3 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2019  |  PA 5890 Section 001: Topics in Global Policy and Human Rights -- Int'l Strategic Crisis Negotiation Exercise (33014)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Repeat Credit Limit:
5 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
10/18/2019
Fri 03:00PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 15
 
10/19/2019
Sat 08:00AM - 04:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 15
Enrollment Status:
Closed (41 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected course topics in global policy, foreign policy, international security, international development, human rights, and humanitarianism.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mtcurtin+PA5890+Fall2019
Class Description:
The role-playing exercise will be led by the Humphrey School diplomat in residence in partnership with a retired senior diplomat and a team from the U.S. Army War College. The course will enable students to engage in a simulated multi-party negotiation of a complex, high stakes international crisis with multiple players, focused on a future world crisis involving political, military, and humanitarian issues. Students will be divided into six teams representing key players, such as the U.S., Russia, , China, and other countries involved in the chosen crisis situation. Each team will be mentored by a retired diplomat and/or military officer who will provide negotiating and strategic advice. The learning objective of the exercise is to help students gain greater understanding of and experience in the skills needed to operate in complex multifaceted negotiations. Students will gain experience in:
  • Regional Situation Analysis:
  • Negotiation Techniques
  • Strategic Thinking
  • Leadership
  • Planning and Evaluation
  • Decision Making
  • Team Building
  • Time Management

NOTE: Teams will be formed and a complete read-ahead packet provided before the exercise. Teaches the theory and practice of diplomacy and how it is used by the US and others to advance foreign policy objectives. Readings, lectures, and class discussion provide historical and critical understanding; simulations provide opportunities to develop and practice skills in negotiation, policy development, and oral and written communication. The course will focus on how the U.S., other countries, and other international players use diplomacy to advance their foreign policy goals and address and seek to resolve complex international crises. It will examine differing diplomatic styles and skills needed to operate successfully as a professional diplomat.
Exam Format:
Students will be required to fully participate in the events on October 18 and 19 and to submit a prompted two-page reflection memorandum after the exercise.
Class Format:
This exercise takes place on Friday, October 18 from 3:00-8:00 and Saturday, October 19, 8:00-4:00pm and is an active multilateral strategic negotiation exercise. Students will be assigned to one of seven teams, each with a retired diplomat or faculty member as a mentor. A retired senior U.S. diplomat will lead the exercise acting in the role of a UN Special Envoy. All students who register must actively participate.
Workload:
Students will be provided a 100 page read-ahead document. In addition to full engagement during the exercise on February 3-4, students must submit a two-page reflection memorandum.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33014/1199
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/mtcurtin_PA5890_Spring2016.docx (Spring 2016)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/mtcurtin_PA5890_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 March 2019

Fall 2019  |  PA 5890 Section 003: Topics in Global Policy and Human Rights -- Policies/Politics of Humanitarianism in 21st Cent (33084)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
5 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2019 - 12/11/2019
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 125
Enrollment Status:
Open (9 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected course topics in global policy, foreign policy, international security, international development, human rights, and humanitarianism.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kins0017+PA5890+Fall2019
Class Description:
A recent article in The Guardian notes that "more than half of $2.6bn (£1.9bn) in donations made at a special one-day conference to ease the humanitarian crisis in Yemen were pledged by countries that are either fighting in the civil war or selling arms to those undertaking the fighting." This means that the "wealthy combatants in the civil war are also the largest suppliers of humanitarian aid" in one of the most brutal of contemporary wars. Is this a paradox? Similarly, humanitarian aid is presumed, and claimed, to be neutral and impartial, delivered to those in need when in need on the premise of need. And, yet, the rise of humanitarianism intersects with modern European colonialism and is still essentially inflected by that history. Is this a paradox? Finally, humanitarian aid is, in large part, presumed to be delivered to those experiencing the effects of armed conflict and, yet, military operations, such as those in Iraq and Libya, are justified on the basis of humanitarian intervention. Is this a paradox?

In this course we will be addressing these and other questions raised by the philosophy and practice of humanitarianism. What does it mean to claim humanitarianism, to do humanitarian work, and to be a humanitarian? We will take a historical approach to the rise of humanitarianism and trace its subjects and actors from the early 19th century to today as one way of gaining purchase on these questions and to chart the practical, political, and ethical issues intrinsic to the promotion and legitimacy of humanitarianism.




Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33084/1199
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 March 2019

Fall 2019  |  PA 5890 Section 004: Topics in Global Policy and Human Rights -- Women's Human Rights in Practice (34074)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
5 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2019 - 12/11/2019
Mon 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Enrollment Status:
Closed (20 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected course topics in global policy, foreign policy, international security, international development, human rights, and humanitarianism.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?WALSH912+PA5890+Fall2019
Class Description:

This course explores live debates and contemporary movements for women's human rights and gender equality globally and in the US, and builds practical communications skills.


We'll briefly cover foundational women's human rights principles and mechanisms, then we'll explore how advocates are deploying human rights to tackle new challenges and seize opportunities in today's world. We'll examine progress and emerging threats to gender equality in the areas of health rights, employment and economic rights, and natural resources and assets.


Throughout the course, we'll do short exercises to deepen your knowledge about gender equality and women's human rights, and to sharpen your ability to communicate about these issues. We'll practice project planning; advocacy writing; media and social media communications; presentation skills; and writing for donors. We'll also reflect on stress and burnout in the human rights profession, and ways to foster resilience and wellbeing.


There are no prerequisites. This class is designed to complement, not duplicate, other classes on gender, public policy, and human rights. I encourage you to take other courses on these topics in the Humphrey School, the Law School, CLA, and other schools and colleges.


This course qualifies as an elective for the Master of Human Rights and the Human Rights Graduate Minor at the U, as well as the Global Public Policy and the Gender and Public Policy Concentrations at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs.


The syllabus in Google Docs is here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/18W9s0zUmWH_Mkx6ED4Tt95Q70pnqUI-8UPQ5EekeJrk/edit?usp=sharing

And a video intro describing the course is here:

https://player.vimeo.com/external/354726898.hd.mp4?s=83ed921148d703ac314bc2da788503e43c43b007&profile_id=175
Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate and upper-level undergraduate students
Learning Objectives:

The goals of this course are for students to deepen their understanding of contemporary women's human rights topics, debates, and advocacy strategies, and to hone practical communications skills needed in the human rights field.


By reading and discussing diverse materials, doing exercises to hone practical communications skills, and participating in other activities, you'll improve your ability to:

  • Apply human rights principles to current debates on gender and women's rights.

  • Analyze gender and human rights problems, and design strategies to address them.

  • Operate as versatile, confident, informed advocates for gender equality and women's rights.

  • Produce compelling written materials in a variety of formats and for different audiences.

  • Speak succinctly and persuasively about gender and human rights issues.

  • Recognize distinctive barriers to realization of women's human rights and gender equality for marginalized groups.

  • Understand stress and resilience in the human rights field and develop wellbeing practices.

Grading:
Grades are based on posted responses to materials (readings, videos), class participation, and a series of short written and verbal exercises.
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:

Seminar style. Class meets on Mondays 11:15-12:30 for the full semester.

Workload:
Comparable to other graduate courses, though reading load is probably lighter. Students will view or read a variety of short, timely sources to illustrate communications formats and tools used by advocates. There is no long paper assignment.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34074/1199
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/walsh912_PA5890_Spring2022.pdf (Spring 2022)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/walsh912_PA5890_Spring2021.pdf (Spring 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/walsh912_PA5890_Fall2020.pdf (Fall 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 August 2019

ClassInfo Links - Fall 2019 Public Affairs Classes

To link directly to this ClassInfo page from your website or to save it as a bookmark, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=PA&catalog_nbr=5890&term=1199
To see a URL-only list for use in the Faculty Center URL fields, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=PA&catalog_nbr=5890&term=1199&url=1
To see this page output as XML, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=PA&catalog_nbr=5890&term=1199&xml=1
To see this page output as JSON, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=PA&catalog_nbr=5890&term=1199&json=1
To see this page output as CSV, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=PA&catalog_nbr=5890&term=1199&csv=1
Schedule Viewer
8 am
9 am
10 am
11 am
12 pm
1 pm
2 pm
3 pm
4 pm
5 pm
6 pm
7 pm
8 pm
9 pm
10 pm
s
m
t
w
t
f
s
?
Class Title