50 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2017  |  SOC 1001 Section 001: Introduction to Sociology (13986)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 310
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Discussion sections will NOT meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC1001+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
30% Quizzes
30% Reflection Papers
10% Class Participation
10% Laboratory Evaluation Other Grading Information: reaction papers
Exam Format:
Short answer format
Class Format:
50% Lecture
20% Film/Video
30% Discussion videos
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 1001 Section 015: Introduction to Sociology (13993)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 310
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Discussion sections will NOT meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC1001+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course is an introduction to the fascinating field of sociology. The broad aim of the class is for students to learn to develop and deploy their ?sociological imagination,? in order to better understand and participate in the social world. Sociology is the study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociologists investigate the structure of groups, organizations, and societies, and ask how and why people interact within these contexts. In this class you will read the works of classical and contemporary theorists, view sections of documentary films, and engage in debate and discussion with your peers and professor. You will learn to use a sociological lens in analyzing many of the cultural, economic and political phenomena that surround us every day. You will question things that may have never before seemed strange, and you will begin to make ?sociological sense? of things that you may have always before questioned. By the end of the course, you will be familiar with the sociological toolkit-- the core concepts, methods, and theories of the discipline?and be able to begin to use this toolkit to make sense of the world around you.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
20% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
20% Laboratory Evaluation
Exam Format:
true false and essay
Class Format:
40% Lecture
15% Film/Video
25% Discussion
20% Laboratory
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~015&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 1001 Section 030: Introduction to Sociology (13997)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 350
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Discussion sections will NOT meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC1001+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students' critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Required for sociology majors, open to others. This course meets the requirements of the Council on Liberal Education's Social Science core and Social Justice theme.
Grading:
Tests 40%
Lab projects 30%
Lecture attendance/participation 15%
Lab attendance/participation 15%
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Lab/discussion
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
15 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~030&term=1179
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gerte004_SOC1001_Fall2017.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 1011V Section 001: Honors: Introduction to Sociology (14677)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 12:20PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 240
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships, and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life and how you, in turn, affect society.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC1011V+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course introduces pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. Course aims to foster students` sociological imagination, or their ability to apply sociological theories into their everyday lives. This is a writing intensive course. Students will have an opportunity to obtain feedback on their work in order to improve their writing through revision. Students are also expected to play a greater role in class discussions.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
10% Quizzes
30% Reflection Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Film/Video
30% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
18 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1011V~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 1101 Section 001: Law, Crime, & Punishment (17469)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introductory course designed to provide students with a general understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. We examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment using an interdisciplinary social science approach.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC1101+Fall2017
Class Description:
This introductory course is designed to provide students with a general understanding of some of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. Law is everywhere. Law permits, prohibits, enables, legitimates, protects, and prosecutes citizens. Law shapes our day to day lives in countless ways. We examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment using an interdisciplinary social science approach. As one of the founders of the Law and Society movement observed, law is too important to leave to lawyers. Accordingly, this course will borrow from several theoretical, disciplinary, and interdisciplinary perspectives (such as sociology, anthropology, political science, critical studies, psychology). There are two units. We will first explore the sociology of law and laws role primarily in the American context (but with some attention to international law and global human rights efforts). Next, this course seeks to develop a sociological understanding of the patterns of crime and punishment in the United States. The thematic topics to be discussed include law and social control; laws role in social change; same-sex marriage; welfare and crime; the impact of criminal record and race on the employment of ex-offenders; and the effect of juvenile justice criminal policies on urban youth.
Grading:
40% Reports/Papers
15% Written Assignments
20% Class Presentations
25% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Papers
1 Reading Reflection
1 Class Presentation
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1101~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 1911 Section 001: Climate Change and Society (35197)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option No Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Freshman Seminar
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 425
Course Catalog Description:
Over the past 150 years, the burning of fossil fuels to power industrial expansion has brought many benefits, but has also caused a terrible problem: global climate change (GCC). If humanity continues to emit large amounts of greenhouse gasses like carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, it will get hit with intensifying disasters. From a sociological viewpoint, why has this situation come about and what can we do to solve it? Can we create a sustainable world with prosperity for all? This is the most important long-range question for our age. The course presents and discusses the most important social (including political, economic and cultural) problems involved in solving this huge problem. Work consists of mostly of discussing and writing paragraphs on each topic and reading, plus two class presentations, and a few quizzes and two exams.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?broad001+SOC1911+Fall2017
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Workload:
Work consists of mostly of reading, discussing and writing paragraphs on each topic; plus two class presentations, and a few quizzes and two exams.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1911~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 April 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (15081)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
West Bank Skyway AUDITORIUM
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101+Fall2017
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how crime is socially constructed, how the courts function for criminal sentencing, what it is like to be in prison or on community supervision, why the U.S. has such a high imprisonment rate, and the barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% In-Class Quizzes
30% In-Class Midterm Exam
30% Take-Home Final Essay
10% Participation
Exam Format:
Short answers and essays
Class Format:
60% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-120 Pages Reading Per Week
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3101~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 August 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3101H Section 001: Honors: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (17960)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
West Bank Skyway AUDITORIUM
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the US criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the US. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101H+Fall2017
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how crime is socially constructed, how the courts function for criminal sentencing, what it is like to be in prison or on community supervision, why the U.S. has such a high imprisonment rate, and the barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% In-Class Quizzes
30% In-Class Midterm Exam
30% Take-Home Final Essay
10% Participation
Exam Format:
Short answers and essays
Class Format:
60% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-120 Pages Reading Per Week
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3101H~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 August 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (15082)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-104
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walk0938+SOC3102+Fall2017
Class Description:
​This course addresses general issues in conceptualizing and controlling criminal behavior. Course content will be particularly concerned with the processes of classification and the construction of criminal behavior relative to other idealized forms of behavior. Some important questions include: How does criminal behavior and social control change across time and space? What is the relationship between status characteristics like race, gender, sexuality, and prestige etc. and the classification and controlling of some behaviors versus others?
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
(1) Review paper
(1) Term paper
(1) Group/Individual Project
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3102~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3201 Section 001: Inequality: Introduction to Stratification (17164)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Why does inequality exist? How does it work? These are the essential questions examined in this class. Topics range from welfare and poverty to the role of race and gender in getting ahead. We will pay particular attention to social inequities why some people live longer and happier lives while others are burdened by worry, poverty, and ill health. prereq: soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ewf+SOC3201+Fall2017
Class Description:
Stratification is the study of social inequality. We will explore sociological theories of stratification through the lens of three questions:
1. Does education reduce inequality--or make it worse?
2. Half a century after the legal revolution that was the Civil Rights Movement, why is racial inequality in the United States still so stark?
3. What's behind the rise of the 1% all over the world?
Grading:
Grades will be based on writing assignments and regular quizzes.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3201~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (16336)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?rajas011+SOC3211W+Fall2017
Class Description:
"Race" has been an important of American history, but we try to talk about a "post-racial" society in the 21st century. This class will cover the origins of race (and racism), before diving into race in American history and the consequences this history has for contemporary race relations. We will discuss what exactly "race" is and isn't, why race and racism are central to American politics and culture, and how "race" in the post-Civil Rights Era and the 21st century has both declined and grown in significance.
Class Format:
Active participation and discussion are encouraged in this class environment. Students should expect in-class activities.
Workload:
Students interested in this course can expect to read 10-30 pages of academic work per week; in addition, we will be writing and revising paper work over the course of the semester.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3211W~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 May 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3215 Section 001: Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy (35198)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
GLOS 3215 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 04:30PM - 05:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 240
Course Catalog Description:
Far-reaching transformations of the global economy over the last seventy years in the realms of labor, consumption and the environment. The movement away from regulated national economies to a more fully integrated global economy; changing patterns and organization of production, employment, consumption, and waste disposal; rise of supercapitalism: a new culture of market rule over society and nature.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schurman+SOC3215+Fall2017
Class Description:

Manifestations of the new global economy are everywhere. From the jeans you buy at your favorite shopping mall to the place mats you purchase at Target, most of the items we consume here in the United States are made somewhere else. Global production networks link consumers of fresh green beans in Britain with horticulturalists, pickers, and exporters in Zambia. And it isn't only products that move around the globe; so do people. Thanks to immense economic inequalities, upper and even middle class families in Europe, Japan, Canada and the U.S. enjoy the cheap and plentiful labor of Eastern European, Filipino, and Honduran nannies, housecleaners, and gardeners. Even diverse forms of "waste" associated with consumption and production from metal scrap to plastics to discarded electronics to a city's garbage have become global commodities as giant container ships make it economical to transport items unwanted in richer countries for use as raw materials in poorer ones, albeit at a high cost to human health and the environment.

How did this new global economy come to be, what forces are responsible for these changes, how has it impacted working people, consumers and ecosystems, and with what ethical and political implications?

In this course, we will focus on the changes that have taken place in the global economy over the last half-century (and occasionally more) in the realms of labor, consumption, and the environment. We will examine the economic theories, institutional changes, technological developments and practices that have undergirded them. We will focus heavily on transformations in forms of work, as well as ecological implications of global capitalism. Our mode of exploration will be both historical and contemporary. We will examine the movement away from the relatively regulated national economies of the 1940s-1960s to a more fully integrated global economy; changing patterns and organization of production, distribution, consumption, and waste disposal; the rise of neoliberalism; and the shift in the U.S. from "managerial capitalism to shareholder capitalism". Some of the substantive topics we will explore include the globalization of mass consumption and the rise of new middle classes in Turkey, China, India, and elsewhere; the culture of the "new" capitalism; the growing "precarity" and insecurity of work at all levels; the environmental changes global capitalism has wrought; recent economic and political crises in Europe and the United States; and alternatives to the "business-as-usual" economy.

Learning Objectives:
Well after this class is over, I want you to be able to utilize the perspectives and knowledge you have acquired during the course to understand the everchanging nature of the global political economy.
Class Format:
This course is based on lectures, films, and a lot of in-class discussion. From the outset, I want you to know that (a) this course is very reading intensive, and (b) I expect you to do all of the readings all of the time. Active participation in this class is very important.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3215~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3246 Section 001: Diseases, Disasters, & Other Killers (35708)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 5246 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 150
Course Catalog Description:
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ewf+SOC3246+Fall2017
Class Description:
This class is about the past, present, and future of why people die. Why did infectious diseases rapidly seem to disappear--and will they come back? How have historical changes in social organization and interaction with the natural environment changed when and how we die, and what do medical advances, climate change, and persistent inequalities imply for what we might die of in the future?

Reading historical classics in population health and conducting hands-on data analyses, we will:
* Explore the causes and consequences of a historic worldwide transformation in death and disease
* Analyze how that transformation occurred differently in different parts of the world, and why it matters
* Consider to what extent mortality can--or can't--be further eradicated.
Grading:
Grades will be primarily based on three writing and data analysis assignments. We will also have occasional quizzes.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3246~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (17961)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3251W+Fall2017
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing. Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your own life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of others. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the social construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings. These include the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and corporate approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:

45% Papers (3 papers, 15% each)

15% Group Presentation

20% Final Exam

20% Class Participation

Exam Format:
1 exam, True/False and Short Answer
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam
3 Papers
1 Group Presentation
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3251W~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3501 Section 001: Sociology of Families (17964)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 150
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Family has long been a significant experience in human societies; much of what we understand ourselves to be, arises in family life. But family also varies widely in composition across time and place. We will learn how sociologists study and understand families theoretically, as social institutions, as well as sites and sources of social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?noble207+SOC3501+Fall2017
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3501~001&term=1179

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3613V Section 001: Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (35746)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
GLOS 3613V Section 001
GLOS 3613W Section 001
SOC 3613W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Food issues from sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about/relate to food.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schurman+SOC3613V+Fall2017
Class Description:
Hamburgers and a Coke, rice and beans, collard greens, "sustainable" sushi. What meanings do these foods conjure up, and for whom? Where are their ingredients grown, and what are the social and environmental impacts? Who prepares these dishes and who eats them? This course is built on two central premises: first, that the production, distribution, and consumption of food is profoundly relational, connecting different groups of people and places; and second, that one can gain great insights into these social relations through a sociological and political-economic analysis of food. This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the agrifood system. Among the themes we explore are the different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; work in the food sector; the global food economy; the idea of "food justice"; and the environmental consequences of food production. We will also study social movements seeking to change the food system. The general objective of this course is to teach you how to view the world of food and agriculture from a sociological and global perspective. A more specific objective is to get you to think analytically about something that is so "everyday" that most of us take it for granted: where our food comes from and why, why we eat the way (and what) we do, and the kind of social and political-economic relationships involved in our food encounters. As in all of our sociology courses, honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of understanding in their written assignments, oral participation, and course activities.
Grading:
A-F, no incompletes
Class Format:
lectures, films, guest speakers, class discussion.
Workload:
Students can expect to read between 60-80 pages a week, write eight commentaries that demonstrate your understanding of the readings, write two short (2-3 page) papers, and write a 1,500 word research based op-ed piece on a course-related topic. The writing-intensive course is also heavily discussion-based, and attendance and active participation are required.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3613V~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 November 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3613W Section 001: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (35745)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
GLOS 3613V Section 001
GLOS 3613W Section 001
SOC 3613V Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Food issues from a sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about and relate to food. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schurman+SOC3613W+Fall2017
Class Description:
Hamburgers and a Coke, rice and beans, collard greens, "sustainable" sushi. What meanings do these foods conjure up, and for whom? Where are their ingredients grown, and what are the social and environmental impacts? Who prepares these dishes and who eats them? This course is built on two central premises: first, that the production, distribution, and consumption of food is profoundly relational, connecting different groups of people and places; and second, that one can gain great insights into these social relations through a sociological and political-economic analysis of food. This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the agrifood system. Among the themes we explore are the different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; work in the food sector; the global food economy; the idea of "food justice"; and the environmental consequences of food production. We will also study social movements seeking to change the food system. The general objective of this course is to teach you how to view the world of food and agriculture from a sociological and global perspective. A more specific objective is to get you to think analytically about something that is so "everyday" that most of us take it for granted: where our food comes from and why, why we eat the way (and what) we do, and the kind of social and political-economic relationships involved in our food encounters. As in all of our sociology courses, honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of understanding in their written assignments, oral participation, and course activities.
Grading:
A-F, no incompletes
Class Format:
lectures, films, guest speakers, class discussion.
Workload:
Students can expect to read between 60-80 pages a week, write eight commentaries that demonstrate your understanding of the readings, write two short (2-3 page) papers, and write a 1,500 word research based op-ed piece on a course-related topic. The writing-intensive course is also heavily discussion-based, and attendance and active participation are required.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3613W~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 November 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3701 Section 001: Social Theory (17476)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 150
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC3701+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Exam Format:
Short answer; essays
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3701~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3701 Section 002: Social Theory (14006)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 12:20PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
West Bank Skyway AUDITORIUM
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?broad001+SOC3701+Fall2017
Class Description:
Social theories help us understand society and how it works. In this class, we cover the development of social theory from the classical and founding works of Marx, Durkheim and Weber, through more contemporary ideas such as feminism, rational choice, racism, and post-modernity. Throughout this class, we have three goals: to learn to read and understand key theoretical work in sociology; to use this work to better understand the social world; and to develop our own capacity to talk and write about the world using ideas from theory.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
40% Reports/Papers
15% Written Homework
5% In-class Presentations Other Grading Information: Two mini-papers about the readings each about 3 to 4 pages in length. 25 answers (about 1/3 page in length) to reading questions for each class. They class will break up into 10 groups and each group will make one presentation about the readings.
Exam Format:
The exams are designed to evaluate your mastery of the concepts and ideas covered by the readings, lectures and discussions. The questions will include short-answer and essay. The midterm exam is worth 150 points and the final exam is 250 points.
Class Format:
70% Lecture
10% Film/Video
17% Discussion
3% Student Presentations
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
16 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
25 Homework Assignment(s)
Other Workload: Workload may change depending upon the degree of teaching assistant support available
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3701~002&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3701 Section 301: Social Theory (18138)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
Times and Locations:
ODL Open Enrl Reg Acad Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Exam Format:
Short answer; essays
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3701~301&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3701 Section 302: Social Theory (36841)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
Times and Locations:
ODL Open Enrl Reg Acad Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Exam Format:
Short answer; essays
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3701~302&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3801 Section 001: Sociological Research Methods (14003)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 230
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Discussion sections WILL meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?eroberts+SOC3801+Fall2017
Class Description:
The research methods course teaches you to understand, critique, and plan sociological research. This course introduces you to both qualitative and quantitative research designs. The course is intended for sociology majors and it should be taken before you begin your major project. We will use lectures, discussions, lab exercises, short weekly assignments, and a few small outside-of-class "hands-on" research assignments to get a feel for a variety of research methods. In addition to exams and the activities listed above, students will prepare a research proposal as their final project for the course.
Grading:

20% Special Projects
20% Laboratory Evaluation
20% Other Evaluation

Other Grading Information: homework; 40% examinations
Exam Format:
Short answer and brief essay.
Class Format:
60% Lecture
5% Film/Video
5% Discussion
20% Laboratory
5% Small Group Activities
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
30-50 pages of reading per week
10-12 pages of writing per semester
2 exams
2 papers critically evaluating the evidence for claims made by a professional sociologist
11 homework worksheets based on assigned readings.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3801~001&term=1179
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eroberts_SOC3801_Fall2017.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3801 Section 009: Sociological Research Methods (16034)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-109
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Discussion sections WILL meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gunth031+SOC3801+Fall2017
Class Description:
Imagine this course as a civilian's guide to social research. We'll focus on the development, conduct, and dissemination of scholarship in a way that prepares you to complete a major project in sociology, but we'll also build the tools you'll need to evaluate truth claims that circulate in everyday public life and politics. Learn how to identify quality social research and put it to work. Defend it from skeptics. Think responsibly about its effects. Our assignments will help you mobilize several different types of existing research in order to answer a range of sociological questions.
Grading:

10% Attend and participate in class discussion

10% Recall key terms and details

20% Find relevant sources of research

30% Interpret and compare different types of evidence

30% Justify and critique common research practices

Class Format:
Lecture Section:
50% conceptual development
25% participatory activities

25% guest speakers, media, in-class writing, & miscellaneous

Lab Section:
80% Analyze and discuss weekly readings (available online)
20% Workshop term paper

Workload:
20-40 pages of reading per week
2 exams
Daily in-class writing exercises
2 term papers, 5-6 pages each
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3801~009&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3811 Section 001: Social Statistics (13936)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 5811 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 310
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Discussion sections will NOT meet the first week of class. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC3811+Fall2017
Class Description:
This is a social statistics course for sociology graduate students and undergraduate honors students. It meets for lectures with SOC3811, but has a separate weekly lab session. It emphasizes describing data and testing hypotheses. Lectures expose students to the theoretical bases of statistical methods and how to use them in social research. Laboratory sessions teach computing skills and data manipulation techniques. Test problems and lab assignments help students to gain knowledge of basic descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequency distributions, means tests, correlation and regression. Many examples are drawn from diverse sociological topics and illustrated with national survey data.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology majors and students from other disciplines.
Learning Objectives:
Acquire knowledge of basic statistical principles and computation methods, applied to real social data. Ability to read and understand articles that analyze social data.
Grading:
For SOC 3811:
75% Three Exams
25% Two computer data analysis assignments.

For SOC 5811:
100% Three computer data analysis assignments.
Exam Format:
Computations
Short Answer
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Laboratory
Workload:
For SOC 3811:
10-35 PowerPoint slides reading per week; 2 computer problem sets; 3 exams.

For SOC 5811:
10-35 PowerPoint slides reading per week; 3 computer problem sets; no exams.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3811~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 May 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Black to the Future: Race & Visions of Tomorrow (35420)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F; cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jmbell+SOC4090+Fall2017
Class Description:
The discipline of sociology has a central concern with understanding race in the US, but despite our disciplinary desire to predict future social trends, we do not often spend time examining popular visions of the future. Still scholars, novelists, filmmakers and social movements alike often construct visions of the future through claims about what will happen, what could happen, or what should happen. Using a diverse array of sources, this course will look specifically at the kinds of racial futures that are anticipated, feared and hoped for. We will read sociological texts, examine the use of allegory and parables by historians and social scientists, look at the visions set forth by social movements, and dissect future-oriented films and fiction all toward understanding the sociology of race in the US.


We will explore constructions of the future to examine what kinds of racial futures social movements and scholars/writers imagine and use that to illustrate the areas of concern of race-based social movements and sociological scholarship on race.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Anyone with an interest in the sociology of race and social movements or exploring science fiction/speculative fiction as a genre. Previous sociology courses will be helpful.
Learning Objectives:
Students should leave this course with a working knowledge of sociological perspectives on race and social movements. Students should also end the course with a solid understanding of how sociologists approach visions of the future.
Exam Format:
essay
Class Format:
lecture, discussion, group work
Workload:
Students should expect to read about 75-100 pages per week in addition to any outside film or art viewings assigned. There will be a big final project that can be fulfilled in a number of ways using various media. This will be presented at the end of the term. Students should expect to do a significant amount of writing in this course including weekly assignments.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4090~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 April 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4101V Section 001: Honors: Sociology of Law (17179)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 4101W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Sociological analysis of law/society. Why people obey law. Social forces involved in creating law (civil/criminal). Procedures of enforcement. Impact of law on social change. Honors students expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, presentations, leadership of students. prereq: [1001, 3101, 3102] or 3701 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC4101V+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Throughout the course, we will consider the role of law in reinforcing and changing class, gender, and race inequalities. Although this course focuses on the U.S. legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between U.S. law and global law and concepts of justice. This course uses an array of reading materials including: theoretical works, empirical studies, and U.S. Supreme Court cases. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
50% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4101V~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2013

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4101W Section 001: Sociology of Law (16064)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 4101V Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the U.S. legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. prereq: [1001; 1101 or 3101 or 3102] recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC4101W+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Throughout the course, we will consider the role of law in reinforcing and changing class, gender, and race inequalities. Although this course focuses on the U.S. legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between U.S. law and global law and concepts of justice. This course uses an array of reading materials including: theoretical works, empirical studies, and U.S. Supreme Court cases.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
50% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4101W~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 November 2013

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4102 Section 001: Criminology (17966)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
SOC 4102H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-147
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Nature/types of crime. Problems in measuring incidence/trends. Review of sociological theories of crime causation. Implications for crime prevention/control. prereq: [3101 or 3102 or instr consent], soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC4102+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course examines new trends in criminological research, i.e. innovative explanations of crime and punishment. A cross-section of recent criminology books and articles will be discussed that have attracted much attention among scholars and/or the broader public. Examples for crime theories discussed are Messner and Rosenfeld's "Crime and the American Dream," Sampson and Wilson's focus on inner city poverty and dislocation as a central root of crime, Hagan/McCarthy's "Mean Streets" with its focus on homeless youth and crime, Newman's "Rampage," a study on school shootings, and Anderson's "Code of the Street." The punishment side covers sections from books by Beckett on the role of media and politics in creating moral panics, Garland with his focus on punitive responses in times of uncertainty, and texts on international differences in punishment. A new section examines a much neglected theme: criminal violations of human rights and humanitarian law such as war crimes and genocide and control responses to them. Students read chapters from books and articles while lecture provides background information. Lecture is accompanied by discussion and small group work.
Grading:
60% Midterm Exam; 30% Final Exam; 10% Class Participation (for students who seek honors credit in this class only: a paper of about 12-15 pages is expected [possibly the review of a book on which students agree with the instructor at the beginning of the semester; alternative paper types can be considered]).
Exam Format:
multiple choice, short answer
Class Format:
50% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities small group work
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4102~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 February 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4102H Section 001: Honors: Criminology (35066)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
Meets With:
SOC 4102 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-147
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Nature/types of crime. Problems in measuring incidence/trends. Review of sociological theories of crime causation. Implications for crime prevention/control. prereq: Honors student, [3101 or 3102 or instr consent], soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC4102H+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course examines new trends in criminological research, i.e. innovative explanations of crime and punishment. A cross-section of recent criminology books and articles will be discussed that have attracted much attention among scholars and/or the broader public. Examples for crime theories discussed are Messner and Rosenfeld's "Crime and the American Dream," Sampson and Wilson's focus on inner city poverty and dislocation as a central root of crime, Hagan/McCarthy's "Mean Streets" with its focus on homeless youth and crime, Newman's "Rampage," a study on school shootings, and Anderson's "Code of the Street." The punishment side covers sections from books by Beckett on the role of media and politics in creating moral panics, Garland with his focus on punitive responses in times of uncertainty, and texts on international differences in punishment. A new section examines a much neglected theme: criminal violations of human rights and humanitarian law such as war crimes and genocide and control responses to them. Students read chapters from books and articles while lecture provides background information. Lecture is accompanied by discussion and small group work. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
60% Midterm Exam; 30% Final Exam; 10% Class Participation (for students who seek honors credit in this class only: a paper of about 12-15 pages is expected [possibly the review of a book on which students agree with the instructor at the beginning of the semester; alternative paper types can be considered]).
Exam Format:
multiple choice, short answer
Class Format:
50% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities small group work
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4102H~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 February 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4105 Section 001: Sociology of Punishment and Corrections (34680)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 415
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Correctional strategies such as prison, probation, and parole. Theories/structures of diversion, probation, parole, and other community corrections programs. U.S. penal policies/practices compared with those in other countries. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC4105+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course is an in-depth sociological analysis of core penal institutions in the United States. We examine the origins, functions, and effects of incarceration from the 19th century to the present; the culture and social relations in male and female prisons; and the causes and consequences of America's extraordinary prison boom. Along with imprisonment, we study the birth and transformation of "community corrections" (e.g., parole, probation, and drug treatment). This class combines readings, lectures/discussions, and films.
Grading:
Other Grading Information: 75% of the course grade will be from the exams. 25% will be from the reaction papers and class attendance.
Exam Format:
Quizzes and two exams.
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
35% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
Workload:
75-100 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
Other Workload: This class has a heavy reading load. However, the readings are interesting and straightforward (mostly ethnographies and histories).
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4105~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
31 March 2014

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4106 Section 001: Crime on TV (34681)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course uses television shows to explore sociological perspectives on crime and punishment. We will critically examine how (and to what extent) four television series represent or distort prevailing knowledge about crime and punishment. prereq: recommended [1001 or 1001V, 1101 or 3101 or 3102]; Soph or above or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC4106+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course uses television shows to explore sociological perspectives on crime and punishment. The premise of this class is that we can learn a great deal about lawbreaking and social control from watching (and analyzing) television shows. (It is also true that much television misrepresents the nature and consequences of crime and punishment.) We will critically examine how (and to what extent) four television series represent or distort prevailing knowledge about crime and punishment. Topics will include the social origins and functions of crime, causes and consequences of lawbreaking, policing, race and the war on drugs, mass imprisonment, the culture and social relations of prisons, and prisoner re-entry. Featured shows include: The Walking Dead, The Wire, Orange is the New Black, The Shield, and Rectify (the exact line is subject to change). Disclosure. The shows we will watch graphically depict poverty, sexuality, drug-use, and violence. Several of the shows include profanity and vulgar language. As such, students who may be offended or uncomfortable with such language and themes may not wish to take this course.
Grading:
The final exam will be "take home".
Exam Format:
25% Midterm Exam
45% Reports/Papers
25% Quizzes
5% Class Participation
Class Format:
30% Lecture
45% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4106~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 March 2015

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4125 Section 001: Policing America (34929)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 415
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Forms, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of policing/surveillance agencies (formal/informal). Legal limitations, police culture, community relations, aims of policing, state power. prereq: [3101 or 3102 recommended or instr consent], soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC4125+Fall2017
Class Description:

In the wake of the #BlackLivesMatter movement and the President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing, it is clear that U.S. policing is in a moment of transition. This course is an in-depth sociological analysis of the origins, composition, and effects of policing in contemporary U.S. society. Throughout the course, we focus on using a social science lens to understand what policing is and how it influences social life. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which race and class inequalities are reflected in and reshaped by policing practices. The course material is divided into four units. In the first, we cover the history of formal policing in the U.S. and the turn toward the war on drugs. We then consider an ethnography of policing in Los Angeles'
"skid row" in the 2000s. The third section explores broader patterns of surveillance and control, focusing in particular on policing gender, class, schools, and terror. Our final section considers present-day efforts to reform the police (or "police the police"). Throughout the course, we draw on contemporary media stories, podcast, documentaries, and guest visitors to connect scholarship with the world around us.

Grading:
30% Midterm Exam
40% Final Exam
30% Participation
Exam Format:
Mixed
Class Format:
60% Lecture
10% Film/Video
20% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-150 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4125~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 January 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4141 Section 001: Juvenile Delinquency (34682)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Meets With:
SOC 4141H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 110
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Childhood/delinquency. Measuring extent/distribution of delinquent behavior. Applying theories to relationships within family, school, peer group. Institutional responses to delinquency. Evaluating programs for treatment, prevention, control. prereq: [3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent], soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?uggen001+SOC4141+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course presents an overview of sociological theory and research on juvenile delinquency, along with discussion of cutting-edge controversies and policy issues. We start with a critical examination of the social facts surrounding the measurement, extent, and distribution of delinquency. Next we study some of the principal sociological explanations of delinquent behavior. These theories provide conceptual tools for analyzing monographs detailing delinquency among diverse groups of young people. We conclude by analyzing some of the key programs implemented in attempts to reduce delinquency. Course objectives: 1) To understand the way that delinquency is currently measured and the extent and distribution of delinquent behavior according to these measures; 2) To gain a working knowledge of the major sociological theories used to explain delinquency; 3) To apply the conceptual tools of these theories to selected case studies; and, 4) To critically evaluate concrete policy responses to delinquency.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam
25% Reports/Papers
10% Special Projects
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Mixed
Class Format:
50% Lecture
5% Film/Video
30% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
5% Field Trips
5% Web Based
Workload:
100 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4141~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 June 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4141H Section 001: Honors: Juvenile Delinquency (35123)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
Meets With:
SOC 4141 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 110
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Childhood/delinquency. Measuring extent/distribution of delinquent behavior. Applying theories to relationships within family, school, peer group. Institutional responses to delinquency. Evaluating programs for treatment, prevention, control. prereq: honors student, [3101 or 3102 or instr consent], soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?uggen001+SOC4141H+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course presents an overview of sociological theory and research on juvenile delinquency, along with discussion of cutting-edge controversies and policy issues. We start with a critical examination of the social facts surrounding the measurement, extent, and distribution of delinquency. Next we study some of the principal sociological explanations of delinquent behavior. These theories provide conceptual tools for analyzing monographs detailing delinquency among diverse groups of young people. We conclude by analyzing some of the key programs implemented in attempts to reduce delinquency. Course objectives: 1) To understand the way that delinquency is currently measured and the extent and distribution of delinquent behavior according to these measures; 2) To gain a working knowledge of the major sociological theories used to explain delinquency; 3) To apply the conceptual tools of these theories to selected case studies; and, 4) To critically evaluate concrete policy responses to delinquency.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam
25% Reports/Papers
10% Special Projects
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Mixed
Class Format:
50% Lecture
5% Film/Video
30% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
5% Field Trips
5% Web Based Media
Workload:
120 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4141H~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 June 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4142 Section 001: Juvenile Law (17970)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Fri 12:30PM - 03:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Evolution of juvenile court. Organizational relationships among court, police, and other agencies. Policies regarding serious and status offenders. Intake, diversion, pretrial detention, waiver to adult court, and sentencing. Conflicts over due process and treatment. Movements to abolish juvenile justice system. prereq: soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?malmq001+SOC4142+Fall2017
Class Description:
An overall focus on issues involving juveniles in our society and how various issues are dealt with in the system of juvenile justice. Topics include: allocation of power among juveniles, families, and the state; problems that arise for juveniles with the school setting and within families; abuse and child neglect; children's rights; and the juvenile court and its origins up to more current problems. Various types of cases and problems that arise in the juvenile justice system will be considered.
Grading:
95% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: exams, 5% class participation
Exam Format:
multiple choice
Class Format:
60% Lecture
30% Discussion
10% Other Style videos
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
Other Workload: graduate/law students will be required to write a paper
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4142~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 September 2007

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4161 Section 001: Criminal Law in American Society (17971)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-103
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Purposes of criminal law and of principles of criminal liability, justification, and excuse. Applications to law of criminal homicide, sexual assault, drugs, and crimes against property, public order, and morals. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jbs+SOC4161+Fall2017
Class Description:
What's criminal law and what's it good for? Should we punish people only for what they do? or for what they might do? or even sometimes for who they are? What are the justifications and excuses for committing crimes? Topics: elements of crime that the prosecution has to prove beyond a reasonable doubt; accomplices; criminal attempts; defenses of justification (self-defense, defense of home) and defenses of excuse (insanity, age); criminal homicide; criminal sexual conduct. Read and discuss actual cases edited for non lawyers. Intensive class discussion. For upper division undergraduates, all majors.
Grading:
10% Class Participation
90% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: weekly exams covering reading and discussion
Exam Format:
40%, short answer quiz on each week's assigned reading (no notes or books allowed); 20%, analysis of week's assigned cases (take home); 40%, reaction essay based on the day's discussion topic (open book and notes)
Class Format:
15% Lecture
85% Discussion
Workload:
35 Pages Reading Per Week
13 Homework Assignment(s)
13 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4161~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 August 2011

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4461 Section 001: Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict (17976)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Effects of ethnic migration and of social movements. Construction of ethnic/national identities. Questions of citizenship. Rise of transnational movements, how they help shape racial/ethnic conflicts. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?aminzade+SOC4461+Fall2017
Class Description:

We will examine conceptual and theoretical approaches to the sociological study of ethnic and racial conflict around the globe, looking at ethnicity and race as distinctive but overlapping social constructions of collective identity that underpin patterns of social conflict and systems of power and privilege. We will also explore the difference between race and ethnicity, the various ways in which racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed in different countries, individual versus group approaches to the study of prejudice and discrimination, and the racialization of ethnic and religious groups. In analyzing the sources of ethnic and racial conflicts in different nation-states, we will examine the role played by racism, ethnocentrism, and xenophobia, situating particular cases of conflict in North America, Africa, Latin America, and Asia in the contexts of colonialism, slavery, globalization, democratization, nation-state formation, and transnational migration. Using a comparative and historical approach, we will also examine the racialization of ethnic and religious groups, how different countries formulate immigration policies and address issues of immigrant incorporation, exclusion, and citizenship, and the conditions under which conflicts turn violent, leading to ethnic cleansing and genocide. Finally, we will analyze different approaches to reducing ethnic and racial conflicts, from affirmative action and reparations to cosmopolitanism, federalism, and global governance.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students with some background in Sociology, especially those who have taken other courses concerning race and ethnicity.
Learning Objectives:
The course aims to get you to think critically about issues of racial and ethnic conflict in different parts of the globe and to situate these conflicts within broader historical processes, such as colonialism, capitalist development, and nation-state formation,
Grading:

http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4461~001&term=1179

Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/aminzade_SOC4461_Fall2017.doc
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 May 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4551 Section 001: Sociology of Sexualities (35011)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 317
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Sexual attitudes, behaviors, identities. Taken-for-granted beliefs about naturalness of sexual phenomena. How social forces shape sexual lives. Diversity of thought, behavior, lived experience with regard to sexuality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?upton042+SOC4551+Fall2017
Class Description:

In this course we will examine social theories and sociological research on the topic of sexuality. We will explore the concept of sexuality as it intersects with race, gender, and class. The course will be divided into three different sections. We will begin by defining sexuality, with a focus on the history of sexuality. Second, we will explore theories of sexuality. The third section of the course will focus on applying these theories through looking closely at contemporary issues and sexuality in film and other popular culture. The course is designed to give you a basic understanding of sociological implications of sexuality in the United States.

Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4551~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 April 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (14251)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mgoldman+SOC4966W+Fall2017
Class Description:
The purpose of this course is to assist students in fulfilling CLA's senior project requirement, the 'capstone' of the undergraduate career. Enrollment is limited to student majors in Sociology. The class provides a structure and guided format for completing the senior project. There will be two options: the research option and the service learning option. For the first, students select a topic, formulate a research question, read on the topic, conduct preliminary research, and write up lessons learned from the experience. Emphasis will be on the preparation, reading, and thought that goes into research, less so the implementation, as time is limited. Students can also choose the `service learning' option, in which they will be required to do community service learning and to write either a field research paper or an action project paper based on their work with participating community organizations. The final project will build on the values of critical thinking, effective communication, diversity, and social responsibility that are cultivated in sociology. Course readings provide guidelines about how to ask sociological questions, and the ethical questions concerning research. Course work requires intense individual engagement in the design of a project, and active class discussion of the issues students face in the process.
Grading:
90% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4966W~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 4977V Section 001: Senior Honors Proseminar I (14275)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Wed 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Exploring contemporary research for senior thesis. Guidance in defining a problem and reviewing prior theory/research. Presentation/discussion with faculty researchers. prereq: 3701, 3801, 3811, 9 additional upper div sociology cr, sr soc honors major, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tgowan+SOC4977V+Fall2017
Class Description:
This is the first course in a two-semester sequence designed to help honors students majoring in sociology prepare their senior projects research papers. Throughout this semester, we review key issues in the design of social research as students work on their independent projects. Specific activities in this semester of the course sequence include development of a research topic, exploring and reviewing relevant existing literature, applying for human subjects approval, putting together a faculty committee for the project, and completing first drafts of the literature review and methods sections of the research paper. Some students may begin data collection in the fall, but data collection and analysis, as well as the write-up and presentation of the final paper, are the main activities of the spring course. Students must take both courses in the sequence.
Grading:

Class participation 15%, topic statements 10%, completed IRB form 10%, preliminary bibliography 20%, methods section draft 20%, literature review draft 25%.

Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
20% Lecture
80% Discussion
Workload:
40-60 Pages Reading Per Week
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4977V~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 April 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 5246 Section 001: Disease, Disasters, and Other Killers (36293)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3246 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 150
Course Catalog Description:
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Grad student or instructor consent.
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ewf+SOC5246+Fall2017
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC5246~001&term=1179

Fall 2017  |  SOC 5811 Section 001: Social Statistics for Graduate Students (13942)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3811 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 310
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. Soc 5811 is intended for new graduate students, undergraduate honors students, and students pursuing the Sociology BS degree. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with a strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc majors must register A-F. 5811 is a good social statistics foundation course for MA students from other programs.
Class Notes:
15 seats reserved for sociology graduate students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC5811+Fall2017
Class Description:
This is a social statistics course for sociology graduate students and undergraduate honors students. It meets for lectures with SOC3811, but has a separate weekly lab session. It emphasizes describing data and testing hypotheses. Lectures expose students to the theoretical bases of statistical methods and how to use them in social research. Laboratory sessions teach computing skills and data manipulation techniques. Test problems and lab assignments help students to gain knowledge of basic descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequency distributions, means tests, correlation and regression. Many examples are drawn from diverse sociological topics and illustrated with national survey data.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology majors and students from other disciplines.
Learning Objectives:
Acquire knowledge of basic statistical principles and computation methods, applied to real social data. Ability to read and understand articles that analyze social data.
Grading:
For SOC 3811:
75% Three Exams
25% Two computer data analysis assignments.

For SOC 5811:
100% Three computer data analysis assignments.
Exam Format:
Computations
Short Answer
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Laboratory
Workload:
For SOC 3811:
10-35 PowerPoint slides reading per week; 2 computer problem sets; 3 exams.

For SOC 5811:
10-35 PowerPoint slides reading per week; 3 computer problem sets; no exams.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC5811~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 May 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 8001 Section 001: Sociology as a Profession (15224)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Grading Basis:
S-N or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue 01:00PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1183
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This 1 credit class fosters adaptation to the Graduate Program in Sociology and preparation for a sociological career. In the Fall, we explore professional careers in this field. We discuss the wide range of opportunities in sociology and help students further explore the next steps to becoming a scholar, educator, and member of various professional, intellectual, and social communities. We share practical information about being a student in sociology and about sociological careers, discuss presentations in department workshop seminars, and provide a safe place to discuss issues of student concerns. Students are encouraged to bring to the class their thoughts and reactions to experiences during their first semester in the PhD program. The Spring 8001 class is oriented to particular milestones in the Sociology Graduate Program and important student activities (for example, preparing reading lists for the preliminary exam and then writing the preliminary exam, preparing a dissertation prospectus, writing grant proposals, preparing an article for publication, etc.). Pre-req: Soc PhD students
Class Notes:
11 seats reserved for sociology graduate students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?morti002+SOC8001+Fall2017
Class Description:
This class fosters adaptation to the Graduate Program in Sociology and exploration of professional careers in this field.

We will discuss the wide range of opportunities in sociology and help students get started in thinking about becoming a scholar, educator, and member of various professional, intellectual, and social communities.

We will share practical information about being a student in sociology and about sociological careers, discuss presentations in department workshop seminars, and provide a safe place to discuss issues of student concern. Students are encouraged to bring to the class their thoughts and reactions to experiences in the program.




Who Should Take This Class?:
First year graduate students in Sociology.
Learning Objectives:
Students will learn about different types of sociological careers and share experiences that facilitate adaptation to the life of a graduate student.
Grading:
S-N
Exam Format:
No exams
Class Format:
We meet one hour per week. Several sessions feature visitors or panels of sociologists representing different institutional contexts (e.g. R1 university faculty, faculty at a small liberal arts college, sociologists in research organizations, those who work in government agencies, etc.).
Workload:
There are no required readings or exams.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8001~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 8090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Sociology & Its Publics (34683)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5-3 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Fri 10:00AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC8090+Fall2017
Class Description:


Students in this workshop will serve as the graduate student board for The Society Pages, an online social science journalism project housed at the University of Minnesota. Participation is based on application. In addition to experience and qualifications, the board is selected so as to involve students from different stages in the program, substantive interest areas, and methodological specialties. Most participants are expected to make a year-long commitment to the project, though membership will rotate on an annual basis.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students in sociology
Learning Objectives:
  • To deepen students' substantive research expertise
    by engaging cutting edge sociological scholarship. Students will unearth the most interesting findings and best evidence from new research in their areas of study. This provides students with a broader vision of the sociological field and offers an opportunity to diversify their reading in the prelim and dissertation processes.

  • To develop writing and communication skills
    in addressing academic and non-academic audiences. Grad board members regularly write for the website, and our supportive, professional editorial team gives direct feedback designed to improve these skills as the pieces are published online.

  • To gain deep, practical appreciation of the process of editorial decision-making
    and public scholarship.
    TSP
    had almost 11 million unique page views last year. Working with the site allows students to engage in critical and constructive discussion of the field of sociology, while participating in a collaborative public outreach project by shaping and improving the site as an online vehicle to disseminate great research.


Exam Format:
none
Class Format:
Weekly seminar
Workload:
4-6 hours a week
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8090~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 8190 Section 001: Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance -- Genocide & Mass Violence: Causes & Consequences (34684)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1183
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Advanced topics in law, crime, and deviance. Social underpinnings of legal/illegal behavior and of legal systems.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?abaer+SOC8190+Fall2017
Class Description:

Despite the existence of a legal definition brought forward by the 1948 UN Genocide Convention, the concept of genocide is at times expanded by scholars, victim groups and activists to encompass different categories and methods of extreme violence, including state terror against political enemies, war crimes and other massive human right violations committed by state and non-state actors. In this course, we will address definitional and theoretical problems that have emerged in the study of large scale political violence and its repercussions over the last decades. We will a) trace the history of the concept of genocide, the UN Convention and its connection to the Holocaust and the post-World War II order b) examine the work of classic and recent authors who discuss Cases examined in the course include the Holocaust, colonial genocide in North America, the Armenian genocide, State terror in Spain and in the Southern Cone and Stalinist crimes in Eastern Europe.


Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8190~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 April 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 8311 Section 001: Political Sociology (35010)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Fri 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Social dimensions of political behavior and social origins of different forms of the state. How various theoretical traditions--Marxist, Weberian, and feminist--address key issues in political sociology, including citizenship, revolution, state formation, origins of democracy, welfare state, and fascism.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?aminzade+SOC8311+Fall2017
Class Description:



This introduction to political sociology focuses on the social bases of power and various dimensions of the exercise of power in the modern world. It explores debates concerning the nature of state power in contemporary societies and takes a comparative/historical perspective on key long-term processes of political change. The goal is to develop an understanding of these debates and a capacity to link them to concrete problems of social research and political practice. The focus is on historically informed approaches to the politics of state formation, nation building, colonialism, imperialism, democratization, globalization, citizenship, and contentious politics. The first two weeks of the course address debates over the concept of power, examining socio-economic and cultural dimensions of power and the relationship between power, interests, and knowledge. The following three weeks examine different theories of the state and various aspects of state power, including the relationship between nation-states, globalization, multinational corporations, and digital technologies. We then spend two weeks examining the politics of nation-building and citizenship and the operation of processes of inclusion and exclusion in national political communities, with a focus on immigration policies. The subsequent eight weeks survey debates over the impact of the internet on political participation and democracy, authoritarian populism and the future of democracy, the politics of food and agricultural development, the political sociology of colonialism and imperialism, the relationship between political parties, social movements, and political change, and the role of emotions in electoral and non-electoral politics.
The topics and readings reflect my own interests and expertise, but you should feel free to pursue other areas of interest. The written assignments give you an opportunity review key theoretical debates in your own areas of interest and to think about how the concepts and theories discussed in our seminar relate to research and political practice in these areas.

Who Should Take This Class?:
To gain a better understanding of key debates in political sociology and of the theories and empirical research that speaks to these debates and to develop a global and historically informed perspective on key political issues.
Learning Objectives:
Critically evaluate different theoretical perspectives, assess empirical evidence supporting and critiquing these perspectives, and develop a global and comparative/historical approach to the study of political sociology
Grading:

Although you will not receive a participation grade in this course, you are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the readings and to send weekly discussion questions. Your final grade will be based on the two essays, each of which is worth 40% of your final grade and a policy brief, which is worth 20% of your final grade. Late papers will be graded down one-third of a grade for every day late, i.e. an A
will become an A- and a B+ will become a B if the paper is one day late. In order to get a grade of B+ or higher in this course, you must attend all of the seminars or provide a legitimate excuse for your absence (e.g. a health problem or family emergency) and submit discussion questions every week. If you are going to miss a class, please let me know in advance. In the case of a borderline grade (e.g. between a B+ and A-), your final grade will be determined by my judgment of the quantity and quality of classroom participation and the quality of your weekly discussion questions. No incompletes will be given for this course.


The grades for your three papers will be based on the following criteria:



·Substance: Does the paper address the questions, show an awareness of the central ideas and debates in the required readings, and make connections among the readings and to relevant class discussions and presentations? Are the ideas original?



·Evidence: Are statements accurate and are opinions adequately supported by evidence? Are relevant examples provided? Are sources identified and appropriately documented?



·Organization: Is the structure of the paper clear, with an introduction, development, and conclusion?
Is each paragraph coherent? Are transitions from one idea to the next logical?



·Mechanics: Is the sentence structure correct? Are sentences awkward? Are there errors in the use of verbs, pronouns, modifiers, word usage, punctuation, and spelling?




Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
Discussion of required readings, videos, mini-lectures, active learning exercises
Workload:
In addition to the two required papers and the policy brief, you are required to submit weekly discussion questions, based on debates, arguments, and evidence presented in the required readings, which should be no more than 1-2 pages double-spaced. These questions will help to facilitate a coherent and focused seminar discussion by identifying what you found to be the most illuminating, surprising, provocative, problematic, or confusing points in the readings, making connections among different readings, and connecting the readings to your own research.The questions should help us to discuss conceptual and methodological claims, identify assumptions, compare arguments, assess evidence, and identify silences in the readings.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8311~001&term=1179
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/aminzade_SOC8311_Fall2017.docx
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/aminzade_SOC8311_Fall2015.docx (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 April 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 8412 Section 001: Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (34686)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Fri 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC8412+Fall2017
Class Description:
This seminar introduces social network analysis to graduate students, emphasizing its theoretical, substantive, and methodological foundations. Our collective goal is to acquire a sufficient grasp of the contemporary network literatures to pursue independent advanced study, and ultimately, to contribute original research results to our disciplines. Specifically, we'll identify key network concepts and principles; examine data collection, measurement, and computer analysis techniques; and investigate applications in sociology, organization studies, political science, public administration, and related disciplines. Network analysis spans a diverse range of phenomena from ego-centric ties, to small work-team sociograms, to organizational relations, to trade and military alliances among nation states. Based on the summer survey of registered students' substantive interests, we'll concentrate on social capital, communication, personal networks, learning and innovation diffusion, intra- and interorganizational relations, social movements and collective action, political networks, international systems, and small world and Internet dynamics. About an hour of each class will be spent on network methodologies. The principles that students learn in this course will enable them to study advanced topics of their own choosing. Wasserman & Faust's encyclopedic Social Network Analysis provides our primary text, with required and background articles and chapters selected from the research literatures of several disciplines. Students will learn how to perform basic network analyses of previously collected datasets, using the UCINET computer package. We'll also explore network visualizations using spatial plotting programs. Doctoral students in the Department of Sociology may use this course to fulfill their advanced methods requirement.
Grading:
Leading a class discussion
(10%), preparing a discussion guide (10%), four best of five computer assignments (40%), course paper
(40%).
Class Format:
60% Lecture
20% Discussion
20% Student Presentations
Workload:
75 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Paper
5 Computer assignments
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8412~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 8551 Section 001: Life Course Inequality & Health (34687)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Thu 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Course Catalog Description:
Seminar examines the changing life course in its social and historical context, including theoretical principles, methodologies, and policy implications. Focus on key societal institutions that offer unequal opportunities and constraints, depending on social class, race/ethnicity, and gender. Unequal access to age-graded social roles and resources shape the course of development, and in doing so, they have profound impacts on health. We will consider how inequality in the family, education, work, the military, and in the health care & criminal justice systems influence health behaviors and outcomes at different ages and life stages. prereq: grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?morti002+SOC8551+Fall2017
Class Description:
0A

This seminar will examine the life course paradigm, its origins, and its broad influence on the social sciences and social policy, with special focus on inequality and health. We will be examining theoretical and empirical work inspired by the life course paradigm, featuring structural sources of inequality throughout the life course in major institutional contexts of development (e.g., family, education, work, criminal justice) and their impacts on long-term cumulative processes that promote resilience or vulnerability. Emphasis is on recent studies, conceptual and methodological challenges in understanding the nexus of life course inequality and health, promising directions for future research, and implications for policy, including health policy. By presenting key life course concepts, research strategies, and empirical exemplars, it will provide students with the intellectual tools to assess how inequality throughout the life course is reflected in individual well-being and what might be done to reduce the health risks associated with life course inequalities.


Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students in sociology, demography, social psychology, public health, and related disciplines.
Learning Objectives:
Students will gain familiarity with theoretical and empirical literature relating to life course inequality and health, as well as emerging research questions and approaches. The term paper will enable the student to delve deeply into a selected subject of interest, and the student-led seminars will heighten students' skills in leading, and contributing to, small group discussions. This seminar fosters a multidisciplinary orientation, as it draws on literature from multiple fields and typically attracts students from diverse departments in the university.
Grading:
Grades will be based on class participation (participation in, and leading some seminar discussions) (50%) and a term paper (10% oral presentation; 40% written document).

Exam Format:
None
Class Format:
Class Format. Each seminar will be divided into segments:

(1) An introduction by the instructor, indicating key issues and debates, the broader intellectual context, important works, and implications.

(2) A student-led discussion. Seminars are the place for lively exploration of ideas. The student leader will bring up issues related to the required readings, and prepare several questions related to the readings and topics for each seminar. They should stimulate critical and evaluative discussion. I provide some examples for illustration (these are general in character; they need to be specified and elaborated for each topic:

How does the concept in question (e.g., age norm, turning point, etc.) enhance our understanding of life course inequality and health? Is the concept precise and clear? Somewhat vague or ill-defined? How has it been measured or operationalized? How has it stimulated empirical research? How might it be extended or elaborated?

What examples of historical variability, inter- or intra-societal variation clarify or extend our understanding of life course concepts?

In addressing the readings, you might ask, is the author's central argument well justified (logically, empirically, etc.)?

How does the selection help us to understand specific life course inequalities (which you identify) and their consequences for health? How can the concepts be applied to life course phenomena other than those explicitly considered in the selection you read? Can the empirical findings be generalized to other phenomena? To other times and places? Are there gaps or unaddressed issues which should be considered? Does the selection raise questions amenable to future empirical investigation? Does it provide information or data relevant to social policy? How does the reading address your particular interests?

All students should be prepared to actively participate in the discussion. To do this, it is necessary to read each required selection, consider the issues/questions raised by the seminar leaders, and be ready to bring new questions and issues into the discussion.

(3) The last 20 minutes of some seminars will be devoted to a discussion of term papers. Early in the semester, these segments will focus on term paper topics and issues to be considered. Presentations of the papers at the end of the term may be in the same format as a round table discussion, or may be a more formal presentation with powerpoint. Allow 20 minutes for the presentation itself; 5 minutes for questions and discussion.
Workload:
Approximately 50-60 pages of reading per week, and a term paper.
Students may choose one of the following term paper options:

A. An analysis of a life course concept of your choosing (for example, cohort, transition, trajectory, generation, age grading, age norm, age identity pathway, agency, cumulative disadvantage, accentuation, resilience, or others). Trace the development of the concept historically; indicate how it has been useful in promoting understanding of processes relevant to an understanding of life course inequality and health; describe how it has inspired empirical research; discuss its limitations; and indicate the kinds of research that are necessary to further illuminate its application. (approximately 20 double-spaced pages of text; in addition, include an abstract and a reference list).

B. A journal-type article on a topic related to the study of life course inequality and health, involving the analysis of data of your choice, qualitative or quantitative. (approximately 20 double-spaced pages of text; additional materials include abstract, footnotes, reference list, figures and tables).

Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8551~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 8701 Section 001: Sociological Theory (14278)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 614
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Traditions of social theory basic to sociological knowledge, their reflection and expansion in contemporary theory, their applications in selected areas of empirical research. Sample topics: social inequality, social organization and politics, family organization and social reproduction, social order and change, sociology of knowledge and religion.
Class Notes:
12 seats reserved for sociology graduate students Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC8701+Fall2017
Class Description:
This course provides an introduction to the central traditions, figures and concepts in sociological theory. It is intended primarily for first-year graduate students in Sociology, but it covers work that is widely read and referenced in the social sciences generally. This course covers the work of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Mead, Goffman, Bourdieu, and several other traditions and figures.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Required for first year graduate students in Sociology. A few seats are open to other students upon request.
Grading:
Attendance and participation: 30%
Memos and class discussions: 40%
Final paper: 30%
Exam Format:
None.
Class Format:
Orienting lecture from instructor, but mostly seminar format with student leadership.
Workload:
Substantial reading. Reading may be longer and (at times) more difficult than you are used to. Please see attached syllabus to gauge average week's reading.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8701~001&term=1179
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gerte004_SOC8701_Fall2017.pdf
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gerte004_SOC8701_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 8890 Section 001: Advanced Topics in Research Methods -- Ethnographic Practicum (34688)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Thu 02:30PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Advanced Research Methods (e.g., multilevel models), historical/comparative, field, survey research. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 8801, 8811, or instr consent. Cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tgowan+SOC8890+Fall2017
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC8890~001&term=1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 February 2016

ClassInfo Links - Fall 2017 Sociology Classes

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