10 classes matched your search criteria.

Summer 2017  |  SOC 1001 Section A97: Introduction to Sociology (88311)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Online & Distance Lrng (ODL)
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/22/2017 - 08/25/2017
Off Campus
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
35% Final Exam
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: reaction papers
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Class Format:
40% Lecture
30% Discussion
20% Other Style percent videos, 10% written reports
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~A97&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3003 Section 001: Social Problems (88108)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Mon, Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-224
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Analysis of major social problems, including inequality, crime, drug abuse, pollution, and racism. Proposed solutions, evaluation of policy consequences. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pharr004+SOC3003+Summer2017
Class Description:
This course is an exploration of how sociologists confront, diagnose, analyze, and theorize contemporary social problems. Some of the topics we will examine include the environment and climate change; socioeconomic inequality and globalization; crime, punishment, and drug abuse; health and medicalization; modernization and rationalization; and the rise (or return) of nationalism and authoritarianism. In our examination of these issues we will tackle some fundamental questions, namely: 1) How and why did sociologists come to see themselves as social pathologists in the first place; 2) what drives society to define these issues as "problems" and what narratives and assumptions emerge in the process; and 3) who lays claim to these problems and how do they mobilize the public to get their message heard? This class is primarily discussion-based with brief introductory lectures; course materials include journal articles, book excerpts, and films. Students will be expected to come to class prepared to participate in and lead discussions, write weekly short (2-3 page) papers, and take a final exam.
Grading:
20% class participation and presentations
20% final exam
60% short papers
Class Format:
30% lecture
35% discussion
35% films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
75-100 pages reading per week
~12-15 pages writing per term
1 exam
6 short papers
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3003~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 March 2017

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Understanding New Zealand: Culture, Society, & Env (88283)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
UMTC, East Bank
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F; cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?eroberts+SOC3090+Summer2017
Class Description:
Understanding New Zealand: Culture, Society, and Environment is a three-week global seminar to New Zealand with a particular focus on indigenous rights, immigration, and the environment. Assignments develop skills in social observation, life course and archival research. We meet with students at New Zealand universities to interact with peers abroad.
Learning Objectives:
  • Learn about New Zealand's geologic origin, human history, and government to better understand its current culture and economy.

  • Learn about areas of culture that interest you (e.g., art, architecture, transportation, language, music, food, entertainment, politics, interpersonal relations…) and how you can appreciate and adapt to such differences.

  • Learn about current environmental issues in New Zealand

  • Grow emotionally:
    • Develop self-confidence by stepping out of your ordinary life and taking personal risks.

    • Learn how to adapt to a different culture by short-term immersion in a culture.

    • Learn flexibility and patience by living closely with previously unknown people and on a hectic schedule you do not control.


  • Develop a life-long interest in international affairs.

Grading:
10% Pre-departure personal statement and goals.
20%: Before departure and in New Zealand: Biographical profile and presentation about a New Zealand soldier developing skills in archival and life-course research
30%: Reflective journal writing throughout class
20%: Academic team work preparing class for various sites and events
30%: Final paper completed on a topic of your choice, finished after return home.
Exam Format:
No exam
Class Format:
Global Seminar. Time is allocated for reading each day, and we have various lectures and group presentations. We have very little formal classroom time. The majority of instruction and learning takes place individually and in discussion with the instructor and guest speakers.
Workload:
51 contact hours over three weeks, plus other time for reading and independent exploration.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3090~001&term=1175
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eroberts_SOC3090_Summer2017.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 March 2017

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (82838)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Mon, Wed 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-224
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mave0013+SOC3101+Summer2017
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how crime is socially constructed, how the courts function for criminal sentencing, what it is like to be in prison or on community supervision, why the U.S. has such a high imprisonment rate, and the barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
25% Final Exam Other Grading Information: 75% three exams (25% each)
Exam Format:
Three multiple choice and short answer exams, and one final take-home short essay exam
Class Format:
30% Lecture
10% Film/Video
30% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Student Presentations
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
~100 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3101~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 February 2016

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (82902)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 184
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?maha0134+SOC3251W+Summer2017
Class Description:

This course introduces students to the social, historical, political and theoretical contexts that shape our conceptions of race, gender, and class. Though the title of this course is free of spelling errors, there exists the potential for intersectional inaccuracies. The separation of race, class, and gender by commas implies that these parts of identity are uncooperative. Race, gender, class, sexuality and other dimensions of identity are relational and function within a broader, dynamic matrix comprised intersecting identities. Additive models of social difference do little to recognize the simultaneity of inequality. To "bring race into the conversation," is not license to silence other instruments (gender, sexuality, class) playing within an orchestra of oppression. Intersectional analyses of race, gender, and class require scholars to acknowledge how various forms of social difference work in concert with one another to produce and reproduce social inequalities and a multiplicative model of marginalization. Multiple forms of marginalization involve teamwork. Through such co-operation and cooperation, oppressions build off one another in cumulative,"multiplicative," and in some cases, exponential fashion. Hence, a more accurate title for this course could be racegenderclasssexualityindigeneityabilitycitizenship3.

In this course we will study the inextricable links between race, gender and class, as well as other dimensions of social difference, while ensuring that the other instruments playing in orchestras of oppression are not silenced. Students will explore both the stability and variability of race, gender, and class as dimensions of social difference. In addition to analyzing the role of race, gender, class, and other dimensions of social difference as independent conditioning forces, students will also examine the level of cooperation required between these social constructs to produce and reproduce inequality. The content of this course urges students to form a relational (as opposed to autonomous) conception of gender, race, and class to better grasp their existence as social constructs.

This course meets the following Council on Liberal Education requirements: Diversity and Social Justice in the U.S. theme, theSocial Sciences core, and the Writing Intensive core. This course contributes to the acquisition of a liberal education, helping students gain a broad understanding of the subject, including factual knowledge, the theoretical foundations of that knowledge, and its associated key modes of inquiry.

Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
20% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: short reaction papers
Exam Format:
multiple choice, short answer, essay
Class Format:
40% Lecture
40% Discussion
20% Other Style
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3251W~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 March 2017

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3451W Section 001: Cities & Social Change (88109)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Tue, Thu 09:00AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-224
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Social, economic, cultural foundations of modern city. Theories/models of urbanism from Wirth to Sassen. Migration/ethnic enclaves. Racial segregation, social control. Urban social movements. Urban-suburban divide. Decline of urban liberalism. "Brazilianization" of American city. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?karak014+SOC3451W+Summer2017
Class Description:
This course will use sociology, history, fiction and film to follow the rise of urbanism. Reading and discussing writing from some of the great scholars of urbanism, including Wirth, Marx and Engels, DuBois, DeBord, Castells and Sassen, we will apply their models to topics such as racial segregation and social control, the city as artistic milieu, ecological sustainability, the urban-suburban divide, and the contemporary "Brazilianization" of the American city. The focus is roughly half on the US urban experience, half on international comparison. Since this is a writing intensive (W) course, students will develop their insights into cities and urban life through writing, including in-class brainstorms, ethnographic exercises in the Twin Cities, reading reports, and the term paper. Students will have the opportunity to produce a well-written and well thought-out term paper, following a three-stage planning, drafting, and revision process over several weeks.
Grading:
20% Class Participation
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: exams, 20% reading reports, 40% term paper
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Discussion
35% Other Style writing exercises, films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Other Workload: 2 reading reports, class presentations
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3451W~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 May 2007

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3811 Section 001: Social Statistics (82959)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 10 wk
 
06/12/2017 - 08/18/2017
Tue, Thu 03:30PM - 05:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-213
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?stewa777+SOC3811+Summer2017
Class Description:

Quantitative data can reveal the social world - or disguise it. This class will teach methods of describing, displaying, analyzing, and interpreting quantitative data so that it can reveal, not disguise, social patterns. We will cover: (1) descriptive statistics and principles of good graphing; (2) methods of transforming data to make its patterns visible; (3) the probability theory that lets us use samples to learn about populations; (4) principles of causal inference; and (5) methods for relating multiple variables to understand their relationships.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.

Grading:
33% Quizzes
33% Problem sets
33% Analytical memos
Exam Format:
Computations
Multiple Choice
Short Answer
Class Format:
50% Lecture and large-group activities
50% Computer Labs
Workload:
10-35 pages reading per week; quizzes most weeks; 5 shorter problem sets; 3 longer analytical memos
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3811~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 November 2016

Summer 2017  |  SOC 4114 Section 001: Women & the Criminal Justice System (88321)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 03:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Historical/current explanations for female criminality. Current trends in women's participation in crime, their treatment in the legal system. prereq: recommend 3101 or 3102 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?noble207+SOC4114+Summer2017
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4114~001&term=1175

Summer 2017  |  SOC 4246 Section A97: Sociology of Health and Illness (88312)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Online & Distance Lrng (ODL)
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/22/2017 - 08/25/2017
Off Campus
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Context of social, political, economic, and cultural forces and medical knowledge. Social meanings. How people seek help and manage illnesses. How doctors, nurses, and patients interact. Social movements surrounding health. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Who Should Take This Class?:
This class is relevant to anyone interested in topics of health and illness, medical sociology, health policy, and a career in medicine or public health.
Exam Format:
There will be one short and long essay midterm exam and one 12-15 page final research paper.
Class Format:
This class is taught online. All interaction with the professor and classmates is virtual through online discussion forums and other interactive technologies.
Workload:
This course averages 50-75 pages of reading per week with weekly online forum discussion posts about the readings. There are additional assignments and reflection journals intermittently through the semester with a midterm exam and a final research paper.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4246~A97&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 March 2017

Summer 2017  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Major-Project Seminar (82618)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 10 wk
 
06/12/2017 - 08/18/2017
Mon, Wed 06:00PM - 07:55PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-111
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data. Analyzing data. Writing report. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?manni224+SOC4966W+Summer2017
Class Description:
You have spent a great deal of time and energy in the last few years developing core knowledge, skills and ethics that are central to the practice of Sociology. The senior project class is the final step in your undergraduate experience, which will encourage your to engage deeply in a writing project and showcase the knowledge and skills you have learned via your Sociological course work. We will also discuss the issues and challenges that students encounter as their work progresses. When there are reading assignments, students should come to class prepared to discuss them. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and work values, developing resumes, practice job interviews, etc. Students will write short papers that can be put together in the final senior project paper.


1) An Extended Reflective Work-related Autobiography. This option will follow the class lectures and discussions most closely as we together examine the changing U.S. occupational structure, work experiences, career development, post-graduate educational options (including graduate and professional school, technical training, etc.), occupational choice, and the way sociological knowledge, skills, and perspectives can be used in your future work careers. Students will write about their work-related experiences, including both paid and unpaid work (the latter including work in the family setting, internships, and volunteering) and how they influenced their development. They will also reflect on the benefits, rewards, and drawbacks of the occupations they are considering in the future, drawing on the assigned texts and other relevant literature.

2) An Extended Reflective Essay on the Uses of Sociology in Public Life. Specific topics could include: the status of social scientific research and writing in politics and public policy implementation; the ways in which sociological thinking and research inform movements for social change;
the presence (or absence) of sociological research and thought in popular culture and the mainstream American media; and others.

3) Service Learning Report or Action Project. This option will involve writing a sociological report based on community service learning with a local community organization of your choice. This paper will be based on a minimum of 30 hours of community service work completed during the course of the semester. The Community Service Learning Center will help you find a place, or if you're already volunteering they will help you formalize this so you can write on it.

Alternatively, instead of writing a report based upon the service experience, the final product will involve working on, and writing about, an actual project of direct relevance or immediate concern to your organization or agency. These projects might involve a variety of tasks such as writing a mission statement or action plan, creating program materials or a grant proposal, working on an evaluation study, or producing publicity information.

Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Visiting Speakers
30% Small Group Activities and writing exercises
Workload:
Less than 25 Pages Reading Per Week, Six assignments that are drafts of final paper sections, Final Paper is 12-18 pages
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4966W~001&term=1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

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