6 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2014  |  GLOS 3900 Section 001: Topics in Global Studies -- Chinese Society: Culture, Networks & Inequality (68532)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
SOC 3090 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Topic prereq - Soph or above or instr consent
Class Description:
The aim of this course is to introduce students to sociological perspectives and analyses of cultures, social networks, and socioeconomic inequalities in China today. The instructor will give lectures on relevant topics with the assistance of PPT presentation, and in-class discussions will be organized to exchange opinions about issues of common interests among the enrolled students. A cultural tour to China (Beijing, Shanghai, and Xi'an) will be arranged during the Spring Break. Through this course, students will gain a basic understanding of how Chinese society operates today. The prerequisite is Soc1001 'Introduction to Sociology,' or otherwise the Instructor's permission is required to enroll in the class.
Grading:
70% Reports/Papers
20% Quizzes
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Discussion
15% Field Trips
Workload:
15 Pages Reading Per Week
15 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
3 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~001&term=1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 November 2013

Spring 2014  |  GLOS 3900 Section 002: Topics in Global Studies -- The United States and the Global Economy (69152)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
POL 3833 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 210
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Description:
This course provides an overview of the impact of the global economy on domestic politics, with a particular focus on the US. The global economy impacts all forms of politics, not just those we traditionally think of as foreign policy. For example, US labor markets are highly dependent on cheap immigrant labor, the housing market is (or was?) financed by cheap foreign capital, and Walmart is dependent on cheap foreign resources to achieve those everyday low prices. Both the 2008 and 2012 general elections focused heavily on economic issues (the effects of stimulus on the economy, the appropriateness of auto and bank bailouts, the impact of government healthcare regulations on unemployment, etc.), thus complicated economic issues had major electoral consequences. This course will help you understand how the ever more complex global market impacts politics from the international to the local level. You will, I hope, become educated consumers of economic news, and be able to link it clearly to your own political preferences and those of other citizens in the US and abroad.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~002&term=1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 November 2013

Spring 2014  |  GLOS 3900 Section 003: Topics in Global Studies -- Nationalisms (69174)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
POL 4810 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Description:
Nationalism has been one of the most significant ideologies influencing global politics during the past two centuries. The different colors on the map designate political units that bear the name of a nation. Today nationalism is increasingly challenged by global and local pressures and in Europe by supranational integration. However, nation remains an important political category, and without an understanding of nationalism, it would be impossible to analyze many contemporary political processes. The course offers an in-depth presentation of the main research traditions and approaches in the study of nationalism and shows how they can be applied in concrete case studies. We will cover a wide area both in terms of research traditions and geographical coverage. The aim of the course is to help students understand and analyze how nationalism affects international politics as well as everyday life of people in different corners of the globe. The course is divided into two parts. Lectures in the first part in introduce the main theoretical traditions in the study of nationalism. The first part will end with mid-term exam. The second part consists of student presentations on nationalisms in different parts of the world and during different historical eras. Students are expected to write a research paper on the topic of their choosing and present their case to other students.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam
10% In-class Presentations
10% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 40% Research Paper; 10% Lead discussion.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~003&term=1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 November 2013

Spring 2014  |  GLOS 3900 Section 004: Topics in Global Studies -- Disposable People? Surplus Value/Surplus Humanity (69459)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 430
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
GloS 3144 and/or 3145 recommended.
Class Description:
How do economic and social arrangements generate marginalized populations that are considered "surplus"? What is distinctive about "surplus populations" in the present global age? Have certain segments of humanity--remaindered lives, as it were--become "disposable" within the existing order of things? In what ways does capitalism's drive for productivity and profit contribute to the rise of superfluous populations? How do states "manage" surplus populations? What kinds of political and ethical questions does the existence of "surplus humanity" force us to confront? Our course will address these urgent issues and others. Classes will be a combination of lectures, discussions, debates, and audio-visual clips. Some books will have to be purchased. Other readings and assignments will be posted on Moodle. There will be no exams; instead participants will be expected to: a) attend class regularly and participate in class discussions (10%), b) post weekly annotations on assigned readings (25%); c) work cooperatively in groups of two to three on a high quality end-of-semester research presentation on a contemporary event, problem or phenomenon with the instructor's prior approval (25%); d) write a 10-page research essay on a topic relevant to the course with the instructor's prior approval (40%).
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~004&term=1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 November 2013

Spring 2014  |  GLOS 3900 Section 005: Topics in Global Studies -- The Cultures of the Silk Road (69901)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
ALL 3872 Section 001
HIST 3504 Section 001
RELS 3708 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Mon, Wed, Fri 10:10AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 5
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Description:
"Modern Iran" covers Iranian history from the fall of the Sassanids (7th c. CE) to the present. Part 1 discusses the coexistence of Islam and Iranian culture culminating in the adoption of Shi'ism as the official religion of Iran (16th c. CE). Part 2 examines the role of the Safavids, Qajars, and Pahlavis in the modernization and westernization of Iran. Part 3 examines the impact of the 1979 Islamic Revolution on Iranian society. Student Learning Outcomes: 1. Acquaint students with the history and culture of modern Iran. 2. Examine the impact of Zoroastrianism on Islam. 3. Examine the impact of modernization/westernization on Iranian culture. 4. Discuss Iranians' reaction to westernization: the 1979 Islamic Revolution.
Grading:
15% Midterm Exam
40% Reports/Papers
22% Quizzes
3% Attendance
15% In-class Presentations
5% Class Participation Other Grading Information: Attendance is tracked by signing a sheet.
Exam Format:
Essay format
Class Format:
50% Lecture
20% Film/Video
10% Discussion
20% Student Presentations
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
15 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
1 Book Report(s)
Other Workload: There is more reading at the beginning of the course.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~005&term=1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 November 2013

Spring 2014  |  GLOS 3900 Section 006: Topics in Global Studies -- The History of Modern Iran (69902)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (5 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
HIST 3506 Section 001
RELS 3713 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Mon, Wed, Fri 02:30PM - 03:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 220
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
Class Description:
"Modern Iran" covers Iranian history from the fall of the Sassanids (7th c. CE) to the present. Part 1 discusses the coexistence of Islam and Iranian culture culminating in the adoption of Shi'ism as the official religion of Iran (16th c. CE). Part 2 examines the role of the Safavids, Qajars, and Pahlavis in the modernization and westernization of Iran. Part 3 examines the impact of the 1979 Islamic Revolution on Iranian society. Student Learning Outcomes: 1. Acquaint students with the history and culture of modern Iran. 2. Examine the impact of Zoroastrianism on Islam. 3. Examine the impact of modernization/westernization on Iranian culture. 4. Discuss Iranians' reaction to westernization: the 1979 Islamic Revolution.
Grading:
15% Midterm Exam
40% Reports/Papers
22% Quizzes
3% Attendance
15% In-class Presentations
5% Class Participation Other Grading Information: Attendance is tracked by signing a sheet.
Exam Format:
Essay format
Class Format:
50% Lecture
20% Film/Video
10% Discussion
20% Student Presentations
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
15 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
1 Book Report(s)
Other Workload: There is more reading at the beginning of the course.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=GLOS3900~006&term=1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 November 2013

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