10 classes matched your search criteria.

Summer 2017  |  SOC 1001 Section A97: Introduction to Sociology (88311)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Online & Distance Lrng (ODL)
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/22/2017 - 08/25/2017
Off Campus
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
35% Final Exam
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: reaction papers
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Class Format:
40% Lecture
30% Discussion
20% Other Style percent videos, 10% written reports
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~A97&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Summer 2017  |  SOC 1001 Section A98: Introduction to Sociology (88948)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Online & Distance Lrng (ODL)
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/22/2017 - 08/25/2017
Off Campus
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
35% Final Exam
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: reaction papers
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Class Format:
40% Lecture
30% Discussion
20% Other Style percent videos, 10% written reports
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~A98&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3003 Section 001: Social Problems (88108)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Mon, Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-224
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Analysis of major social problems, including inequality, crime, drug abuse, pollution, and racism. Proposed solutions, evaluation of policy consequences. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pharr004+SOC3003+Summer2017
Class Description:
This course is an exploration of how sociologists confront, diagnose, analyze, and theorize contemporary social problems. Some of the topics we will examine include the environment and climate change; socioeconomic inequality and globalization; crime, punishment, and drug abuse; health and medicalization; modernization and rationalization; and the rise (or return) of nationalism and authoritarianism. In our examination of these issues we will tackle some fundamental questions, namely: 1) How and why did sociologists come to see themselves as social pathologists in the first place; 2) what drives society to define these issues as "problems" and what narratives and assumptions emerge in the process; and 3) who lays claim to these problems and how do they mobilize the public to get their message heard? This class is primarily discussion-based with brief introductory lectures; course materials include journal articles, book excerpts, and films. Students will be expected to come to class prepared to participate in and lead discussions, write weekly short (2-3 page) papers, and take a final exam.
Grading:
20% class participation and presentations
20% final exam
60% short papers
Class Format:
30% lecture
35% discussion
35% films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
75-100 pages reading per week
~12-15 pages writing per term
1 exam
6 short papers
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3003~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 March 2017

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (82838)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Mon, Wed 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-224
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mave0013+SOC3101+Summer2017
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to engage students in a sociological analysis of the ?American Criminal Justice system.? We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision (i.e., probation and parole). Throughout the course, we will investigate the relationships between criminal punishment and ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. Specific topics include the social construction of crime and criminals, whether criminal justice policies, practices, and institutions are ?just,? and unique characteristics of American criminal justice. No prior knowledge of the criminal justice system is required. The course meets two university requirements: the Council on Liberal Education's (CLE) Social Science Core and the Civic Life and Ethics Theme. As such, this course will address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the critical framework of Liberal Education and provide tools to evaluate moral questions relating to punishment.
Grading:
25% Final Exam Other Grading Information: 75% three exams (25% each)
Exam Format:
Three multiple choice and short answer exams, and one final take-home short essay exam
Class Format:
30% Lecture
10% Film/Video
30% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Student Presentations
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
~100 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3101~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 February 2016

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (82902)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 184
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?maha0134+SOC3251W+Summer2017
Class Description:

This course introduces students to the social, historical, political and theoretical contexts that shape our conceptions of race, gender, and class. Though the title of this course is free of spelling errors, there exists the potential for intersectional inaccuracies. The separation of race, class, and gender by commas implies that these parts of identity are uncooperative. Race, gender, class, sexuality and other dimensions of identity are relational and function within a broader, dynamic matrix comprised intersecting identities. Additive models of social difference do little to recognize the simultaneity of inequality. To "bring race into the conversation," is not license to silence other instruments (gender, sexuality, class) playing within an orchestra of oppression. Intersectional analyses of race, gender, and class require scholars to acknowledge how various forms of social difference work in concert with one another to produce and reproduce social inequalities and a multiplicative model of marginalization. Multiple forms of marginalization involve teamwork. Through such co-operation and cooperation, oppressions build off one another in cumulative,"multiplicative," and in some cases, exponential fashion. Hence, a more accurate title for this course could be racegenderclasssexualityindigeneityabilitycitizenship3.

In this course we will study the inextricable links between race, gender and class, as well as other dimensions of social difference, while ensuring that the other instruments playing in orchestras of oppression are not silenced. Students will explore both the stability and variability of race, gender, and class as dimensions of social difference. In addition to analyzing the role of race, gender, class, and other dimensions of social difference as independent conditioning forces, students will also examine the level of cooperation required between these social constructs to produce and reproduce inequality. The content of this course urges students to form a relational (as opposed to autonomous) conception of gender, race, and class to better grasp their existence as social constructs.

This course meets the following Council on Liberal Education requirements: Diversity and Social Justice in the U.S. theme, theSocial Sciences core, and the Writing Intensive core. This course contributes to the acquisition of a liberal education, helping students gain a broad understanding of the subject, including factual knowledge, the theoretical foundations of that knowledge, and its associated key modes of inquiry.

Grading:
Writing assignments = 30%
Mid-term paper = 30%
Final exam = 30%
Attendance and participation = 10%
Exam Format:
Final paper
Class Format:
40% Lecture
40% Discussion
20% Other Style
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
25-30 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3251W~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 April 2017

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3451W Section 001: Cities & Social Change (88109)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Tue, Thu 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-224
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Social, economic, cultural foundations of modern city. Theories/models of urbanism from Wirth to Sassen. Migration/ethnic enclaves. Racial segregation, social control. Urban social movements. Urban-suburban divide. Decline of urban liberalism. "Brazilianization" of American city. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?karak014+SOC3451W+Summer2017
Class Description:
Using sociology, along with history and urban studies this course, will follow the rise of "cities". We will study the great scholars of urbanism, including Wirth, Engels, DuBois, Castells and Sassen, to apply their models to topics such as the rise of modernism, the city as a milieu of design and consumption, ecological sustainability, the urban-suburban divide, and the contemporary "Brazilianization" of the American city.
Learning Objectives:
What makes a space urban? How can we make sense of urbanism? How are cities different than the countryside, how are they interlinked? We will start our summer-long journey with these questions that have informed scholars of the urban, people who both theorized about and influenced the making of cities. In order to make sense of the urban phenomenon we will historicize it, as social scientists usually do. We will look at the idea of the polis, following it in medieval European towns and industrial cities. Reading visions of architects and designers will help us investigate the link between modernity, modernism, and cities, as well as the suburban dream and its critiques. Before the midterm we will see how people, who will of course be raced, classed and gendered fit in our historicized model of cities and discuss how our backgrounds influence, and contribute to the urban experience. In the second half, we will do some weaving and connect the world by looking at global cities, unequal urban development, and deconstruct the notion of development itself, through cases of Turkey and Brazil. Lastly, we will tackle with gentrification, city as a space of consumption, and nostalgia.

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Grading:
24% Midterm
36%Short Response Papers
10%Participation
30%Final Paper
Exam Format:
Midterm consists of short answer questions, a short essay and comparison. It is a tool to assess how we are doing in class, and if we are ready to move ahead or linger some more on previous subjects.
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Discussion
35% Other Style writing exercises, films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Session
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam, 1 Final Paper Short Response Papers
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3451W~001&term=1175
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/karak014_SOC3451W_Summer2017.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 April 2017

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3811 Section 001: Social Statistics (82959)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 10 wk
 
06/12/2017 - 08/18/2017
Tue, Thu 03:30PM - 05:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-213
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?stewa777+SOC3811+Summer2017
Class Description:

Statistics are powerful tools for studying society. For some sociologists, they are one of the best ways to understand broad trends across time, space, and social groups. For others, they are the kind of elite, technological wizardry that turns people into numbers and blinds us to important sociological questions about who decides what we "know" about the world. Some of us think math is fascinating, and some got into this business because we don't speak math. This class tackles both sides. We want to provide you with the skills you need to understand and use statistical analyses, but also to think about where and when these skills are best put to use. The University of Minnesota is especially concerned that students spend time in the classroom "doing the work of the field, not just reading about it," and so we will take a hands-on approach to working with real life data. By the end of this class, students will be able to:

  • Find statistical information, interpret what it tells us, and decide whether to believe it

  • Manage data and do basic statistical analyses with a computer program

  • Interpret the output from that program and clearly communicate that information to other people using plain language and effective visual figures

Whether you plan to go to graduate school, go into a data-driven job such as policy analysis or non-profit work, or just want to be a better consumer of information, these skills should serve you well. This course also fulfills UMN's Mathematical Thinking Core. We will be discussing the math behind each statistical concept as both a body of knowledge that is worth understanding on its own and a logical tool that can help us work through real-world problems. While we will be working through a few calculations to do this, the point of these exercises will be to improve your ability to explain what a particular process does to our data and how we should interpret the results.

"Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write." - H.G. Wells

"No one man should have all that power." - Kanye West

Grading:
Grades will be based on three major assignments, three in-class exams, attendance, and participation in both class and lab.
Exam Format:
The point of learning statistics is to understand and explain the substantive meaning behind the math. Exams will include some calculation problems and multiple choice questions to measure knowledge of the concepts, but the majority of questions will be short answer responses where students will draw conclusions from statistical analyses and explain results.
Class Format:
Class time will include lecture, discussion, and exercises to practice the material. Weekly lab attendance is required and will offer time to practice and work on major assignments using university software.
Workload:
10-35 pages reading per week; quizzes most weeks; 5 shorter problem sets; 3 longer analytical memos
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3811~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 November 2016

Summer 2017  |  SOC 4114 Section 001: Women & the Criminal Justice System (88321)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 03:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Historical/current explanations for female criminality. Current trends in women's participation in crime, their treatment in the legal system. prereq: recommend 3101 or 3102 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?noble207+SOC4114+Summer2017
Class Description:
If women make up only about 10 percent of the incarcerated population in the U.S., why is it important to study women's involvement in the criminal justice system? What do we gain from learning about and analyzing women's experiences with crime and punishment? The goal of this course is to foster your sociological imagination in relation to gender, crime, and punishment, with a focus on women's involvement in the criminal justice system. Women participate in criminal justice in a variety of ways. Women commit crimes, are victimized through crime, serve time in prisons, jails, and under community supervision, and work in the criminal justice field. In this course, we will examine all of these social positions, and the ways gender organizes the primary spaces of criminal justice: crime, prosecution and sentencing, incarceration, and re-entry. While gender is the focus of this course, we will explore how gender intersects with sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, citizenship, and age. I use a mix of class materials, including film, popular news articles and media, scholarly research, policy-oriented briefs, and guest speakers. I encourage student engagement through a variety of methods, including small group discussions, in-class writing, class-wide discussions, think-pair-share activities, and outside assignments.
Who Should Take This Class?:
I welcome all students to my course. However, it is recommended that you have taken SOC1001, SOC3101 or SOC3102. Please email me with any questions: noble207@umn.edu
Learning Objectives:
1) Explain how sociology helps us to understand women's multiple forms of involvement in the criminal justice system
2) Interpret news stories and current events related to crime and punishment with a sociological lens, and develop skills to explain these events to non-sociology folks
3) Describe and evaluate explanations for women's crime and victimization
4) Evaluate and critique policies related to criminal justice
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4114~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 April 2017

Summer 2017  |  SOC 4246 Section A97: Sociology of Health and Illness (88312)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Online & Distance Lrng (ODL)
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/22/2017 - 08/25/2017
Off Campus
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Context of social, political, economic, and cultural forces and medical knowledge. Social meanings. How people seek help and manage illnesses. How doctors, nurses, and patients interact. Social movements surrounding health. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Who Should Take This Class?:
This class is relevant to anyone interested in topics of health and illness, medical sociology, health policy, and a career in medicine or public health.
Exam Format:
There will be one short and long essay midterm exam and one 12-15 page final research paper.
Class Format:
This class is taught online. All interaction with the professor and classmates is virtual through online discussion forums and other interactive technologies.
Workload:
This course averages 50-75 pages of reading per week with weekly online forum discussion posts about the readings. There are additional assignments and reflection journals intermittently through the semester with a midterm exam and a final research paper.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4246~A97&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 March 2017

Summer 2017  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (82618)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 10 wk
 
06/12/2017 - 08/18/2017
Mon, Wed 06:00PM - 07:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-111
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?manni224+SOC4966W+Summer2017
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of Sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience, which will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your Sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper.


1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions most closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change;
the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

3) Service Learning Report or Action Project. This option will involve writing a sociological report based on community service learning with a local community organization of your choice. This paper will be based on a minimum of 30 hours of community service work completed during the course of the semester. The Community Service Learning Center will help you find a place, or if you're already volunteering they will help you formalize this so you can write on it.

Alternatively, instead of writing a report based upon the service experience, the final product will involve working on, and writing about, an actual project of direct relevance or immediate concern to your organization or agency. These projects might involve a variety of tasks such as writing a mission statement or action plan, creating program materials or a grant proposal, working on an evaluation study, or producing publicity information.

Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4966W~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

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