46 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2018  |  SOC 1001 Section 001: Introduction to Sociology (17098)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 310
Enrollment Status:
Open (146 of 174 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Discussion sections will NOT meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?meierann+SOC1001+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course will introduce basic sociological concepts including theories, methods and common subjects of sociological study including the individual and society, structures of power, social institutions, and social change. We will accomplish this through lectures, readings, assignments and videos.
Grading:
50% Weekly Quizzes (13 total, drop 2 lowest scores)
20% Short paper 1
20% Short paper 2
10% Class participation and discussion section evaluation
Other Grading Information: These percentages are estimates and subject to minor modifications.
Exam Format:
Weekly quizzes will ask you to respond to one question on issues discussed in the previous class meetings' lecture AND your assigned reading for the week. You are to respond in short answer (1-2 paragraphs) in class during a 15 minute window on designated quiz days (will be noted in syllabus).
Class Format:
50% Lecture
20% Discussion
10% Film/Video
10% In class activities
10% In class quiz time
Workload:
Approximately 50 pages reading per week
20 page writing per term (across 2 papers)
13 quizzes
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/17098/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 1001 Section 015: Introduction to Sociology (17105)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 210
Enrollment Status:
Open (145 of 174 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Discussion sections will NOT meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC1001+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course is an introduction to the fascinating field of sociology. The broad aim of the class is for students to learn to develop and deploy their ?sociological imagination,? in order to better understand and participate in the social world. Sociology is the study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociologists investigate the structure of groups, organizations, and societies, and ask how and why people interact within these contexts. In this class you will read the works of classical and contemporary theorists, view sections of documentary films, and engage in debate and discussion with your peers and professor. You will learn to use a sociological lens in analyzing many of the cultural, economic and political phenomena that surround us every day. You will question things that may have never before seemed strange, and you will begin to make ?sociological sense? of things that you may have always before questioned. By the end of the course, you will be familiar with the sociological toolkit-- the core concepts, methods, and theories of the discipline?and be able to begin to use this toolkit to make sense of the world around you.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
20% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
20% Laboratory Evaluation
Exam Format:
true false and essay
Class Format:
40% Lecture
15% Film/Video
25% Discussion
20% Laboratory
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/17105/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 1001 Section 030: Introduction to Sociology (17109)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Open (48 of 116 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Discussion sections will NOT meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?frost166+SOC1001+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the sociological imagination -- a way of viewing the events, relationship, and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Sociologists investigate the structure of groups, organizations, and societies, and ask how and why people interact within these contexts. Sociology explores the social conditions that enable and constrain the courses of action that any individual can take, meaning it is often at the forefront of identifying and proposing solutions to major forms of inequality and injustice. Throughout the course, you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. We will examine some of the central concepts and problems that preoccupy sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives.
Learning Objectives:
Demonstrate recognition that everyday experiences, from minor thoughts and interactions to sweeping social problems, are socially constructed. Demonstrate an understanding of key sociological concepts, terms, theories, and perspectives. Evaluate current events, social policies, and personal experiences using sociological concepts, theories, and perspectives. Critically evaluate written arguments by assessing their evidence, methods, and assumptions.
Grading:
30% Exams
35% Papers and Assignments
15% In-Class Activities
20% Lab Section Participation
Exam Format:
Short answer and essay
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Discussion/In-class Activity
15% Film/Video
20% Separate Discussion Sections
Workload:
3 Exams
2 Papers
~ 40 Pages of Reading Per Week
~ 20 pages of writing (across 2 papers and shorter writing assignments throughout the semester)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/17109/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 April 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 1011V Section 001: Honors: Introduction to Sociology (17758)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Mon, Wed 12:20PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 220
Enrollment Status:
Open (19 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships, and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life and how you, in turn, affect society.
Class Notes:
12 seats reserved for CLA honors sophomores 10 seats reserved for CLA honors freshman 3 seats reserved for honors freshman Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?meierann+SOC1011V+Fall2018
Class Description:
This coures is intended to provide an overview of the discipline of sociology including some of the main sub-fields and different theoretical approaches to understanding social life. The course will be a seminars style course where participants will be expected to engage in discussions of assigned readings and extend the ideas learned in the class to current issues of social interest. The course will use a sociological lens to examine U.S. and international social issues.
Grading:
10% Midterm Exam
15% Final Exam
40% Reports/Papers
15% Additional Semester Exams
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: Percentages are estimates and subject to slight modification.
Exam Format:
multiple choice, short answer, and essay
Class Format:
20% Lecture
10% Film/Video
40% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Exam(s)
4 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/17758/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 1101 Section 001: Law, Crime, & Punishment (20289)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Open (111 of 140 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introductory course designed to provide students with a general understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. We examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment using an interdisciplinary social science approach.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC1101+Fall2018
Class Description:
This introductory course is designed to provide students with a general understanding of some of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. Law is everywhere. Law permits, prohibits, enables, legitimates, protects, and prosecutes citizens. Law shapes our day to day lives in countless ways. We examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment using an interdisciplinary social science approach. As one of the founders of the Law and Society movement observed, law is too important to leave to lawyers. Accordingly, this course will borrow from several theoretical, disciplinary, and interdisciplinary perspectives (such as sociology, anthropology, political science, critical studies, psychology). There are two units. We will first explore the sociology of law and laws role primarily in the American context (but with some attention to international law and global human rights efforts). Next, this course seeks to develop a sociological understanding of the patterns of crime and punishment in the United States. The thematic topics to be discussed include law and social control; laws role in social change; same-sex marriage; welfare and crime; the impact of criminal record and race on the employment of ex-offenders; and the effect of juvenile justice criminal policies on urban youth.
Grading:
40% Reports/Papers
15% Written Assignments
20% Class Presentations
25% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Papers
1 Reading Reflection
1 Class Presentation
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/20289/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Justice, Health & Good Life in the 21st Century (34406)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Blegen Hall 110
Enrollment Status:
Open (23 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F; cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?asalamha+SOC3090+Fall2018
Class Description:
What does it mean to have justice, health, and the good life in this world? In our attempts to imagine and reimagine the contemporary globe, we examine the challenges to justice, health, and the realization of the good life. We ask questions that affect many in the contemporary world: How is it possible for a person to physically torture another? Why do people obey orders to kill? Why do people discriminate? How do we get our identities? Why do we feel helpless? Why are we humans aware of our ability to cooperate, and yet are alienated from one another? Why is there a rise of mental illness in industrial societies worldwide? Around the world, there are reports of genocide, torture, racism, inequality, crime, poverty, and authoritarian rule. These conditions have sweeping effects on the health of the globe's populations. Drawing on sociological and humanistic perspectives, we seek to answer these questions and explore the possibilities for social change and the realization of the good life for peoples worldwide. The course seeks to examine how social order is produced, and how individuals and groups knowingly - and also unknowingly - enable the emergence of the very threats to life, health, and justice that they fear. We examine how social conformity creates social stability yet also perniciously enables torture, genocide, and inequality, and mental health crises. The course invites learners to explore the multiple ways that human beings can cooperate to mutually enable individuals to express and participate in beauty, truth, love, and health. Throughout the course, you will be asked to discuss how society individually impacts you, and how society contributes to the perpetuation - as well as degradation - of the good life. Students will write a strategy memo connecting justice, health, and the good life and are anticipated to participate in a simulation of the United Nations Security Council and the World Health Organization.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Any student who is interested in any one of three themes of justice, health, or the good life would find this course relevant. The course is meant to increase knowledge about the mutual relationships between justice, health, and the good life. The idea behind the course is to show how thinking about the combination of justice, health, and the good life surprisingly facilitates a deeper understanding of each separately.

Students of nursing, medicine, social work, law, ethics, sociology, public health, political science, psychology, and policy (and other related fields) are expected to find this course helpful in advancing their thinking on issues and questions that preoccupy their specific field. The hope is that the course provides students an opportunity to think in new ways about familiar issues within their field.
Learning Objectives:
To reveal the inextricable connections between justice, health, and the good life.
To explore strategies to advance social justice, medical health, and the good life.
To ask why individuals and groups behave in ways that interrelatedly promote injustice and health crises.
To understand how individuals, groups, and organizations produce global problems.
To imagine new ways to link justice and health to further the good life.
Grading:
30% Participation (includes attendance, blog discussion, polls, individual in-class discussion of readings, and general participation)
20% Debate (Simulation) (4-7 minute speech)
20% Strategy Memo (class discussion of memo ideas, the sharing of comments, and grading based on honor).
30% Simulation of the United Nations Security Council and the World Health Organization

*This grading scheme is not final, as the instructor intends to consult with students in the beginning of the course.
Exam Format:
There are NO exams in this course.
Class Format:
The course is discussion-based. It includes lectures, blogs, activities, and in-class discussion.
There are no textbooks in the course. All readings are anticipated to be available on Canvas.
Workload:
20-30 Pages Reading per Week (excluding the last weeks, and weeks when the strategy memo and the simulation takes place)
1 Debate
1 Strategy Memo
1 United Nations Security Council Simulation
1 World Health Organization Simulation
15-50 words of Blog Writing Per Week
15-20 Polls to respond to (There are no correct answers).
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/34406/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 May 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (18143)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 350
Enrollment Status:
Open (75 of 95 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC3101+Fall2018
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to help students develop an introductory understanding of the criminal punishment system in the United States. We study law enforcement, courts, prisons, jails, parole, and capital punishment. Additionally, we analyze the relationships between criminal punishment and social processes, including: ethnic, racial and class inequality; political and economic change; and popular representations of crime and criminals. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam,
30% Final Exam,
30% Quizzes,
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (3 quizzes, 1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture,
5% Film/Video,
40% Discussion,
5% Small Group Activities,
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: There will be three opportunities for extra credit, all of which include writing.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/18143/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 November 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3101H Section 001: Honors: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (20573)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Meets With:
SOC 3101 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 350
Enrollment Status:
Open (11 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: Honor students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power-point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F, honors
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC3101H+Fall2018
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to help students develop an introductory understanding of the criminal punishment system in the United States. We study law enforcement, courts, prisons, jails, parole, and capital punishment. Additionally, we analyze the relationships between criminal punishment and social processes, including: ethnic, racial and class inequality; political and economic change; and popular representations of crime and criminals. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam,
30% Final Exam,
30% Quizzes,
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (3 quizzes, 1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture,
5% Film/Video,
40% Discussion,
5% Small Group Activities,
5% Guest Speakers
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/20573/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 November 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (18144)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Open (55 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pieho001+SOC3102+Fall2018
Class Description:
​This course addresses general issues in conceptualizing and controlling criminal behavior. Course content will be particularly concerned with the processes of classification and the construction of criminal behavior relative to other idealized forms of behavior. Some important questions include: How does criminal behavior and social control change across time and space? What is the relationship between status characteristics like race, gender, sexuality, and prestige etc. and the classification and controlling of some behaviors versus others?
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
(1) Review paper
(1) Term paper
(1) Group/Individual Project
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/18144/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2017

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3201 Section 001: Inequality: Introduction to Stratification (20045)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 350
Enrollment Status:
Open (69 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Why does inequality exist? How does it work? These are the essential questions examined in this class. Topics range from welfare and poverty to the role of race and gender in getting ahead. We will pay particular attention to social inequities why some people live longer and happier lives while others are burdened by worry, poverty, and ill health. prereq: soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ewf+SOC3201+Fall2018
Class Description:
Stratification is the study of social inequality. We will explore sociological theories of stratification through the lens of three questions:
1. Does education reduce inequality--or make it worse?
2. Half a century after the legal revolution that was the Civil Rights Movement, why is racial inequality in the United States still so stark?
3. What's behind the rise of the 1% all over the world?
Grading:
45% Essays
35% Quizzes
20% Written Reflections
Class Format:
Lecture and discussion
Workload:
Substantial reading load; regular reading quizzes (lowest two dropped); regular short writing assignments
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/20045/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 March 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (19328)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Closed (52 of 52 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?maha0134+SOC3211W+Fall2018
Class Description:

To fully endorse a course called "American Race Relations," we must first interrogate the extent to which racial(ized) groups relate. Through such examination, we will question how race is used as a classificatory system of difference and differential relations of human value and valueness. We will explore how these differences are magnified through processes of racialization and how race is used as a tool for domination through systemic racism producing stark inequalities between groups. It's often said that race may be a social construct, but it is real in its implications. We will discuss the limitations of conceptualizing race as a "social construct" when it has denied many racialized groups access to the social and thus, the possibility humanness. As a class, we will attend to the role of relationality between groups. What factor does race play in esteeming some groups at the expense and further marginalization of others? Without conceptualizing race in relation to other classificatory systems of difference such as a gender, class, indigeneity, sexuality, ability, and citizenship, the study of race relations is incomplete. Hence, we will continuously explore the ways both oppression and privilege multiply based on the entanglement of difference.

Class Format:
Active participation and discussion are encouraged in this class environment. Students should expect in-class activities.
Workload:
Students interested in this course can expect to read 10-30 pages of academic work per week; in addition, we will be writing and revising paper work over the course of the semester.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/19328/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 April 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3246 Section 001: Diseases, Disasters, & Other Killers (21287)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Closed (80 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ewf+SOC3246+Fall2018
Class Description:
This class is about the past, present, and future of why people die. Why did infectious diseases rapidly seem to disappear--and will they come back? How have historical changes in social organization and interaction with the natural environment changed when and how we die, and what do medical advances, climate change, and persistent inequalities imply for what we might die of in the future?

We will:
* Explore the causes and consequences of a historic worldwide transformation in death and disease
* Analyze how that transformation occurred differently in different parts of the world, and why it matters
* Consider to what extent mortality can--or can't--be further eradicated.
Grading:
Grades will be based on three written essays and regular (approximately weekly) reading quizzes.
Class Format:
Lecture and discussion
Workload:
Substantial reading; regular quizzes based on readings (lowest two dropped); three essays
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/21287/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 March 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (20574)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Closed (48 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?karak014+SOC3251W+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course is built around the exploration of ideas in the sociology of race, class, and gender. This course will focus on understanding multiple positions, and learning how to refute arguments based on evidence and reasoning. Focus will be given to topics in the sociology of race, class, and gender that carry important political implications.

Some of the possible topics include:
- What ‘race', ‘class', and ‘gender' are
- Understanding racism in the sciences
- Sex work, pornography, and radical feminism
- Marxism and the alienation of the working class
- Intersectional theory
- Mass incarceration and prison abolition

Learning Objectives:
Students will learn about sociological perspectives on race, class, and gender. Students will also learn how to write argumentative papers, and how to navigate conversations about a variety of sociological topics.
Grading:
60% Writing Assignments
25% Final paper
15% Class participation/ other evaluations
Exam Format:
Final paper
Class Format:
50% Lecture
40% Discussion
10% Other
Workload:
Students should expect to complete around 40 pages of readings a week. In addition to the readings, students will have a few writing assignments over the course of the semester, and will be expected to participate in class discussions.

30-45 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Final Paper
3 Writing Assignments
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/20574/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 October 2017

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3411W Section 001: Organizations and Society (33508)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Open (44 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces undergraduates to contemporary theories and debates about formal organizations in an international context, including such forms as large corporations, small businesses, public bureaucracies, nonprofits, voluntary associations, social movement organizations, terrorist networks and counterterror organizations. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC3411W+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course introduces undergraduates to contemporary theories and debates about formal organizations in an international context, including such forms as large corporations, small businesses, public bureaucracies, nonprofits, voluntary associations, social movement organizations.
Grading:
Writing Intensive course with short writing assignments and a longer course paper. Instructor feedback provided on partial draft of the course paper. Course grade is based on 3 assignments (20% each) and course paper (40%).. A service learning component is available. An honors option and a sociology major senior paper option are also available.
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
Lectures (60%), small group discussions and role-playing exercises (20%), videos (15%), and guest speakers (5%).
Workload:
About 30-40 pages of articles or book chapter reading per week. 20-25 pages of writing per semester.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33508/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 October 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3452 Section 001: Education and Society (33488)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (42 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?warre046+SOC3452+Fall2018
Class Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is and how schools work, partly because everyone has first-hand experience with schools and the education system. Most people have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others, why some people learn more than others, and what creates systematic group differences in educational outcomes. Beyond that, most people have ideas about how education shapes who knows more, who gets good jobs, and who enjoys a long and happy life. Virtually everyone has opinions about how schools and the education system should be changed or improved.

This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about these things. We will critically engage research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. And, we will bring academic materials into direct dialogue with structured experiences in community organizations to enrich our understanding of educational issues. The goal is to better understand how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where inequalities in educational achievements come from; how and why educational experiences and accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved.

This is not a course in which I will tell you what is true. Instead, we will collectively draw on our individual backgrounds and experiences; read and discuss research and other scholarship; debate and argue about the issues; consider how academic issues play out in the community; and challenge and transform our ideas. For the class to succeed, we must all be willing to bring our unique backgrounds and experiences into dialogue with academic knowledge and community service activities and to have our ideas and assumptions challenged. We must also all be willing to listen respectfully and carefully to one another, even when we come from different backgrounds or have sharply different views.

NOTE #1: This course involves a substantial community-engaged learning component. This is a valuable learning opportunity, but it does require 25 hours during the semester of off-campus community service.

NOTE #2: See the web page for the most recent version of the course at: https://www.rob-warren.com/3452.html

NOTE #3: See the student course evaluations for the most recent version of the course on that same web page.
Grading:
1. Community Engaged Learning (CEL)
(130 points, or 65% of course grade)

Community-engaged learning (CEL) is a teaching and learning strategy that combines meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.

You will do 25 hours of service in a community organization and complete a series of written and other assignments reflecting on your experiences there.

2. Writing Assignments: Statements of Beliefs
(30 points, or 15% of course grade)

There are two writing assignments.

First, at the start of the semester you will write an essay about your educational biography, about the factors that contributed to your educational accomplishments, and about the nature of educational inequality in America. Second, at the end of the semester you will write a version of that same essay that focuses on how your views and opinions changed after taking this course. Your will get a chance to write a rough draft of the latter essay and then revise it.

3. In-Class Quizzes & Writing Assignments
(40 points, or 20% of course grade)

There will be a brief quiz or short writing assignment during every class session. They might happen at the beginning, middle, or end of class sessions. Some days, they will ask basic questions about readings or other materials I'll ask you to review before class. Other days, they will ask about activities or discussions that happen in class.

4. Extra Credit

There are multiple ways to get extra credit in this course.
Exam Format:
There will be no exams in this course.
Class Format:
There may be short lectures at the beginning of some class sessions, but mostly the class will be interactive discussions. There will be films, YouTube clips, Skype interviews with authors, and in-class visitors.
Workload:
Most of the work of the class involves community-engaged learning. You will serve for 25 hours during the semester at an off-campus organization, and then you will write a series of short papers reflecting on your experiences there in light of class materials and discussions.
Beyond that, there are two other short papers and daily in-class quizzes or short writing assignments.

For each class session you will need to read something and to consider some online materials.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33488/1189
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/warre046_SOC3452_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 March 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3503 Section 001: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (33489)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3503H Section 001
AAS 3503 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 260
Enrollment Status:
Closed (16 of 16 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. We will then apply theories and data to understanding two specific cases with particular relevance for Minnesota: Hmong immigrant experiences and transnational adoption. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A/F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tswartz+SOC3503+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, identity,education, mental health, ethnic enclaves and ethnic economies, family and intergenerational relationships, media and culture, food, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individual's affect society. Course projects will be utilized to help students gain a concrete appreciation of how a sociological perspective sheds light on the lived experience of contemporary Asian Americans. Students will have an option to participate in community service learning, or do another project that reflects their interests. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
40% Quizzes, Exams
40% Papers/Project
20% Class Participation and Presentations
Class Format:
35% Lecture
10% Film/Video
30% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Student Presentations
Workload:
60-80 Pages Reading Per Week
Quizzes Possible
2 ESSAY Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
2 Presentation(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33489/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 November 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3503H Section 001: Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (33533)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Meets With:
SOC 3503 Section 001
AAS 3503 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 260
Enrollment Status:
Closed (4 of 4 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. We will then apply theories and data to understanding two specific cases with particular relevance for Minnesota: Hmong immigrant experiences and transnational adoption. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly i
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tswartz+SOC3503H+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, identity,education, mental health, ethnic enclaves and ethnic economies, family and intergenerational relationships, media and culture, food, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individual's affect society. Course projects will be utilized to help students gain a concrete appreciation of how a sociological perspective sheds light on the lived experience of contemporary Asian Americans. Students will have an option to participate in community service learning, or do another project that reflects their interests. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
40% Quizzes, Exams
40% Papers/Project
20% Class Participation and Presentations
Class Format:
35% Lecture
10% Film/Video
30% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Student Presentations
Workload:
60-80 Pages Reading Per Week
Quizzes Possible
2 ESSAY Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
2 Presentation(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33533/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 November 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3613W Section 001: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (21290)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
GLOS 3613V Section 001
GLOS 3613W Section 001
SOC 3613V Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 145
Enrollment Status:
Closed (5 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Food issues from a sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about and relate to food. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
5 seats reserved for Soc majors. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schurman+SOC3613W+Fall2018
Class Description:
Hamburgers and a Coke, rice and beans, collard greens, "sustainable" sushi. What meanings do these foods conjure up, and for whom? Where are their ingredients grown, and what are the social and environmental impacts? Who prepares these dishes and who eats them? This course is built on two central premises: first, that the production, distribution, and consumption of food is profoundly relational, connecting different groups of people and places; and second, that one can gain great insights into these social relations through a sociological and political-economic analysis of food. This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the agrifood system. Among the themes we explore are the different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; work in the food sector; the global food economy; the idea of "food justice"; and the environmental consequences of food production. We will also study social movements seeking to change the food system. The general objective of this course is to teach you how to view the world of food and agriculture from a sociological and global perspective. A more specific objective is to get you to think analytically about something that is so "everyday" that most of us take it for granted: where our food comes from and why, why we eat the way (and what) we do, and the kind of social and political-economic relationships involved in our food encounters. As in all of our sociology courses, honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of understanding in their written assignments, oral participation, and course activities.
Grading:
A-F, no incompletes
Class Format:
lectures, films, guest speakers, class discussion.
Workload:
Students can expect to read between 60-80 pages a week, write eight commentaries that demonstrate your understanding of the readings, write two short (2-3 page) papers, and write a 1,500 word research based op-ed piece on a course-related topic. The writing-intensive course is also heavily discussion-based, and attendance and active participation are required.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/21290/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 November 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3671 Section 001: Contemporary Chinese Society: Culture, Networks, & Inequality in China (33490)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
GLOS 3911 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 115
Enrollment Status:
Open (6 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduces students to sociological perspectives and analyses of cultures, social networks, and socioeconomic inequalities in post-1980 China. In addition to lectures, the instructor will show video clips about various backgrounds of China and group discussions will be organized to exchange opinions about issues of common interest. Students will gain a basic understanding of how Chinese society operates today. prereq: 1001 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC3671+Fall2018
Class Description:
The aim of this course is to introduce students to sociological perspectives and analyses of cultures, social networks, and socioeconomic inequalities in China today. The instructor will give lectures on these topics with the assistance of PPT presentation. In addition, videos about various backgrounds of China will be shown, and group discussions will be organized to exchange opinions about issues of common interest. Through this course, students will gain a basic understanding of how Chinese society operates today. Soc1001 "Introduction to Sociology" is recommended.
Grading:
60% term paper
30% quizzes
10% in class participation and discussion.
Exam Format:
Quizzes and term paper, no final exam.
Class Format:
Lecture and group discussion
Workload:
30-page readings a week.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33490/1189
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC3671_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 April 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3701 Section 001: Social Theory (20295)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Mon, Wed 09:05AM - 10:45AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Open (54 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
15 seats reserved for Soc majors. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?broad001+SOC3701+Fall2018
Class Description:
Social theories help us understand society and how it works. In this class, we cover the development of social theory from the classical and founding works of Marx, Durkheim and Weber, through more contemporary ideas such as feminism, rational choice, racism, and post-modernity.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology majors and all those with an interest in the subject matter
Learning Objectives:
Throughout this class, we have three goals: to learn to read and understand key theoretical work in sociology; to use this work to better understand the social world; and to develop our own capacity to talk and write about the world using ideas from theory.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
25% Final Exam
20% Attendance (in-class sign-up on group discussion sheets)(one point per class)
20% Written Homework (100 to 150 word response to the designated reading question for that class period, submitted by website after class) (one point per submission for 20 submissions)
10% In-class Presentations (two at 5 points each)
Other Grading Information: The class will break up into 10 groups and each group will make two presentations about the readings.
Exam Format:
The questions will include multiple-choice, short-answer and essay.
Class Format:
70% Lecture
10% Film/Video
15% Discussion
5% Student Presentations
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
2 Presentation(s) (2 minutes per student for each presentation)
20 Homework Assignment(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/20295/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 April 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3701 Section 002: Social Theory (17117)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Mon, Wed 12:20PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Open (79 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
15 seats reserved for Soc majors. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hull+SOC3701+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to current theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns, including: What holds human societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? What are the key sources of social conflict, and how are they resolved or contained? What are the significant features of modernity, and what are the implications of modernity for social life? How are social identities created, sustained or transformed, and to what effect? Where is society headed in the future? The goals of the course are to deepen students' understanding of the significance of such questions and to provide a preliminary survey of theories that have tackled these questions from the late 19th century to the present. For present and future sociology majors, the course provides an indispensable background for subsequent work in the discipline. For all others, it provides an invitation to think about some of the most vital questions that confront us all as reflective and self-aware members of our communities and our world. The course design is premised on the idea that the best way to learn and understand social theory is by seeing its connection to contemporary issues and concerns. Therefore, the primary theory readings in this course are paired with writings that illustrate the relevance of these theories to contemporary concerns or that directly apply the theories to current issues and questions.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
35% Final Exam
30% Quizzes
Exam Format:
multiple choice, short answer and essay
Class Format:
60% Lecture
10% Film/Video
20% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
Workload:
100 Pages Reading Per Week
6 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/17117/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3701 Section 003: Social Theory (33491)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Open (45 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
10 seats reserved for Soc majors. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pharr004+SOC3701+Fall2018
Class Description:

This course provides a broad overview of the major paradigms of social thought. While we will initially focus on classical theory and the "Big Three"
of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, the emphasis of this course will be on how contemporary thinkers draw upon and modify the classics for modern contexts. With the help of such thinkers, we will tackle such core sociological questions as: What is social theory? How does it differ from the theories applied in "hard" sciences such as physics and biology? What holds society together? How do social networks and institutions endure over time? What is the relationship between the individual and society? How is human thought and behavior shaped by social interaction? What is power, who holds it, and how is it exercised? What are the primary axes of social change? What defines the modernity? Are we living in a post-modern era? Over the course of the semester our goal will be to not only understand a diverse range of theories and thinkers, but to apply them to our own lives and social contexts. In addition to lectures and in-class activities, students will engage in weekly online discussions to hone their own critical sensibilities by identifying and interrogating the key arguments and assumptions of the texts.

Grading:
15% Attendance and participation (online and in-person)
40% Online discussion posts
20% Quizzes
25% Final exam
Exam Format:
Multiple choice; essay
Class Format:
75% Lecture, videos, and in-class activities
25% Online discussion
Workload:
40-50 pages reading per week
5 online discussion posts (300 words each), in addition to commenting on others' posts
4 quizzes
1 exam
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33491/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 April 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3801 Section 001: Sociological Research Methods (17115)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 10
Enrollment Status:
Open (82 of 112 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Lab sections will NOT meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jdewaard+SOC3801+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory how-to guide for conducting and evaluating social scientific research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing the various components of research design, including: philosophical and theoretical foundations, research topics and questions, conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, index and scale construction, reliability and validity, data collection and sources, sampling, comparisons across groups and over time, and research ethics. This is followed by developing an understanding how these components are packaged together in various ways into research designs, including: experiments and quasi-experiments, ethnography, case studies, interviews and focus groups, ethnosurveys and surveys, content analysis, archival and comparative-historical research, and more. The course concludes by considering issues of workflow in social scientific research, including issues related to the organization, cleaning, and analysis of data.
Grading:
Attendance (10%); 5-6 assignments (10%); 2 exams (30%); 3 papers (50%)
Exam Format:
2 in-class exams
Class Format:
67% lecture; 33% lab/discussion section
Workload:
20-50 pages reading/week; 5-6 assignments; 2 exams; 3 papers
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/17115/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 September 2017

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3801 Section 009: Sociological Research Methods (19056)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (55 of 56 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Lab sections WILL meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?steel158+SOC3801+Fall2018
Class Description:
How do we know what we know, and what is the role of research in generating sociological knowledge? This class will take a deep dive into sociological approaches to research, and the relationship between theory, methods, and analysis. We will review many of the methods that make sociology a multi-method discipline. We will interrogate the claims that researchers make, and the scope and limitations of various methodological approaches. In this class, students will learn how to identify quality social research, and how to generate their own meaningful research questions.
Grading:

20% Attend and participate in class & lab discussion

10% Lab journals

50% Exams
20% Final Paper
Class Format:
Lecture Section:
50% conceptual development
25% participatory activities

25% guest speakers, media, in-class writing, & miscellaneous

Lab Section:
80% Analyze and discuss weekly readings
20% Workshop term paper

Workload:
20-40 pages of reading per week
2-3 exams
Weekly lab journals
1-2 papers
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/19056/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 April 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3811 Section 001: Social Statistics (17048)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 5811 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 210
Enrollment Status:
Open (184 of 210 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Lab sections will NOT meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC3811+Fall2018
Class Description:
This is a social statistics course for sociology graduate students and undergraduate honors students. It meets for lectures with SOC3811, but has a separate weekly lab session. It emphasizes describing data and testing hypotheses. Lectures expose students to the theoretical bases of statistical methods and how to use them in social research. Laboratory sessions teach computing skills and data manipulation techniques. Test problems and lab assignments help students to gain knowledge of basic descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequency distributions, means tests, correlation and regression. Many examples are drawn from diverse sociological topics and illustrated with national survey data.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology majors and students from other disciplines.
Learning Objectives:
Acquire knowledge of basic statistical principles and computation methods, applied to real social data. Ability to read and understand articles that analyze social data.
Grading:
For SOC 3811:
75% Three Exams
25% Two computer data analysis assignments.

For SOC 5811:
100% Three computer data analysis assignments.
Exam Format:
Computations
Short Answer
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Laboratory
Workload:
For SOC 3811:
10-35 PowerPoint slides reading per week; 2 computer problem sets; 3 exams.

For SOC 5811:
10-35 PowerPoint slides reading per week; 3 computer problem sets; no exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/17048/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 May 2017

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4101V Section 001: Honors: Sociology of Law (20060)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Meets With:
SOC 4101W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (1 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
1 seat reserved for Sociology Honors major. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC4101V+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Throughout the course, we will consider the role of law in reinforcing and changing class, gender, and race inequalities. Although this course focuses on the U.S. legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between U.S. law and global law and concepts of justice. This course uses an array of reading materials including: theoretical works, empirical studies, and U.S. Supreme Court cases. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
50% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/20060/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2013

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4101W Section 001: Sociology of Law (19081)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 4101V Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (48 of 53 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. prereq: [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC4101W+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Throughout the course, we will consider the role of law in reinforcing and changing class, gender, and race inequalities. Although this course focuses on the U.S. legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between U.S. law and global law and concepts of justice. This course uses an array of reading materials including: theoretical works, empirical studies, and U.S. Supreme Court cases.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
50% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/19081/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 November 2013

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4106 Section 001: Crime on TV (21024)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Closed (80 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course uses television shows to explore sociological perspectives on crime and punishment. We will critically examine how (and to what extent) four television series represent or distort prevailing knowledge about crime and punishment. prereq: recommended [1001 or 1001V, 1101 or 3101 or 3102]; Soph or above or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC4106+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course uses television shows to explore sociological perspectives on crime and punishment. The premise of this class is that we can learn a great deal about lawbreaking and social control from watching (and analyzing) television shows. (It is also true that much television misrepresents the nature and consequences of crime and punishment.) We will critically examine how (and to what extent) four television series represent or distort prevailing knowledge about crime and punishment. Topics will include the social origins and functions of crime, causes and consequences of lawbreaking, policing, race and the war on drugs, mass imprisonment, the culture and social relations of prisons, and prisoner re-entry. Featured shows include: The Walking Dead, The Wire, Orange is the New Black, The Shield, and Rectify (the exact line is subject to change). Disclosure. The shows we will watch graphically depict poverty, sexuality, drug-use, and violence. Several of the shows include profanity and vulgar language. As such, students who may be offended or uncomfortable with such language and themes may not wish to take this course.
Grading:
The final exam will be "take home".
Exam Format:
25% Midterm Exam
45% Reports/Papers
25% Quizzes
5% Class Participation
Class Format:
30% Lecture
45% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/21024/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 March 2015

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4125 Section 001: Policing America (21115)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-103
Enrollment Status:
Open (42 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Forms, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of policing/surveillance agencies (formal/informal). Legal limitations, police culture, community relations, aims of policing, state power. prereq: [3101 or 3102 recommended or instr consent], soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC4125+Fall2018
Class Description:

In the wake of the #BlackLivesMatter movement and the President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing, it is clear that U.S. policing is in a moment of transition. This course is an in-depth sociological analysis of the origins, composition, and effects of policing in contemporary U.S. society. Throughout the course, we focus on using a social science lens to understand what policing is and how it influences social life. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which race and class inequalities are reflected in and reshaped by policing practices. The course material will cover a different aspect of policing each week, including historical patterns, broken windows policing, gangs in Chicago and skid row in Los Angeles, inequities in who is pulled over by the police while driving, and contemporary efforts to "police the police." Throughout the course, we draw on contemporary media stories, podcast, documentaries, and guest visitors to connect scholarship with the world around us.

Grading:
30% Midterm Exam
40% Final Exam
30% Participation
Exam Format:
Mixed
Class Format:
60% Lecture
10% Film/Video
20% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-150 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/21115/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 May 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4142 Section 001: Adolescents and the Legal System (20577)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Open (32 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This is a course covers the legal and social statuses of juveniles in our society. A recurrent theme is the power relationships among minors, their families, social institutions, and the legal system. Issues dealing with delinquent behavior are discussed in terms of different behaviors with which a juvenile justice system has to deal, such as the matter of certification to adult courts, the procedures in different jurisdictions for such matters, and death penalty issues which arose with juveniles and the consequences of several recent Supreme Court cases. prereq: soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?malmq001+SOC4142+Fall2018
Class Description:
An overall focus on issues involving juveniles in our society and how various issues are dealt with in the system of juvenile justice. Topics include: allocation of power among juveniles, families, and the state; problems that arise for juveniles with the school setting and within families; abuse and child neglect; children's rights; and the juvenile court and its origins up to more current problems. Various types of cases and problems that arise in the juvenile justice system will be considered.
Grading:
95% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: exams, 5% class participation
Exam Format:
multiple choice
Class Format:
60% Lecture
30% Discussion
10% Other Style videos
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
Other Workload: graduate/law students will be required to write a paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/20577/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 September 2007

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4161 Section 001: Criminal Law in American Society (20578)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-109
Enrollment Status:
Closed (58 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Purposes of criminal law and of principles of criminal liability, justification, and excuse. Applications to law of criminal homicide, sexual assault, drugs, and crimes against property, public order, and morals. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jbs+SOC4161+Fall2018
Class Description:
What's criminal law and what's it good for? Should we punish people only for what they do? or for what they might do? or even sometimes for who they are? What are the justifications and excuses for committing crimes? Topics: elements of crime that the prosecution has to prove beyond a reasonable doubt; accomplices; criminal attempts; defenses of justification (self-defense, defense of home) and defenses of excuse (insanity, age); criminal homicide; criminal sexual conduct. Read and discuss actual cases edited for non lawyers. Intensive class discussion. For upper division undergraduates, all majors.
Grading:
10% Class Participation
90% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: weekly exams covering reading and discussion
Exam Format:
40%, short answer quiz on each week's assigned reading (no notes or books allowed); 20%, analysis of week's assigned cases (take home); 40%, reaction essay based on the day's discussion topic (open book and notes)
Class Format:
15% Lecture
85% Discussion
Workload:
35 Pages Reading Per Week. Hey! There are no research or papers required. This is to allow you to time to read thoroughly and know well the content of the assigned pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/20578/1189
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jbs_SOC4161_Fall2018.docx
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 March 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4246 Section 001: Sociology of Health and Illness (33492)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-108
Enrollment Status:
Open (63 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Context of social, political, economic, and cultural forces and medical knowledge. Social meanings. How people seek help and manage illnesses. How doctors, nurses, and patients interact. Social movements surrounding health. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?eroberts+SOC4246+Fall2018
Class Description:
Although everyone gets sick and everyone eventually dies there are important social differences in what illnesses people have, how they are treated and cared for, and how long they live. This class introduces you to the key issues in the sociology of health by reading classic and important articles and books in medical sociology. You will then explore a topic in greater depth as part of a class project. We will work collaboratively to build a set of real health and medical records that will be a shared resource for a final class research project. The semester will conclude with students working on an original research project on a topic of your choice using the shared data we have created. The research project will connect the theory from readings to the actual practice and experience of health care. Please contact the instructor for a copy of the syllabus and with questions: eroberts@umn.edu.
Grading:
Participation and discussion (20%), Research proposal and bibliography (30%), Research paper (40%), Research presentation (10%)
Exam Format:
No exam
Class Format:
Lecture, discussion, and collaborative work on research projects. Student presentations.
Workload:
2.5 hours of class time and 6.5 hours of independent work on reading and research in accordance with UMN guidelines (3 hours per week per credit)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33492/1189
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eroberts_SOC4246_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 October 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4309 Section 001: Religion in American Public Life: Culture, Politics, & Communities (33493)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 4309H Section 001
RELS 4309 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Enrollment Status:
Open (13 of 15 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
How diversity/vitality of American religion shape public life. How religious groups engage in political action, foster understandings of democracy/styles of civic participation. Volunteering/service activities. Race, poverty, the family, sexuality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?edgell+SOC4309+Fall2018
Class Description:
Many people think of religion as a private matter, having to do with what people believe about god or the afterlife. But in the United States religion has a strong public presence. That presence is changing, as Americans become less religious (especially in younger generations) and as minority religious groups become more visible.

The purpose of this course is to help you understand contemporary American religion, in all its diversity and inter-generational differences. How does religion foster volunteering and civic engagement? How does it shape political partisanship and voting? What issues draw religious people into social movements, why do they care about those issues, and why do our battles over law and social policy take shape the way they do? Religious discourses foster particular understandings of gender, race, citizenship and democracy and religious groups train people in particular styles of civic and political engagement. This is why religion in the United States has such a large -- and contested -- public impact.

This course is open to majors and non-majors and fulfills the LibEd requirement for Civic Life and Ethics. The course also helps students build the Core Career Competencies of Analytical and Critical Thinking and Engaging Diversity.
Learning Objectives:
Civic Life and Ethics LibEd learning objectives: Civic life is comprised of voluntary, face-to-face arenas of activity that are not controlled by the state, arenas were citizens debate ethics, broadly conceived, and where ideas of the good society are formed, debated, shared, and contested. The civic arena is diverse, with many types of secular and religious organizations. Through its role in civic life, religion is an important and visible arena for the construction of ethical discourse and understandings of the public (and the private) good. This course will help you develop a critical understanding of the ethical claims made by spokespersons for religious organizations, viewpoints, and movements, and assess the role that such claims have in shaping public discourse, legal outcomes, and policy outcomes. In a supportive environment, students will be prompted to consider their own religious and ethical beliefs in light of the range of such views in contemporary American society. Weekly student-led discussions will help you to use the insights of scholarly works to become more critical and educated readers of mass-media-based news about religion in our society. The course emphasizes the diversity and variety of religious and political traditions in the United States, and that religious arenas are only one of many locations for the development of ethical discourse in American life.

Career Competencies in Analytical and Critical Thinking and Engaging Diversity: In this course, students will learn how to recognize multiple points of view as valid and evaluate issues from multiple perspectives, and account for their own biases. They will learn to recognize when media or popular discussions of religion in public life do not provide complete information for making an informed assessment, and where to go for more complete information. Students will understand how to appreciate multiple worldviews (including diverse religious and secular viewpoints) and understand how culture and power interact to shape public religious expression -- and responses to that expression.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
25% Final Exam
50% Other assignments, including 2 in-class presentations (one on a class reading, one on a media account of religion in public life -- for each, students will also turn in a short summary and discussion questions).
Exam Format:
short answer and essay
Class Format:
50% Lecture
50% Discussion
Workload:
50-100 Pages Reading Per Week
5-7 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
2 Presentation(s): Two presentations will be made to your small group (1st on a class reading, 2nd on a media/news account on course-related themes -- for each you will turn in a 1-page summary and discussion questions).
HONORS STUDENTS: will do additional work determined in consultation with the professor the first week of the semester.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33493/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 March 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4309H Section 001: Honors: Religion in American Public Life - Culture, Politics, & Communities (33535)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Meets With:
SOC 4309 Section 001
RELS 4309 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Enrollment Status:
Open (3 of 5 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
How diversity/vitality of American religion shape public life. How religious groups engage in political action, foster understandings of democracy/styles of civic participation. Volunteering/service activities. Race, poverty, family, sexuality. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor.
Class Notes:
1 seat reserved for Sociology Honors major. Click link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?edgell+SOC4309H+Fall2018
Class Description:
Many people think of religion as a private matter, having to do with what people believe about god or the afterlife. But in the United States religion has a strong public presence. That presence is changing, as Americans become less religious (especially in younger generations) and as minority religious groups become more visible.

The purpose of this course is to help you understand contemporary American religion, in all its diversity and inter-generational differences. How does religion foster volunteering and civic engagement? How does it shape political partisanship and voting? What issues draw religious people into social movements, why do they care about those issues, and why do our battles over law and social policy take shape the way they do? Religious discourses foster particular understandings of gender, race, citizenship and democracy and religious groups train people in particular styles of civic and political engagement. This is why religion in the United States has such a large -- and contested -- public impact.

This course is open to majors and non-majors and fulfills the LibEd requirement for Civic Life and Ethics. The course also helps students build the Core Career Competencies of Analytical and Critical Thinking and Engaging Diversity.
Learning Objectives:
Civic Life and Ethics LibEd learning objectives: Civic life is comprised of voluntary, face-to-face arenas of activity that are not controlled by the state, arenas were citizens debate ethics, broadly conceived, and where ideas of the good society are formed, debated, shared, and contested. The civic arena is diverse, with many types of secular and religious organizations. Through its role in civic life, religion is an important and visible arena for the construction of ethical discourse and understandings of the public (and the private) good. This course will help you develop a critical understanding of the ethical claims made by spokespersons for religious organizations, viewpoints, and movements, and assess the role that such claims have in shaping public discourse, legal outcomes, and policy outcomes. In a supportive environment, students will be prompted to consider their own religious and ethical beliefs in light of the range of such views in contemporary American society. Weekly student-led discussions will help you to use the insights of scholarly works to become more critical and educated readers of mass-media-based news about religion in our society. The course emphasizes the diversity and variety of religious and political traditions in the United States, and that religious arenas are only one of many locations for the development of ethical discourse in American life.

Career Competencies in Analytical and Critical Thinking and Engaging Diversity: In this course, students will learn how to recognize multiple points of view as valid and evaluate issues from multiple perspectives, and account for their own biases. They will learn to recognize when media or popular discussions of religion in public life do not provide complete information for making an informed assessment, and where to go for more complete information. Students will understand how to appreciate multiple worldviews (including diverse religious and secular viewpoints) and understand how culture and power interact to shape public religious expression -- and responses to that expression.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
25% Final Exam
50% Other assignments, including 2 in-class presentations (one on a class reading, one on a media account of religion in public life -- for each, students will also turn in a short summary and discussion questions).
Exam Format:
short answer and essay
Class Format:
50% Lecture
50% Discussion
Workload:
50-100 Pages Reading Per Week
5-7 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
2 Presentation(s): Two presentations will be made to your small group (1st on a class reading, 2nd on a media/news account on course-related themes -- for each you will turn in a 1-page summary and discussion questions).
HONORS STUDENTS: will do additional work determined in consultation with the professor the first week of the semester.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33535/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 March 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4321 Section 001: Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (33494)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
GLOS 4221 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 110
Enrollment Status:
Open (10 of 15 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Globalization of organizations, political relations, and culture. Dependency, world systems theories. Growth of international nongovernmental organizations, their impact on state policies and civil society. Expansion of international norms. Globalization of popular culture. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mgoldman+SOC4321+Fall2018
Class Description:
From the factories of Shenzhen to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent. This course offers an overview of the processes forcing and encouraging people's lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. We will start with the most basic questions: What is this thing called globalization? What are the forces behind it and how are we involved? Second, we will explore the idea that this latest era of globalization is marked by dramatic transformations in the ways we work, do politics, play, and communicate. We will explore the ideas that capitalism is rapidly transforming, communication and media are altering the way we dream, entertain and engage, and yet, the division between rich and poor has intensified and ecological distress is global. We will learn about the fast-moving world of Wall Street and global-city life, and the creative projects for social and ecological change coming from communities in Jamaica, the U.S., Mexico, India, and South Africa. Throughout, this course will use texts, films, lecture, discussion, and student research and debate, to help us become fluent in diverse world-views, ideas, and trends from around the world.
Grading:
Grades will be based on short papers, small research projects, presentations and discussion, and regular attendance
Exam Format:
no exams
Class Format:
65% Lecture
35% participation, discussion, small group work
Workload:
~50-70 Pages Reading Per Week
~20 Pages Writing Per Term: two one-page assignments, two five-page papers, one eight-page paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33494/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 March 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4821 Section 001: Measuring the Social World: Concepts and Analysis (33495)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 440
Enrollment Status:
Open (16 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In this course, you will develop practical social science data analysis skills for use in the non-profit or corporate workplace or in a graduate program of research. You will assess the measurement of important social concepts, like race, health, or education, in large social surveys, and the strengths and weaknesses of those different measurement techniques. You will conduct data analysis on large datasets (see, e.g., www.ipums.org) using a statistical software program, such as STATA. You will develop a substantive, empirical final project (poster and paper) based on your analysis. prereq: SOC 3801 or equiv, and SOC 3811 or equivalent
Class Notes:
8 seats reserved for Soc BS majors and 2 for Soc BS Honors. Click link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC4821+Fall2018
Class Description:

In this course, students will come to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the ways in which social concepts have been measured in important, large-scale data sets. The course will include extensive class discussion, a number of guest speakers, and substantial class time in a computer lab doing hands-on work with STATA or SPSS. Students will gain deep familiarity with the data sources available through www.ipums.org. We will also discuss basics of presenting results from the analysis of quantitative data. Using their quantitative analysis skills and a deep understanding of measurement issues, students will develop a substantive, empirical final project using one of the above data sets.

This course fits at the intersection between the sociology department's social statistics course (Soc 3811), its sociology methods course (Soc 3801), and substantive courses on topics such as race, class, gender, health, and education. Students will deepen their understanding of how ascribed and achieved social statuses are operationalized in real social science data and research, strengthening substantive knowledge. At the same time, students will apply the training they gained in their statistics and methods classes, thus enhancing their understanding of that material and their ability to use it. Students will become proficient in learning new data sets, getting the data on to their computer, producing high quality quantitative information, presenting this clearly, and thoughtfully describing what the data do and do not show. The combination of skills developed in this course has very practical applications, whether in the non-profit or corporate workplace or in moving forward with a quantitative or qualitative graduate program of research.

This course can be used toward earning a bachelor's of science in sociology. Course goals are consistent with the Student Learning Outcomes in which students master a body of knowledge and a mode of inquiry.

The data are hosted by projects at the Minnesota Population Center and students will benefit from guest speakers who work on creating and maintaining these data bases. As students become experts in the hands-on use of the web-based data extraction technology, they will develop practical skills and knowledge useful for handling other data sources.

Grading:

In-class participation and engagement = 20% of grade

Base Group presentations = 20% of grade

Detailed plan for empirical project (due week 12) = 10% of grade

Draft of poster (due week 14) = 10% of grade

Draft of write-up (at least 5 pages; due week 14) = 10% of grade

Final poster (presentation is during the scheduled time of the final) = 15% of grade

Final write-up (5-8 pages; due finals week) = 15% of grade
Exam Format:
There are no exams in this class
Class Format:

This class is organized into three sections. A substantive introduction to how and why we might measure ascribed and achieved statuses; a hands-on look at a number of large-scale survey/census data sets to understand how these master statuses are actually measured; and a concentrated time in which to develop and finalize an independent project.

Based on interest, students will be assigned to a Base Group of 3-4 students. Each Base Group will focus on a single core concept throughout the course (e.g., race, gender, families, education, migration, occupations, or health) and will have classwork and homework assignments targeted to the concept and collaborative with their Base Group. Each Base Group will be responsible for achieving a broad and deep understanding of material related to the concept and will serve as a resource on that topic for others.

Section 1: Concepts and Conceptualization - What are we trying to measure? Why? This portion of the class will have substantive readings, lectures, and in-class discussions about the Base Group concepts, including how other sociologists have conceptualized the concept and reasons for studying this aspect of the social world.

Section 2: Data Resources - In this section of the class, we will go through each of the data resources. Each data resource will be covered on a Thursday and then the following Tuesday. Thursdays will be devoted to getting an overview of the data from a guest speaker, extracting and opening the data, and creating Base Group reports on the primary concepts. On Tuesdays, each Base Group will give a 4-5 minute presentation about ways in which their concept has been measured in the data, pros and cons of each way of measuring, and any cross-time or cross-data set issues. After the presentations, students will complete in-class worksheets with the data to master data manipulation and analysis.

Section 3: Prepare and Present New Analyses - The final section will include time devoted to students finalizing their own projects, as well as lectures and discussions on how to effectively present results from studies using quantitative data. Final projects will include empirical analyses of relationships between course concepts. Students will develop and present analyses which include univariate and multivariate descriptive and inferential statistics, including a discussion of the strengths and limitations of the data, measures, and methods used.
Workload:
Consistent with university guidelines, students should expect to spend 6 hours a week outside of class doing work for this class.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33495/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 March 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Capstone Experience: Seminar (17355)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Closed (54 of 54 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC4966W+Fall2018
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of Sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience, which will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your Sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper.


1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions most closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change;
the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

3) Service Learning Report or Action Project. This option will involve writing a sociological report based on community service learning with a local community organization of your choice. This paper will be based on a minimum of 30 hours of community service work completed during the course of the semester. The Community Service Learning Center will help you find a place, or if you're already volunteering they will help you formalize this so you can write on it.

Alternatively, instead of writing a report based upon the service experience, the final product will involve working on, and writing about, an actual project of direct relevance or immediate concern to your organization or agency. These projects might involve a variety of tasks such as writing a mission statement or action plan, creating program materials or a grant proposal, working on an evaluation study, or producing publicity information.

Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/17355/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4977V Section 001: Senior Honors Proseminar I (17379)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Closed (16 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Exploring contemporary research for senior thesis. Guidance in defining a problem and reviewing prior theory/research. Presentation/discussion with faculty researchers. prereq: 3701, 3801, 3811, 9 additional upper div sociology cr, sr soc honors major, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC4977V+Fall2018
Class Description:
The Senior Honors Proseminar is designed to help students in the process of reseraching and writing the Honors Thesis in sociology. The first semester ("Proseminar I") is dedicated to a set of interrelated goals: (1) thinking through the relationship between our personal biographies and our intellectual interests; (2) identifying and sharpening research topics and questions; (3) finding the relevant social scientific research, mastering it, and locating our interests in relation to it; (4) producing an initial research proposal; (5) considering and addressing the ethics of research concerning human subjects; and (6) finalizing a plan of research which will guide our research as we work toward the final paper. In the Spring semester ("Proseminar II"), we will be engaged in the process of collecting and analyzing data, polishing our written work into a full thesis paper, and presenting our work.
Grading:
80% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
40% Discussion
40% Small Group Activities
20% Student Presentations
Workload:
20-30 Pages Reading Per Week
25-30 Pages Writing Per Term
4 Paper(s)
2 Presentation(s)
2 Special Project(s)
Other Workload: Much of the work for the course is done on your own, to further the projects you will outline. Coursework is designed to help you on that path.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/17379/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 April 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 5811 Section 001: Social Statistics for Graduate Students (17054)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3811 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 210
Enrollment Status:
Open (8 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. Soc 5811 is intended for new graduate students, undergraduate honors students, and students pursuing the Sociology BS degree. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with a strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc majors must register A-F. 5811 is a good social statistics foundation course for MA students from other programs.
Class Notes:
Lab section will NOT meet first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC5811+Fall2018
Class Description:
This is a social statistics course for sociology graduate students and undergraduate honors students. It meets for lectures with SOC3811, but has a separate weekly lab session. It emphasizes describing data and testing hypotheses. Lectures expose students to the theoretical bases of statistical methods and how to use them in social research. Laboratory sessions teach computing skills and data manipulation techniques. Test problems and lab assignments help students to gain knowledge of basic descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequency distributions, means tests, correlation and regression. Many examples are drawn from diverse sociological topics and illustrated with national survey data.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology majors and students from other disciplines.
Learning Objectives:
Acquire knowledge of basic statistical principles and computation methods, applied to real social data. Ability to read and understand articles that analyze social data.
Grading:
For SOC 3811:
75% Three Exams
25% Two computer data analysis assignments.

For SOC 5811:
100% Three computer data analysis assignments.
Exam Format:
Computations
Short Answer
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Laboratory
Workload:
For SOC 3811:
10-35 PowerPoint slides reading per week; 2 computer problem sets; 3 exams.

For SOC 5811:
10-35 PowerPoint slides reading per week; 3 computer problem sets; no exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/17054/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 May 2017

Fall 2018  |  SOC 8001 Section 001: Sociology as a Profession (18275)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue 01:00PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1183
Enrollment Status:
Closed (6 of 6 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This 1 credit class fosters adaptation to the Graduate Program in Sociology and preparation for a sociological career. In the Fall, we explore professional careers in this field. We discuss the wide range of opportunities in sociology and help students further explore the next steps to becoming a scholar, educator, and member of various professional, intellectual, and social communities. We share practical information about being a student in sociology and about sociological careers, discuss presentations in department workshop seminars, and provide a safe place to discuss issues of student concerns. Students are encouraged to bring to the class their thoughts and reactions to experiences during their first semester in the PhD program. The Spring 8001 class is oriented to particular milestones in the Sociology Graduate Program and important student activities (for example, preparing reading lists for the preliminary exam and then writing the preliminary exam, preparing a dissertation prospectus, writing grant proposals, preparing an article for publication, etc.). Pre-req: Soc PhD students
Class Notes:
All 6 seats reserved for sociology graduate students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?meierann+SOC8001+Fall2018
Class Description:
This class fosters adaptation to the Graduate Program in Sociology and exploration of professional careers in this field.

We will discuss the wide range of opportunities in sociology and help students get started in thinking about becoming a scholar, educator, and member of various professional, intellectual, and social communities.

We will share practical information about being a student in sociology and about sociological careers, discuss presentations in department workshop seminars, and provide a safe place to discuss issues of student concern. Students are encouraged to bring to the class their thoughts and reactions to experiences in the program.




Who Should Take This Class?:
First year graduate students in Sociology.
Learning Objectives:
Students will learn about different types of sociological careers and share experiences that facilitate adaptation to the life of a graduate student.
Grading:
S-N
Exam Format:
No exams
Class Format:
We meet one hour per week. Several sessions feature visitors or panels of sociologists representing different institutional contexts (e.g. R1 university faculty, faculty at a small liberal arts college, sociologists in research organizations, those who work in government agencies, etc.).
Workload:
There are no required readings or exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/18275/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 March 2017

Fall 2018  |  SOC 8090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology (33496)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Fri 10:00AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Virtual Rooms ROOM-TBA
Enrollment Status:
Open (7 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC8090+Fall2018 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?uggen001+SOC8090+Fall2018
Class Description:


Students in this workshop will serve as the graduate student board for The Society Pages, an online social science journalism project housed at the University of Minnesota. Participation is based on application. In addition to experience and qualifications, the board is selected so as to involve students from different stages in the program, substantive interest areas, and methodological specialties. Most participants are expected to make a year-long commitment to the project, though membership will rotate on an annual basis.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students in sociology
Learning Objectives:
  • To deepen students' substantive research expertise
    by engaging cutting edge sociological scholarship. Students will unearth the most interesting findings and best evidence from new research in their areas of study. This provides students with a broader vision of the sociological field and offers an opportunity to diversify their reading in the prelim and dissertation processes.

  • To develop writing and communication skills
    in addressing academic and non-academic audiences. Grad board members regularly write for the website, and our supportive, professional editorial team gives direct feedback designed to improve these skills as the pieces are published online.

  • To gain deep, practical appreciation of the process of editorial decision-making
    and public scholarship.
    TSP
    had almost 11 million unique page views last year. Working with the site allows students to engage in critical and constructive discussion of the field of sociology, while participating in a collaborative public outreach project by shaping and improving the site as an online vehicle to disseminate great research.


Exam Format:
none
Class Format:
Weekly seminar
Workload:
4-6 hours a week
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33496/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 March 2017

Fall 2018  |  SOC 8290 Section 001: Topics in Social Stratification (33498)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (5 of 15 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Comparative perspectives on racial inequality; race, class, and gender; quantitative research on gender stratification; stratification in post-communist societies; institutional change and stratification systems; industrialization and stratification. Topics specified in [Class Schedule].
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC8290+Fall2018
Class Description:
This graduate-level course is about whites, whiteness, and racism in theory and practice in the contemporary United States. Course work will involve reading and discussion to understand theoretical approaches and prior findings, as well as community engaged learning to see how course concepts do or do not play out in real life. The course is designed to help students develop and articulate their own understanding of how the social construction of race categories such as "white" works, how whiteness exists and functions as a social and cultural way of being, and how various forms of racism can work within or against these systems and structures.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students
Exam Format:
No exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33498/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 8701 Section 001: Sociological Theory (17382)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (7 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Traditions of social theory basic to sociological knowledge, their reflection and expansion in contemporary theory, their applications in selected areas of empirical research. Sample topics: social inequality, social organization and politics, family organization and social reproduction, social order and change, sociology of knowledge and religion.
Class Notes:
6 seats reserved for sociology graduate students Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC8701+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course provides an introduction to the central traditions, figures and concepts in sociological theory. It is intended primarily for first-year graduate students in Sociology, but it covers work that is widely read and referenced in the social sciences generally. This course covers the work of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Mead, Goffman, Bourdieu, and several other traditions and figures.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Required for first year graduate students in Sociology. A few seats are open to other students upon request.
Grading:
Attendance and participation: 30%
Memos and class discussions: 40%
Final paper: 30%
Exam Format:
None.
Class Format:
Orienting lecture from instructor, but mostly seminar format with student leadership.
Workload:
Substantial reading. Reading may be longer and (at times) more difficult than you are used to. Please see attached syllabus to gauge average week's reading.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/17382/1189
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gerte004_SOC8701_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gerte004_SOC8701_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 March 2017

Fall 2018  |  SOC 8721 Section 001: Social Psychology: Micro-Sociological Approaches to Inequalities and Identities (33499)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Wed 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (9 of 15 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Social psychology is basic to an understanding of contemporary social life. This subfield of sociology focuses on social phenomena at the micro-level. Small group dynamics, social interactions, and individual experiences are importantly structured by the macro-structural context, e.g., by socioeconomic status, race, gender, sexuality, and other dimensions of social inequality. At the same time, these and other micro-sociological processes reflect individual-level identities, perceptions, motivations and cognitions. This seminar examines a wide range of social psychological phenomena linked to inequality (e.g., the effects of class, minority status, and gender on disparities in identity, self-concept, and health; the development of status hierarchies in small group interaction; intergroup relations, prejudice, and discrimination). We begin with a consideration of "personal structure," emphasizing the cultural and structural variability of self-conceptions and identities, cognitive processes, and motivation, as well as the biosocial bases of action. These may be considered individual-level "building blocks" of social psychological theories (along with emotions, attitudes, values, and ideologies). We then address prominent theoretical perspectives in social psychology that illuminate the linkages between micro-social contexts of inequality and identity, including symbolic interactionism, exchange theory, structural social psychology ("social structure and personality") and the social psychology of the life course. Social psychological theory and research are foundational to many specialty fields in sociology, including the sociology of the family, education, health, deviance, work, social mobility, social movements, emotions, and the sociology of childhood, youth, and aging. Social psychology is also central to prominent theoretical debates in sociology surrounding the relationship between social structure and agency; individual-level identities, perceptions, moti
Class Notes:
2 seats reserved for Soc PhD Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?morti002+SOC8721+Fall2018
Class Description:
Social psychology is basic to an understanding of social life. It includes social phenomena at both the macro and micro-levels, and the connections between them. Social psychology is central to an understanding of the interrelations of structure and agency: individual-level identities, cognitions, goals, and strategies, as they affect, and are influenced by, diverse and unequal social contexts. This seminar starts with a consideration of personal structure, emphasizing the cultural variability of self-conceptions and identities, cognitive processes, emotion and motivation. These may be considered individual-level building blocks of social psychological theories. Prominent theoretical perspectives in social psychology, i.e., symbolic interactionism, exchange theory, and structural social psychology (social structure and personality) illuminate the content of many specialty fields in sociology. This seminar examines interpersonal relationships, networks, small group dynamics, and a wide range of social psychological phenomena linked to inequality (e.g., the effects of class, race/ethnicity, and gender on disparities in self-concept, identity, and health; the development of status hierarchies in small group interaction; social mobility; work conditions; intergroup relations; prejudice and discrimination). Social psychological perspectives on deviance, the life course, and social movements are also examined.
Grading:
20% Leadership of student discusson
20% Other class Participation
60% Term paper
Class Format:
33% Lecture
67% Student-led class discussion
Workload:
50-100 Pages Reading Per Week
25-30 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Presentation(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33499/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 March 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 8735 Section 001: Sociology of Culture (33500)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Thu 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (14 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Definition/importance of culture as dimension of social life. Structural/Durkheimian approaches, cultural Marxism, practice theory. Cultural creation/reception. Identities as cultural formations. Culture/social inequality. Culture and race. Cultural construction of social problems. Culture and globalization.
Class Notes:
7 seats reserved for Soc PhD Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hull+SOC8735+Fall2018
Class Description:
This course provides a general overview of the rapidly expanding field of the sociology of culture. Culture can be broadly conceived as the symbolic/expressive dimension of social life, but there are ongoing theoretical debates about how to define culture and how to use culture in sociological analysis. We begin with the basic conceptual question about the definition and importance of culture as a dimension of social life. We will then explore a series of theoretical and empirical works that address various aspects of the role of culture in social life. We will examine several distinct approaches to investigating and explaining culture, including structural/Durkheimian approaches, cultural Marxism, and practice theory. We will also devote several weeks to processes of cultural creation and reception, identities as cultural formations, and the relationship between culture and social inequality, among other topics. Throughout the course, we will cast a critical eye on the relationship between theories of culture, empirical evidence on cultural processes, and methods of investigating culture. We will also try to think about the sociology of culture in relation to other fields within the discipline, to consider how cultural theories, methods, and findings can contribute to our understanding of diverse social domains such as education, employment, politics, personal relationships, sexuality, morality, race, and urban life.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33500/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 March 2010

Fall 2018  |  SOC 8851 Section 001: Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing (33501)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Thu 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1183
Enrollment Status:
Closed (13 of 12 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Interviewers have opened up other worlds to the sociological imagination and taught us much about the way people think, feel, and make sense of the world as well as of their own identities. We will conduct interviews; transcribe, code, and analyze interview data; and write up interview- based research. We will also consider a range of epistemological, practical, and ethical issues related to interviewing as a research method, reading materials drawn from a broad range of substantive sociological subfields as well as from geography. This course is best suited to graduate students who have an interview-based project in mind and want to acquire the skills for carrying out their research, and students who are considering using interviews in their dissertation research and want to try their hand at interviewing before making a decision. Because this is a hands-on, fieldwork-based course, no auditors are permitted.
Class Notes:
12 seats reserved for sociology grad students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schurman+SOC8851+Fall2018
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstore-prd.umn.edu/course-lookup/33501/1189

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