5 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2020  |  SOC 5090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Intersections of Family, Youth, & Culture (35311)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits (9 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Exclude fr or soph 5000 level courses
Meets With:
SOC 8540 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (2 of 3 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: Undergrad soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. Need instructor consent to add. For advanced undergraduates enrolling in the course this might include a senior project or other piece of writing on new or ongoing work on the Kids Involvement and Diversity Study (KIDS) (students will identify their project within the first weeks of the course in consultation with the professor). Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tswartz+SOC5090+Fall2020
Class Description:
This seminar will explore recent and/or pathbreaking sociological research on families, youth, and culture, and will provide students with the opportunity to advance a scholarly project of their own in a related area. Readings will include primarily cultural, interpretive, and critical scholarship. Some of the readings will be selected by seminar participants in relation to their projects. Through common readings, discussion, and individual projects we will examine the social worlds of families and young people, investigating the meaning and experience of how youth and family experiences are differently patterned by social class, race and ethnicity, gender, community and place, and considering the ways that micro and macro dimensions of culture and inequality influence families, youth and social outcomes. We will also pay attention to the ways in which family's and youth's worlds are created in and through social interactions, networks and organizations, institutions, and discourses. A major goal and main focus of the course will be the development of student individual scholarly projects. For graduate students, these might include a new or ongoing research project, a section on a prelim, or the development of a prospectus. For advanced undergraduates enrolling in the course this might include a senior project or other piece of writing on new or ongoing work on the KIDS Involvement and Diversity Study (KIDS) (students will identify their project within the first weeks of the course in consultation with the professor). Time will be designated for independent work on projects, structured timelines and writing goals, and regular workshopping and peer and instructor feedback. Students will co-lead a discussion on a set of readings, submit intermittent writing assignments or section drafts depending on their project, present their project to the class, and provide peer feedback to others on their projects. By the end of the course, students will have made substantial progress on a self-identified project and will have produced an associated piece of writing.
Exam Format:
No exams
Class Format:
Seminar and workshop format including online group discussion and posting about readings and common themes/methods/theory; presentation and discussion of student projects in various stages of development; individual meetings with instructor on project; time designated and structured for individual project work.
Workload:
Some shared readings and discussion (some of which will be determined by seminar participants and relevant to their projects). Time will be designated for independent work on projects, structured timelines and writing goals, and regular workshopping and peer and instructor feedback. Students will co-lead a discussion on readings, submit intermittent writing assignments or section drafts depending on their project, present their project to the class, and provide peer feedback to others on their projects. By the end of the course, students will have made substantial progress on a project of their choosing and will have produced an associated piece of writing.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/35311/1209
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 July 2020

Spring 2017  |  SOC 5090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Immigration to the U.S.: Beyond Walls (67194)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
SOC 3090 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2017 - 05/05/2017
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: Undergrad soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jdewaard+SOC5090+Spring2017
Class Description:

The topic of immigration--including the labels used to describe this phenomenon--is one of the most politically and emotionally charged issues in the United States and in other parts of the world today. This course provides an extensive overview of the causes, characteristics, and consequences of immigration to the United States. It begins by assessing current levels and trends, perceptions and rhetoric, and polices. Drawing from disciplines across the social sciences, it then moves to understand the diverse and interconnected demographic, economic, environmental, political, and sociocultural drivers. This is followed by examining the composition of immigration flows, as well as the characteristics immigrants themselves. The course then considers the implications of immigration for a range of domains and, in the process, dispels a number of prevalent and politicized myths. Throughout, students will be encouraged and guided through the process of unpacking the many layers, nuances, and contradictions involved in immigration to the United States from multiple vantage points in the social sciences.

Grading:
Participation (20%); facilitation (20%); 2 exams (20% each); 1 paper (20%)
Exam Format:
2 in-class written exams
Class Format:
Lecture and discussion
Workload:
50-75 pages reading/week; see grading above
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67194/1173
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Fall 2016  |  SOC 5090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- A Human Right to Healthcare - in Europe & the U.S. (34929)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
SOC 3090 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 425
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: Undergrad soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jmuckenh+SOC5090+Fall2016
Class Description:

This topics course will be taught by visiting sociology professor, Johanna Muckenhuber from University of Graz, Austria.

This course is designed with the aim that the students get to know the Austrian health care system and the problems migrants and refugees face in the access to the health care system and that they get to know in detail and reflect about the problems migrants and refugees face in the U.S. Students will discuss the problems and they will learn to discuss the topic not just from a sociological point of view but also from a Human Rights perspective. We will discuss and analyze the effects of cultural differences between health professionals and patients and we will discuss the differences and similarities we can find between Austria and the U.S. In addition, we will reflect on a regular basis about the cultural differences we experience in the course of our interaction with a university teacher from Europe, with students from the U.S., and perhaps also other countries of origin.

The course will be divided into three consecutive phases:

Phase 1 of the course introduces you to the sociology of health illness, including topics such as the social, political, economic and cultural context which have an influence on health and illness: influences on access to health care services: patients' practices in seeking help: health literacy and the intersection of social status, gender a migratory status in people's association with health. Phase 1 will also cover international differences in health care services and the implications of these differences on health and illness. Didactically, Phase 1 introduces you to the foundational readings in the field; this phase is therefore more reading intensive than the following two.

In Phase 2, students will be divided into subgroups. You will organize a focus group discussion in the class with a part of the students as participants and a part of you will conduct the focus group. The topic of the focus group discussion will be "The problems of migrants in the access to health care services". The aim will be to analyze the way students frame this problems and how you discuss the problem as a human rights problem. Phase 2 will conclude with my lecture on a human rights perspective on constraints to the access to health care.

In phase 3, you will get the opportunity to analyze and discuss the transcript of the focus group as well as extracts of interviews of my own research project together with me. I will present also transcripts of interviews and of a focus group with students which I will conduct in Austria. I will lead the discussion and give inputs in particular concerning the Austrian context compared to the U.S. context. This will give you the opportunity to get insights in real empirical social research and to get insights in the Austrian health care systems.

During the first and the second phase of the course you will be asked to develop your own research projects about the intersection of social determinants of health the access to health care services. You may choose to rely on literature and an investigation of the state of the art, but you may also choose to work with the results of the focus groups and with the interview transcripts. In regular office meetings, I will mentor students and support them in the finding process of both existing research and in formulating their own research questions.

In the last meetings of the course you will be asked to present your own research projects. We will discuss the projects in the course and you will get my feedback. The discussions will always have the focus on the human rights perspective. The full papers will be due at the end of the semester so that the final grades can be in according to the grading schedule. Graduate students in this combined class are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.

Grading:
35% - 3 Papers (10% the 1st paper, 10% the second paper and 15% the third paper)
15% - Group Presentation
20% - Midterm Exam
15% - Class Participation
15% - Reading Journal

Regarding the paper, there will be three deadlines. First, you will be asked to write down the research question and the bibliography and you will get a feedback from me. Then, you will be asked to turn in the analysis of the focus group discussion or the interviews (depending on your choice for your research project). At this point in time you will get a second feedback. Finally, you will be asked to turn in the final paper.
Exam Format:
1 exam, True/False and Short Answer
Class Format:
25% - Lecture
10% - Film/Video
15% - Small Group Activities
50% - Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing per Term
1 Exam
1 Paper
1 Group Presentation
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34929/1169
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 May 2016

Fall 2015  |  SOC 5090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Law, Society & the Mental Health System (34570)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2015 - 12/16/2015
Fri 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1183
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: Undergrad soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?malmq001+SOC5090+Fall2015
Class Description:
The course will focus on selective and often controversial issues that arise in those with mental disorders or conflicts, and how they intersect with the legal system. Contrasts are made between legal approaches and broader social or clinical approaches to these problems. Mental disorder as a category is often used differently in law, the mental health professions, and society. Specific problems taken up are: What is a mental disorder? The role of experts and the roles they play; risk assessments of dangerousness; competency in a civil and criminal context; the insanity question; civil commitment of the mentally ill; sexual offenders and special commitment procedures; right to treatment and right to refuse treatment. Other topics may be selected based on student interest.
Exam Format:
50% Reports/Papers
50% Class Participation
Class Format:
50% Lecture
50% Discussion
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
15-30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Presentation(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34570/1159
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 March 2015

Spring 2014  |  SOC 5090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Reframing Mass Violence-Human Rights/Social Memory (68651)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
GLOS 5900 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/23/2014
Thu 03:00PM - 04:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Virtual Rooms ROOM-TBA
 
02/06/2014
Thu 03:00PM - 04:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Virtual Rooms ROOM-TBA
 
03/06/2014
Thu 03:00PM - 04:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Hanson Hall 1-109
 
03/27/2014
Thu 03:00PM - 04:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Hanson Hall 1-109
 
04/10/2014
Thu 04:00PM - 05:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Virtual Rooms ROOM-TBA
 
04/24/2014
Thu 03:00PM - 04:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Hanson Hall 1-109
 
05/08/2014
Thu 03:00PM - 04:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Hanson Hall 1-109
 
02/20/2014
Thu 03:00PM - 04:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Hanson Hall 1-109
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
This class meets in Notle 235
Class Description:
REFRAMING MASS VIOLENCE: HUMAN RIGHTS AND SOCIAL MEMORY IN LATIN AMERICA AND SOUTHERN EUROPE (1 Credit - Topics Course) This course will explore the particular developments and transnational entaglements of social memories in societies revisiting their legacies of dictatorship, state terror, and grave human rights violations. The focus will be on Latin America and Southern Europe and the contemporary processes of re-interpretation and re-framing of a) the atrocities themselves and b) the transitional justice models that were adopted in their aftermaths. The course is organised as a lecture series in which experts from the countries of study will discuss their work and engage in dialogue with local scholars and students. The course will be co-facilitated by Barbara Fry (Human Rights Program), Ana Forcinito (Spanish and Portuguese) and Alejandro Baer (Sociology, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies). This course is part of a Research Collaborative funded by the Institute of Advanced Studies. Session will take place in Room 235 NOLTE (East Bank).
Grading:
100% Reports/Papers Other Grading Information: Pass/No Pass
Class Format:
20% Lecture
10% Film/Video
70% Guest Speakers Seminar will meet on the following Thursdays from 3pm to 4.30pm Jan 23, Feb6, Feb20, March6, March27, April 10, April 24, May 8
Workload:
Other Workload: Readings of guest lecturers will be posted on Course's Moodle Site.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/68651/1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 November 2013

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