3 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2017  |  GLOS 3900 Section 001: Topics in Global Studies -- Urban Love, Fear, and Uprising (35417)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 430
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
FFI http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mgoldman+GLOS3900+Fall2017
Class Description:
This seminar will tap into the urban pulse. We'll travel to the homeless streets of San Francisco, energetic slums of Mumbai, the 2016 Rio Olympics, suburban housing in Detroit, protest-filled Tahrir Square in Cairo, Gezi Park in Istanbul, Wall Street in NYC, smart cities and global cities of Asia, and the diverse and mural-painted Lake Street in Minneapolis. We will ask why cities become sites of revolution and tumult, great social change and creativity, phenomenal wealth production and trenchant social inequality. We'll explore the questions of what drives urban transformations, and why cities in different corners of the world can be so intimately linked (i.e., 19th century London and Bombay) while ones next door can be so disconnected. By reading, listening to, and observing urban voices and streets, films and texts, we will learn about the range of urban fears, loves, and uprisings, in ways that will teach us much about the politics, economics, and social change. In the process, we will learn different sociological perspectives on themes of urban poverty and wealth, urban sprawl and gentrification, ghetto/slum fears and hatred, and the politics of race, class, gender, nation, and the new discourse of global urbanism. We will develop analytic tools to better understand urban institutions, structures, policies, and practices here and around the world that tend to encourage social outcomes ranging from social injustice to social justice.
Learning Objectives:
This course requires students to identify and define urban problems and create solutions by doing close readings of social science and fictional texts, films, and art/music that describe city processes from a variety of subject positions (i.e., urban planners, investors/builders, and citizens from different socio-economic groups and experiences), and in different historical periods in different sites. Each student will, by the end of the course, develop an original research project that utilizes the analytic tools presented in the course, and use them to identify, define, and understand the range of ways of grappling with pressing urban problems.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 April 2017

Fall 2017  |  GLOS 3900 Section 002: Topics in Global Studies -- Biopolitics of Health and Disease in the African D (35750)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 10/26/2017
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Vincent Hall 209
 
10/26/2017 - 10/31/2017
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Nolte Ctr for Continuing Educ 20
 
11/01/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Vincent Hall 209
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
FFI http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jssuh+GLOS3900+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course explores how interlocking gender and race relations have influenced the management and experience of health and disease among people of African descent from the periods of slavery and colonialism until the present. It traces how the pathologization of the African body has engendered inequitable - and unethical - treatment of black people in the clinical practice of medicine, the execution of health research, and the management of public health systems. At the same time, it examines strategies adopted by populations of African descent to combat harmful stereotypes and hold authorities accountable for disproportionate distributions of disease in their communities. Sub-topics include medical experimentation on black populations in European colonies and in the US; the construction of conditions such as sickle cell as "black" disease in the US; the clinical, scientific, and discursive exclusion of blacks from chronic diseases of "civilization" or "development" such as cancer; the global politics of HIV/AIDS research, prevention, and treatment; the (mis)management of "tropical" disease such as Ebola, Zika, malaria and sleeping sickness; and strategies to control the African reproductive body through policies related to marriage, prostitution, sterilization, abortion, and contraception. This is a highly interdisciplinary course that draws on medical sociology and anthropology, history, science and technology studies (STS), epidemiology, global health, population and development, and human rights.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~002&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 April 2017

Fall 2017  |  GLOS 3900 Section 005: Topics in Global Studies -- Stories, Bodies, Movements (36718)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
GLOS 5900 Section 003
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon 05:00PM - 07:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Peik Gymnasium G55
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
FFI http://classinfo.umn.edu/?nagar+GLOS3900+Fall2017
Class Description:
For most of us, stories seem to simply 'happen.' We listen to stories, we tell stories, we are moved by stories, and we retell stories. However, every act of telling stories involves making decisions or moves, and each re-telling of a familiar story may either give birth to new meanings, nuances, and affects, or, it may erase their possibility. Thus, each storyteller can be seen as a translator of stories with a responsibility to retell stories ethically. It is precisely through these translational acts that all politics become politics of storytelling. In this course, we will consider the ways in which the politics of the global and the intimate derive their meanings, effects, and affects from the circulation, transaction, and re-tellings of stories within and across borders. We will ask how a praxis of ethical engagement with politics can be imagined as a praxis of receiving and retelling stories. By immersing ourselves in the process of remembering, telling, listening, trimming, interweaving, distilling, and performing stories, we will consider how ethical receiving and retelling of stories involves continuous revising, repositioning, and re-theorizing of such vexed and entangled terrains and terminologies as identity, community, rights, and justice, as well as the contingent meanings of knowledge, truth, and ethics.

This course will engage this terrain through a mode of active learning in which all the participants will read and reflect, listen and discuss, tell and retell, watch and play, move and perform collectively. By becoming aware of the ways in which our minds-bodies-souls are inserted in the receiving and translation of stories, we will grapple together with the ways in which our bodies--as our embodiments--help to relationally shape not only our own performances but also our responses to the performances of other living and moving bodies around us.

We will learn from writings, film, songs, and plays by writers, artists, activists, and thinkers from a range of historical and contemporary locations and struggles. These include: Marie Lily Cerat, W. E. B. Du Bois, Suheir Hammad, Sterlin Harjo, Naeem Inayatullah, June Jordan, AnaLouise Keating, Kauanui, J. Kehaulani, Audre Lorde, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Middle East Research and Information Project, Munshi Premchand, Alok Rai, Nina Simone, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Sangtin Writers, Standing Rock Collective, Eve Tuck, Patrick Wolfe, and K. Wayne Yang. Several of the 'Acts' in this course will be co-facilitated with writers and artists, including Beaudelaine Pierre, co-author and co-editor of How to Write an Earthquake; Esther Ouray, a theater artist and playwright who has worked with zAmya Theater and Heart of the Beast Theater in Minneapolis, and Tarun Kumar, an actor and director who has worked with Parakh Theatre in Minneapolis, Lucknow and Mumbai and with Sangtin Kisaan Mazdoor Sangathan in Sitapur, India.


There are no prerequisites for this course. We invite people from all kinds of locations and journeys to join us in this collective exploration. For further information, email: nagar@umn.edu
Grading:
A/F. The course requires all the participants to do sustained work and deep reflections, enjoy the process of imagining and creating with peers in a non-competitive environment.
Exam Format:
The class is based on active ongoing participation, deep reflection, and on building trust and co-creativity with all other members of the class. There will be no final exam. Students will work together to create and perform polyvocal scripts.
Workload:
Students will do about 100 pages of reading per week. Readings include works in all genres (poetry, memoir, creative non-fiction, and other forms of academic writing). They will prepare reflections in preparation for in-class exercises and group work which will include collective creation of texts, skits, and scripts.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~005&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 November 2016

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