10 classes matched your search criteria.

Summer 2018  |  SOC 1001 Section 301: Introduction to Sociology (83302)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/21/2018 - 08/24/2018
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Closed (30 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~301&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Summer 2018  |  SOC 1001 Section 302: Introduction to Sociology (83333)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/21/2018 - 08/24/2018
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Closed (30 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~302&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3003 Section 001: Social Problems (83298)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/11/2018 - 08/03/2018
Mon, Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-136
Enrollment Status:
Open (7 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In this course, we will engage in a sociological examination of major social problems facing the contemporary US and abroad. We explore the origins and causes of different social problems, seek to understand how they impact individuals, groups, and the society as a whole, and evaluate solutions. We ask how an issue becomes defined as a "social problem," discuss the social construction of reality and deviance, and consider the primary frameworks under which societies have organized their responses to different social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?rajas011+SOC3003+Summer2018
Class Description:
All societies have their issues, but what exactly are "social problems?" In this course, we will begin by covering important social issues and sources of inequality in the United States, including poverty and wealth, crime, prison and incarceration, health, and immigration. We will also discuss how these social issues intersect with identity such as race, gender, class, sexuality, and more. More importantly, however, is that we will discuss exactly what makes "social problems" into "problems;" who determines this conversation? Why are certain issues described as "social problems" but others are often overlooked or ignored? Thus, in this course, we will use sociological ideas to cover the history of social problems as well as the ways social problems are discussed today.
Grading:
30% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: class participation and presentations, 30% mid-term, 40% community involvement and related final paper
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Discussion
35% Other Style group work, films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
25-40 Pages Reading Per Week with reading quizzes
2 papers
1 Presentation
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3003~001&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 February 2018

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (82965)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/11/2018 - 08/03/2018
Mon, Wed 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-136
Enrollment Status:
Open (12 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wulff039+SOC3101+Summer2018
Class Description:

This course will introduce you to a sociological perspective on crime and punishment in the United States. Three central aspects of the criminal justice process will be discussed. First, this course will start with an account of policing and the courts. Second, we will discuss punishment with a focus on incarceration. Third, we will discuss the causes and consequences of the carceral state.

This course meets the Council on Liberal Education's (CLE) Civic Life and Ethics Theme. That said, this course offers an opportunity to become critically engaged about the world around you and to become more informed in your public life whether when serving on a jury, getting involved in politics, or pursuing a criminal justice career. As a Civic Life and Ethics Theme requirement, this course equips you with analytical skills to evaluate core questions about the criminal justice system such as: What is a crime? Who is a criminal? Is the U.S. system of punishment fair? How does society seek to address racial and ethnic inequalities in the criminal justice system? These questions are not just objective but also ethical and normative and should elicit strong feelings and debate. As we spend this semester examining and discussing these controversies, this course will enable you to learn how to consider broader research evidence from various disciplinary perspectives, including anthropology, sociology, psychology, and law, when analyzing criminal justice patterns and policies.

Learning Objectives:
When thinking through these aspects of the criminal justice process, exercising the sociological imagination will be useful for advancing a macro-level understanding of what are typically viewed as micro-level issues that individuals involved in the criminal justice system experience. Throughout the different stages of the criminal justice process race, gender, and socio-economic status play an integral part. The gendered, racialized, and classed nature of crime and punishment will be a central focus of this course. In addition, sociological theories, particularly Durkheim and neo-Marxist perspectives, will be applied to the different units in the class, which will deepen your sociological understanding.

In this course, you will be exposed to the major sociological literature on the criminal justice system through readings and lectures. Further, you will also learn material through class discussion, in-class quizzes, an outside field assignment, and written exams. Through these various approaches to learning, this course will train you how to think sociologically,

to interpret and reformulate research findings, and use the research literature to arrive at your own conclusions and construct your own sociological arguments.
Grading:

10% Attendance & Participation
20% Engagement
10% Outside Field Assignment
30% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam

Exam Format:
The two exams (i.e., mid-term and final) will consist of multiple choice and essay questions.
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
30-50 pages of reading per week
Daily quizzes on the readings
One 3-5 page outside field assignment
2 Exams
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3101~001&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 February 2018

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (83027)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/11/2018 - 08/03/2018
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-127
Enrollment Status:
Open (15 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tabor027+SOC3251W+Summer2018
Class Description:

In this course we examine race, class, and gender as axes of stratification, identity, and experience. More importantly, we learn how these and other crucial aspects of social identity intersect to form a complex matrix of privilege and power. Our goal is to understand the multiple and intersecting ways that these concepts shape American society and influence each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions.


This course meets the Diversity and Social Justice in the U.S. theme, the Social Sciences core, and the Writing Intensive.

Learning Objectives:

In this course, students will:

-Explore the social construction of race, class, gender, as well as ethnicity, sexuality, citizenship, and (dis)ability;

-Consider how race, class, gender, and other dimensions of social organization shape individual experiences and interactions with social institutions such as education, work, medicine, and law;

-Develop and use a 'sociological imagination' to analyze privilege and inequalities;

-Learn how to develop a sociological research question, review relevant literatures, design a project, and write a research proposal

Grading:

Participation and Attendance = 20% (100 points)

Five Reading Response Memos = 20% (100 points total/20 points per response)

Peer review = 10% (50 points)

Final Paper = 50% (250 points)

Exam Format:
n/a
Class Format:
Mix of lecture, large and small group discussion, independent writing, and multimedia activities
Workload:
Students can expect to read approximately 100 pages per week, which will be a mix of journal articles, book chapters, newspaper articles, and reports. No textbooks -- all reading materials are provided by the instructor.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3251W~001&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 March 2018

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3701 Section 301: Social Theory (88000)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/21/2018 - 08/24/2018
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Closed (30 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Exam Format:
Short answer; essays
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3701~301&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3701 Section 302: Social Theory (89025)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/21/2018 - 08/24/2018
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (16 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Exam Format:
Short answer; essays
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3701~302&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3811 Section 001: Social Statistics (83082)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 10 wk
 
06/11/2018 - 08/17/2018
Tue, Thu 03:30PM - 05:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-103
Enrollment Status:
Open (23 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gunth031+SOC3811+Summer2018
Class Description:
The summer 2018 section of this course will feature extensive in-class work opportunities to be completed both individually and in groups, with guidance provided by the instructor / TA. Students will be expected to prepare for work-oriented lecture and lab sections with reading materials and videos before class begins, as traditional lecture delivery will be minimized. Lab will help familiarize students with a range of software tools (including a mix of proprietary and open source products) that you may expect to encounter in professional settings. Before the term begins, students may wish to review basic spreadsheet programs, like Excel or Google Sheets. No textbook purchase necessary.
Grading:
3 exams
Regular in-class group work
Very brief memo assignments completed outside of class
Reading and video assignments completed outside of class
Class Format:
Active learning with minimal lecture component
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3811~001&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 February 2018

Summer 2018  |  SOC 4108 Section 001: Current Issues in Crime Control (87938)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/11/2018 - 08/03/2018
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-219
Enrollment Status:
Open (8 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected current criminal justice policies from perspective of courts, legislature, community, and interest groups. Impact of criminal justice policy changes on society and on social control agencies. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?garna029+SOC4108+Summer2018
Class Description:

This course focuses on alcohol and drug control in the U.S. Using film, literature and popular media - in addition to the rich and fascinating sociological literature on drugs - we will explore the peculiar and perplexing story of U.S. drug control. We will examine the dynamic and ostensibly arbitrary history of alcohol and drug policies, assess current trends in consumption, treatment and punishment, and unpack a concept often used but rarely questioned:
addiction. Ultimately, we will be able to utilize course materials to reflect on our perceptions of - and (in)experience with - drugs and alcohol, question what we take for granted, and explore what we do not know.

Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4108~001&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 February 2018

Summer 2018  |  SOC 4246 Section 301: Sociology of Health and Illness (83303)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/21/2018 - 08/24/2018
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Closed (30 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Context of social, political, economic, and cultural forces and medical knowledge. Social meanings. How people seek help and manage illnesses. How doctors, nurses, and patients interact. Social movements surrounding health. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course provides a topical overview and introduction to important sociological perspectives on health and illness. We will identify and critically evaluate the social, political, economic, and cultural forces that influence health outcomes and health disparities by demographic group. Over the semester, we will analyze a variety of readings on health, including qualitative and quantitative empirical studies, medical sociology theory, public health reports, and mainstream news articles, in order to delve deeper into the sociological meanings of health. The course will cover topics ranging from health policy and the U.S. health system in the international context to health social movements to bioethics and biotechnology. By the end of the course, you will have a firm grasp on the connections between medical sociology, the broader disciplinary concerns of sociology, and the pragmatic concerns of health issues.
Who Should Take This Class?:
This course serves as an elective in the Sociology major. It can also be used as an elective undergraduate/ graduate course.
Learning Objectives:
1) Demonstrate an understanding of a broad overview of the field of sociology of health and illness.
2) Examine the cause and cultural impact of socioeconomic, racial/ethnic, immigrant status, and gender health disparities.
3) Synthesize contemporary research and current events in the areas of health and illness to define their implications of current U.S. health policy.
4) Critically analyze the social implications of health and illness.
5) Discuss the connections between medical sociology, the broader disciplinary concerns of sociology, and the pragmatic concerns of health issues.
Grading:
Discussion posts (worth 200 points)
Reading journals (worth 75 points)
Midterm exam (worth 225 points)
Writing group (worth 100 points)
Research paper (worth 400 points)
Total: 1,000 points
Exam Format:
Online midterm exam
Class Format:
Online format
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4246~301&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 February 2018

ClassInfo Links - Summer 2018 Sociology Classes

To link directly to this ClassInfo page from your website or to save it as a bookmark, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=SOC&term=1185
To see a URL-only list for use in the Faculty Center URL fields, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=SOC&term=1185&url=1
To see this page output as XML, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=SOC&term=1185&xml=1
To see this page output as JSON, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=SOC&term=1185&json=1
To see this page output as CSV, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=SOC&term=1185&csv=1
Schedule Viewer
8 am
9 am
10 am
11 am
12 pm
1 pm
2 pm
3 pm
4 pm
5 pm
6 pm
7 pm
8 pm
9 pm
10 pm
s
m
t
w
t
f
s
?
Class Title