33 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2021  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Capstone Experience: Seminar (48643)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 38 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. This course is completely online in a synchronous format. The course will meet online at the scheduled times. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC4966W+Spring2021
Class Description:

This course is designed to: a) provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a portfolio of self-presentation materials and sociological analyses based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. The main goal of the course is to guide you through the process of writing your capstone portfolio by providing structure, advice, and encouragement. Successful completion of the analytic portion of your portfolio shows mastery of the skills and perspectives of your field of study. Along the way, we will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civil engagement.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Seniors with a major in Sociology
Learning Objectives:


Grading:
Active class participation in activities, discussion, and in-class writing (20% of grade)
Capstone Portfolio (60% of grade) -- Includes resume, personal statement, paper analyzing CEL site, and paper analyzing interview
Community-Engaged Learning (20% of grade)
Exam Format:
There are no exams
Class Format:
20% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
40% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/48643/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/liebler_SOC4966W_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 October 2019

Spring 2021  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Capstone Experience: Seminar (50905)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 38 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. This course is completely online in a synchronous format. The course will meet online at the scheduled times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC4966W+Spring2021
Class Description:

This course is designed to: a) provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a portfolio of self-presentation materials and sociological analyses based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. The main goal of the course is to guide you through the process of writing your capstone portfolio by providing structure, advice, and encouragement. Successful completion of the analytic portion of your portfolio shows mastery of the skills and perspectives of your field of study. Along the way, we will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civil engagement.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Seniors with a major in Sociology
Learning Objectives:


Grading:
Active class participation in activities, discussion, and in-class writing (20% of grade)
Capstone Portfolio (60% of grade) -- Includes resume, personal statement, paper analyzing CEL site, and paper analyzing interview
Community-Engaged Learning (20% of grade)
Exam Format:
There are no exams
Class Format:
20% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
40% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50905/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/liebler_SOC4966W_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 October 2019

Spring 2021  |  SOC 4966W Section 003: Capstone Experience: Seminar (66596)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 38 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. This course is completely online in a synchronous format. The course will meet online at the scheduled times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC4966W+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course will guide you through the process of writing your senior project paper, a graduation requirement for all Sociology majors. The class will structure your work as you select your topic, write a draft, and polish your paper. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will also help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and career choices, developing resumes, and getting ready for job interviews. Presentations and discussions by students are organized in class to help them learn from each other. This is a writing intensive class with a total of six writing assignments. The class is organized into three parts.

Part One (weeks 1-3) is a recap of sociological knowledge. What is sociology? What are the key elements of a sociological analysis? What are career choices for a sociology major? These three questions are focused in lectures and in-class discussions. The last lecture is a description of three options from which each student chooses for his/her senior project paper.

Part Two (weeks 4-6) is focused on expectations and requirements of your major project. This project should be the capstone expression of your "sociological imagination." It should show the knowledge, skills, and ethics that are central to the practice of Sociology. Examples of each of the three different kinds of a major project paper are discussed in lectures.

Part Three (weeks 7-14) is designed for the development and finalization of your senior project paper. Each student is required to schedule individual meetings with your chosen Instructor to discuss the issues and challenges that the students encounter during their work progress toward the completion of the senior project paper.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology major in the senior year.
Learning Objectives:
To complete senior project paper, a requirement for graduation.
Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Class Format:
30% Lectures
20% Writing exercises
50% Community engagement and major project paper
Workload:
Less than 20 Pages Reading Per Week, Four writing exercises (1-5 pages) and One major project paper (12-18 pages).
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66596/1213
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC4966W_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 October 2019

Fall 2020  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Capstone Experience: Seminar (13786)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Closed (70 of 65 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. This course is completely online in a synchronous format. The course will meet online at the scheduled times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC4966W+Fall2020
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major and to think ahead about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University. It is, in short, a capstone course. The focus is on how sociological knowledge, research, and thought help to promote critical thinking, effective communication, an appreciation of diversity and ambiguity, and social responsibility in public life. Specific topics include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change; the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; the day-to-day work of professional sociologists in the academy; the professions and careers where sociological methods and insights are most useful and prominent; and the utility and value of situating ones life and work in sociological perspective. This will all be situated in the context of the role of ideas, information, intellectuals, and experts in the complex, contemporary global world. Indeed, the larger intellectual goals of the course are to encourage you to think critically about your place in society and history, to reflect on the role of knowledge in the contemporary world, and to understand what skills and understandings you will take with you from your study of sociology to your future careers and lives beyond the academy.
Grading:
50% Reports/Papers
25% Reflection Papers
25% Class Participation
Class Format:
25% Lecture
10% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
15% Guest Speakers
25% Service Learning
Workload:
25-50 Pages Reading Per Week
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/13786/1209
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2020  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Capstone Experience: Seminar (52136)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (53 of 54 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC4966W+Spring2020
Class Description:
This course will guide you through the process of writing your senior project paper, a graduation requirement for all Sociology majors. The class will structure your work as you select your topic, write a draft, and polish your paper. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will also help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and career choices, developing resumes, and getting ready for job interviews. Presentations and discussions by students are organized in class to help them learn from each other. This is a writing intensive class with a total of six writing assignments. The class is organized into three parts.

Part One (weeks 1-3) is a recap of sociological knowledge. What is sociology? What are the key elements of a sociological analysis? What are career choices for a sociology major? These three questions are focused in lectures and in-class discussions. The last lecture is a description of three options from which each student chooses for his/her senior project paper.

Part Two (weeks 4-6) is focused on expectations and requirements of your major project. This project should be the capstone expression of your "sociological imagination." It should show the knowledge, skills, and ethics that are central to the practice of Sociology. Examples of each of the three different kinds of a major project paper are discussed in lectures.

Part Three (weeks 7-14) is designed for the development and finalization of your senior project paper. Each student is required to schedule individual meetings with your chosen Instructor to discuss the issues and challenges that the students encounter during their work progress toward the completion of the senior project paper.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology major in the senior year.
Learning Objectives:
To complete senior project paper, a requirement for graduation.
Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Class Format:
30% Lectures
20% Writing exercises
50% Community engagement and major project paper
Workload:
Less than 20 Pages Reading Per Week, Four writing exercises (1-5 pages) and One major project paper (12-18 pages).
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52136/1203
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC4966W_Spring2020.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 October 2019

Spring 2020  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Capstone Experience: Seminar (54587)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Closed (54 of 54 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC4966W+Spring2020
Class Description:

This course is designed to: a) provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a portfolio of self-presentation materials and sociological analyses based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. The main goal of the course is to guide you through the process of writing your capstone portfolio by providing structure, advice, and encouragement. Successful completion of the analytic portion of your portfolio shows mastery of the skills and perspectives of your field of study. Along the way, we will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civil engagement.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Seniors with a major in Sociology
Learning Objectives:


Grading:
Active class participation in activities, discussion, and in-class writing (20% of grade)
Capstone Portfolio (60% of grade) -- Includes resume, personal statement, paper analyzing CEL site, and paper analyzing interview
Community-Engaged Learning (20% of grade)
Exam Format:
There are no exams
Class Format:
20% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
40% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54587/1203
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/liebler_SOC4966W_Spring2020.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 October 2019

Fall 2019  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Capstone Experience: Seminar (17117)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2019 - 12/11/2019
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 317
Enrollment Status:
Open (52 of 54 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schurman+SOC4966W+Fall2019
Class Description:
This course serves as a capstone to your studies in sociology. It is designed to provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; to think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of sociology can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University, and to use that knowledge to complete a senior project. The particular focus of this section of the course will be on the "world of work." While the main practical goal of the course is to guide you through the process of doing a senior project (a graduation requirement for all Sociology majors), the central intellectual goal of the course will be to learn about changes in the US economy over the last half century and their implications for the labor market; the new culture of capitalism; different organizational cultures; "life on the job;" and more. All senior projects will need to address some aspect of the sociology of work and will involve both research and your own personal experience/s as a worker, be it through your job, an internship, or service learning. Classes will include a combination of lectures, guest speakers, films, active learning exercises, writing exercises, and engaged discussions of the required readings.
Grading:
35% Reports/Papers
15% Special Projects
15% Written Homework
15% Reflection Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: I require regular, 2 paragraph written commentaries on the readings, which will constitute 15% of your grade. The 'special project' will involve research into the occupation that most attracts you and will be part of your course paper/project
Exam Format:
none
Class Format:
15% Lecture
10% Film/Video
25% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
5% Web Based
20% Service Learning Attendance and active participation in this class are mandatory and crucial.
Workload:
50-80 Pages Reading Per Week
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Paper(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Other Workload: Readings will be a core part of this course, as will be research on occupations that interest you.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17117/1199
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2019  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Capstone Experience: Seminar (52266)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2019 - 05/06/2019
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Closed (54 of 52 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC4966W+Spring2019
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of Sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience, which will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your Sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper.


1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions most closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change;
the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

3) Service Learning Report or Action Project. This option will involve writing a sociological report based on community service learning with a local community organization of your choice. This paper will be based on a minimum of 30 hours of community service work completed during the course of the semester. The Community Service Learning Center will help you find a place, or if you're already volunteering they will help you formalize this so you can write on it.

Alternatively, instead of writing a report based upon the service experience, the final product will involve working on, and writing about, an actual project of direct relevance or immediate concern to your organization or agency. These projects might involve a variety of tasks such as writing a mission statement or action plan, creating program materials or a grant proposal, working on an evaluation study, or producing publicity information.

Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52266/1193
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/liebler_SOC4966W_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2019  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Capstone Experience: Seminar (54863)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2019 - 05/06/2019
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Closed (54 of 52 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?morti002+SOC4966W+Spring2019
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience. It will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper. There are two options:

1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change; the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Exam Format:
no exam
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54863/1193
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Capstone Experience: Seminar (17355)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Closed (57 of 57 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC4966W+Fall2018
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of Sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience, which will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your Sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper.


1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions most closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change;
the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

3) Service Learning Report or Action Project. This option will involve writing a sociological report based on community service learning with a local community organization of your choice. This paper will be based on a minimum of 30 hours of community service work completed during the course of the semester. The Community Service Learning Center will help you find a place, or if you're already volunteering they will help you formalize this so you can write on it.

Alternatively, instead of writing a report based upon the service experience, the final product will involve working on, and writing about, an actual project of direct relevance or immediate concern to your organization or agency. These projects might involve a variety of tasks such as writing a mission statement or action plan, creating program materials or a grant proposal, working on an evaluation study, or producing publicity information.

Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17355/1189
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC4966W_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (49005)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Enrollment Status:
Closed (52 of 52 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?morti002+SOC4966W+Spring2018
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience. It will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper. There are two options:

1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change; the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Exam Format:
no exam
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/49005/1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Major-Project Seminar (51789)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Closed (52 of 52 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schurman+SOC4966W+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course serves as a capstone to your studies in sociology. It is designed to provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; to think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of sociology can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University, and to use that knowledge to complete a senior project. The particular focus of this section of the course will be on the "world of work." While the main practical goal of the course is to guide you through the process of doing a senior project (a graduation requirement for all Sociology majors), the central intellectual goal of the course will be to learn about changes in the US economy over the last half century and their implications for the labor market; the new culture of capitalism; different organizational cultures; "life on the job;" and more. All senior projects will need to address some aspect of the sociology of work and will involve both research and your own personal experience/s as a worker, be it through your job, an internship, or service learning. Classes will include a combination of lectures, guest speakers, films, active learning exercises, writing exercises, and engaged discussions of the required readings.
Grading:
35% Reports/Papers
15% Special Projects
15% Written Homework
15% Reflection Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: I require regular, 2 paragraph written commentaries on the readings, which will constitute 15% of your grade. The 'special project' will involve research into the occupation that most attracts you and will be part of your course paper/project
Exam Format:
none
Class Format:
15% Lecture
10% Film/Video
25% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
5% Web Based
20% Service Learning Attendance and active participation in this class are mandatory and crucial.
Workload:
50-80 Pages Reading Per Week
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Paper(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Other Workload: Readings will be a core part of this course, as will be research on occupations that interest you.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51789/1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (14251)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mgoldman+SOC4966W+Fall2017
Class Description:
The purpose of this course is to assist students in fulfilling CLA's senior project requirement, the 'capstone' of the undergraduate career. Enrollment is limited to student majors in Sociology. The class provides a structure and guided format for completing the senior project. There will be two options: the research option and the service learning option. For the first, students select a topic, formulate a research question, read on the topic, conduct preliminary research, and write up lessons learned from the experience. Emphasis will be on the preparation, reading, and thought that goes into research, less so the implementation, as time is limited. Students can also choose the `service learning' option, in which they will be required to do community service learning and to write either a field research paper or an action project paper based on their work with participating community organizations. The final project will build on the values of critical thinking, effective communication, diversity, and social responsibility that are cultivated in sociology. Course readings provide guidelines about how to ask sociological questions, and the ethical questions concerning research. Course work requires intense individual engagement in the design of a project, and active class discussion of the issues students face in the process.
Grading:
90% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/14251/1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Summer 2017  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (82618)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 10 wk
 
06/12/2017 - 08/18/2017
Mon, Wed 06:00PM - 07:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-111
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?manni224+SOC4966W+Summer2017
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of Sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience, which will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your Sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper.


1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions most closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change;
the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

3) Service Learning Report or Action Project. This option will involve writing a sociological report based on community service learning with a local community organization of your choice. This paper will be based on a minimum of 30 hours of community service work completed during the course of the semester. The Community Service Learning Center will help you find a place, or if you're already volunteering they will help you formalize this so you can write on it.

Alternatively, instead of writing a report based upon the service experience, the final product will involve working on, and writing about, an actual project of direct relevance or immediate concern to your organization or agency. These projects might involve a variety of tasks such as writing a mission statement or action plan, creating program materials or a grant proposal, working on an evaluation study, or producing publicity information.

Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82618/1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2017  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (49404)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2017 - 05/05/2017
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 215
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC4966W+Spring2017
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of Sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience, which will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your Sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper.


1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions most closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change;
the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

3) Service Learning Report or Action Project. This option will involve writing a sociological report based on community service learning with a local community organization of your choice. This paper will be based on a minimum of 30 hours of community service work completed during the course of the semester. The Community Service Learning Center will help you find a place, or if you're already volunteering they will help you formalize this so you can write on it.

Alternatively, instead of writing a report based upon the service experience, the final product will involve working on, and writing about, an actual project of direct relevance or immediate concern to your organization or agency. These projects might involve a variety of tasks such as writing a mission statement or action plan, creating program materials or a grant proposal, working on an evaluation study, or producing publicity information.

Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/49404/1173
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/liebler_SOC4966W_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2017  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Major-Project Seminar (52810)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2017 - 05/05/2017
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?morti002+SOC4966W+Spring2017
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience. It will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper. There are two options:

1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change; the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Exam Format:
no exam
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52810/1173
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Fall 2016  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (14418)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 215
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?aminzade+SOC4966W+Fall2016
Class Description:
This section is a community service learning version of the senior projects course that is designed to provide students with an opportunity to think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociology major can be used in lives and careers outside of the University. The course will explore the role of sociological knowledge, research, and thought in contemporary American public life. The focus will be on how those outside the academy (e.g. journalists, judges, lawmakers, probation officers, etc.) have used, ignored, or misused sociological knowledge. Instead of traditional research projects, students will be encouraged to conduct projects that are more engaged and applied in nature. Specifically, students will be required to do community service learning and to write either a field research paper or an action project paper based on their work with participating community organizations. The final project will build on the values of critical thinking, effective communication, diversity, and social responsibility that are cultivated in sociology.
Grading:
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: paper proposals, outlines and drafts
Class Format:
33% Lecture
33% Discussion
33% Service Learning paper development and one on one meetings with instructors
Workload:
25-30 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
Other Workload: one final paper with preparatory drafts along the way
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/14418/1169
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 November 2015

Summer 2016  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (82615)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Extended Regular Session
 
06/13/2016 - 08/24/2016
Mon, Wed 06:00PM - 07:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 260
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
No class on Monday, July 4th or Monday, August 22nd. Last class on Wednesday, August 24th. Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?step0310+SOC4966W+Summer2015
Class Description:
This course serves as a capstone to your studies in sociology. The focus is on how sociological knowledge, research, and thought help to promote critical thinking, effective communication, an appreciation of diversity, and social responsibility in public life. The first goal of the course is to guide you through the process of writing your senior project paper, a graduation requirement for all sociology majors. This project and related materials require you to reflect on the role of sociological knowledge in the contemporary world and to connect your sociological knowledge to a community-based senior research project. The second goal is for you to connect a sociological perspective to your professional and civic life following graduation. Classes will include a combination of lectures, active learning exercises, writing exercises to help you prepare your main paper, and discussions of the required readings.

Special note: No class on Monday, July 4th or Monday, August 22. Last class on Wednesday, August 24th.
Grading:
60% Reports/Papers
20% Written assignments
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
25% Lecture
30% Discussion
30% Small Group Activities
15% Guest Speakers
Workload:
15-25 Pages Writing Per Term
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82615/1165
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 April 2016

Spring 2016  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (47334)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2016 - 05/06/2016
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-142
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?morti002+SOC4966W+Spring2016
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of Sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience, which will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your Sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper.

1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions most closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change; the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

3) Service Learning Report or Action Project. This option will involve writing a sociological report based on community service learning with a local community organization of your choice. This paper will be based on a minimum of 30 hours of community service work completed during the course of the semester. The Community Service Learning Center will help you find a place, or if you're already volunteering they will help you formalize this so you can write on it.

Alternatively, instead of writing a report based upon the service experience, the final product will involve working on, and writing about, an actual project of direct relevance or immediate concern to your organization or agency. These projects might involve a variety of tasks such as writing a mission statement or action plan, creating program materials or a grant proposal, working on an evaluation study, or producing publicity information.

Grading:
60% Reports/Papers
20% Written assignments
20% Class Participation
Exam Format:
no exam
Class Format:
25% Lecture
50% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities and in class writing
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week Paper draft assignments Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/47334/1163
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 November 2015

Spring 2016  |  SOC 4966W Section 003: Major-Project Seminar (68238)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2016 - 05/06/2016
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 240
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC4966W+Spring2016
Class Description:
In this "capstone" version of the course, we will be looking back at what sociology was all about, looking forward to what sociology majors do after graduation. Most important, the course will provide the resources, assistance and encouragement to help majors in the Sociology Department to fulfill this requirement for a paper in the major field during the senior year -- mostly based on observational studies tied to service learning projects. The course is organized as a seminar and workshop. There are no formal lectures, but the instructor will present overviews of the stages of research and writing necessary to complete the senior project paper. Students build their major project through completing guided, periodic assignments. Along the way, we will be reading and thinking about how to apply a sociological eye to understand success, failure, and the world around us.
Grading:
50% Reports/Papers
10% Attendance
20% Journal
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
25% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
40% Service Learning
Workload:
20-50 Pages Reading Per Week
25-35 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Paper(s)
Other Workload: Assignments relating to sections of project paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/68238/1163
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 November 2015

Fall 2015  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (11821)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2015 - 12/16/2015
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC4966W+Fall2015
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major and to think ahead about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University. It is, in short, a capstone course. The focus is on how sociological knowledge, research, and thought help to promote critical thinking, effective communication, an appreciation of diversity and ambiguity, and social responsibility in public life. Specific topics include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change; the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; the day-to-day work of professional sociologists in the academy; the professions and careers where sociological methods and insights are most useful and prominent; and the utility and value of situating ones life and work in sociological perspective. This will all be situated in the context of the role of ideas, information, intellectuals, and experts in the complex, contemporary global world. Indeed, the larger intellectual goals of the course are to encourage you to think critically about your place in society and history, to reflect on the role of knowledge in the contemporary world, and to understand what skills and understandings you will take with you from your study of sociology to your future careers and lives beyond the academy.
Grading:
50% Reports/Papers
25% Reflection Papers
25% Class Participation
Class Format:
25% Lecture
10% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
15% Guest Speakers
25% Service Learning
Workload:
25-50 Pages Reading Per Week
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/11821/1159
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 April 2013

Summer 2015  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (80865)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 10 wk
 
06/15/2015 - 08/21/2015
Mon, Wed 06:00PM - 07:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management L-118
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?step0310+SOC4966W+Summer2015
Class Description:
This course serves as a capstone to your studies in sociology. The focus is on how sociological knowledge, research, and thought help to promote critical thinking, effective communication, an appreciation of diversity, and social responsibility in public life. The first goal of the course is to guide you through the process of writing your senior project paper, a graduation requirement for all sociology majors. This project and related materials require you to reflect on the role of sociological knowledge in the contemporary world and to connect your sociological knowledge to a community-based senior research project. The second goal is for you to connect a sociological perspective to your professional and civic life following graduation. Classes will include a combination of lectures, active learning exercises, writing exercises to help you prepare your main paper, and discussions of the required readings.
Class Format:
25% Lecture
30% Discussion
30% Small Group Activities
15% Guest Speakers
Workload:
15-25 Pages Writing Per Term
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/80865/1155
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 March 2015

Spring 2015  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (47165)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Tue 06:00PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register.
Class Description:
This course serves as a capstone to your studies in sociology. It is designed to provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; to think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of sociology can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University, and to use that knowledge to complete a senior project. The particular focus of this section of the course will be on the "world of work." While the main practical goal of the course is to guide you through the process of doing a senior project (a graduation requirement for all Sociology majors), the central intellectual goal of the course will be to learn about changes in the US economy over the last half century and their implications for the labor market; the new culture of capitalism; different organizational cultures; "life on the job;" and more. All senior projects will need to address some aspect of the sociology of work and will involve both research and your own personal experience/s as a worker, be it through your job, an internship, or service learning. Classes will include a combination of lectures, guest speakers, films, active learning exercises, writing exercises, and engaged discussions of the required readings.
Grading:
35% Reports/Papers
15% Special Projects
15% Written Homework
15% Reflection Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: I require regular, 2 paragraph written commentaries on the readings, which will constitute 15% of your grade. The 'special project' will involve research into the occupation that most attracts you and will be part of your course paper/project
Exam Format:
none
Class Format:
15% Lecture
10% Film/Video
25% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
5% Web Based
20% Service Learning Attendance and active participation in this class are mandatory and crucial.
Workload:
50-80 Pages Reading Per Week
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Paper(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Other Workload: Readings will be a core part of this course, as will be research on occupations that interest you.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/47165/1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 November 2014

Spring 2015  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Major-Project Seminar (47166)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 230
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register.
Class Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a senior thesis (usually based on community service learning); and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of sociology can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University. It is, in short, a capstone course. The focus is on how sociological knowledge, research, and thought help to promote critical thinking, effective communication, an appreciation of diversity, and social responsibility in public life. The main goal of the course is to guide you through the process of writing your senior thesis paper, a graduation requirement for all Sociology majors. Course materials encourage you to reflect on the role of sociological knowledge in the contemporary world and to connect your sociological knowledge to a community-based senior research project. Classes will include a combination of lectures, active learning exercises, writing exercises to help you prepare your main paper, and discussions of the required readings.
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
15% Student Presentations
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
4 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
12 Homework Assignment(s)
Other Workload: Regular engagement in service learning (or another community-based fieldsite).
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/47166/1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2013

Fall 2014  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (11938)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report.
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register.
Class Description:
This course serves as a capstone to your studies in sociology. It is designed to: a) provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; b) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of sociology can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University, and c) use that knowledge to write a senior project paper (usually based on community service learning). The focus is on how sociological knowledge, research, and thought help to promote critical thinking, effective communication, an appreciation of diversity, and social responsibility in public life. The main goal of the course is to guide you through the process of writing your senior project paper, a graduation requirement for all Sociology majors. Course materials encourage you to reflect on the role of sociological knowledge in the contemporary world and to connect your sociological knowledge to a community-based senior research project. Classes will include a combination of lectures, active learning exercises, writing exercises to help you prepare your main paper, and discussions of the required readings.
Grading:
50% Reports/Papers
30% Written Homework
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
20% Lecture
20% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
15% Guest Speakers
25% Service Learning
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/11938/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 April 2014

Fall 2014  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Major-Project Seminar (34391)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 430
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report.
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register.
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major and to think ahead about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University. It is, in short, a capstone course. The focus is on how sociological knowledge, research, and thought help to promote critical thinking, effective communication, an appreciation of diversity and ambiguity, and social responsibility in public life. Specific topics include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change; the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; the day-to-day work of professional sociologists in the academy; the professions and careers where sociological methods and insights are most useful and prominent; and the utility and value of situating ones life and work in sociological perspective. This will all be situated in the context of the role of ideas, information, intellectuals, and experts in the complex, contemporary global world. Indeed, the larger intellectual goals of the course are to encourage you to think critically about your place in society and history, to reflect on the role of knowledge in the contemporary world, and to understand what skills and understandings you will take with you from your study of sociology to your future careers and lives beyond the academy.
Grading:
50% Reports/Papers
25% Reflection Papers
25% Class Participation
Class Format:
25% Lecture
10% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
15% Guest Speakers
25% Service Learning
Workload:
25-50 Pages Reading Per Week
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34391/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 April 2013

Summer 2014  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (81809)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 10 wk
 
06/16/2014 - 08/22/2014
Mon, Wed 06:00PM - 07:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 245
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report.
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register.
Class Description:
Major Project Seminar is designed to provide sociology majors with resources and guidance necessary to complete an independent research project. To facilitate your success, I will present material and provide resources relevant to each stage of the research and writing processes including: formulating a research question, reviewing relevant literature, designing the data collection, collecting and analyzing data, and writing a final paper. At each of the above-mentioned stages, you will write and submit a section of your paper, steadily working toward a complete research project due at the close of the semester. You will receive detailed written feedback and one-on-one consultations throughout the research and writing processes. I encourage each of you to investigate a sociological topic of personal interest, thus increasing the likelihood that completion of your major project research experience, though demanding, will be both professionally rewarding and intellectually gratifying.
Grading:
60% Reports/Papers
10% Attendance
10% In-class Presentations
10% Class Participation
10% Laboratory Evaluation
Class Format:
20% Lecture
30% Discussion
20% Laboratory
20% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40 - 80 Pages Reading Per Week
40 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Other Workload: 1 Final paper is due at the end of the semester. Sections of the paper are due at different dates throughout the semester (detailed in course syllabus)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/81809/1145
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 March 2013

Spring 2014  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (51892)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report.
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register.
Class Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a senior research project based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of sociology can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University. The focus is on how sociological knowledge, research, and thought help to promote critical thinking, effective communication, an appreciation of diversity, and social responsibility in public life. The main goal of the course is to guide you through the process of writing your senior thesis paper, a graduation requirement for all Sociology majors. Course materials encourage you to reflect on the role of sociological knowledge in the contemporary world and to connect your sociological knowledge to a community-based senior research project. Classes will include a combination of lectures, active learning exercises, writing exercises to help you prepare your main paper, and discussions of the required readings.
Grading:
60% Reports/Papers
10% Attendance
20% Journal
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
10% Lecture
10% Film/Video
40% Discussion
10% Student Presentations
30% Service Learning
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
10 Homework Assignment(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51892/1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 October 2013

Spring 2014  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Major-Project Seminar (51893)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report.
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register.
Class Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a senior thesis (usually based on community service learning); and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of sociology can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University. It is, in short, a capstone course. The focus is on how sociological knowledge, research, and thought help to promote critical thinking, effective communication, an appreciation of diversity, and social responsibility in public life. The main goal of the course is to guide you through the process of writing your senior thesis paper, a graduation requirement for all Sociology majors. Course materials encourage you to reflect on the role of sociological knowledge in the contemporary world and to connect your sociological knowledge to a community-based senior research project. Classes will include a combination of lectures, active learning exercises, writing exercises to help you prepare your main paper, and discussions of the required readings.
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
15% Student Presentations
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
4 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
12 Homework Assignment(s)
Other Workload: Regular engagement in service learning (or another community-based fieldsite).
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51893/1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2013

Fall 2013  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (17646)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2013 - 12/11/2013
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report.
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register.
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major and to think ahead about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University. It is, in short, a capstone course. The focus is on how sociological knowledge, research, and thought help to promote critical thinking, effective communication, an appreciation of diversity and ambiguity, and social responsibility in public life. Specific topics include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change; the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; the day-to-day work of professional sociologists in the academy; the professions and careers where sociological methods and insights are most useful and prominent; and the utility and value of situating ones life and work in sociological perspective. This will all be situated in the context of the role of ideas, information, intellectuals, and experts in the complex, contemporary global world. Indeed, the larger intellectual goals of the course are to encourage you to think critically about your place in society and history, to reflect on the role of knowledge in the contemporary world, and to understand what skills and understandings you will take with you from your study of sociology to your future careers and lives beyond the academy.
Grading:
50% Reports/Papers
25% Reflection Papers
25% Class Participation
Class Format:
25% Lecture
10% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
15% Guest Speakers
25% Service Learning
Workload:
25-50 Pages Reading Per Week
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17646/1139
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 April 2013

Summer 2013  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (82107)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 10 wk
 
06/17/2013 - 08/23/2013
Mon, Wed 06:00PM - 07:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 430
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report.
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register.
Class Description:
Major Project Seminar is designed to provide sociology majors with resources and guidance necessary to complete an independent research project. To facilitate your success, I will present material and provide resources relevant to each stage of the research and writing processes including: formulating a research question, reviewing relevant literature, designing the data collection, collecting and analyzing data, and writing a final paper. At each of the above-mentioned stages, you will write and submit a section of your paper, steadily working toward a complete research project due at the close of the semester. You will receive detailed written feedback and one-on-one consultations throughout the research and writing processes. I encourage each of you to investigate a sociological topic of personal interest, thus increasing the likelihood that completion of your major project research experience, though demanding, will be both professionally rewarding and intellectually gratifying.
Grading:
60% Reports/Papers
10% Attendance
10% In-class Presentations
10% Class Participation
10% Laboratory Evaluation
Class Format:
20% Lecture
30% Discussion
20% Laboratory
20% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40 - 80 Pages Reading Per Week
40 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Other Workload: 1 Final paper is due at the end of the semester. Sections of the paper are due at different dates throughout the semester (detailed in course syllabus)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82107/1135
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 March 2013

Spring 2013  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (46892)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Seminar
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report.
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register.
Class Description:
Description: This Major Project Seminar is designed to provide the resources and guidance necessary for sociology majors to complete their senior research project structured around Community Service Learning. It will also serve as a capstone learning experience for the major, providing students with an opportunity to think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociology major can be used after students graduate. The instructor will present material relevant for each stage of the research and writing process including: formulating a research question, engaging with theory, designing the data collection, collecting and analyzing data, and writing a final paper. During the semester, students will write and submit sections of their paper, working toward a complete research project due at the close of the semester. Students will also work together in small groups, reading and commenting upon each other's work. Students will receive regular feedback from the instructor, as well as one-on-one consultation, throughout the research and writing processes.
Grading:
15% Reports/Papers
55% Special Projects
15% Journal
15% Class Participation
Class Format:
15% Lecture
30% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
35% Service Learning Students will participate in a service learning project for at least 30 hours.
Workload:
20-80 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Paper(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Other Workload: The heaviest reading load for this course will occur in the first half of the semester, while the writing load will be distributed throughout.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/46892/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 December 2012

Spring 2013  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Major-Project Seminar (46893)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Seminar
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report.
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register.
Class Description:
This section is a community service learning version of the senior projects course that is designed to provide students with an opportunity to think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociology major can be used in lives and careers outside of the University. The course will explore the role of sociological knowledge, research, and thought in contemporary American public life. The focus will be on how those outside the academy (e.g. journalists, judges, lawmakers, probation officers, etc.) have used, ignored, or misused sociological knowledge. Instead of traditional research projects, students will be encouraged to conduct projects that are more engaged and applied in nature. Specifically, students will be required to do community service learning and to write either a field research paper or an action project paper based on their work with participating community organizations. The final project will build on the values of critical thinking, effective communication, diversity, and social responsibility that are cultivated in sociology.
Grading:
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: paper proposals, outlines and drafts
Class Format:
33% Lecture
33% Discussion
33% Service Learning paper development and one on one meetings with instructors
Workload:
25-30 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
Other Workload: one final paper with preparatory drafts along the way
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/46893/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 October 2012

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