2 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2020  |  PA 5890 Section 001: Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs -- Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights (67712)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
5 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020
Mon 01:00PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Enrollment Status:
Closed (16 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?WALSH912+PA5890+Spring2020
Class Description:

This 3 credit course will familiarize you with core principles and techniques for human rights fact-finding, focusing especially on interview skills. You will learn what fact-finding is and how it is used to advance human rights. You'll also learn how to plan and prepare for fact-finding; coordinate with partners and others; navigate security challenges; conduct interviews with survivors, witnesses, officials, and others; minimize the risk of retraumatization and vicarious trauma; and adapt fact-finding interview approaches for challenging contexts (e.g., emergency or conflict settings, detention facilities, or refugee camps).


You will practice interview techniques through in-class simulations, and learn to tailor interviews for specific situations and populations. Discussions and exercises will address specific considerations when interviewing LGBTQI survivors, children, people with disabilities, older people, and other groups.


While there are many possible approaches to fact-finding, this course will focus heavily on one-on-one interviews. We will touch briefly on other forms of fact-finding, including through the use of various technologies.


The course will draw heavily on my experience conducting fact-finding interviews and training staff at Human Rights Watch. Bear in mind that this is just one of many approaches to investigating the realization or denial of human rights. This elective course should be considered a supplement to other courses on research methods, not a replacement. I strongly encourage students to take courses on qualitative research methods and social science perspectives on human rights. The approach taught in this course is more like investigative journalism paired with advocacy than like social science research.


There are no prerequisites.


Meets full semester.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students.
This course qualifies as an elective for the Master of Human Rights and the Human Rights Graduate Minor at the U.
Learning Objectives:

Learning objectives: Through this course, you will understand what fact-finding is, and how it is used in the human rights field. More specifically, you will have developed skills and knowledge that will enable you to:

  • Plan for fact-finding

  • Adhere to core standards and ethical considerations

  • Interview survivors of human rights abuses

  • Understand best practices for interviewing specific populations

  • Interview government officials, UN representatives, and others

  • Obtain secondary data and information

  • Handle the stress of human rights fact-finding, and minimize the risk of vicarious trauma

  • Prevent and handle security risks

  • Conduct interviews for multimedia

  • Understand options for technology-enabled fact-finding


Grading:
Grades are based on class participation and on written and verbal assignments and exercises. Grade basis can be A-F or S/N.
Exam Format:

No exams. Assignments will be practical, aimed at developing skills for planning and executing fact-finding.


Class Format:

Seminar style.

Workload:
Comparable to other graduate courses, with reading load probably somewhat lighter than other courses.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67712/1203
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/walsh912_PA5890_Spring2022.pdf (Spring 2022)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/walsh912_PA5890_Spring2021.pdf (Spring 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/walsh912_PA5890_Fall2020.pdf (Fall 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 December 2019

Spring 2020  |  PA 5890 Section 002: Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs -- Gender-Based Violence: Human Rights Responses (67713)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
5 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/17/2020 - 05/04/2020
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 15
Enrollment Status:
Open (13 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?WALSH912+PA5890+Spring2020
Class Description:
This seminar will introduce you to how human rights actors have engaged with the issue of gender-based violence. We will survey global and regional human rights standards and mechanisms that have evolved over the past three decades, and their application today at the local and international level.

The types of gender-based violence we will discuss as examples are: domestic violence; sexual violence; femicide; workplace sexual harassment and violence; online and technology-facilitated gender-based violence; and child marriage.

Throughout the course, we will delve into General Recommendation No. 35 on "gender-based violence against women," adopted by the UN Committee on the Elimination of Violence against Women in 2017, as a primary "soft law" source on human rights and gender-based violence. It focuses on: legislative measures; prevention; protection; prosecution and punishment; reparations; coordination, monitoring and data collection; and international cooperation. This source acknowledges that intersecting forms of discrimination and oppression impact risk of and response to gender-based violence, including discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identify, race, class, ability, indigineity, caste, nationality, religion, marital and pregnancy status, immigrant, asylum or refugee status, health status, socioeconomic status, and other factors. The course readings and discussions will address these and other intersections.

Finally, we will discuss gaps in regional and international law on gender-based violence, and debates about a potential global treaty on violence against women.

The readings and other materials assigned for this course will address violence and state responses or failures. The content will likely be disturbing and stressful to read or view. I will offer options and alternatives where feasible, and will suggest techniques to minimize the risks of vicarious trauma. I ask that we all work to create an atmosphere of respect and sensitivity in the classroom. If you are struggling with the course because of the content, speak with me and/or seek help from the counseling center or other support services.

This class will meet twice a week for the latter half of the spring semester.

There are no prerequisites.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students. This course qualifies as an elective for the Master of Human Rights and the Human Rights Graduate Minor at the U, as well as the Global Public Policy and the Gender and Public Policy Concentrations at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs.
Learning Objectives:
The goals of this course are for students to deepen their understanding of gender-based violence as a human rights issue. By reading and discussing diverse materials, doing several written exercises, and participating in other activities, you'll improve your ability to:
  • Apply a human rights lens to responses to gender-based violence
  • Understand the strengths and weaknesses of international and regional human rights standards on gender-based violence
  • Recognize how intersecting forms of discrimination and oppression impact risk of and response to gender-based violence
  • Identify ways that global and regional human rights standards could be used in local advocacy on eliminating gender-based violence
Grading:
Grades are based on class participation and on written and verbal assignments and exercises. Grade basis can be A-F or S/N.
Exam Format:
No exams. Several short, written assignments will provide an opportunity to hone advocacy and media writing skills.
Class Format:
Seminar style. Class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays from 9:45 - 11:00 for the second half of the semester.
Workload:
Comparable to other graduate courses, with reading load probably somewhat lighter than other courses.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67713/1203
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/walsh912_PA5890_Spring2022.pdf (Spring 2022)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/walsh912_PA5890_Spring2021.pdf (Spring 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/walsh912_PA5890_Fall2020.pdf (Fall 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 April 2020

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