literatures and questions: settler colonialism, questions of the intersection of discursive construction and material processes of domination (especially as regards land, sovereignty over land, and land alienation), gender and sexuality, performance and demands for/discourses of authenticity, religion, belief, spirituality, and missionization, and racialization and racial construction. In a number of cases, we will be approaching these issues through memory, textuality, book studies, literary history, archaeology, art history, and museum studies. These fields are all rich with productive ideas, which should make for provocative discussion across geographies and time periods. Of particular interest will be: what do these other fields have to offer the discipline of history, and what does the discipline of history bring to these other disciplines and interdisciplinary modes of analysis? This is a conversation that can bring us together on a common intellectual project, given the disparate graduate programs you come from as students.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/69872/1173
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 August 2016

Fall 2016  |  HIST 5910 Section 001: Topics in U.S. History -- American Colonialism and Indigenous Histories (33699)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
HIST 8910 Section 001
AMST 8920 Section 003
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Tue 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 105
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?dchang+HIST5910+Fall2016
Class Description:
American Colonialism and Indigenous Histories:
Colonialism, American Indian Studies, and indigenous studies have been, for the past twenty years, some of the most productive sites of scholarship in the humanities, including history. They are topics of study that demand by their very nature the bringing together of different fields of endeavor, different disciplines, and different questions. This semester we will be addressing a number of current literatures and questions: settler colonialism, questions of the intersection of discursive construction and material processes of domination (especially as regards land, sovereignty over land, and land alienation), gender and sexuality, performance and demands for/discourses of authenticity, religion, belief, spirituality, and missionization, and racialization and racial construction. In a number of cases, we will be approaching these issues through memory, textuality, book studies, literary history, archaeology, art history, and museum studies. These fields are all rich with productive ideas, which should make for provocative discussion across geographies and time periods. Of particular interest will be: what do these other fields have to offer the discipline of history, and what does the discipline of history bring to these other disciplines and interdisciplinary modes of analysis? This is a conversation that can bring us together on a common intellectual project, given the disparate graduate programs you come from as students.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33699/1169
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 August 2016

Fall 2016  |  HIST 5910 Section 002: Topics in U.S. History -- Race and Class in the United States (37225)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1-4 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
HIST 8910 Section 002
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Thu 03:20PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 140
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Notes:
Race and Class in the US
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/37225/1169

Spring 2016  |  HIST 5910 Section 001: Topics in U.S. History -- Women and Gender in the United States (60000)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3-4 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
HIST 8910 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2016 - 02/28/2016
Wed 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 225
 
02/29/2016 - 03/05/2016
Wed 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 205
 
03/06/2016 - 05/06/2016
Wed 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 225
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tdeutsch+HIST5910+Spring2016
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/60000/1163

Fall 2015  |  HIST 5910 Section 001: Topics in U.S. History -- Mass Incarceration & Public Memory (25701)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
HIST 8910 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2015 - 12/16/2015
Thu 06:20PM - 08:50PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 260
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Description:
This graduate seminar explores the relationship between ideas about sexuality and religion over the course of United States history. We will also consider the ways in which religion has influenced sexual practice over time and examine how religious conceptions of sexual propriety and normativity have shaped American culture and politics. Finally, we will engage critical interdisciplinary scholarship that analyzes sexuality in relation to theories and histories of secularism. Students will be expected to read and discuss one monograph per week (or the equivalent), write weekly response papers, conduct one oral presentation, and produce a final written assignment based on original research or that critically examines major scholarship on course themes.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/25701/1159
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 November 2011

Spring 2015  |  HIST 5910 Section 001: Topics in U.S. History -- Indigenous Histories and American Colonialism (67635)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
HIST 8910 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Tue 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Walter W Heller Hall 1210A
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Description:
Colonialism and Indigenous studies have been, for the past twenty years, two of the most productive sites of scholarship in the humanities, including history. This semester we will be addressing a number of current literatures and questions: settler colonialism, questions of the intersection of discursive construction and material processes of domination (especially as regards land, sovereignty over land, and land alienation), gender and sexuality, performance and demands for / discourses of authenticity, religion, belief, spirituality, and missionization, and racialization and racial construction. In a number of cases, we will be approaching these issues through memory, textuality, book studies, public history, and museum studies. These fields are all rich with productive ideas, which should make for provocative discussion across geographies and time periods.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67635/1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 December 2014

Spring 2015  |  HIST 5910 Section 003: Topics in U.S. History -- History Through Memoirs: the 20th-Century (67638)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
HIST 8910 Section 003
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Wed 03:35PM - 05:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Walter W Heller Hall 1210A
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Description:
HISTORY THROUGH MEMOIR. This graduate seminar uses memoirs, non-fictional life stories narrated in the first person, as a lens into the past and, just as importantly, as a way to investigate and problematize what counts as history itself. The relationship between personal narratives and professionally produced histories is often fraught or confused, even though both can reasonably be understood as forms of creative non-fiction. Is the memoirist responsible to the historical record in the same way as an historian? Does the historian know how to assess and appreciate the power of personal memory? This course will examine abiding and often vexing concerns about truth-telling and story-telling, about emotional accuracy, factuality, and documentability, and about the role of individual memory in the writing of a larger social and political history. We will explore the gains and the limitations of using personal stories to understand past experience. Course material consists of books, essays, and a documentary film that reside at the intersection of personal experience and social and political history. Theoretical pieces that examine the blurred boundaries of history and memoir will help us to clarify what is at stake in the truth claims of each. In a number of short, reflective essays, students will bring theoretical approaches to bear on particular memoirs: how the memoir makes its truth claims, and what is compelling or unsettling about this particular rendition of the past. Students will also research and write an essay of non-fiction (8-12 pages) that retells but also contextualizes and interprets a personal memory. (It can be that of the student or of someone else). The point is to investigate the relationship between personal memory and verifiable historical fact, and to articulate what insights and challenges come with using personal memory as an historical source. STUDENTS FROM ALL DEPARTMENTS ARE WELCOME. PLEASE CONTACT INSTRUCTOR FOR A SYLLABUS, kfischer@umn.edu.
Grading:
80% Reports/Papers
20% In-class Presentations
Class Format:
5% Film/Video
95% Discussion
Workload:
150-300 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
4 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67638/1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2014

Spring 2015  |  HIST 5910 Section 004: Topics in U.S. History -- Readings and Research in Immigration History (67636)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
HIST 8910 Section 004
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Wed 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 435
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
Class Description:
U.S. IMMIGRATION HISTORY Dreamers. H1-B visa holders. ?New? immigrants, ?old? immigrants, and ?undocumented? immigrants. International students. Border security. Migrant labor. Anti-immigrant movements. Deportation. Public Health, Assimilation. Activism. Transnational and diasporic identities. Immigration is at the center of dramatic changes in contemporary American society, but of course, immigration is nothing new, and the U.S. is just one of many countries around the world with histories of emigration and immigration. We live in a world in motion, and migration and its consequences are central topics of study for scholars in a multiple disciplines. This graduate seminar examines immigration to the U.S. beginning with the origins of the field and its evolution to encompass a broad range of topics, methodologies, and perspectives, including: immigration and settler colonialism, race, citizenship, gender and sexuality, law and politics, labor, international relations, refugee resettlement, human rights, and global/transnational/diasporic frameworks and identities, community-engaged research, oral history, and digital storytelling. We will read ?classics? as well as newly-published work that overlap with American Indian, African American, Chicano/Latino, and Asian American Studies. On the 50th anniversary of the 1965 Immigration Act, we'll consider the connections between historical and contemporary migrations and migration scholarship, exploring where the field has been and where it is going. We'll draw from resources at the Immigration History Research Center and Archives, the oldest and largest institution studying and preserving immigrant and refugee life in North America. We'll discuss research and writing strategies across a broad range of disciplines that make up the interdisciplinary field of U.S. migration studies.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67636/1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 October 2014

Fall 2014  |  HIST 5910 Section 001: Topics in U.S. History -- New Approaches to African American History (34545)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
AFRO 8910 Section 001
HIST 8910 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Wed 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Walter W Heller Hall 1229
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34545/1149

Spring 2013  |  HIST 5910 Section 003: Topics in U.S. History -- Indigenous Histories and American Colonialism (58415)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (4 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
AMIN 5920 Section 001
HIST 8910 Section 003
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Fri 01:25PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 205
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits.
Class Description:
Students will explore the politics of history by reading in American Indian, Hawaiian, and African American interventions on the meaning of colonialism and race. The course centers on cultural and intellectual history and politics, but because these are fields of inquiry that are best studied in broadly interdisciplinary ways, it incorporates readings in theory and cultural studies, as well as foundational documents by nineteenth-century American Indian, Hawaiian, and African American intellectuals.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/58415/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 November 2009

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