49 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2018  |  SOC 1001 Section 001: Introduction to Sociology (48770)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Freshman Full Year Registration
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 310
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elmen006+SOC1001+Spring2018
Class Description:
How
​is it possible for
​a​
person
​to ​
physically torture another? Why do people obey orders to kill? Why do people discriminate? Around the world, there are reports of genocide, torture, racism, inequality, crime, poverty, mass displacement, political corruption, slavery, and authoritarian rule. But how
​have
these
​social ​
problems emerge
​d​
? To answer
​this
question, students are invited to explore how human beings
​have ​
collectively enable
​d​
the emergence of
​these rampant social ​
problems. Drawing on classical and contemporary sociological
​perspectives
, the course seeks to examine how social order is itself produced, and how individuals and groups knowingly - and also unknowingly - enable the emergence of the very threats they fear. We examine how social conformity creates social stability yet also perniciously enables torture, genocide, and
​widespread ​
inequality. Examining the relationship between the individual, groups, and society
​provides the beginnings of
an understanding of how social institutions and
​social ​
structures emerge -
​and ​
how rules
​become "rules"
worthy of
​mass ​
conformity
​ - rules that socialize individuals to think and morally value in particular ways instead of others. ​
But while institutions, societies, and cultures produce stable norms, they also change. As yesterday's
​standards are replaced by newly invented conventions, what counts as "normal" shifts.
We investigate
how cultural change suddenly takes place - and why
​in some instances ​
- despite the
​ persistence ​
of change agents - change never comes - and ironclad norms prevail. We look to historical examples of how genocide, slavery, and racism persist - and yet also - suddenly come to an end. We discuss how cultural change may occur through the will of activists and the influence of social movements, but that change may also occur without any discernible collective action. The goal
​s​
of the course are to inspire our sociological imagination - our ability to see how social forces permit and hinder the actions of individuals -
​as well as
deepen
​our ​
understanding about contemporary social problems. The course invites learners to question the ways
​in which
they explain
​social ​
events
​,​
and
​appreciate
the
​multiplicity of ways - as well as - ​
​the challenges and complexity - involved in describing
​society
. Throughout the course, you will be asked to discuss how society individually impacts you, and how you also contribute to the perpetuation - as well as degradation - of society's norms. You will write a weekly journal, discuss readings and contemporary controversies on an online blog, participate in polls and surveys, write a reflections essay, and conduct
​short ​
activities
​including
​historical analyses,
quantitative
​analyses
, ethnographic
​participant​
observation
​ exercises, ​and interviews
.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Required for sociology majors, open to others. This course meets the requirements of the Council on Liberal Education's Social Science core and Social Justice theme.
Learning Objectives:
To think about the social world and the ways in which the social world shapes human experience.
To ask why individuals and groups behave as they do.
To understand how social problems emerge.
To explore how human thought and perception are by-products of broader social structures.
To engage one's sociological imagination.
Grading:
25% Quizzes
10% Polls
10% Journal
20% Section and Blog Participation
5% Reflections Essay (Graded on the basis of honor).
30% Final Exam
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answers, and oral presentation. All quizzes and the final exam are conducted online.
Class Format:
Lecture, Discussion, Journals, Blogs, and Activities
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading per Week
100-200 words of Journal Writing per Week (Activities are connected to the journal).
5 Quizzes
15-50 words of Blog Writing Per Week
1 Exam
1 Reflections Essay
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 October 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 1001 Section 011: Introduction to Sociology (48773)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Freshman Full Year Registration
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 310
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Discussion sections will NOT meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jmbell+SOC1001+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~011&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 1001 Section 021: Introduction to Sociology (48776)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Freshman Full Year Registration
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 350
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Discussion sections will NOT meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC1001+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what Mills calls the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists, and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the often unseen social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. We will first explore the creation and maintenance of the social order as well as the social processes by which people develop a sense of self and negotiate meanings in everyday social interactions. We then take a look at social structure, social institutions and social stratification. Finally, we will explore how, why, and when social life changes. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. Class time will be a mix of lecture, discussion, multimedia, small group work and in-class exercises. The course is targeted to undergraduate majors and non-majors.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
25% Final Exam
25% Reports/Papers
25% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Class Format:
50% Lecture
10% Film/Video
20% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
10% Web Based
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
12 Pages Writing Per Term
2 OR 3 Exam(s)
2 OR 3 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~021&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 1011V Section 001: Honors: Introduction to Sociology (48783)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Mon, Wed 12:20PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 215
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships, and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life and how you, in turn, affect society.
Class Notes:
7 seats reserved for honors freshman and sophomores, 3 seats for CLA honors freshman, & 15 seats for CLA honors sophomores through 01/12/2018. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jmbell+SOC1011V+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course introduces pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. Course aims to foster students` sociological imagination, or their ability to apply sociological theories into their everyday lives. This is a writing intensive course. Students will have an opportunity to obtain feedback on their work in order to improve their writing through revision. Students are also expected to play a greater role in class discussions.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1011V~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 1101 Section 001: Law, Crime, & Punishment (51637)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Freshman Full Year Registration
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 230
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introductory course designed to provide students with a general understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. We examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment using an interdisciplinary social science approach.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC1101+Spring2018
Class Description:
This introductory course is designed to provide students with a general understanding of some of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. Law is everywhere. Law permits, prohibits, enables, legitimates, protects, and prosecutes citizens. Law shapes our day to day lives in countless ways. We examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment using an interdisciplinary social science approach. As one of the founders of the Law and Society movement observed, law is too important to leave to lawyers. Accordingly, this course will borrow from several theoretical, disciplinary, and interdisciplinary perspectives (such as sociology, anthropology, political science, critical studies, psychology). There are two units. We will first explore the sociology of law and laws role primarily in the American context (but with some attention to international law and global human rights efforts). Next, this course seeks to develop a sociological understanding of the patterns of crime and punishment in the United States. The thematic topics to be discussed include law and social control; laws role in social change; same-sex marriage; welfare and crime; the impact of criminal record and race on the employment of ex-offenders; and the effect of juvenile justice criminal policies on urban youth.
Grading:
40% Reports/Papers
15% Written Assignments
20% Class Presentations
25% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Papers
1 Reading Reflection
1 Class Presentation
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1101~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (49934)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-106
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course provides an overview of the American criminal justice system. We will analyze the functions and missions of the police, courts, and corrections agencies. We will think critically about the structure of the criminal justice system and the formal and informal rules guiding criminal justice decision-making. The textbook and lectures are designed to help you understand the organization of the criminal justice system. Films and discussions illustrate current issues and debates in criminal justice. Finally, guest speakers will share their experiences and inform us of the practical challenges they face in their daily work. No prior knowledge of the criminal justice system is required.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
25% Final Exam
13% Reports/Papers
12% Quizzes
25% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: 2nd midsemester exam
Exam Format:
multiple choice, short answer, essay
Class Format:
60% Lecture
30% Discussion
10% Other Style Guest speakers
Workload:
15-20 Pages Reading Per Week
4 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Other Workload: 2 quizzes
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3101~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 February 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (49935)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 317
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walk0938+SOC3102+Spring2018
Class Description:
​This course addresses general issues in conceptualizing and controlling criminal behavior. Course content will be particularly concerned with the processes of classification and the construction of criminal behavior relative to other idealized forms of behavior. Some important questions include: How does criminal behavior and social control change across time and space? What is the relationship between status characteristics like race, gender, sexuality, and prestige etc. and the classification and controlling of some behaviors versus others?
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
(1) Review paper
(1) Term paper
(1) Group/Individual Project
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3102~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (52225)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3211W+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. Our goal is to examine the myriad ways that race structures American society and influences the experiences and life chances of all its members. In the opening sections of the class, we study definitions of race and major theories of how race and racism work in the contemporary U.S. The next unit begins with an overview of the concept of racial identity, and asks how social location impacts one's identity and daily interactions. After inquiring into the general process of identity formation, we look at the specific experiences of whites, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and multiracial Americans. Though our central focus is on race relations in today's society, we also provide a historical overview of the experiences of each group in order to help explain their present-day social status. The next part of the course examines the significance of race in several specific contexts. We look at controversies over race and immigration, race and education, and race and popular culture. We close the class by considering the future of race relations in the U.S., and evaluating remedies to racial inequality.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3211W~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 March 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (51032)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?agui0110+SOC3251W+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course is built around the exploration of ideas in the sociology of race, class, and gender. This course will focus on understanding multiple positions, and learning how to refute arguments based on evidence and reasoning. Focus will be given to topics in the sociology of race, class, and gender that carry important political implications.

Some of the possible topics include:
- What ‘race', ‘class', and ‘gender' are
- Understanding racism in the sciences
- Sex work, pornography, and radical feminism
- Marxism and the alienation of the working class
- Intersectional theory
- Mass incarceration and prison abolition

Learning Objectives:
Students will learn about sociological perspectives on race, class, and gender. Students will also learn how to write argumentative papers, and how to navigate conversations about a variety of sociological topics.
Grading:
60% Writing Assignments
25% Final paper
15% Class participation/ other evaluations
Exam Format:
Final paper
Class Format:
50% Lecture
40% Discussion
10% Other
Workload:
Students should expect to complete around 40 pages of readings a week. In addition to the readings, students will have a few writing assignments over the course of the semester, and will be expected to participate in class discussions.

30-45 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Final Paper
3 Writing Assignments
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3251W~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 October 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3301W Section 001: Politics and Society (66988)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Political sociology is concerned with the social bases of power and the social consequences of the organization of power, especially how power operates in relationship to various forms of inequality and different institutions. We will explore political socialization, electoral politics and voting, social movements, the media and framing, and politics of inequality, poverty, and welfare. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?broad001+SOC3301W+Spring2018
Class Description:
Politics and society go together like a horse and carriage, but its hard to tell which is the horse and which the carriage! This course approaches politics from the standpoint of society. Accordingly, it does not focus on the details of the formal political institutions such as voting, legislatures or the presidency. Rather, it focuses on how society organizes around and pushes political questions. For instance, society is divided by social categories such as race, class, gender, age, education, religion, associational membership, wealth. The systemic relations among these categories, equal or unequal, exploitative or cooperative, and so forth, determine the allocation of "goods" and "bads" in society, and therefore many political dynamics. In addition, people and groups have different levels of social capital (connections) and cultural capital (for instance, levels of education and tastes about music, theater, literature, news, sports and alcohol). These different factors help create ideological values such as group and nationalist beliefs. They bear upon how individuals and groups think about the issues that face them and how they do or do not translate these into political issues demanding governmental action. These social factors interact with the type of local and national regime and its placement in global systems to channel conflicts and outcomes. Depending on the openness of the regime, popular pressures can lead to peaceful democratic change, open protests, or revolution.
Grading:
15% Midterm Exam
15% Final Exam
45% Reports/Papers
5% Quizzes
18% Written Homework
2% Class Participation
Exam Format:
short essay, T/F, multiple choice
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Discussion
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
6 Homework Assignment(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: This is a writing intensive (W) course. It requires that you develop your term paper in four stages, each of which is submitted for feedback and improvement.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3301W~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 February 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3412 Section 001: Social Networking: Theories and Methods (67265)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3412H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Network analysis spans a diverse range of phenomena from ego-centric ties, to small work-team sociograms, to organizational relations, to trade and military alliances among nation states. This course introduces undergraduate students to theories and methods for studying social networks, the ties connecting people, groups, and organizations. Topics include friendship, communication, small group, health, sexual and romantic, corporate, social movement, public policy, innovation diffusion, criminal and terrorist, and Internet networks.
Class Notes:
30 seats reserved for sociology BS majors through 12/4/2017 Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?almquist+SOC3412+Spring2018
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3412~001&term=1183

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3412H Section 001: Honors: Social Networking: Theories and Methods (67266)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3412 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Network analysis spans a diverse range of phenomena from ego-centric ties, to small work-team sociograms, to organizational relations, to trade and military alliances among nation states. This course introduces undergraduate students to theories and methods for studying social networks, the ties connecting people, groups, and organizations. Topics include friendship, communication, small group, health, sexual and romantic, corporate, social movement, public policy, innovation diffusion, criminal and terrorist, and Internet networks. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Class Notes:
2 seats reserved for sociology majors & 2 seats reserved for sociology BS majors through 12/4/2017 Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?almquist+SOC3412H+Spring2018
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3412H~001&term=1183

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3452 Section 001: Education and Society (66989)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-108
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?warre046+SOC3452+Spring2018
Class Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is and how schools work, partly because everyone has first-hand experience with schools and the education system. Most people have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others, why some people learn more than others, and what creates systematic group differences in educational outcomes. Beyond that, most people have ideas about how education shapes who knows more, who gets good jobs, and who enjoys a long and happy life. Virtually everyone has opinions about how schools and the education system should be changed or improved.

This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about these things. We will critically engage research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. And, we will bring academic materials into direct dialogue with structured experiences in community organizations to enrich our understanding of educational issues. The goal is to better understand how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where inequalities in educational achievements come from; how and why educational experiences and accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved.

This is not a course in which I will tell you what is true. Instead, we will collectively draw on our individual backgrounds and experiences; read and discuss research and other scholarship; debate and argue about the issues; consider how academic issues play out in the community; and challenge and transform our ideas. For the class to succeed, we must all be willing to bring our unique backgrounds and experiences into dialogue with academic knowledge and community service activities and to have our ideas and assumptions challenged. We must also all be willing to listen respectfully and carefully to one another, even when we come from different backgrounds or have sharply different views.
Grading:
1. Community Engaged Learning (CEL)
(130 points, or 65% of course grade)

Community-engaged learning (CEL) is a teaching and learning strategy that combines meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.

You will do 25 hours of service in a community organization and complete a series of written and other assignments reflecting on your experiences there.

2. Writing Assignments: Statements of Beliefs
(30 points, or 15% of course grade)

There are two writing assignments.

First, at the start of the semester you will write an essay about your educational biography, about the factors that contributed to your educational accomplishments, and about the nature of educational inequality in America. Second, at the end of the semester you will write a version of that same essay that focuses on how your views and opinions changed after taking this course. Your will get a chance to write a rough draft of the latter essay and then revise it.

3. In-Class Quizzes & Writing Assignments
(40 points, or 20% of course grade)

There will be a brief quiz or short writing assignment during every class session. They might happen at the beginning, middle, or end of class sessions. Some days, they will ask basic questions about readings or other materials I'll ask you to review before class. Other days, they will ask about activities or discussions that happen in class.

4. Extra Credit

There are multiple ways to get extra credit in this course.
Exam Format:
There will be no exams in this course.
Class Format:
There may be short lectures at the beginning of some class sessions, but mostly the class will be interactive discussions. There will be films, YouTube clips, Skype interviews with authors, and in-class visitors.
Workload:
Most of the work of the class involves community-engaged learning. You will serve for 25 hours during the semester at an off-campus organization, and then you will write a series of short papers reflecting on your experiences there in light of class materials and discussions.
Beyond that, there are two other short papers and daily in-class quizzes or short writing assignments.

For each class session you will need to read something and to consider some online materials.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3452~001&term=1183
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/warre046_SOC3452_Spring2018.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 September 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3505 Section 001: Migrations: People in Motion (66990)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
GLOS 3705 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 110
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Students in this course will tackle debates related to migration from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and will compare and connect diverse migration trends around the world (Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America). Students will critically engage with various paradigms on the geopolitical, racial, and gender power dynamics that anchor migration processes and outcomes. Why would the movement of individuals from some parts of the world (often from the least developed regions to the highly developed Western nations) create such strong and highly charged debates? How are cross border social and economic relations of individuals and households maintained and perpetuated? What are particular governments doing to either encourage or hinder these movements? How are current migrations different from earlier eras? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore the above questions through academic and policy published literature. prereq: Soph, jr, or sr
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC3505+Spring2018
Class Description:
How is transnationalism or cross border social and economic relations maintained and perpetuated? How are these relations affecting identity? How is current transnationalism different from earlier migration? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore these questions through theoretical and case study based literature on the subject. The first part of the course provides a historical overview on migration over the last two centuries. The second section centralizes identity in terms of transnational or dispersed communities. The aim of this section is to introduce the complex web of culture, agency and structure in play when dealing with migration. The third section presents case studies on the social and economic relations of transnational communities. The nature of family connections across borders and the economic ties of those who migrated with their families in the home country is discussed. The role of gender in these relations is also explored. The final section of the course deals with the role of the nation-state in transnational migration.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam
30% Written Homework
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
50% Lecture
20% Film/Video
30% Discussion
Workload:
65 Pages Reading Per Week
15 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3505~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 April 2013

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3511 Section 001: World Population Problems (66991)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Population growth, natural resources, fertility/mortality in less developed nations, population dynamics/forecasts, policies to reduce fertility. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F, credit will not be granted if credit has been received for 3511H
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sgarcia+SOC3511+Spring2018
Class Description:
In 1800 the world's population reached 1 billion people for the first time, then took just over a century to double to 2 billion in the 1920s. In the twentieth century the world's population grew 400%. In the 21st century the world's population is expected to grow another 50% so that world population will near 11 billion. Different countries have experienced these changes in quite different ways, and will continue to do so. For example, in the year 2000 Japan and Nigeria had similar populations but in the next 50 years Japan's population will shrink 20% and Nigeria's will double. In the United States the Asian and Hispanic-origin populations will triple in size, median age will increase to 40 (in 1900 it was less than 20) and the share of the country living in rural areas will fall below 10% (in 1800 it was over 90%). This class introduces you to the dramatic changes in world population in the recent past, and the continuing demographic change occurring in the United States and around the world. You will learn about the fundamental demographic processes of mortality, fertility, migration, population aging. We will explore these processes in global perspective, with additional attention given to regional differentiation, primarily by comparing less- and more-developed countries. Key population-level theories, concepts, trends, and policies will be discussed. We will explore demographic processes and changes as both cause and effect of other social changes and structures. Graduate students in this combined class are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
A-F
S/N
Exam Format:
Demographic profile of country; book report; reading quizzes
Class Format:
75% Lecture
25% Discussion
Workload:
30-70 Pages Reading Per Week
8-16 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Paper(s)
Other Workload: weekly quizzes
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3511~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 October 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3681 Section 001: Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (52229)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
GLOS 3681 Section 001
GWSS 3681 Section 001
RELS 3716 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Experiences of Muslim women/families from historical/comparative perspective. Gender/family power relations in colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education/health, paid work, human rights, and Islamic feminism. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC3681+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. It aims to expand the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East to highlight the complex and diverse everyday experiences of women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical Western representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminism debates.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam
50% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Film/Video
30% Discussion
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
15 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
1 Book Report(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3681~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3701 Section 001: Social Theory (48793)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Mon, Wed 09:05AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 425
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
20 seats reserved for sociology majors through 11/27/2017 Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tgowan+SOC3701+Spring2018
Class Description:
Social theory helps us to make sense from chaos, revealing core logics of development, change, meaning and domination which structure the bewildering, messiness of human experience. This class works closely with texts by a handful of great theorists who have created particularly illuminating, even world-changing ways of seeing. Reading extracts from Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Gramsci, De Beauvoir, Fanon, Patricia Hill Collins, Dorothy Smith, Debord, Foucault, and Baudrillard we will concentrate on readings around notions of power: economic, racist, colonial, patriarchal, bureaucratic, and discursive. You should improve your ability to think, read, and LIVE critically, able to better recognize and evaluate assumptions underlying "common sense" statements about how societies work. I believe that theoretical competence comes when you learn to enjoy intellectual creativity and risk-taking, and so we will spend considerable class time using debate and role-playing to loosen up those Minnesota inhibitions. Reading will not be extensive in terms of number of pages, but I will expect you to wrestle energetically before class with texts that can sometimes be both dense and abstract. Most of the required reading reports and other assignments will be self published by students on the class blog, which will enrich the depth and scope of class debate.
Grading:
Other Grading Information: 40% exams, quizzes. 40% Official Blog Entries. 20% class citizenship and blog citizenship. Each absence after three will decrease your grade by .2. E.g. 3.3 > 3.1 (B+ > B)
Exam Format:
Quotation identification and analysis. Comparison of theories and/or application to historical & contemporary phenomena.
Class Format:
50% Lecture
40% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
Workload:
Other Workload: 15-30 pages of (difficult) reading per week, 25-30 pages of writing per semester.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3701~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3701 Section 002: Social Theory (52221)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Mon, Wed 10:10AM - 11:55AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 317
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
20 seats reserved for sociology majors through 11/27/2017 Click the link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?abaer+SOC3701+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Exam Format:
Short answer; essays
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3701~002&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3701 Section 003: Social Theory (52222)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Wed 05:30PM - 08:50PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
15 seats reserved for sociology majors through 11/27/2017 Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?augus170+SOC3701+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Grading:
3 Engagement Papers - 30% (10% each)
Reflections on Classmates' Papers - 10%
Midterm Exam - 25%
Final Exam - 25%
Attendance & Participation - 10%

Exam Format:
Midterm contains multiple choice and short answer; Final exam contains multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions
Class Format:
50% Lecture
30% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
10% Film
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3701~003&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 October 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3801 Section 001: Sociological Research Methods (48787)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
West Bank Skyway AUDITORIUM
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jdewaard+SOC3801+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory how-to guide for conducting and evaluating social scientific research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing the various components of research design, including: philosophical and theoretical foundations, research topics and questions, conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, index and scale construction, reliability and validity, data collection and sources, sampling, comparisons across groups and over time, and research ethics. This is followed by developing an understanding how these components are packaged together in various ways into research designs, including: experiments and quasi-experiments, ethnography, case studies, interviews and focus groups, ethnosurveys and surveys, content analysis, archival and comparative-historical research, and more. The course concludes by considering issues of workflow in social scientific research, including issues related to the organization, cleaning, and analysis of data.
Grading:
Attendance (10%); 5-6 assignments (10%); 2 exams (30%); 3 papers (50%)
Exam Format:
2 in-class exams
Class Format:
67% lecture; 33% lab/discussion section
Workload:
20-50 pages reading/week; 5-6 assignments; 2 exams; 3 papers
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3801~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 September 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3811 Section 001: Social Statistics (48752)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 330
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ewf+SOC3811+Spring2018
Class Description:

Quantitative data can reveal the social world - or disguise it. This class will teach methods of describing, displaying, analyzing, and interpreting quantitative data so that it can reveal, not disguise, social patterns. We will cover: (1) descriptive statistics and principles of good graphing; (2) methods of transforming data to make its patterns visible; (3) the probability theory that lets us use samples to learn about populations; (4) principles of causal inference; and (5) methods for relating multiple variables to understand their relationships.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology majors and students from other disciplines.
Learning Objectives:
Acquire knowledge of basic statistical principles and computation methods, applied to real social data. Ability to read and understand articles that analyze social data.
Grading:
33% Quizzes
33% Problem sets
33% Analytical memos
Exam Format:
Computations
Multiple Choice
Short Answer
Class Format:
50% Lecture and large-group activities
50% Computer Labs
Workload:
10-35 pages reading per week; quizzes most weeks; 5 shorter problem sets; 3 longer analytical memos
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3811~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 March 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3811 Section 008: Social Statistics (50022)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 317
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?almquist+SOC3811+Spring2018
Class Description:

Quantitative data can reveal the social world - or disguise it. This class will teach methods of describing, displaying, analyzing, and interpreting quantitative data so that it can reveal, not disguise, social patterns. We will cover: (1) descriptive statistics and principles of good graphing; (2) methods of transforming data to make its patterns visible; (3) the probability theory that lets us use samples to learn about populations; (4) principles of causal inference; and (5) methods for relating multiple variables to understand their relationships.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology majors and students from other disciplines.
Learning Objectives:
Acquire knowledge of basic statistical principles and computation methods, applied to real social data. Ability to read and understand articles that analyze social data.
Grading:
100% Three computer data analysis assignments.
Exam Format:
Computations
Short Answer
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Laboratory
Workload:
10-35 PowerPoint slides reading per week; 3 computer problem sets; no exams
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3811~008&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 March 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4101V Section 001: Honors: Sociology of Law (51502)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 4101W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Sociological analysis of law/society. Why people obey law. Social forces involved in creating law (civil/criminal). Procedures of enforcement. Impact of law on social change. Honors students expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, presentations, leadership of students. prereq: [1001, 3101, 3102] or 3701 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC4101V+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Throughout the course, we will consider the role of law in reinforcing and changing class, gender, and race inequalities. Although this course focuses on the U.S. legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between U.S. law and global law and concepts of justice. This course uses an array of reading materials including: theoretical works, empirical studies, and U.S. Supreme Court cases. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
50% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4101V~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2013

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4101W Section 001: Sociology of Law (49398)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 4101V Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the U.S. legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. prereq: [1001; 1101 or 3101 or 3102] recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC4101W+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Throughout the course, we will consider the role of law in reinforcing and changing class, gender, and race inequalities. Although this course focuses on the U.S. legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between U.S. law and global law and concepts of justice. This course uses an array of reading materials including: theoretical works, empirical studies, and U.S. Supreme Court cases.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
50% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4101W~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 November 2013

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4104 Section 001: Crime and Human Rights (52230)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
GLOS 4104 Section 001
GLOS 4104H Section 001
GLOS 5104 Section 001
SOC 4104H Section 001
SOC 5104 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Serious violations of humanitarian/human rights law. Criminalization. Impact of interventions on memories/future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: 1001, at least one 3xxx SOC or GLOS course recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC4104+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Examples are crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on memories of atrocities as such memories are likely to affect the future of cycles of violence. Section I provides an overview of the basic themes of this class and their interconnection: atrocities, legal and other institutional responses, and the ways responses mediate memory. Section II addresses a series of cases in which responses to past atrocities included criminal prosecution and trials: the Holocaust, the Balkan wars, and the My Lai massacre during the Vietnam War. A special focus will be on the violence in the Darfur region of Sudan. Section III will examine cases in which a major response to atrocities was truth commissions, at times combined with trials and compensation programs. Special cases include South Africa, Argentina, and post-Communist Eastern Europe. Section IV addresses the consequences of interventions and memories for ending cycles of violence. Honors and graduate students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
40% Weekly two-page reaction papers
40% Twenty-page seminar paper
20% Exams
Exam Format:
Short answer and essay
Class Format:
65% Lecture
10% Film/Video
10% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
Workload:
About 80 pages reading per week plus exams and writing assignments
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4104~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 September 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4104H Section 001: Honors: Crime and Human Rights (52231)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
Meets With:
GLOS 4104 Section 001
GLOS 4104H Section 001
GLOS 5104 Section 001
SOC 4104 Section 001
SOC 5104 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Serious violations of humanitarian/human rights law. Criminalization. Impact of interventions on memories/future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: 1001, at least one 3xxx SOC or GLOS course recommended
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC4104H+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Examples are crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on memories of atrocities as such memories are likely to affect the future of cycles of violence. Section I provides an overview of the basic themes of this class and their interconnection: atrocities, legal and other institutional responses, and the ways responses mediate memory. Section II addresses a series of cases in which responses to past atrocities included criminal prosecution and trials: the Holocaust, the Balkan wars, and the My Lai massacre during the Vietnam War. A special focus will be on the violence in the Darfur region of Sudan. Section III will examine cases in which a major response to atrocities was truth commissions, at times combined with trials and compensation programs. Special cases include South Africa, Argentina, and post-Communist Eastern Europe. Section IV addresses the consequences of interventions and memories for ending cycles of violence. Honors and graduate students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
40% Weekly two-page reaction papers
40% Twenty-page seminar paper
20% Exams
Exam Format:
Short answer and essay
Class Format:
65% Lecture
10% Film/Video
10% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
Workload:
About 80 pages reading per week plus exams and writing assignments
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4104H~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 September 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4109 Section 001: Domestic Criminal Violence (52233)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Mon 06:00PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Survey of research on family violence within criminological framework. Definition of domestic violence. Empirical/theoretical approaches. Response of social control agencies. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?rselmini+SOC4109+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course provides an overview of the key issues concerning domestic violence as a crime and as a social problem. We will discuss the nature and feature of violence in the family and in other settings, with a focus on intimate partner violence, child abuse, elder abuse, and in dating relationships. The course will also explore how violence against vulnerable people takes different shapes across the world and is related to some cultural practices and traditions (like child marriages and sexual exploitation and trafficking of women and children). In the first part of the course students will examine these various concepts of domestic criminal violence and become familiar with the debates surrounding it. We will discuss new findings from several national and international studies on rape, female homicide, violence against men as a new concern, and violence through the Internet. We will try to understand how to explain this form of violence, comparing sociological and psychological perspectives. Features of victims and offenders and the nature and extent of domestic criminal violence will also be examined, with reference to the major victimization surveys -- and other kinds of research -- carried out in the US, Canada, and selected European countries. In the final part of the course we will focus on social and criminal justice system responses to domestic criminal violence, paying particular attention to understanding what works in preventing and controlling it. Some parts of the course will offer a comparative perspective, paying attention to international debates and research.
Grading:
60% Midterm Exam
20% Reports/Papers
10% Quizzes
5% Attendance
5% Class Participation Other Grading Information: There are 3 short exams, each counts 20%, a short paper (20%), 5 quizzes and multiple choice (each counts 2%)
Exam Format:
short essay questions
Class Format:
60% Lecture
10% Film/Video
10% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40-60 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: 1 short paper (5-10 pages)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4109~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2014

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4111 Section 001: Deviant Behavior (66992)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Definition/nature of deviant behavior. Social processes associated with deviant careers and social reintegration. Relationship of deviant behavior to social control. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walk0938+SOC4111+Spring2018
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4111~001&term=1183

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4149 Section 001: Killing (48784)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Fri 12:30PM - 03:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Sociological, legal, psychological aspects of diverse types of killing. Normal killings contrasted with pathological types. Mentally disturbed killings, sexual killings, killings within families, gang killings, terrorist killings. prereq: jr or sr or grad student or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?malmq001+SOC4149+Spring2018
Class Description:
Sociological, legal, and psychological aspects of diverse types of killing. The topic of "normal" killings is contrasted with various pathological types. Criminological data on homicides from national and sectional data are presented. Legal approaches to homicides are contrasted with criminological and clinical approaches. Subtopics covered include: mentally disturbed killings, sexual killings, killings within families, gang killings, and terrorist killings.
Workload:
3 Exam(s)
Other Workload: (2 mid-term examinations and a cumulative final examination)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4149~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 October 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4162 Section 001: Criminal Procedure in American Society (52235)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-103
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
How constitutional democracy balances need to enforce criminal law and rights of individuals to be free of unnecessary government intrusion. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jbs+SOC4162+Spring2018
Class Description:
Course Content: Balance between government power to enforce criminal laws and individuals' right to be let alone by the government in a constitutional democracy. Topics include: police power to stop and frisk, arrest, search, interrogate, and identify suspects; right to a lawyer; remedies for constitutional violations; social science, the courts, and the law of criminal procedure. Teaching methods: Read and discuss U.S. Supreme Court and other cases. Textbooks and other reading: Samaha, Criminal Procedure 9th edition (earlier editions won't do). Audience: Upper division undergraduates in all departments and colleges.
Grading:
90% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: 90%,13 non cumulative short answer and essay exams; 10%, participation in course surveys
Exam Format:
60% identification, definition; description and explanation of legal concepts and social science findings (no multiple choice); 10% case briefs; 30% discussion reaction essays
Class Format:
15% Lecture
85% Discussion
Workload:
35 Pages Reading Per Week
13 Exam(s)
Other Workload: weekly non-cumulative short answer exam (60%); weekly case briefs (10%); weekly discussion analysis essay (30%)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4162~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 October 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4190 Section 001: Topics in Sociology With Law, Criminology, and Deviance Emphasis -- Gangs & Youth Violence Around the World (67308)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 110
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [1001, [3101 or 3102]] recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F; cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
Class Notes:
[1101, 3101 or 3102] recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F; cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?rselmini+SOC4190+Spring2018
Class Description:

The course is aimed at exploring the subject of youth violence in a global dimension. It will help students in becoming familiar with this cross-national social phenomenon and in critically understanding it not only as a crime issue, but as an expression of social change and of cultural resistance. After a discussion of what is "youth violence" and what behaviors are defined in this way in different contexts and by different actors, we will analyze critically different forms of collective youth violence. Youth violence, in fact, is a broad category - and a controversial concept - that includes different phenomena: Gangs and street organizations, of course, but also young people resisting processes of exclusion expressed by the global movements for social justice and by the more recent anti - austerity mobilizations. Main topics of the class will include how youth violence is theorized and conceptualized in sociological and criminological discourses; traditional and alternative definitions of gangs, their features and their origin in the US and in other countries (Europe and Latin America); the processes of globalization of gangs and the role of social media; he repertoire of actions that characterizes youth violence around the world, with a focus on the European riots in the French banlieues and in other European and Latin American ghettos; the representation of youth violence in the media, in music and movies; the policing of youth violence and youth protest and the search for alternative solutions, like legalization and mediation. In class we will use a variety of scientific readings, of reports and media news, and other sources of visual information, particularly video, and movies.

Grading:
60% Midterm Exam
10% Quizzes
10% Attendance and class participation
20% paper
Exam Format:
short answers and short essays
Class Format:
50% Lecture
20% Film/Video
10% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50 - .60 pages reading per week and individual research project
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4190~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 October 2015

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4246 Section 001: Sociology of Health and Illness (51562)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Context of social, political, economic, and cultural forces and medical knowledge. Social meanings. How people seek help and manage illnesses. How doctors, nurses, and patients interact. Social movements surrounding health. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?eroberts+SOC4246+Spring2018
Class Description:
Although everyone gets sick and everyone eventually dies there are important social differences in what illnesses people have, how they are treated and cared for, and how long they live. This class introduces you to the key issues in the sociology of health by reading classic and important articles and books in medical sociology. You will then explore a topic in greater depth as part of a class project. We will work collaboratively to build a set of real health and medical records that will be a shared resource for a final class research project. The semester will conclude with students working on an original research project on a topic of your choice using the shared data we have created. The research project will connect the theory from readings to the actual practice and experience of health care. Please contact the instructor for a copy of the syllabus and with questions: eroberts@umn.edu.
Grading:
Participation and discussion (20%), Research proposal and bibliography (30%), Research paper (40%), Research presentation (10%)
Exam Format:
No exam
Class Format:
Lecture, discussion, and collaborative work on research projects. Student presentations.
Workload:
2.5 hours of class time and 6.5 hours of independent work on reading and research in accordance with UMN guidelines (3 hours per week per credit)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4246~001&term=1183
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eroberts_SOC4246_Spring2018.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 October 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4305 Section 001: Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (52236)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
GLOS 4305 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 145
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Examines how natural/built environments influence human behavior/social organization. Focuses on microenvironments/their influence on individuals. Impact of macroenvironments on societal organization. Environmental movements. prereq: 1001 or environmental course recommended, [soc majors/minors must register A-F]
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?broad001+SOC4305+Spring2018
Class Description:

Since its evolutionary appearance, the human species has exerted a large and increasing influence upon its surrounding natural environment. In last two hundred years, this influence has mushroomed. The human population has multiplied enormously, as has its consumerism and its use of technology to extract resources and dump waste back into the environment. Our planet is like a spaceship, "Spaceship Earth;" it can only support a limited amount of human activities. Human society is now pushing the limits of the planetary ecological systems. Our impact is so strong that our current geological era is now called the Anthropocene--the era of humans being the most powerful ecological influence. We are causing massive degradation of the water, land, atmosphere and extinction of other species. Why is it so difficult for human society to learn to live with the limits imposed by the ecological systems of the planet? What fundamental changes do we need to make in order to create a type of human society that can co-exist with a healthy ecology for a long time? These are the basic questions asked by Environmental Sociology, the basis of this course. Growth of population, increasing affluence and more effective extractive technology are the immediate material factors of our devastating impact on the environment. But beyond these material factors lie many social causes. Human society has a strong tendency to ignore environmental problems. These denial tendencies are caused by sociological factors such as social organization, political processes, profit-hungry economic production, insatiable consumer demand, and beliefs that ignore science and disregard the environment. The course examines these various sociological factors that drive our environmental impact and considers ways they might be changed to create a more sustainable form of society.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Those with an interest in the sustainability of humanity
Learning Objectives:
Study the interaction patterns between human society and the natural and built environment.
Grading:
Student presentations, exercises, quizzes, midterm and final exam.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions and short essays
Class Format:
Lecture and discussion
Workload:
30 pages of reading per week plus occasional exercises and student group presentations
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4305~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
18 October 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4411 Section 001: Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations (66993)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
SOC 5411 Section 001
SOC 4411H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Graduate and honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and, to a degree, length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC4411+Spring2018
Class Description:
Theories/evidence about origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. Efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by use of law enforcement, security, and military forces. Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.

Graduate students in this combined class are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
100% Reports/Papers Other Grading Information: Three shorter writing assignments 20% each, course paper 40%.
Class Format:
40% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
24 Pages Writing Per Term
4 Paper(s)
Other Workload: Three shorter writing assignments during the semester, one longer course paper due at the end of the semester.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4411~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 April 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4411H Section 001: Honors: Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations (67267)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
Meets With:
SOC 4411 Section 001
SOC 5411 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Graduate and honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and, to a degree, length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC4411H+Spring2018
Class Description:
Theories/evidence about origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. Efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by use of law enforcement, security, and military forces. Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.

Graduate students in this combined class are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
100% Reports/Papers Other Grading Information: Three shorter writing assignments 20% each, course paper 40%.
Class Format:
40% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
24 Pages Writing Per Term
4 Paper(s)
Other Workload: Three shorter writing assignments during the semester, one longer course paper due at the end of the semester.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4411H~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 April 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (49005)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?morti002+SOC4966W+Spring2018
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience. It will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper. There are two options:

1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change; the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Exam Format:
no exam
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4966W~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Major-Project Seminar (51789)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schurman+SOC4966W+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course serves as a capstone to your studies in sociology. It is designed to provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; to think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of sociology can be used and applied in your lives and careers outside of the University, and to use that knowledge to complete a senior project. The particular focus of this section of the course will be on the "world of work." While the main practical goal of the course is to guide you through the process of doing a senior project (a graduation requirement for all Sociology majors), the central intellectual goal of the course will be to learn about changes in the US economy over the last half century and their implications for the labor market; the new culture of capitalism; different organizational cultures; "life on the job;" and more. All senior projects will need to address some aspect of the sociology of work and will involve both research and your own personal experience/s as a worker, be it through your job, an internship, or service learning. Classes will include a combination of lectures, guest speakers, films, active learning exercises, writing exercises, and engaged discussions of the required readings.
Grading:
35% Reports/Papers
15% Special Projects
15% Written Homework
15% Reflection Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: I require regular, 2 paragraph written commentaries on the readings, which will constitute 15% of your grade. The 'special project' will involve research into the occupation that most attracts you and will be part of your course paper/project
Exam Format:
none
Class Format:
15% Lecture
10% Film/Video
25% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
5% Web Based
20% Service Learning Attendance and active participation in this class are mandatory and crucial.
Workload:
50-80 Pages Reading Per Week
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Paper(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Other Workload: Readings will be a core part of this course, as will be research on occupations that interest you.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4966W~002&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 4978V Section 001: Senior Honors Proseminar II (49009)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Developing the methodology of senior project, researching it, and writing the thesis. Students work individually or in small groups in consultation with seminar director and other faculty. Group discussion of individual projects. prereq: [4977V or instr consent], 3701, 3801, 3811, at least 9 additional upper div soc cr, sr soc honors major, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from instructor to register. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tgowan+SOC4978V+Spring2018
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4978V~001&term=1183

Spring 2018  |  SOC 5104 Section 001: Crime and Human Rights (52546)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
GLOS 4104 Section 001
GLOS 4104H Section 001
GLOS 5104 Section 001
SOC 4104 Section 001
SOC 4104H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Course Catalog Description:
Serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law. Criminalization. Impact of interventions on memories and future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, and compensation programs.
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC5104+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Examples are crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on memories of atrocities as such memories are likely to affect the future of cycles of violence. Section I provides an overview of the basic themes of this class and their interconnection: atrocities, legal and other institutional responses, and the ways responses mediate memory. Section II addresses a series of cases in which responses to past atrocities included criminal prosecution and trials: the Holocaust, the Balkan wars, and the My Lai massacre during the Vietnam War. A special focus will be on the violence in the Darfur region of Sudan. Section III will examine cases in which a major response to atrocities was truth commissions, at times combined with trials and compensation programs. Special cases include South Africa, Argentina, and post-Communist Eastern Europe. Section IV addresses the consequences of interventions and memories for ending cycles of violence. Honors and graduate students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
40% Weekly two-page reaction papers
40% Twenty-page seminar paper
20% Exams
Exam Format:
Short answer and essay
Class Format:
65% Lecture
10% Film/Video
10% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
Workload:
About 80 pages reading per week plus exams and writing assignments
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC5104~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 September 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 5411 Section 001: Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations (66994)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
SOC 4411 Section 001
SOC 4411H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Theories/evidence about origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. Efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by use of law enforcement, security, and military forces. Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Graduate and honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC5411+Spring2018
Class Description:
Theories/evidence about origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. Efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by use of law enforcement, security, and military forces. Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.

Graduate students in this combined class are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
100% Reports/Papers Other Grading Information: Three shorter writing assignments 20% each, course paper 40%.
Class Format:
40% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
24 Pages Writing Per Term
4 Paper(s)
Other Workload: Three shorter writing assignments during the semester, one longer course paper due at the end of the semester.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC5411~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 April 2016

Spring 2018  |  SOC 8001 Section 001: Sociology as a Profession (49706)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue 01:15PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1183
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This 1 credit class fosters adaptation to the Graduate Program in Sociology and preparation for a sociological career. In the Fall, we explore professional careers in this field. We discuss the wide range of opportunities in sociology and help students further explore the next steps to becoming a scholar, educator, and member of various professional, intellectual, and social communities. We share practical information about being a student in sociology and about sociological careers, discuss presentations in department workshop seminars, and provide a safe place to discuss issues of student concerns. Students are encouraged to bring to the class their thoughts and reactions to experiences during their first semester in the PhD program. The Spring 8001 class is oriented to particular milestones in the Sociology Graduate Program and important student activities (for example, preparing reading lists for the preliminary exam and then writing the preliminary exam, preparing a dissertation prospectus, writing grant proposals, preparing an article for publication, etc.). Pre-req: Soc PhD students
Class Notes:
Grad SOC major or Instr consent. Click this link for more detailed information:
Class Description:
This class fosters adaptation to the Graduate Program in Sociology and exploration of professional careers in this field.

We will discuss the wide range of opportunities in sociology and help students get started in thinking about becoming a scholar, educator, and member of various professional, intellectual, and social communities.

We will share practical information about being a student in sociology and about sociological careers, discuss presentations in department workshop seminars, and provide a safe place to discuss issues of student concern. Students are encouraged to bring to the class their thoughts and reactions to experiences in the program.




Who Should Take This Class?:
First year graduate students in Sociology.
Learning Objectives:
Students will learn about different types of sociological careers and share experiences that facilitate adaptation to the life of a graduate student.
Grading:
S-N
Exam Format:
No exams
Class Format:
We meet one hour per week. Several sessions feature visitors or panels of sociologists representing different institutional contexts (e.g. R1 university faculty, faculty at a small liberal arts college, sociologists in research organizations, those who work in government agencies, etc.).
Workload:
There are no required readings or exams.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8001~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 March 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 8011 Section 001: Teaching Sociology: Theory & Practice (51284)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Thu 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1183
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Social/political context of teaching. Ethical issues, multiculturalism, academic freedom. Teaching skills (e.g., lecturing, leading discussions). Active learning. Evaluating effectiveness of teaching. Opportunity to develop syllabus or teaching plan. prereq: Soc grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC8011+Spring2018
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8011~001&term=1183

Spring 2018  |  SOC 8090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Sociology & Its Publics (66998)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Fri 10:00AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC8090+Spring2018
Class Description:


Students in this workshop will serve as the graduate student board for The Society Pages, an online social science journalism project housed at the University of Minnesota. Participation is based on application. In addition to experience and qualifications, the board is selected so as to involve students from different stages in the program, substantive interest areas, and methodological specialties. Most participants are expected to make a year-long commitment to the project, though membership will rotate on an annual basis.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students in sociology
Learning Objectives:
  • To deepen students' substantive research expertise
    by engaging cutting edge sociological scholarship. Students will unearth the most interesting findings and best evidence from new research in their areas of study. This provides students with a broader vision of the sociological field and offers an opportunity to diversify their reading in the prelim and dissertation processes.

  • To develop writing and communication skills
    in addressing academic and non-academic audiences. Grad board members regularly write for the website, and our supportive, professional editorial team gives direct feedback designed to improve these skills as the pieces are published online.

  • To gain deep, practical appreciation of the process of editorial decision-making
    and public scholarship.
    TSP
    had almost 11 million unique page views last year. Working with the site allows students to engage in critical and constructive discussion of the field of sociology, while participating in a collaborative public outreach project by shaping and improving the site as an online vehicle to disseminate great research.


Exam Format:
none
Class Format:
Weekly seminar
Workload:
4-6 hours a week
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8090~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 March 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 8090 Section 002: Topics in Sociology -- Migration and Migrants in Demographic Perspective (66999)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1183
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jdewaard+SOC8090+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course provides a graduate-level treatment of major theoretical and empirical debates in demographic research on migration and migrants, and considers questions such as: i) why people migrate (or not) and how migration decisions are made; ii) the effects of migration in sending and receiving societies, iii) the role of the state, including migration and integration policies, iv) the effects of migration on migrants themselves, including linking to debates on assimilation, integration and social exclusion, and v) measuring and modeling migration in empirical research. Although this course comes with "demographic" in the title and fulfills one of the seminar requirements for graduate trainees and the population studies minor at the Minnesota Population Center, as the above questions make clear, it is necessarily much broader in scope, and draws from quantitative and qualitative research in economics, demography, human geography, history, political science, population health, public policy, and sociology.
Grading:
Attendance/Participation; Final paper and presentation
Exam Format:
N/A
Class Format:
25% lecture; 75% student-led discussion
Workload:
Weekly readings and student-led discussions; Final Paper and presentation
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8090~002&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 September 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 8101 Section 001: Sociology of Law (66995)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Wed 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Course Catalog Description:
Sociological analysis of law and society. In-depth review of research on why people obey the law, of social forces involved in creation of law (both civil and criminal), procedures of enforcement, and impact of law on social change.
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC8101+Spring2018
Class Description:
The course will provide an overview of basic sociological theories of law, classical and contemporary. It will also address current issues such as globalization of law, local interpretation and knowledge, legal consciousness, law and collective memory. There will be room to address interests of graduate students related to their dissertation projects. Throughout, the sociology of law will be treated in relation to other social phenomena (e.g., family and life course, organizations, development, human rights, crime and punishment).
Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students in sociology and other disciplines such as law, public policy, management, anthropology, and political science.
Learning Objectives:
Learn basic ideas from the sociology of law, learn to apply them to themes of students' special interest.
Grading:
Grading will be based on course participation, leading discussions, brief notes on readings and one seminar paper.
Exam Format:
N/A
Class Format:
Seminar: Brief lecturing interchanged with seminar discussion.
Workload:
Workload in line with typical graduate seminar.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8101~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 October 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 8211 Section 001: The Sociology of Race & Racialization (66996)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Fri 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Major theoretical debates. Classic and contemporary theoretical approaches to studying U.S. race relations; contemporary and historical experiences of specific racial and ethnic groups.
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC8211+Spring2018
Class Description:

Race in the contemporary United States is a complex, dynamic, "moving target" so to speak. In this seminar, we will explore the changing dimensions of the contemporary construct of race through a sociological framework. Topics to be discussed in the class this term include: race, globalization and Asian Americans, multiracial identity and the color line, mass incarceration and racial caste, race and beauty work, transnational adoption, race and sports, whiteness and social class, black immigrants & black identity, environmental racism, and the future of race in the U.S.

To explore these issues, we will read a book or collection of articles a week. Students will do weekly response papers on the readings (~ 2 pages), lead discussions, and complete a major term paper on a topic of their choice by the end of the term. In addition to covering the material in the readings, we will also begin each class with a 20-30 minute discussion of racial issues and controversies currently in the news (this term we'll probably end up discussing the 2016 election quite a bit). We'll then weave our discussion of these issues into our exploration of the readings for the week.

Participation from students from a variety of disciplines is welcomed! Please email me with any questions at elogan@umn.edu. The working syllabus for the class is found below.

Grading:
30% Class Participation (including co-leading 1-2 discussions)
30% Reflection Papers (10 out of 12 weeks)
40% Final Paper (components include ideas in progress, preliminary bibliography, rough draft, and final version, ~ 20 pages)
Exam Format:
none
Class Format:
20% Student Presentations (of Readings & Discussion Questions)
10% Lecture (Brief overview of topic by Professor)
70% Discussion (of Weekly Readings and Current Racial Topics)
Workload:
225 Pages Reading Per Week (generally 1 book)
1 Final Paper (~ 20 pages)
10 Reading Response Papers (1-2 pages)
30-40 pages of Writing Total
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8211~001&term=1183
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/elogan_SOC8211_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2015

Spring 2018  |  SOC 8801 Section 001: Sociological Research Methods (50119)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 614
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?edgell+SOC8801+Spring2018
Class Description:
This class focuses on the logic of research design, linking research questions with methods and analytical strategies at the appropriate level of analysis, understanding the assumptions about the world, the nature of knowledge, and what kinds of knowledge are theoretically valued that are embedded within particular methods (e.g. survey research, ethnography) or methodological approaches (qualitative, quantitative, mixed methods). Students will be pushed to go beyond their taken-for-granted understanding of what methods "I'm good at" and which methods and approaches are valuable and helpful for any given area of inquiry.
Workload:
It's a graduate class, so expect a medium reading load weekly (2-4 hours), several shorter assignments that ask you to critically assess the methodology of "exemplar" pieces, and a final paper of 15-20 pages.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8801~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 September 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 8811 Section 001: Advanced Social Statistics (49141)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC8811+Spring2018
Class Description:
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Topics for Spring 2012: logistic regression, event history analysis, structural equation models.
Grading:
3 data analysis papers on the three topics, each 33.3% of the course grade.
Class Format:
60% Lecture
10% Discussion
30% Laboratory
Workload:
12 Pages Reading Per Week
40 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8811~001&term=1183
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/knoke001_SOC8811_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 October 2015

Spring 2018  |  SOC 8890 Section 001: Advanced Topics in Research Methods -- Sex, Death, & Mobility: Population Modeling (66997)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Thu 04:00PM - 06:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Advanced Research Methods (e.g., multilevel models), historical/comparative, field, survey research. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 8801, 8811, or instr consent. Cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ewf+SOC8890+Spring2018
Class Description:

"He not busy being born is busy dying." -- Bob Dylan


Populations are made up of people whose lives are changing all the time: growing up; moving around; having kids; gaining and losing jobs and spouses; entering and leaving schools and prisons; getting sick; and dying. This course covers population modeling techniques from the demographic tradition, organized around these kinds of life changes. These techniques excel at describing social and epidemiological changes occurring along multiple time scales simultaneously; identifying the inequalities lurking beneath population averages; and figuring out what population a research question is really about. The course assumes no prior knowledge of demography and will cover a range of applications from across the social and health sciences.

REGISTRATION NOTE: If you are not a Sociology student, you may need a code to register. Students from all disciplines are welcome in the course. Please email the instructor (ewf@umn.edu) for a registration code if you need one.

Grading:
60% Problem Sets
20% Quizzes
20% Short Essays
Exam Format:
Short quizzes with multiple choice, short answer, or small computations
Class Format:
Active lectures and seminar discussion
Workload:
Approx. 50 pages reading per week; weekly problem sets; five quizzes; short essays at term end on using the methods in research
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8890~001&term=1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 November 2016

ClassInfo Links - Spring 2018 Sociology Classes

To link directly to this ClassInfo page from your website or to save it as a bookmark, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=SOC&term=1183
To see a URL-only list for use in the Faculty Center URL fields, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=SOC&term=1183&url=1
To see this page output as XML, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=SOC&term=1183&xml=1
To see this page output as JSON, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=SOC&term=1183&json=1
To see this page output as CSV, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=SOC&term=1183&csv=1
Schedule Viewer
8 am
9 am
10 am
11 am
12 pm
1 pm
2 pm
3 pm
4 pm
5 pm
6 pm
7 pm
8 pm
9 pm
10 pm
s
m
t
w
t
f
s
?
Class Title