8 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2021  |  GLOS 5403 Section 001: Human Rights Advocacy (50813)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Delivery Mode
Online Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Meets With:
LAW 6058 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 04/26/2021
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (19 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
Class Description:
This 3-credit seminar will study the histories, philosophies, and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class provides an opportunity to put in perspective students' previous experiences as interns or staff with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the human rights field. The class will use case studies and other participatory methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. We will learn about tactical methods including fact-finding and documentation of violations, normative campaigns, the use of social networking, and discuss the effectiveness and consequences of each method. The class will consider critiques of human rights practice including cultural relativsm and the asymmetries of power that affect relationships among human rights advocates. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
Grading:
20% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 30% oral presentation; 30% group project
Class Format:
15% Lecture
75% Discussion
10% Group Work
Workload:
60-100 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term Other Workload: 3 short papers and 1 oral presentation; group advocacy presentations.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50813/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 April 2012

Spring 2020  |  GLOS 5403 Section 001: Human Rights Advocacy (54485)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
LAW 6058 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 184
Enrollment Status:
Open (11 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
Class Description:
This 3-credit seminar will study the histories, philosophies, and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class provides an opportunity to put in perspective students' previous experiences as interns or staff with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the human rights field. The class will use case studies and other participatory methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. We will learn about tactical methods including fact-finding and documentation of violations, normative campaigns, the use of social networking, and discuss the effectiveness and consequences of each method. The class will consider critiques of human rights practice including cultural relativsm and the asymmetries of power that affect relationships among human rights advocates. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
Grading:
20% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 30% oral presentation; 30% group project
Class Format:
15% Lecture
75% Discussion
10% Group Work
Workload:
60-100 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term Other Workload: 3 short papers and 1 oral presentation; group advocacy presentations.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54485/1203
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 April 2012

Spring 2019  |  GLOS 5403 Section 001: Human Rights Advocacy (54739)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
LAW 6058 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2019 - 04/29/2019
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 135
Enrollment Status:
Open (13 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
Class Description:
This 3-credit seminar will study the histories, philosophies, and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class provides an opportunity to put in perspective students' previous experiences as interns or staff with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the human rights field. The class will use case studies and other participatory methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. We will learn about tactical methods including fact-finding and documentation of violations, normative campaigns, the use of social networking, and discuss the effectiveness and consequences of each method. The class will consider critiques of human rights practice including cultural relativsm and the asymmetries of power that affect relationships among human rights advocates. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
Grading:
20% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 30% oral presentation; 30% group project
Class Format:
15% Lecture
75% Discussion
10% Group Work
Workload:
60-100 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term Other Workload: 3 short papers and 1 oral presentation; group advocacy presentations.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54739/1193
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 April 2012

Spring 2018  |  GLOS 5403 Section 001: Human Rights Advocacy (51622)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
LAW 6058 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 04/23/2018
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 135
Enrollment Status:
Closed (19 of 18 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
Class Description:
This 3-credit seminar will study the histories, philosophies, and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class provides an opportunity to put in perspective students' previous experiences as interns or staff with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the human rights field. The class will use case studies and other participatory methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. We will learn about tactical methods including fact-finding and documentation of violations, normative campaigns, the use of social networking, and discuss the effectiveness and consequences of each method. The class will consider critiques of human rights practice including cultural relativsm and the asymmetries of power that affect relationships among human rights advocates. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
Grading:
20% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 30% oral presentation; 30% group project
Class Format:
15% Lecture
75% Discussion
10% Group Work
Workload:
60-100 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term Other Workload: 3 short papers and 1 oral presentation; group advocacy presentations.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51622/1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 April 2012

Spring 2017  |  GLOS 5403 Section 001: Human Rights Advocacy (52449)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
LAW 6058 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2017 - 05/05/2017
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 435
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
Class Description:
This 3-credit seminar will study the histories, philosophies, and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class provides an opportunity to put in perspective students' previous experiences as interns or staff with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the human rights field. The class will use case studies and other participatory methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. We will learn about tactical methods including fact-finding and documentation of violations, normative campaigns, the use of social networking, and discuss the effectiveness and consequences of each method. The class will consider critiques of human rights practice including cultural relativsm and the asymmetries of power that affect relationships among human rights advocates. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
Grading:
20% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 30% oral presentation; 30% group project
Class Format:
15% Lecture
75% Discussion
10% Group Work
Workload:
60-100 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term Other Workload: 3 short papers and 1 oral presentation; group advocacy presentations.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52449/1173
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 April 2012

Spring 2016  |  GLOS 5403 Section 001: Human Rights Advocacy (60376)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
LAW 6058 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2016 - 05/06/2016
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 230
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
Class Description:
This 3-credit seminar will study the histories, philosophies, and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class provides an opportunity to put in perspective students' previous experiences as interns or staff with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the human rights field. The class will use case studies and other participatory methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. We will learn about tactical methods including fact-finding and documentation of violations, normative campaigns, the use of social networking, and discuss the effectiveness and consequences of each method. The class will consider critiques of human rights practice including cultural relativsm and the asymmetries of power that affect relationships among human rights advocates. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
Grading:
20% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 30% oral presentation; 30% group project
Class Format:
15% Lecture
75% Discussion
10% Group Work
Workload:
60-100 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term Other Workload: 3 short papers and 1 oral presentation; group advocacy presentations.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/60376/1163
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 April 2012

Spring 2015  |  GLOS 5403 Section 001: Human Rights Advocacy (68173)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
LAW 6058 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
Class Notes:
Please conctact Barbara Frey at freyx001@umn.edu for a permission number.
Class Description:
This 3-credit seminar will study the histories, philosophies, and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class provides an opportunity to put in perspective students' previous experiences as interns or staff with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the human rights field. The class will use case studies and other participatory methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. We will learn about tactical methods including fact-finding and documentation of violations, normative campaigns, the use of social networking, and discuss the effectiveness and consequences of each method. The class will consider critiques of human rights practice including cultural relativsm and the asymmetries of power that affect relationships among human rights advocates. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
Grading:
20% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 30% oral presentation; 30% group project
Class Format:
15% Lecture
75% Discussion
10% Group Work
Workload:
60-100 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term Other Workload: 3 short papers and 1 oral presentation; group advocacy presentations.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/68173/1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 April 2012

Fall 2013  |  GLOS 5403 Section 001: Human Rights Advocacy (26275)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
LAW 6058 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2013 - 12/11/2013
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 425
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study.
Class Description:
This 3-credit seminar will study the histories, philosophies, and activities of human rights activists and organizations. The course examines the theoretical basis of the human rights movement, the principles underlying key organizations in the human rights field as well as their strategies, tactics, and programs. The class provides an opportunity to put in perspective students' previous experiences as interns or staff with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the human rights field. The class will use case studies and other participatory methods to understand and to evaluate the work of human rights activists. We will learn about tactical methods including fact-finding and documentation of violations, normative campaigns, the use of social networking, and discuss the effectiveness and consequences of each method. The class will consider critiques of human rights practice including cultural relativsm and the asymmetries of power that affect relationships among human rights advocates. Students will consider the basic organizational structure and fundraising needs of NGOs. Students will design and present a research project based on their selection of in-class topics. Readings include material on the history of NGOs; roots and development of the human rights movement; analysis of key NGOs; advocacy within international institutions; and reports and publications from NGOs working in the field.
Grading:
20% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 30% oral presentation; 30% group project
Class Format:
15% Lecture
75% Discussion
10% Group Work
Workload:
60-100 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term Other Workload: 3 short papers and 1 oral presentation; group advocacy presentations.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/26275/1139
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 April 2012

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