3 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2016  |  GLOS 3900 Section 001: Topics in Global Studies -- Ways of Knowing in Global Studies (34918)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 110
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wolfe023+GLOS3900+Fall2016
Class Description:
This course will introduce students to questions of knowing, practices of knowledge making, and the contemporary political and cultural contexts that shape expertise in everyday life. We will begin the course with an introduction to the most useful philosophical concepts that describe the human capacity to form certain statements and judgments about the world. We will then turn our attention to how knowledge is something made by people with certain tools and certain aims. We will do close readings of a variety of documents in order to explore the social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of their making. Students will spend the last part of the course working on several group projects that explore authoritative texts about recent and current events.
Exam Format:
25% Reports/Papers
15% Special Projects
15% Reflection Papers
10% In-class Presentations
35% Class Participation
Class Format:
20% Lecture
10% Film/Video
30% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
20% Student Presentations
Workload:
75 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Presentation(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~001&term=1169
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 March 2015

Fall 2016  |  GLOS 3900 Section 002: Topics in Global Studies -- Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & Environment (34919)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 10/17/2016
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 609
 
10/18/2016
Tue 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 614
 
10/19/2016 - 12/14/2016
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 609
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gidwa002+GLOS3900+Fall2016
Class Description:
How do economic and social arrangements generate marginalized populations that are considered "surplus"? What is distinctive about "surplus populations" in the present global age? Have certain segments of humanity--remaindered lives, as it were--become "disposable" within the existing order of things? In what ways does capitalism's drive for productivity and profit contribute to the rise of superfluous populations? How do states "manage" surplus populations? What kinds of political and ethical questions does the existence of "surplus humanity" force us to confront? Our course will address these urgent issues and others. Classes will be a combination of lectures, discussions, debates, and audio-visual clips. Some books will have to be purchased. Other readings and assignments will be posted on Moodle. There will be no exams; instead participants will be expected to: a) attend class regularly and participate in class discussions (10%), b) post weekly annotations on assigned readings (25%); c) work cooperatively in groups of two to three on a high quality end-of-semester research presentation on a contemporary event, problem or phenomenon with the instructor's prior approval (25%); d) write a 10-page research essay on a topic relevant to the course with the instructor's prior approval (40%).
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~002&term=1169
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 April 2016

Fall 2016  |  GLOS 3900 Section 003: Topics in Global Studies -- Biopolitics of Health & Illness African Diaspora (35140)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Akerman Hall 211
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Topic Title: Biopolitics of Health and Illness in the African Diaspora. FFI: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jssuh+GLOS3900+Fall2016
Class Description:
This course explores how interlocking gender and race relations have influenced the management and experience of health and disease among people of African descent from the periods of slavery and colonialism until the present. It traces how the pathologization of the African body has engendered inequitable - and unethical - treatment of blacks in the clinical practice of medicine, the execution of health research, and the management of public health systems. At the same time, it examines strategies adopted by populations of African descent to combat harmful stereotypes and hold authorities accountable for disproportionate distributions of disease in their communities. Sub-topics include medical experimentation on black populations in European colonies and in the US; the construction of conditions such as sickle cell as "black" disease in the US; the clinical, scientific, and discursive exclusion of blacks from chronic diseases of "civilization" or "development" such as cancer; the global politics of HIV/AIDS research, prevention, and treatment; the (mis)management of "tropical" disease such as Ebola, Zika, malaria and sleeping sickness; and strategies to control the African reproductive body through policies related to marriage,prostitution, sterilization, abortion, and contraception. This is a highly interdisciplinary course that draws on medical sociology and anthropology, history, science and technology studies (STS), epidemiology, global health, population and development, and human rights.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~003&term=1169
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 April 2016

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