1190 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2023  |  SOC 1001 Section 001: Introduction to Sociology (51733)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Freshman Full Year Registration
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 240 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC1001+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51733/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Spring 2023  |  SOC 1001 Section 011: Introduction to Sociology (51736)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Freshman Full Year Registration
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 180 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC1001+Spring2023
Class Description:

This course introduces pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analyses of how society is possible and how order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining the close relationship of the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of power relations in everyday living. The course material is chosen to help you develop your sociological imagination, to give you the tools to understand how our lives are linked to larger forces that ultimately shape our individual and collective experiences. We will explore diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society and the forces that drive or/and hinder change.

Learning Objectives:
Students are expected to show a good understanding of core sociological concepts and perspectives.
Students should be able to apply sociological analysis to their everyday experience
Students will be expected to improve their critical thinking skills and learn to better articulate their ideas in both verbal and written formats.

Exam Format:
multiple choice/True-Falso/Short answer questions
Class Format:
Discussion
Lectures, discussions, Videos
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51736/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 August 2020

Spring 2023  |  SOC 1001 Section 021: Introduction to Sociology (51739)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Freshman Full Year Registration
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 150 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jvanheuv+SOC1001+Spring2023
Class Description:
Sociology offers a unique lens through which we can examine the world around us. In this course you will develop a perspective that will allow you to analyze the social world in a way that reveals the hidden and/or overlooked social forces that shape our lives. This approach, the sociological imagination, will enable you to explore how social forces influence the ways we view and navigate our social world. We will discuss how sociologists use theory and research to better understand important social issues such as inequalities of race, class, gender, sexualities and how social order and social change are possible. We will discuss how society affects individuals and in turn how individuals can affect society.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Class Format:
Classes will consist of a mixture of lecture and discussion.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51739/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 October 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 1101 Section 001: Law, Crime, & Punishment (53788)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Freshman Full Year Registration
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 140 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introductory course designed to provide students with a general understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. We examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment using an interdisciplinary social science approach.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC1101+Spring2023
Class Description:
This introductory course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. Drawing from an interdisciplinary social science perspective, we examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment with a particular focus on how forms of social control institutionalize, legitimize and perpetuate inequality. The course is comprised of two units. First, we will critically analyze central theoretical traditions in criminology with an emphasis on theories currently shaping research in the field. The second unit will include an examination of contemporary case studies in several substantive areas. Thematic topics to be discussed include law and social control; the impact of criminal record and race on the employment of ex-offenders; the effect of juvenile justice criminal policies on urban youth; and alternatives to policing and police reform.
Grading:
40% Reports/Papers
15% Written Assignments
20% Class Presentations
25% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Papers
1 Reading Reflection
1 Class Presentation
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53788/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 October 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3003 Section 001: Social Problems (65578)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In this course, we will engage in a sociological examination of major social problems facing the contemporary US and abroad. We explore the origins and causes of different social problems, seek to understand how they impact individuals, groups, and the society as a whole, and evaluate solutions. We ask how an issue becomes defined as a "social problem," discuss the social construction of reality and deviance, and consider the primary frameworks under which societies have organized their responses to different social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information:
Class Description:
What can you learn from sociology about how to look behind the "social problems" you hear about on the news? This class will teach you to ask yourself three questions. Why has this issue come to be seen as particularly problematic in a particular place and time? What kind of assumptions lie behind the popular interpretations of the problem? Which groups are "claiming" the problem and which are successfully persuading the public to accept their interpretation? Kicking off with the development of the concept "social problem" during the late 19th century, we will move on to the medicalization of everyday life during the 20th-century, the privatisation of "welfare" during the late 20th-century, and to the continuing debate over whether problems of inequality are best addressed by tending to "needs" or demanding "rights."Among the specific social problems we will tackle will be substance abuse, educational inequality, anorexia, and homelessness. The class will incorporate a community involvement element, where students go out and work with an activist or non-profit organisation for two to three hours per week (or four to six hours every two weeks, for example). You will digest and interpret your experiences "in the field" in class time and in the final take-home paper.
Grading:
30% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: class participation and presentations, 30% mid-term, 40% community involvement and related final paper
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Discussion
35% Other Style group work, films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
25-50 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Other Workload: 2-3 hours of community involvement (service learning) per week.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65578/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 May 2007

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (52662)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 100 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101+Spring2023
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how certain behaviors are defined as crime, how police and the courts function, and the experience of imprisonment and barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. We will also investigate how police, jails, prisons, and other criminal justice agencies responded to the COVID-19 pandemic. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic,racial, class,and gender inequality. Assignments will include books, reports, articles, podcasts, and documentaries.

The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework.

Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion and will be assigned additional reading and writing assignments.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in the criminal justice system.
Learning Objectives:
To become familiar with the criminal justice system in the United States.
Grading:
50% Quizzes + Participation
25% Midterm Essay
25% Final Essay or Project
Exam Format:
Multiple choice, short answers, and essays
Class Format:
TBD -- In person if college approves large in person classes
Workload:
50-100 Pages reading per week (+ videos, podcasts, etc.)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52662/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 March 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3101H Section 001: Honors: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (65579)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Enrollment Requirements:
honors student
Meets With:
SOC 3101 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: Honor students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power-point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F, honors
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101H+Spring2023
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how certain behaviors are defined as crime, how police and the courts function, and the experience of imprisonment and barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. We will also investigate how police, jails, prisons, and other criminal justice agencies responded to the COVID-19 pandemic. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic,racial, class,and gender inequality. Assignments will include books, reports, articles, podcasts, and documentaries.

The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework.

Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion and will be assigned additional reading and writing assignments.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in the criminal justice system.
Learning Objectives:
To become familiar with the criminal justice system in the United States.
Grading:
50% Quizzes + Participation
25% Midterm Essay
25% Final Essay or Project
Exam Format:
Multiple choice, short answers, and essays
Class Format:
TBD -- In person if college approves large in person classes
Workload:
50-100 Pages reading per week (+ videos, podcasts, etc.)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65579/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 March 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (52663)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information:
Class Description:
​This course addresses general issues in conceptualizing and controlling criminal behavior. Course content will be particularly concerned with the processes of classification and the construction of criminal behavior relative to other idealized forms of behavior. Some important questions include: How does criminal behavior and social control change across time and space? What is the relationship between status characteristics like race, gender, sexuality, and prestige etc. and the classification and controlling of some behaviors versus others?
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
(1) Review paper
(1) Term paper
(1) Group/Individual Project
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52663/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2017

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3207 Section 001: Global Islamophobia (65580)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Meets With:
GLOS 3407 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon 05:30PM - 08:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
"We don't want Muslims in our country." "All Muslims should leave." "Muslims are terrorists." Throughout the world, anti-Muslim activists and politicians have been increasingly attacking Muslims and Islam. And, international organizations have reported human rights violations against Muslims worldwide. Recently, in the United States, there have been calls to ban Muslims, as well as register American Muslims. In France, Muslim women are prohibited to wear a headscarf in high school. And in Myanmar, a genocide against Muslim minorities is currently underway. While anti-Islamic discourses have a long history in many societies worldwide (including Muslim-majority countries), the course seeks to explore the global rise of these discourses since September 11, 2001. The course examines the cultural, political, and historical origins of Islamophobic discourses that cast Muslims as "violent," "hateful," and "uncivilized." Class sessions will include some lecture but will be largely discussion based. Assignments will ask students to think and write critically about course concepts, debate and participate in simulation exercises, and reflect on personal thoughts and feelings about course content.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?asalamha+SOC3207+Spring2023
Class Description:
"We don't want Muslims in our country." "All Muslims should leave." "Muslims are terrorists." Throughout the world, anti-Muslim activists and politicians have been been increasingly attacking Muslims and Islam. And, international organizations have reported human rights violations against Muslims worldwide. Recently, in the United States, there have been calls to ban Muslims, as well as register American Muslims. In France, Muslim women are prohibited to wear a headscarf in high school
​.​
A
nd in Myanmar, a genocide against Muslim minorities is currently underway. While anti-Islamic discourses have a long history in many societies worldwide
​ (including Muslim-majority countries)​
, the courseseeks to explore the global rise of these discourses since September 11, 2001. The course examines the cultural, political, and historical origins of Islamophobic discourses that cast Muslims as "violent," "hateful," and "uncivilized."
​​
The course explores
Muslim minorities in Western societies
​​
​​
as a case study of how a minority group comes into formation and becomes adversely targeted.
​The
course examines how discrimination is not a simple straight-forward act, but occurs alongside
​images
of a despicable and threatening "other
​" in our midst.
One goal of the course is to understand the pernicious yet complex ways in which discrimination is justified and normalized in society. Students will write a human rights strategy memo contemplating ways to limit or eliminate discrimination and - at the end of the course - students will participate in a simulation of the United Nations Security Council.
Learning Objectives:
Identify (and define) Islamophobia.
Analyze the multiple human rights challenges resulting from Islamophobia.
Devise strategies to address the challenge of Islamophobia.
Grading:
30% Participation (includes attendance, individual in-class discussion of readings, and general participation)
20% Debate (Simulation) (4-7 minute speech)
20% Strategy Memo (class discussion of memo ideas, the sharing of comments, and grading based on honor).
30% Simulation of the United Nations Security Council

*This grading scheme is not final, as the instructor intends to consult with students in the beginning of the course.
Exam Format:
There are NO exams in this course.
Class Format:
The course is discussion-based. It includes lectures, activities, and in-class discussion.
There are no textbooks in the course. All readings are anticipated to be available on Canvas.
Workload:
20-30 Pages Reading per Week (excluding the last two weeks, considering the simulation and the final week wrap-up)
1 Debate
1 Strategy Memo
1 United Nations Security Council Simulation
1 Commentary based on a guest lecture
1 Reflections Essay
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65580/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 January 2020

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: Race and Racism in the US (53948)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible - some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3211W+Spring2023
Class Description:

mso-fareast-;Times New Roman";>In this class we will explore the dynamics of race and racism in the 21mso-fareast-;Times New Roman";> century U.S.

We inquire into how race works in the U.S. TODAY, as compared to how it seemed to "work" decades ago -- looking at both points of rupture and continuity.

We'll cover issues such as race and policing, racial identity, race and schooling, race and settler colonialism, race and media, and race and electoral politics. We'll look at how race functions to stratify the society as a whole, and also examine issues salient to the lived experiences of specific racialized social groups.

This term we'll talk about all of this using a mixture of academic writing, documentary films, and video clips. We'll incorporate frequent references to current political and social events, popular culture, and the print and online media.

Grading:
70% Reports/Papers
30% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Formal Paper(s), ~ 7-9 pages each, and rewrite/ revision
3 Informal Papers (reading or film reflections) 1-2 pages each
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53948/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 September 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3221 Section 001: Sociology of Gender (65581)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Gender is something so fundamental to our lives, to our identities, and how we interact with others that we often take it for granted. However, understandings of gender vary across time and place, and even within cultures, making it clear that our understandings of gender are not universal or timeless. In this class, we will examine how gender intersects with race and sexuality, as well as how it impacts areas of our lives such as child socialization, family structure, the media, intimate relationships, and the workplace prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC3221+Spring2023
Class Description:

This course examines gender through an interdisciplinary perspective. We will explore how we all ‘do gender' and how this performance varies across time and space. The course draws from literature on the United States as well as from transnational perspectives to critically study the gendered patterns produced by institutions in our society. These patterns reveal how gender intersects with race, ethnicity, nation, class, religion and sexuality in complex ways. We will also engage with academic literature examining how gender shapes our lives throughout the life course including child socialization, family structure, the media, intimate relationships, and the workplace.

Learning Objectives:
Demonstrate a good understanding of feminist sociological theories on gender in society.

Recognize and compare local and global perspectives on gender constructions through sociological theories.

Understand how gender intersects and is closely linked with various power hierarchies in society such as race, class, sexuality.

Grading:
20%-Attendance, participation, presentations.
50%-Two exams over the course of the semester.
30%-Research paper on one of the course themes.
Exam Format:
Two exams over the course of the semester. These exams will include short answer as well as essay-type questions.
Class Format:
Lectures, videos, group discussions and student-led presentations
Workload:
about 50-60 pages of reading per week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65581/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 October 2019

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (53395)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 43 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3251W+Spring2023
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing! Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your OWN life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of OTHERS. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the Social Construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings, such as the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and collective approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:

60% Papers (3 papers, 20% each)

20% Final Exam

20% Class Participation

Exam Format:
1 exam, True/False and Short Answer
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Exam
3 Papers (8-10 pages each)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53395/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 September 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3301W Section 001: Politics and Society (65582)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Political sociology is concerned with the social bases of power and the social consequences of the organization of power, especially how power operates in relationship to various forms of inequality and different institutions. We will explore political socialization, electoral politics and voting, social movements, the media and framing, and politics of inequality, poverty, and welfare. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information:
Class Description:
Politics and society go together like a horse and carriage, but its hard to tell which is the horse and which the carriage! This course approaches politics from the standpoint of society. Accordingly, it does not focus on the details of the formal political institutions such as voting, legislatures or the presidency. Rather, it focuses on how society organizes around and pushes political questions. For instance, society is divided by social categories such as race, class, gender, age, education, religion, associational membership, wealth. The systemic relations among these categories, equal or unequal, exploitative or cooperative, and so forth, determine the allocation of "goods" and "bads" in society, and therefore many political dynamics. In addition, people and groups have different levels of social capital (connections) and cultural capital (for instance, levels of education and tastes about music, theater, literature, news, sports and alcohol). These different factors help create ideological values such as group and nationalist beliefs. They bear upon how individuals and groups think about the issues that face them and how they do or do not translate these into political issues demanding governmental action. These social factors interact with the type of local and national regime and its placement in global systems to channel conflicts and outcomes. Depending on the openness of the regime, popular pressures can lead to peaceful democratic change, open protests, or revolution.
Exam Format:
short essay, T/F, multiple choice
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65582/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 February 2016

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3322W Section 001: Social Movements, Protests, and Change (65705)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about the dilemmas and challenges facing movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and various institutions, and the role of social movements and protest in bringing about change. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long-term and short-run impact. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC3322W+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course covers the origins, dynamics and consequences of social movements and collective action. This includes the challenges facing social movement participants and social movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and political institutions, and the role of movements in bringing about change. We will explore both theoretical issues and grounded case studies in our discussions and reading.
Grading:
30% Reports/Papers
30% Quizzes
20% Journal
10% In-class Presentations
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
35% Lecture
5% Film/Video
35% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
Workload:
30-60 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
2 development papers, leading to 1 final paper.
2 Presentations
10 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65705/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3411W Section 001: Organizations and Society (65595)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces undergraduates to contemporary theories and debates about formal organizations in an international context, including such forms as large corporations, small businesses, public bureaucracies, nonprofits, voluntary associations, social movement organizations, terrorist networks and counterterror organizations. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC3411W+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course introduces undergraduates to contemporary theories and debates about formal organizations in an international context, including such forms as large corporations, small businesses, public bureaucracies, nonprofits, voluntary associations, social movement organizations.
Grading:
Writing Intensive course with short writing assignments and a longer course paper. Instructor feedback provided on partial draft of the course paper. Course grade is based on 3 assignments (20% each) and course paper (40%).. A service learning component is available. An honors option and a sociology major senior paper option are also available.
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
Lectures (60%), small group discussions and role-playing exercises (20%), videos (15%), and guest speakers (5%).
Workload:
About 30-40 pages of articles or book chapter reading per week. 20-25 pages of writing per semester.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65595/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 October 2016

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3415 Section 001: Consume This! The Sociology and Politics of Consumption (65598)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 45 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
How symbols are created, acquired, diffused, and used for organizing personal identity and maintaining group boundaries. Fashion. Socialization. Structure of retail trade. Role of mass media, advertising, marketing/production strategies. Implications of worldwide markets. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tgowan+SOC3415+Spring2023
Class Description:
The course traces the dynamic frontier of commodification, looking at the symbolic construction of products and product-defined "life-styles" through media, the retail experience, advertising and branding. It will benefit students interested in gaining a deeper theoretical understanding of the mechanisms of contemporary consumerism, whether they see themselves as future marketers, critical consumers, or anti-capitalist activists.
Grading:
Other Grading Information: Grade: 40% exams & quizzes. 40% Discussion posts and graphic presentations. 20% class citizenship, blog citizenship. Each absence after three will decrease your grade by .2. E.g. 3.3 > 3.1 (B+ > B)
Class Format:
30% Lecture
10% Film/Video
20% Discussion
40% Small Group Activities My teaching style emphasizes active learning - I aim for high student participation, with lots of wide-ranging (and inter-disciplinary) discussion and energetic group work. The class may not suit those who prefer highly structured classes.
Workload:
Other Workload: Work Load: 50-75 pages of reading per week, 25-30 pages of writing per semester, 2 exams, occasional quizzes. Final projects incorporating photography, music, or fiction may also be approved subject to consultation.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65598/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 November 2019

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3451W Section 001: Cities & Social Change (65706)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 43 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The core themes of this class will provide an essential toolkit for approaching broad questions about social justice, culture, work, housing and service provision on multiple levels and across the globe. This course will have units on economic development, inequality, the interaction between design and human action, inclusive and exclusive cultural formations, crime and cultures of fear, social control and surveillance. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information:
Class Description:
Who you are is in many ways where you are. Our friendships and romantic lives, our work opportunities and political engagement, and our sense of self and relationship to society are inextricably connected to the type of community in which we live. In this course we will attend to the sociology of place, focusing specifically on cities and communities. We will examine how cities relate to many core fields of sociology:
inequality, race and ethnicity, self and identity, deviance and social control, work and occupations, immigration, globalization, and social networks, for example. We will consider differences between communities, such as the rural-urban divide, and we will consider differences within cities, including segregation, neighborhood effects, and the history of urbanization. We will engage with foundational sociological theories of urbanization and contemporary empirical studies. By the end of this course, you will have developed a critical understanding of the role that cities and communities play in maintaining social order and enabling social change. The instructor for this course, Tom VanHeuvelen, will be a new faculty member starting in Fall 2019.
Grading:
20% Class Participation
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: exams, 20% reading reports, 40% term paper
Class Format:
A mixture of lecture and discussion.
Workload:
30-70 pages reading per week. Because this is a writing intensive course, a substantial portion of the final grade will be based on writing. You will receive substantial feedback on writing assignments and be expected to revise your written work in response.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65706/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 March 2019

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3613W Section 001: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (55095)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information:
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55095/1233

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3701 Section 001: Social Theory (51751)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 09:05AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
15 seats reserved for sociology majors. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC3701+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?

In Spring 2022, the course will be taught by Professor Savelsberg. He describes his particular emphasis thus: "This class seeks to develop an understanding of sociological theory. Theory, together with empirical methods, is one of the pillars on which our sociological work is based, no matter if we deal with questions of criminology, family and the life course, organizations, social movements and politics, education and whatever other themes sociology addresses. In this course, we focus primarily on the questions and ideas that the classical sociologists have provided us with, including Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Georg Simmel and W.E.B. DuBois. Yet we also extend the line of thought to contemporary theory. Crucial questions we will engage with include: What basic changes did societies experience in the modernizing process? What holds society together, in other words: why do things work decently well? Yet, also, why does conflict erupt and how do societies handle it? When does repression and massive social inequality not result in open conflict? What role does "race" play? What role do rituals and symbols play when harmony or conflict unfold? What are social roles? Do we identify with social roles, or do we just perform them? Does the size of a group matter? Is society something outside ourselves, or do humans build (and change) it through their everyday interactions? Are human pursuits driven by rational action of self-interested individuals or by social norms and solidarity? What role do social networks play in which they are embedded?
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology (general and LCD) majors
Learning Objectives:
Understand general sociological theories, apply them to specific sociological issues and see how they help us make sense of the world we live in.
Grading:
(1) 20% based on four short quizzes, consisting of short answer and multiple-choice questions. Each quiz is worth 5% of your final grade. This feature is important as it is especially crucial in this course that you stay on top of the readings and do not procrastinate. Keeping up with the course and succeeding would otherwise be very difficult.

(2) 25% based on a midterm exam, consisting of a mixture of short answer and multiple-choice questions.

(3) 35% based on a cumulative final exam, consisting of a mixture of short answer and multiple-choice questions.
(4) 20% based on writing assignments.

Exam Format:
essay; short answer; multiple choice
Class Format:
lecture, plenary discussion, small group work, occasional film segments
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51751/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 September 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3701 Section 002: Social Theory (53947)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 12:20PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
15 seats reserved for sociology majors. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?edgell+SOC3701+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Exam Format:
Short answer; essays
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53947/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3701 Section 301: Social Theory (65825)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Exam Format:
Short answer; essays
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65825/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3721 Section 001: Principles of Social Psychology (65639)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Social psychology is at the intersection of macro and micro sociology, linking social structures, interpersonal relationships and interactions, attitudes, values and the self-concept. Principles of social psychology are drawn from multiple theoretical perspectives, including symbolic interactionism, expectation states theory, social structure and personality, and the life course. This course covers a broad range of topics as well as the diverse methods that social psychologists use to study them (for example, experiments, surveys, ethnographic observation). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walkerml+SOC3721+Spring2023
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65639/1233

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3801 Section 001: Sociological Research Methods (51745)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 120 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC3801+Spring20232
Class Description:
This course focuses on the effective critical evaluation of sociological evidence. After introducing basic principles of sociological research, we will carefully read and analyze significant studies which exemplify each of four types of sociological research methods: field observations, historical archives, surveys, and experiments. No mathematical or statistical background is required.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology majors and other social scientists hoping to understand how sociological research is created and what questions we might ask of each study to better understand it's strengths and weaknesses.
Grading:
10% Worksheets and other assignments based on lectures
15% Worksheets and other assignments based on podcasts
30% Unit quizzes
30% Two brief papers analyzing the quality of methods used by professional sociologists (as described in the readings)
15% Worksheets based on readings
Exam Format:
The unit quizzes are multiple choice and short answer. There are no exams.
Class Format:
Lectures are asynchronous and available on Canvas.
Podcasts are from Give Methods a Chance -- listen to podcast, read accompanying book, answer accompanying questions, contribute to discussions.
Class is divided into nine units and each unit has a short quiz.
Deeper understanding and analysis are required to analyze the quality of methods used by professional sociologists (papers are about the assigned journal article reading material only)
Worksheets based on the assigned journal articles, assessing basic understanding, in preparation for the papers.
Workload:
30-50 pages of reading per week
20-40 minutes of podcast listening per week
10-12 pages of writing per semester
5-10 brief quizzes
2 papers critically evaluating the evidence for claims made by a professional sociologist
11 homework worksheets based on assigned readings
Students have options for how to earn points. There are more points available than are necessary for an "A". The only required assignments are the two papers.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51745/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 March 2022

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3811 Section 001: Social Statistics (51715)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 96 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?warre046+SOC3811+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course is designed to familiarize students with fundamental statistical concepts and techniques. Because this is a sociology course, most of the examples and demonstrations will be drawn from the social sciences; however, the concepts and techniques presented in the course apply much more broadly to other disciplines and to other arenas of life. I do not expect students to become expert statisticians, but I do expect them to gain an understanding of how statistics can be used to address key social science questions. My goal is for students to become knowledgeable and critical consumers of statistical information that appears in the media, in the workplace, and elsewhere. This course includes overviews of the logic of sampling and causal inference; techniques for graphically and numerically describing distributions; the normal curve; relationships between quantitative variables; relationships between categorical variables; analysis of variance; probability; random variables; sampling distributions; statistical inference; confidence intervals; hypothesis testing; bivariate linear regression; analysis of covariance; multiple linear regression; and binary logistic regression. Students will gain basic familiarity with the statistical software package Stata.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
15% Final Exam
10% Class Participation
40% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: Homework problem sets
Exam Format:
Short answer math problems, usually asking for interpretation of results and/or statistical concepts
Class Format:
40% Lecture
40% Laboratory discussion/small group work
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
Other Workload: One or two chapters of reading per week; three exams; six individual homework problem sets
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51715/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 December 2014

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3811 Section 008: Social Statistics (52720)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC3811+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course will introduce sociology majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. In addition to attendance to lectures and labs, students are expected to read 15 pages of the text per week. There will be three exams. Students will need a simple calculator for assignments and exams. This course meets the CLE requirements for the Mathematical Thinking core. We explore the dual nature of social statistics as a body of knowledge with its own logic and way of thinking, and as a powerful tool for understanding and describing social reality. Students in this course are exposed to the mathematic knowledge that underlies key concepts, but they are also shown how each concept applies to real world social science issues and debates. They are asked to demonstrate their mastery of the mathematical concept and its practical application through in-class discussions, problem sets, and exam questions. Students are taught the mathematical foundations of probability and sampling theory; they are taught about sampling distributions; and they are shown the real-world implications of these ideas for how social science knowledge is gained through surveys of randomly sampled observations.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology major.
Learning Objectives:
See full description under Class Description. Briefly, this is a requirement for a sociology major. You will learn basic quantitative analytic skills useful for senior thesis and a future research job.
Grading:
10% Class attendance
50% Problem solving assignments
40% Midterm exam !
05% End of course extra credit
Exam Format:
multiple choice, computational problems
Class Format:
65% Lecture
35% Laboratory
Workload:
10 pages per week reading (textbook and lecture notes)
10 out of 12 assignments and weekly problem solving labs
2 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52720/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC3811_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC3811_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
18 September 2020

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4101V Section 001: Honors: Sociology of Law (65604)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Enrollment Requirements:
honors student
Meets With:
SOC 4101W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 8 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: honors student, [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC4101V+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Throughout the course, we will consider the role of law in creating, reproducing, and shaping class, gender, and race inequalities. An array of reading materials will be assigned including: theoretical works, empirical studies, and U.S. Supreme Court cases. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion and give a class presentation during the course.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
50% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65604/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2019

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4101W Section 001: Sociology of Law (65605)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 4101V Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 52 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. prereq: [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC4101W+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Throughout the course, we will consider the role of law in creating, reproducing, and shaping class, gender, and race inequalities. An array of reading materials will be assigned including: theoretical works, empirical studies, and U.S. Supreme Court cases. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion and give a class presentation during the course.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
50% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65605/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2019

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4104 Section 001: Crime and Human Rights (65637)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
SOC 4104H Section 001
SOC 5104 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: SOC 1001, at least one 3xxx SOC course recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC4104+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Examples are crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on memories of atrocities as such memories are likely to affect the future of cycles of violence. Section I provides an overview of the basic themes of this class and their interconnection: atrocities, legal and other institutional responses, and the ways responses mediate memory. Section II addresses a series of cases in which responses to past atrocities included criminal prosecution and trials: the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, the Balkan wars, and the My Lai massacre during the Vietnam War. A special focus will be on the violence in the Darfur region of Sudan. Section III will examine cases in which a major response to atrocities was truth commissions, at times combined with trials and compensation programs. Special cases include South Africa, Argentina, and post-Communist Eastern Europe. Section IV addresses the consequences of interventions and memories for ending cycles of violence. Honors and graduate students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students with an interest in issues of crime and human rights. In the past, students in sociology (including LCD), global studies, political science, history, and a variety of other fields have been enrolled.
Learning Objectives:
Learn basic facts about grave violations of human rights; engage with efforts at explaining such events; learn about new types of responses and their consequences.
Grading:
80% Two midterm and one final exams.
20% Attendance, participation and individual contribution to group project
A class paper linking the student's thesis project to concepts and theories addresses in this class.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice and short answer or essay
Class Format:
60% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
Workload:
About 80 pages reading per week plus exams and writing assignments plus one class paper (reading and writing)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65637/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
18 March 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4104H Section 001: Honors: Crime and Human Rights (65638)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Honors
Enrollment Requirements:
honors student
Meets With:
SOC 4104 Section 001
SOC 5104 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 4 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on an LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class PowerPoint presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates to themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: SOC 1001, at least one 3xxx SOC course recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC4104H+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Examples are crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on memories of atrocities as such memories are likely to affect the future of cycles of violence. Section I provides an overview of the basic themes of this class and their interconnection: atrocities, legal and other institutional responses, and the ways responses mediate memory. Section II addresses a series of cases in which responses to past atrocities included criminal prosecution and trials: the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, the Balkan wars, and the My Lai massacre during the Vietnam War. A special focus will be on the violence in the Darfur region of Sudan. Section III will examine cases in which a major response to atrocities was truth commissions, at times combined with trials and compensation programs. Special cases include South Africa, Argentina, and post-Communist Eastern Europe. Section IV addresses the consequences of interventions and memories for ending cycles of violence. Honors and graduate students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students with an interest in issues of crime and human rights. In the past, students in sociology (including LCD), global studies, political science, history, and a variety of other fields have been enrolled.
Learning Objectives:
Learn basic facts about grave violations of human rights; engage with efforts at explaining such events; learn about new types of responses and their consequences.
Grading:
80% Two midterm and one final exams.
20% Attendance, participation and individual contribution to group project
A class paper linking the student's thesis project to concepts and theories addresses in this class.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice and short answer or essay
Class Format:
60% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
Workload:
About 80 pages reading per week plus exams and writing assignments plus one class paper (reading and writing)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65638/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
18 March 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4105 Section 001: Sociology of Punishment (65636)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The purpose of this class is to develop a working understanding of the sociology of punishment. To that end, the course focuses on three interrelated questions: How do various social factors (the economy, culture, crime, media, race relations, etc.) shape the development of criminal punishment? Why does punishment differ across time and place? How do penal laws, practices, and institutions affect individuals, groups, and communities? The course combines lectures and small and large group discussions. prereq: 3101 or 3102 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC4105+Spring2023
Class Description:
0A

The purpose of this class is to develop a working understanding of the "sociology of punishment." To that end, we will focus on three interrelated questions: What are the sources of punishment? Why does punishment differ across time and place? How do penal laws, practices, and institutions affect individuals, groups, and communities? We will also study how the legal system (and non-state organizations) should serve victims of crime. This class combines readings, podcasts, fiction, and films.

Grading:
70% of the course grade will be from the exams;
30% will be from the reaction papers and class attendance.
Exam Format:
Quizzes, reaction papers, and final exam.
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
35% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-74 Pages Reading Per Week.
3 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65636/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2019

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4108 Section 001: Current Issues in Crime Control (65635)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected current criminal justice policies from perspective of courts, legislature, community, and interest groups. Impact of criminal justice policy changes on society and on social control agencies. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC4108+Spring2023
Class Description:
Race, Crime, Policing, and Punishment: Exploring Black America's Agency & Resistance

With the rise of the #BlackLivesMatter movement and increasingly loud critiques of mass incarceration from both liberals and conservatives, the U.S. criminal system is once again "on trial" in popular opinion and the mass media. Is our current system of policing and punishment "racist"
and the product of whites' racial resentment in the post civil rights era? This special topics seminar examines social scientific understandings of the relationships between race, crime, policing, and punishment in the U.S. during the 21st century.

The seminar centers on three recent, path-breaking books on the intersection of race, crime, policing, and punishment and written by scholars of color. (These books are Locking Up Our Own, Big House on the Prairie, and The Chosen Ones.) All question the "standard story" of mass incarceration and race, focusing in particular on black agency, resistance, and redemption.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students looking to dive deeper into the history of contemporary policing and punishment. Most students should have already taken Soc 3101 and/or Soc 4105 or Soc 4125.
Grading:
3 Short Essay Exams + 1 Final Paper
Class Format:
50% Lecture
50% Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exams
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65635/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 October 2018

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4113 Section 001: Sociology of Violence: Bedrooms, Backyards, and Bars (65634)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
soph or jr or sr
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course looks at violent behavior across a wide variety of social arenas, bedrooms, backyards, and bars, being some common places where violence occurs. Students will wrestle with definitions of violence and the circumstances in which behavior is or isn't categorized as violent. A major theme will be how violence operates as a property of institutional arrangements, organizational practices, and interpersonal situations. Subtopics intersecting violence include cohorts (race, class, & gender), sport, sex, emotion, the State, and the environment. Soc Majors and Minors must register A/F. Pre-req of Soc 1001, Soc 1101, 3101 or 3102 is recommended.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walkerml+SOC4113+Spring2023
Class Description:
In this course, we will examine violent behavior across a wide variety of social arenas - bedrooms, backyards, and bars, being some common places where violence occurs. You will interrogate definitions and theoretical perspectives of violence. Our principal concern is with violence as a property of institutional arrangements, organizational practices, and interpersonal situations. Intersecting subtopics include: cohorts (race, class, & gender), sport, sex, emotion, the State, and the environment.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Any student interested sociological perspectives on violence.
Learning Objectives:
    1. Critically discuss perspectives on violence
    2. Differentiate types of violence
    3. Critically discuss social motives associated with violent behaviors and events
Grading:
Exam Format:
One multiple choice exam and several short essays.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65634/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 October 2020

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4147 Section 001: Sociology of Mental Health & Illness (54692)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to give you an overview of the ways a sociological perspective informs our understanding of mental health and illness. While sociologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and others all deal with issues of mental illness, they often approach the topic in very different ways. In general, a sociological perspective tends to focus on aspects of the social environment that we often ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It calls attention to how society or groups are organized, who benefits or is hurt by the way things are organized, and what beliefs shape our behaviors. In viewing mental illness, sociologists have primarily challenged dominant views of mental illness, examined how social relationships play a role in mental illness, questioned the goals and implications of mental health policy and researched how mental health services are organized and provided. prereq: Soc 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jvanheuv+SOC4147+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course is designed to give an overview of sociological perspectives of mental health and illness. As a part of this course we will critically examine issues surrounding mental health and illness by situating them in a broader social context including: social relationships, social structures, and social institutions. Throughout the semester we will address key topics including how mental health is defined in different contexts, the role of social stigma, and policies and health services surrounding mental health and illness.
Exam Format:
Multiple Choice and Short Answer
Class Format:
Classes will consist of a mixture of lecture and discussion.
Workload:
30-75 Pages Reading Per Week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54692/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 October 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4162 Section 001: Criminal Procedure in American Society (53949)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
How constitutional democracy balances need to enforce criminal law and rights of individuals to be free of unnecessary government intrusion. prereq: Soc 3101 or 3102 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in a synchronous format at the posted day/time. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jbs+SOC4162+Spring2023
Class Description:

Welcome to our interactive criminal procedure class!

We spend our Wednesday afternoons together interrogating the central promise of US criminal justice: to balance the power of government to protect the safety and security of all persons against those who want to do them harm, while at the same time protecting their right to come and go as they please without government interference, and guaranteeing all persons that the government will enforce the law on the street, at the police station, in the courts, and when punishing criminal wrongdoing. This promise is also the criminal blaming and punishing regime's greatest problem: How close to social reality is the promise of EQUAL rights and justice to every individual. This promise and this problem have fascinated our beloved "U" undergrads--and me--at least once a year since 1971. I promise to work as hard as I can to make our Interactive Criminal Procedure ZOOM 2022 fascinating and valuable too!😺

A final word: You'll probably learn some actual criminal procedure law in our interactive journey through the criminal process. Good for you. But, remember our goal is above all to work on developing YOUR CPI

Who Should Take This Class?:
If you're an Upper Division undergraduate from all majors and you're interested in becoming a more intelligent consumer of our criminal blaming and punishing regime, then you've found the right class. That regime is a very rough engine of social control, a last resort after families, belief systems, schools, and other non criminal justice social institutions fail. It's also the most expensive and most invasive instrument to affect human behavior in the digital age of the US version of a constitutional democracy, committed to the the values of human dignity, individual autonomy, equal justice for all, and social order.
Grading:
90% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: 90%,13 non cumulative short answer and essay exams; 10%, participation in course surveys
Exam Format:
60% identification, definition; description and explanation of legal concepts and social science findings (no multiple choice); 10% case briefs; 30% discussion reaction essays
Class Format:
15% Lecture
85% Discussion
Workload:
About 35 Pages Reading Per Week. Some weeks are "thicker" than "others."
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53949/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 November 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4321 Section 001: Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (65631)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
GLOS 4221 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
From the city streets of Bangalore to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent, creating new and revitalizing old forms of power and opportunity, exploitation and politics, social organizing and social justice. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people's lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mgoldman+SOC4321+Spring2023
Class Description:
From the factories of Shenzhen to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent. This course offers an overview of the processes forcing and encouraging people's lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. We will start with the most basic questions: What is this thing called globalization? What are the forces behind it and how are we involved? Second, we will explore the idea that this latest era of globalization is marked by dramatic transformations in the ways we work, do politics, play, and communicate. We will explore the ideas that capitalism is rapidly transforming, communication and media are altering the way we dream, entertain and engage, and yet, the division between rich and poor has intensified and ecological distress is global. We will learn about the fast-moving world of Wall Street and global-city life, and the creative projects for social and ecological change coming from communities in Jamaica, the U.S., Mexico, India, and South Africa. Throughout, this course will use texts, films, lecture, discussion, and student research and debate, to help us become fluent in diverse world-views, ideas, and trends from around the world.
Grading:
Grades will be based on short papers, small research projects, presentations and discussion, and regular attendance
Exam Format:
no exams
Class Format:
65% Lecture
35% participation, discussion, small group work
Workload:
~50-70 Pages Reading Per Week
~20 Pages Writing Per Term: two one-page assignments, two five-page papers, one eight-page paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65631/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 March 2018

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4461 Section 001: Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict (65629)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
We will examine conceptual and theoretical approaches to the sociological study of ethnic and racial conflict around the globe, looking at ethnicity and race as distinctive but overlapping social constructions of collective identity that underpin patterns of social conflict and systems of power and privilege. We will also explore the difference between race and ethnicity, the various ways in which racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed in different countries, individual versus group approaches to the study of prejudice and discrimination, and the racialization of ethnic and religious groups prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?asalamha+SOC4461+Spring2023
Class Description:

We will examine conceptual and theoretical approaches to the sociological study of ethnic and racial conflict around the globe, looking at ethnicity and race as distinctive but overlapping social constructions of collective identity that underpin patterns of social conflict and systems of power and privilege. We will also explore the difference between race and ethnicity, the various ways in which racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed in different countries, individual versus group approaches to the study of prejudice and discrimination, and the racialization of ethnic and religious groups. In analyzing the sources of ethnic and racial conflicts in different nation-states, we will examine the role played by racism, ethnocentrism, and xenophobia, situating particular cases of conflict in North America, Africa, Latin America, and Asia in the contexts of colonialism, slavery, globalization, democratization, nation-state formation, and transnational migration. Using a comparative and historical approach, we will also examine how different countries formulate immigration policies and address issues of immigrant incorporation, exclusion, and citizenship and the conditions under which conflicts turn violent, leading to ethnic cleansing and genocide. Finally, we will analyze different approaches to reducing ethnic and racial conflicts, from affirmative action and reparations to cosmopolitanism, federalism, and global governance.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students with some background in Sociology, especially those who have taken other courses concerning race and ethnicity.
Learning Objectives:
The course aims to get you to think critically about issues of racial and ethnic conflict in different parts of the globe and to situate these conflicts within broader historical processes, such as colonialism, capitalist development, and nation-state formation,
Grading:

https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65629/1233

Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 March 2017

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Capstone Experience: Seminar (51922)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC4966W+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course will guide you through the process of writing your senior project paper, a graduation requirement for all Sociology majors. The class will structure your work as you select your topic, write a draft, and polish your paper. In conjunction with Career Services in CLA, the class will also help students to prepare for the job market---thinking through your career goals and career choices, developing resumes, and getting ready for job interviews. Presentations and discussions by students are organized in class to help them learn from each other. This is a writing intensive class with a total of six writing assignments. The class is organized into three parts.

Part One (weeks 1-3) is a recap of sociological knowledge. What is sociology? What are the key elements of a sociological analysis? What are career choices for a sociology major? These three questions are focused in lectures and in-class discussions. The last lecture is a description of three options from which each student chooses for his/her senior project paper.

Part Two (weeks 4-6) is focused on expectations and requirements of your major project. This project should be the capstone expression of your "sociological imagination." It should show the knowledge, skills, and ethics that are central to the practice of Sociology. Examples of each of the three different kinds of a major project paper are discussed in lectures.

Part Three (weeks 7-14) is designed for the development and finalization of your senior project paper. Each student is required to schedule individual meetings with your chosen Instructor to discuss the issues and challenges that the students encounter during their work progress toward the completion of the senior project paper.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology major in the senior year.
Learning Objectives:
To complete senior project paper, a requirement for graduation.
Grading:
60% Six written assignments
15% Class Participation
25% Final paper
Class Format:
30% Lectures
20% Writing exercises
50% Community engagement and major project paper
Workload:
Less than 20 Pages Reading Per Week, Four writing exercises (1-5 pages) and One major project paper (12-18 pages).
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51922/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC4966W_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 October 2019

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Capstone Experience: Seminar (53859)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schurman+SOC4966W+Spring2023
Class Description:
In this "capstone" version of the course, we will be looking back at what sociology was all about, looking forward to what sociology majors do after graduation. Most important, the course will provide the resources, assistance and encouragement to help majors in the Sociology Department to fulfill this requirement for a paper in the major field during the senior year -- mostly based on observational studies tied to service learning projects. The course is organized as a seminar and workshop. There are no formal lectures, but the instructor will present overviews of the stages of research and writing necessary to complete the senior project paper. Students build their major project through completing guided, periodic assignments. Along the way, we will be reading and thinking about how to apply a sociological eye to understand success, failure, and the world around us.
Grading:
50% Reports/Papers
10% Attendance
20% Journal
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
25% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
40% Service Learning
Workload:
20-50 Pages Reading Per Week
25-35 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Paper(s)
Other Workload: Assignments relating to sections of project paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53859/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4978V Section 001: Honors Capstone Experience: Proseminar II (51924)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Enrollment Requirements:
Pol 4977V, honors
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This is the second course in the two-course Honors Capstone Experience. In Soc 4978V, students will complete their data collection and analysis while the focus of the seminar turns to scholarly writing, and particularly to drafting and refining arguments. The Department of Sociology does not make any initial distinction between Honors students who are seeking cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude levels of Latin Honors. Instead, our focus is on helping students to develop ambitious and high-quality original research papers of which they can be justifiably proud and which can serve as testaments to their abilities. The Department of Sociologys approach is to support every Honors student as they plan and conduct summa-level work. The ultimate recommendation for level of latin honors is made by the committee at the time of the thesis defense. In addition to the Honors thesis requirements, the recommendation for summa-level honors is reserved for the papers that demonstrate the following criteria: - Tight integration between a clearly defined question or thesis and the research presented; - Ambitious original research design, with research completed on time and analyzed appropriately; - Integration of ongoing conversations in the research literature into the design and analysis of the data gathered; - Powerful and precise prose which weaves together evidence and argument and which is attentive to both the lessons and limits of the data. Students will do an Oral Defense and participate in a panel presentation at the spring Sociological Research Institute (SRI). The Sociology Department requires completion of Soc 4977V/4978V to graduate with Latin Honors. prereq: 1001/1011V, 3701, 3801, 3811, 4977V, and at least 12 upper-division SOC credits; Sociology honors major & department consent
Class Notes:
15 seats reserved for SOC majors, Jr. or Sr. Honors. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tswartz+SOC4978V+Spring2023
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51924/1233

Spring 2023  |  SOC 5104 Section 001: Crime and Human Rights (65627)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
SOC 4104 Section 001
SOC 4104H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 3 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: at least one 3xxx SOC course recommended
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC5104+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Examples are crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on memories of atrocities as such memories are likely to affect the future of cycles of violence. Section I provides an overview of the basic themes of this class and their interconnection: atrocities, legal and other institutional responses, and the ways responses mediate memory. Section II addresses a series of cases in which responses to past atrocities included criminal prosecution and trials: the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, the Balkan wars, and the My Lai massacre during the Vietnam War. A special focus will be on the violence in the Darfur region of Sudan. Section III will examine cases in which a major response to atrocities was truth commissions, at times combined with trials and compensation programs. Special cases include South Africa, Argentina, and post-Communist Eastern Europe. Section IV addresses the consequences of interventions and memories for ending cycles of violence. Honors and graduate students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students with an interest in issues of crime and human rights. In the past, students in sociology (including LCD), global studies, political science, history, and a variety of other fields have been enrolled.
Learning Objectives:
Learn basic facts about grave violations of human rights; engage with efforts at explaining such events; learn about new types of responses and their consequences.
Grading:
80% Two midterm and one final exams.
20% Attendance, participation and individual contribution to group project
A class paper linking the student's thesis project to concepts and theories addresses in this class.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice and short answer or essay
Class Format:
60% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
Workload:
About 80 pages reading per week plus exams and writing assignments plus one class paper (reading and writing)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65627/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
18 March 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 8001 Section 001: Sociology as a Profession (52502)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
S-N or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Sociology graduate student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue 01:15PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This 1 credit class fosters adaptation to the Graduate Program in Sociology and preparation for a sociological career. In the Fall, we explore professional careers in this field. We discuss the wide range of opportunities in sociology and help students further explore the next steps to becoming a scholar, educator, and member of various professional, intellectual, and social communities. We share practical information about being a student in sociology and about sociological careers, discuss presentations in department workshop seminars, and provide a safe place to discuss issues of student concerns. Students are encouraged to bring to the class their thoughts and reactions to experiences during their first semester in the PhD program. The Spring 8001 class is oriented to particular milestones in the Sociology Graduate Program and important student activities (for example, preparing reading lists for the preliminary exam and then writing the preliminary exam, preparing a dissertation prospectus, writing grant proposals, preparing an article for publication, etc.). Pre-req: Soc PhD students
Class Notes:
12 seats reserved for Sociology grad students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC8001+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course should help graduate students in the transition from the first part of graduate studies to the second, and the much more independent part, that is driven by your own work. Supplementing the work you will be doing with your advisors (and eventually committee members), this course will provide additional assistance with the production of reading lists and prelims. This structure is flexible, however, and we will adjust based on the needs of the group. We do not have papers, readings or formal graded assignments. The main goal of the course is to provide a structure for what you need to get done, and to encourage peer-review and discussion of work in progress. In addition to practical matters of working toward prelim papers, topics may include: library search strategies; planning for the prospectus; grant proposals; journal submissions; and IRB applications.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Third year graduate students in Sociology (possibly 2nd year, especially if entered the program with an MA in hand).
Learning Objectives:
Students will learn and exchange ideas about strategies of moving toward prelim writing, possibly prospectus work and beyond.
Grading:
S-N
Exam Format:
No exams
Class Format:
We meet one hour per week. Several sessions feature visitors, e.g., a librarian, more advanced students in the ABD stage (or recent graduates, looking back).
Workload:
There are no required readings or exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52502/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 September 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 8011 Section 001: Teaching Sociology: Theory & Practice (53575)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Sociology graduate student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Social/political context of teaching. Ethical issues, multiculturalism, academic freedom. Teaching skills (e.g., lecturing, leading discussions). Active learning. Evaluating effectiveness of teaching. Opportunity to develop syllabus or teaching plan. prereq: Soc grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
10 seats reserved for Sociology graduate students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC8011+Spring2023
Class Description:
This course is aimed at graduate students preparing to become teachers at the college level. We begin by working to understand the social/political context of teaching, including topics such as ethics, multiculturalism, and academic freedom. Students also learn practical teaching skills to be used when lecturing or leading discussions. Active learning strategies are emphasized as effective tools for engaging a wide variety of adult learners. A major part of the course is the independent development of a course syllabus and related lesson plans and exercises.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology graduate students
Learning Objectives:
Develop a sociological understanding of university classrooms
Plan a course to teach in the future, including syllabus, assignments, rubrics, and teaching philosophy
Learn student-centered teaching methods and backward course design for effective day to day life in the classroom
Communicate some aspect of this learning to the broader UM sociology community at SRI
Grading:
To earn an "A" in this course, you must have no more than one unexcused absence; actively partipate during our class sessions, including co-facilitating the discussion twice; turn in all assignments fully complete and on-time; provide thoughtful reviewer comments on your partner's work on time and every time; and your work must show effort and growth. Poor performance on any of these will cause your grade to be lower. You are at risk of failing this course if you have three unexcused absences or do not turn in a major assignment. I will not give an Incomplete except when required by university policy.
Exam Format:
There are no exams in this class.
Class Format:
This course is based on in-class discussion of readings, collaborative preparation of materials such as a teaching statement and syllabus, engagement with guest speakers from around the university, and building a capstone group project to share what we have learned.
Workload:
Over the semester, you will hone your CV, create a teaching statement, develop a syllabus for a future class, and write the guidelines and grading rubric for a major assignment for that class. Multiple drafts of each of these will be due at various times during the semester. You will also provide written feedback to other students on their drafts. We also work as a class to create an interesting and meaningful session at the department's SRI conference.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53575/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 October 2018

Spring 2023  |  SOC 8090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Sociology & Its Publics (65625)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
12 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Fri 10:00AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, East Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
By instructor consent Click these links for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC8090+Spring2023 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?uggen001+SOC8090+Spring2023
Class Description:


Students in this workshop will serve as the graduate student board for The Society Pages, an online social science journalism project housed at the University of Minnesota. Participation is based on application. In addition to experience and qualifications, the board is selected so as to involve students from different stages in the program, substantive interest areas, and methodological specialties. Most participants are expected to make a year-long commitment to the project, though membership will rotate on an annual basis.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students in sociology
Learning Objectives:
  • To deepen students' substantive research expertise
    by engaging cutting edge sociological scholarship. Students will unearth the most interesting findings and best evidence from new research in their areas of study. This provides students with a broader vision of the sociological field and offers an opportunity to diversify their reading in the prelim and dissertation processes.

  • To develop writing and communication skills
    in addressing academic and non-academic audiences. Grad board members regularly write for the website, and our supportive, professional editorial team gives direct feedback designed to improve these skills as the pieces are published online.

  • To gain deep, practical appreciation of the process of editorial decision-making
    and public scholarship.
    TSP had almost 11 million unique page views last year. Working with the site allows students to engage in critical and constructive discussion of the field of sociology, while participating in a collaborative public outreach project by shaping and improving the site as an online vehicle to disseminate great research.

Class Format:
Weekly seminar
Workload:
4-6 hours a week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65625/1233
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hartm021_uggen001_SOC8090_Fall2021.pdf (Fall 2021)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 April 2021

Spring 2023  |  SOC 8190 Section 001: Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance (65623)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
9 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Wed 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Advanced topics in law, crime, and deviance. Social underpinnings of legal/illegal behavior and of legal systems.
Class Notes:
5 seats reserved for Sociology graduate students Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC8190+Spring2023
Class Description:
The role of organized political actors, the function of ideology and the impact of structural and social factors on the perpetration of mass atrocities, and c) explore the politics of representation involved in genocide acknowledgement and denial. To on genocide and mass atrocities filtered through the lens of the Holocaust or conditioned by existing theoretical paradigms? Have such frames and terminologies facilitated or inhibited knowledge (and action) vis-a-vis other events of mass violence, as well as remembrance, justice, and reconciliation in their aftermath? Cases analyzed in the course include colonial genocides in North America, the Armenian genocide, State terror in Spain and in the Southern Cone and Stalinist crimes in Eastern Europe.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65623/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 March 2017

Spring 2023  |  SOC 8412 Section 001: Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (65621)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
Class Notes:
4 seats reserved for Sociology graduate students Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC8412+Spring2023
Class Description:
This seminar introduces social network analysis to graduate students, emphasizing its theoretical, substantive, and methodological foundations. Our collective goal is to acquire a sufficient grasp of the contemporary network literatures to pursue independent advanced study, and ultimately, to contribute original research results to our disciplines. Specifically, we'll identify key network concepts and principles; examine data collection, measurement, and computer analysis techniques; and investigate applications in sociology, organization studies, political science, public administration, and related disciplines. Network analysis spans a diverse range of phenomena from ego-centric ties, to small work-team sociograms, to organizational relations, to trade and military alliances among nation states. Based on the summer survey of registered students' substantive interests, we'll concentrate on social capital, communication, personal networks, learning and innovation diffusion, intra- and interorganizational relations, social movements and collective action, political networks, international systems, and small world and Internet dynamics. About an hour of each class will be spent on network methodologies. The principles that students learn in this course will enable them to study advanced topics of their own choosing. Wasserman & Faust's encyclopedic Social Network Analysis provides our primary text, with required and background articles and chapters selected from the research literatures of several disciplines. Students will learn how to perform basic network analyses of previously collected datasets, using the UCINET computer package. We'll also explore network visualizations using spatial plotting programs.
Grading:
Leading a class discussion
(10%), preparing a discussion guide (10%), four best of five computer assignments (40%), course paper
(40%).
Class Format:
60% Lecture
20% Discussion
20% Student Presentations
Workload:
75 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Paper
5 Computer assignments
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65621/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 May 2019

Spring 2023  |  SOC 8801 Section 001: Sociological Research Methods (52778)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Soc grad
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
Class Notes:
3 seats reserved for Sociology graduate students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hull+SOC8801+Spring2023
Class Description:
This is a survey course covering some of the most commonly used research methods in sociology and related disciplines. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between theory and evidence, and how various methods contribute to the development or testing of social theories by gathering and analyzing various forms of evidence. We will also pay attention to the (often implicit) underlying epistemological assumptions or commitments embedded in various methodological approaches. The course seeks to equip students with the ability to evaluate empirical social scientific work based on a range of methodological traditions, but is not focused on detailed training in any individual method. Such training is best obtained through advanced methods courses and/or through active involvement in research projects under the guidance of experienced investigators or mentors/advisors. The course will challenge students to refine their own ideas about how to link their areas of interest with concrete plans for empirical research. Course Objectives o To learn the basics of how research is conducted using different sociological methods. o To develop awareness of the knowledge claims and standards of evidence that underpin various methodological approaches. o To develop the ability to critically evaluate scholarship that uses various methods. o To gain experience in translating general research interests and ideas about research design and evidence into a proposal for a research project that carefully and thoughtfully links research questions, theoretical framing, choice of method(s), and specific plans for data collection and analysis.
Grading:
40% Reports/Papers
40% Written Homework
10% In-class Presentations
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
75% Discussion
10% Student Presentations
15% Guest Speakers
Workload:
100-150 Pages Reading Per Week
50 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
2 Presentation(s)
8 Homework Assignment(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52778/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 November 2014

Spring 2023  |  SOC 8811 Section 001: Advanced Social Statistics (52041)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tvanheuv+SOC8811+Spring2023
Class Description:

Many of the questions that we wish to answer in the social sciences address outcomes that are limited and fixed in their answer choices. For example, do Americans agree that Atheists share a common vision of American society? How did the Great Recession affect employment inequalities across racial groups? Who do happy people compare themselves to? Which social class does the child of a blue-collar worker end up in? How frequently do adolescents use marijuana? Questions such as these cannot be appropriately answered using linear regression models, requiring more advanced techniques which will be covered extensively in Soc8811.

This course will focus on applied statistics and primarily deal with regression models in which the dependent variable is categorical: binary, nominal, ordinal, count, etc. As a catalyst for the course, we will consider flexible methods developed for introducing nonlinearities into the linear regression framework. Specific models to be addressed include: logit, probit, generalized ordered logit, multinomial logit, Poisson, negative binomial, zero inflated, fractional response, LOWESS, kernel weighted local polynomial, and mixture models.

Throughout the course, we will address common statistical issues that require special consideration when applied to nonlinear regression models, including: the calculation of predictions, interpretation of coefficients, interaction, and mediation. We will also become familiarized with techniques developed for applied research: model fit, selection, and robustness, joint hypothesis testing, weighting, clustering, and poststratification for complex survey design, and missing data.

Soc8811 covers statistical methods for analyzing social data and is designed for graduate students in the social sciences. Students are assumed to have a background equivalent to Soc5811 and thus have familiarity with linear regression models. The course will be taught in Stata, but students will have the opportunity to instead use R if they prefer.
Learning Objectives:

1. Produce, interpret, and report results from complex statistical models

2. Understand how to apply data analysis to substantive research questions, and effectively present results to a general interest academic audience

3. Develop strategies and competency to conduct future studies of advanced techniques in quantitative methods

4. Build a robust, reproducible workflow to move from raw data to numerical and visual information placed in a final paper.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52041/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 November 2019

Spring 2023  |  SOC 8890 Section 001: Advanced Topics in Research Methods -- Sex, Death, and Mobility: Population Modeling (65620)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
6 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Thu 04:00PM - 06:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Advanced Research Methods (e.g., multilevel models), historical/comparative, field, survey research. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 8801, 8811, or instr consent. Cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
Class Notes:
3 seats reserved for SOC graduate students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ewf+SOC8890+Spring2023
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65620/1233

Fall 2022  |  SOC 1001 Section 001: Introduction to Sociology (17849)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 310
Enrollment Status:
Open (107 of 240 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tvanheuv+SOC1001+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Workload:
30-60 pages of reading per week.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17849/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 November 2019

Fall 2022  |  SOC 1001 Section 015: Introduction to Sociology (17856)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 310
Enrollment Status:
Open (126 of 240 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pharr004+SOC1001+Fall2022
Class Description:

What sets sociology apart from the other social sciences is its diversity of perspectives and areas of inquiry. Any aspect of human activity can be studied sociologically--from individual cognition, to small group dynamics, to institutions and nation states, to vast, globe-spanning systems and structures. What matters most to the sociologist is less a specific area or specialty and more the ability to see the social in the world around us. The goal of this introductory course is to help students find their sociological perspective and understand how human agency both shapes and is shaped by social structures. We will discuss a broad range of topics, including: 1) theory and methods, both classical and contemporary; 2) culture, socialization, and social solidarity; 3) power, conflict, and the intersection of social statuses such as race, class, and gender; and 4) global dynamics, public sociology, and the potential for social change. By the time they complete this course students will ideally be able to apply their sociological imagination to both current events and their everyday lives.

Grading:
10% attendance and participation
20% short papers and activities
50% weekly quizzes
20% final exam
Exam Format:
Multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions
Class Format:
In-person lecture and discussion sections
Workload:
- approximately 40 pages of reading per week
- attendance and participation in lecture and discussion sessions
- 2-3 short papers/activities
- weekly short quizzes, submitted via Canvas
- final exam, including essay question, submitted via Canvas
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17856/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 April 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 1001 Section 030: Introduction to Sociology (17860)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue 05:15PM - 08:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (119 of 120 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in a synchronous format at the posted day/time. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?asalamha+SOC1001+Fall2022
Class Description:

How does it happen that an individual can physically torture another? Why do people discriminate? How do we reason morally? While the course does not fully answer these questions, the course hopes to begin to have preliminary discussions about them. In these discussions, we draw on classical and contemporary sociological perspectives to examine how social order is produced, and how individuals and groups knowingly - and also unknowingly - enable the emergence of the very threats they fear. The course explores sociological concepts by making connections to global social problems such as torture, genocide, inequality, and the displacement of persons. We examine how social conformity creates social stability yet also perniciously enables torture, genocide, and widespread inequality. The goals of the course are to inspire our sociological imagination - our ability to see how social forces permit and hinder the actions of individuals - as well as deepen our understanding about contemporary social problems. The course invites learners to question the ways in which they explain social events, and appreciate the multiplicity of ways - as well as - the challenges and complexity - involved in describing society. Throughout the course, you will be asked to discuss how society individually impacts you, and how you also contribute to the perpetuation - as well as degradation - of society's norms. You are anticipated to discuss readings and contemporary controversies in discussion groups.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Required for sociology majors, open to others. This course meets the requirements of the Council on Liberal Education's Social Science core and Social Justice theme.
Learning Objectives:
To think about the social world and the ways in which the social world shapes human experience.
To ask why individuals and groups behave as they do.
To understand how social problems emerge.
To explore how human thought and perception are by-products of broader social structures.
To engage one's sociological imagination.
Grading:
30% Attendance, Readings, and Journals
70% Quizzes
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions and short answers (depending on the quiz). All quizzes are conducted online (in class) including the final quiz, which takes place on the last day of classes. Quizzes are cumulative. There is no exam during the exam period. Adequate time would be given for review with teaching assistants.
Class Format:
Lecture and Discussion
There are no textbooks in the course. All readings are anticipated to be available on Canvas.
Workload:
20-30 Pages Reading per Week
4 Quizzes (in-class)
1 Final Quiz (in-class)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17860/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 March 2020

Fall 2022  |  SOC 1101 Section 001: Law, Crime, & Punishment (20187)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 350
Enrollment Status:
Open (59 of 140 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introductory course designed to provide students with a general understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. We examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment using an interdisciplinary social science approach.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC1101+Fall2022
Class Description:
This introductory course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. Drawing from an interdisciplinary social science perspective, we examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment with a particular focus on how forms of social control institutionalize, legitimize and perpetuate inequality. The course is comprised of two units. First, we will critically analyze central theoretical traditions in criminology with an emphasis on theories currently shaping research in the field. The second unit will include an examination of contemporary case studies in several substantive areas. Thematic topics to be discussed include law and social control; the impact of criminal record and race on the employment of ex-offenders; the effect of juvenile justice criminal policies on urban youth; and alternatives to policing and police reform.
Grading:
40% Reports/Papers
15% Written Assignments
20% Class Presentations
25% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Papers
1 Reading Reflection
1 Class Presentation
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20187/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 October 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (18733)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
West Bank Skyway AUDITORIUM
Enrollment Status:
Open (81 of 100 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC3101+Fall2022
Class Description:

The goal of this course is to introduce students to sociological perspectives on the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and the death penalty. We will also explore ongoing efforts to reimagine criminal justice and produce racial justice. Honors students read an extra book and write a memo about it.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the course, you will:

1. be able to think critically about law and criminal justice, and

2. have mastery of a significant body of knowledge about how criminal legal institutions work, how they reinforce or counter social inequalities, and alternative visions of justice;

3. have the ability to interpret and evaluate your own ideas and experiences related to law, crime, and justice within a broader sociological context.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam,
35% Final Exam,
30% Quizzes
5% Participation
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (3 quizzes, 1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
40% Lecture,
5% Film/Video,
50% Discussion,
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18733/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 April 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3101H Section 001: Honors: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (21464)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Enrollment Requirements:
honors student
Meets With:
SOC 3101 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
West Bank Skyway AUDITORIUM
Enrollment Status:
Open (8 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: Honor students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power-point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F, honors
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC3101H+Fall2022
Class Description:

The goal of this course is to introduce students to sociological perspectives on the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and the death penalty. We will also explore ongoing efforts to reimagine criminal justice and produce racial justice. Honors students read an extra book and write a memo about it.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the course, you will:

1. be able to think critically about law and criminal justice, and

2. have mastery of a significant body of knowledge about how criminal legal institutions work, how they reinforce or counter social inequalities, and alternative visions of justice;

3. have the ability to interpret and evaluate your own ideas and experiences related to law, crime, and justice within a broader sociological context.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam,
35% Final Exam,
30% Quizzes
5% Participation
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (3 quizzes, 1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
40% Lecture,
5% Film/Video,
50% Discussion,
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21464/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 April 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (18734)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 10
Enrollment Status:
Open (53 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information:
Class Description:
​This course addresses general issues in conceptualizing and controlling criminal behavior. Course content will be particularly concerned with the processes of classification and the construction of criminal behavior relative to other idealized forms of behavior. Some important questions include: How does criminal behavior and social control change across time and space? What is the relationship between status characteristics like race, gender, sexuality, and prestige etc. and the classification and controlling of some behaviors versus others?
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
(1) Review paper
(1) Term paper
(1) Group/Individual Project
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18734/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2017

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3201 Section 001: Inequality: Introduction to Stratification (20015)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (24 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Why does inequality exist? How does it work? These are the essential questions examined in this class. Topics range from welfare and poverty to the role of race and gender in getting ahead. We will pay particular attention to social inequities why some people live longer and happier lives while others are burdened by worry, poverty, and ill health. prereq: soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC3201+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course examines the basic concepts and theories sociologists use to describe and explain social stratification and inequality. The textbook for the class is Social Stratification and Inequality. Lectures will focus on the contents of selected chapters that all students are required to read. There are twelve short, in-class quizzes (50% of final grade), and each of which has five simple questions about the contents of the chapter lectured in the week prior to the quiz. Ten best of the quizzes are recorded, or students may miss any two quizzes. For a term-paper study project (50% of the final grade), each student is required to conduct interviews of two families about their relative standings in the American stratification system. For this term project, students are requested to submit (1) a study outline of 1-2 pages (5% of final grade), which describes the plan of the study about which families to be studied, how to conduct the interviews/observations, and what to be focused in these interviews/observations; and (2) the written term paper (10 pages, 40% of final grade), which reports and analyzes the results of interviews/observations. NO final exam.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology major or undergraduate student needing a sociology/social science course to fulfill the degree requirement.
Learning Objectives:
To obtain a sociological understanding of stratification and inequalities in the United States in a global perspective.
Grading:
05%, Class attendance.
50%, Best ten out of the 12 quizzes.
05%, Study outline of 2 double-space pages.
40%, Term paper of 10 double-space pages.
Exam Format:
No exam. But each quiz is one page of 5 T/F, multiple-choice, and short-answer questions.
Class Format:
95% Lecture
5% Student Presentations
Workload:
20 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
10 Quiz(zes)
2 Pages for a study outline
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20015/1229
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC3201_Fall2019.pdf (Fall 2019)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC3201_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 March 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: Race and Racism in the US (19501)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (30 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible - some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?joh07820+SOC3211W+Fall2022
Class Description:
In mainstream American culture, race and racism both have a taken-for-granted nature. Race is a "natural" category a person belongs to as bestowed by their parents. Racism is deliberate bigotry or discrimination against certain racial groups actors perpetuate due to ignorance, selfishness, or other moral depravities.

Sociologists, however, conceptualize both race and racism differently. They understand race and racism to be social processes, things that must continually be "accomplished" and enforced by social agents who often are neither especially ignorant nor popularly considered to be morally compromised. How race and racism are "accomplished," and how such processes are embedded deeply into even the mundane features of American life, will be the goal of this class.

Who Should Take This Class?:

Any students able to register for the class with an interest in understanding how race and racism function sociologically are welcome in the class

Learning Objectives:

Students will work on the following skills:



1.) Learn how to read and analyze academic texts



2.) Learn how to collaborate and learn in non-lecture educational settings



3.) Learn how to take ownership of scholarly ideas and apply them to personal contexts of interest



4.) Learn how to develop and refine an original topic of the student's choosing in an academic paper.




Grading:
Students' grades will be based on a mixture of short answer/essay-based quizzes, participation and attendance in class sessions, and a series of assignments concerning the planning, drafting, and submission of a final term paper.
Exam Format:
There will be 2-3 quizzes in the course, each taken with some access to notes. The final exam will be a term paper.
Class Format:

Class will be a mix of lecture and class discussion, with at least 50 percent of class time featuring class discussion.

Workload:

Students should expect to dedicate 3-4 hours a week outside of class time doing academic readings and preparing class assignments.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/19501/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 April 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3225 Section 001: The Power of the 1%: Global Philanthropy and the Making of a New World (32714)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
GLOS 3225 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 415
Enrollment Status:
Open (14 of 15 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Philanthropy has come to play an increasingly important role in the economy and society, on both a national and global level. Americans gave away $450 billion in 2019, or a little over 2 percent of our country's GDP (Giving USA 2020). A few mega-philanthropists, such as Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Michael Bloomberg, and others donated mind-boggling sums of money. These individuals and their foundations are having a significant impact around the world, changing the way public education is carried out in many countries, how global health priorities are defined, how public policies are made, and how African agricultural systems are organized. Forbes magazine reports that there are 1,645 billionaires in the world today, 80% more than a decade ago. While some observers look positively on this philanthropic outpouring, others suggest it may be eroding democracy. In this course, we study philanthropy from a variety of perspectives, exploring who gives away money and why, how this "gift" impacts givers, receivers, and taxpayers, and what the relationship is between global philanthropy and power. Specific topics include the history of foundations; religion and charity; philanthropy and politics; consumption-based giving (or "brand aid"), and philanthropy and social policy. We'll examine case studies such as the Gates Foundation's role in African agriculture. Students will do "participant observation" in a local charity, and a research project on the philanthropic foundation or giving practice of their choice. Pre-req: Soc Majors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schurman+SOC3225+Fall2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32714/1229

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3243W Section 001: On Drugs: Pleasures, Panics & Punishments (33095)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 425
Enrollment Status:
Closed (45 of 45 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In this course we are going to study and reflect on the immense popularity of mood-enhancing drugs, legal and illegal, around the world today. Why do we want to modify our moods, and how do we set about it? Why do some people throw themselves into drug use while others fearfully avoid it? And why do many more of us feel worried about "addiction" to shopping, sex, or gambling? Together we will build a comparative analysis of drug cultures and practices - understanding the place of "journey" and "possession" inebriation across time, and how the temporal and ritual boundaries delimiting substance use get broken down by the mass commoditization of alcohol and other drugs by 19th century capitalism. From there we trace the amazingly confused development of addiction and changing forms of intervention, from alarmist educational campaigns and the militarized maneuvers of the drug war to the drug court movement, and from the twelve-step cure to alternative harm reduction approaches. This class will offer you a mixture of accessible and detailed material, together with some theoretical work which will help you grasp the subject on a deeper level. As a writing intensive class you will develop a three-stage paper with feedback at each stage, producing a strong writing sample. Pre-req: Soc 1001 recommended; Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tgowan+SOC3243W+Fall2022
Class Description:
In this course we examine the immense popularity of mood-enhancing drugs, legal and illegal, around the world today. Why do we want to modify our moods, and how do we set about it? Why do some people throw themselves into drug use while others fearfully avoid it? Why do states and medical authorities promote some mood-changing drugs while waging wars against other, often very similar drugs? Together we will build a comparative analysis of drug cultures and drug regulation. We will start by exploring forms of "journey" and "possession" inebriation across time, learning about how earlier temporal and ritual boundaries limiting substance use get broken down by the modern capitalist commodification of alcohol, tobacco, opium, cocaine, and more. From there we trace how substances shift back and forward between legal, illicit and pharmaceutical statuses, as governments swing between militarized drug wars and more therapeutic controls such as contemporary drug courts and coerced treatment. Throughout the class we will explore the changing meanings of addiction, comparing the twelve-step movement to alternative approaches such as harm reduction. This class will offer you a mixture of accessible and detailed material, together with some theoretical work which will help you grasp the subject on a deeper level.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Take this class if you are interested in drug cultures and addiction, and wanting to move beyond simplistic judgments about "good" vs "bad" drug use!
Learning Objectives:
This class should help you "understand diverse philosophies and cultures within and across societies" (UMN SLO) It should also substantially improve your confidence and skill in qualitative research and writing. Students are expected to complete a research paper that is from 2000 to 2500 words in length, including references. You will use the class qualitative research project to identify a substantive topic or theoretical issue which the interviews illuminate, review important research on that topic, synthesize results, and present an engaging thesis.

NOTE: Students can sign up to make this class satisfy the senior project requirement (instead of taking the capstone class). A senior thesis version of the paper will require a more substantial literature review, addressing their theme across all the class project data, and a paper of 3500 to 4000 words in length, including refs.)
Grading:
The final grade will be weighted
in the following way: 30% term paper (10% for the first draft, 20% for final draft), 30% for moderator posts, 30% for class project participation (15% for interview transcript and profile, 15% for coding and presentations), 10% class and Canvas citizenship.
Class Format:
Short lectures and plenty of discussion, both in small groups and full class.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33095/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 April 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3246 Section 001: Diseases, Disasters, & Other Killers (20636)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 150
Enrollment Status:
Open (77 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ewf+SOC3246+Fall2022
Class Description:
This class is about the past, present, and future of why people die. Why did infectious diseases rapidly seem to disappear--and will they come back? How have historical changes in social organization and interaction with the natural environment changed when and how we die, and what do medical advances, climate change, and persistent inequalities imply for what we might die of in the future?

We will:
* Explore the causes and consequences of a historic worldwide transformation in death and disease
* Analyze how that transformation occurred differently in different parts of the world, and why it matters
* Consider to what extent mortality can--or can't--be further eradicated.
Grading:
Grades will be based on three written essays, regular reading responses, and regular (approximately weekly) reading quizzes.
Class Format:
Lecture and discussion
Workload:
Substantial reading; regular quizzes based on readings (lowest two dropped); three essays
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20636/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 March 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (20383)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Open (27 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information:
Class Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F

Learning Objectives:
A) Explore the social construction of race, class, gender, as well as ethnicity, sexuality, citizenship, and (dis)ability;

B) Consider how race, class, gender, and other dimensions of social organization shape individual experiences and interactions with social institutions such as education, work, medicine, and law;

C) Develop and use a "sociological imagination" to analyze privilege and inequalities

D) Apply sociological approaches to contemporary issues

Exam Format:
There will be no exams for the course. Students will create a final project.
Class Format:
Synchronous online course with flexibility for asynchronous participation.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20383/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 February 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3412 Section 001: Social Networking: Theories and Methods (32715)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3412H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Closed (74 of 74 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Network analysis spans a diverse range of phenomena from ego-centric ties, to small work-team sociograms, to organizational relations, to trade and military alliances among nation states. This course introduces undergraduate students to theories and methods for studying social networks, the ties connecting people, groups, and organizations. Topics include friendship, communication, small group, health, sexual and romantic, corporate, social movement, public policy, innovation diffusion, criminal and terrorist, and Internet networks.' prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC3412+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course introduces students to theories and methods for studying social networks, the ties connecting people, groups, organizations, and nations. Topics include friendship, communication, small group, health, sexual, corporate, social movement, public policy, innovation diffusion, criminal and terrorist, and Internet networks. We investigate network analysis as a distinctive perspective from which to view, understand, and act in an increasingly interdependent world. This course gives student skills to see different sides of controversial issues, develop their critical reasoning abilities, and form ethical standards to participate in society as thoughtful, well-informed, and engaged citizens. Students will be learn how to read, interpret, and create social network diagrams, and to understand how these maps reveal detailed connections among social actors. Students will learn how to perform some basic network analyses of previously collected datasets, using a computer package. Computer programming skill is NOT a prerequisite. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. This course meets the University of Minnesota's Technology and Society Theme requirement.
Grading:
Course grade is determined by highest scores on 4 of 5 social network data analysis assignments (60%) and a course paper not to exceed 3,000 words (40%).
Exam Format:
No exams
Class Format:
Lecture & discussions on Tuesdays, data analysis laboratory on Thursdays.
Workload:
One article + one chapter from a textbook on social network data analysis per week.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32715/1229
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/knoke001_SOC3412H_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 October 2015

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3412H Section 001: Honors: Social Networking: Theories and Methods (32716)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Enrollment Requirements:
honors student
Meets With:
SOC 3412 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Closed (9 of 9 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Network analysis spans a diverse range of phenomena from ego-centric ties, to small work-team sociograms, to organizational relations, to trade and military alliances among nation states. This course introduces undergraduate students to theories and methods for studying social networks, the ties connecting people, groups, and organizations. Topics include friendship, communication, small group, health, sexual and romantic, corporate, social movement, public policy, innovation diffusion, criminal and terrorist, and Internet networks. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F, honors
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC3412H+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course introduces students to theories and methods for studying social networks, the ties connecting people, groups, organizations, and nations. Topics include friendship, communication, small group, health, sexual, corporate, social movement, public policy, innovation diffusion, criminal and terrorist, and Internet networks. We investigate network analysis as a distinctive perspective from which to view, understand, and act in an increasingly interdependent world. This course gives student skills to see different sides of controversial issues, develop their critical reasoning abilities, and form ethical standards to participate in society as thoughtful, well-informed, and engaged citizens. Students will be learn how to read, interpret, and create social network diagrams, and to understand how these maps reveal detailed connections among social actors. Students will learn how to perform some basic network analyses of previously collected datasets, using a computer package. Computer programming skill is NOT a prerequisite. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. This course meets the Universities Technology and Society CLE Theme requirement.
Grading:
Course grade is determined by highest scores on 4 of 5 social network data analysis assignments (60%) and a course paper not to exceed 3,000 words (40%).
Exam Format:
No exams
Class Format:
Lecture & discussions on Tuesdays, data analysis laboratory on Thursdays.
Workload:
One article + one chapter from a textbook on social network data analysis per week.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32716/1229
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/knoke001_SOC3412H_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 October 2015

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3421W Section 001: Sociology of Work: Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs? (21466)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Open (15 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Work is central to individuals, economy, and society. This course introduces students to sociological perspectives and analyses of work. We will look at what makes a good job good, a bad job bad, and impacts of joblessness on society. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC3421W+Fall2022
Class Description:
Work is of centrality to individuals, economy, and society. This course is to introduce students to sociological perspectives and analyses of work. The instructor will give lectures on relevant topics with the assistance of PPT presentation. Students are expected to satisfy three course requirements: (1) read the required and recommended texts and participate in class discussions organized to exchange opinions about issues of work in America today; (2) take in-class quizzes designed to review some of lectured topics and discussed issues; and (3) develop three essays on problems of work described on this syllabus. This is a writing intensive course, and the development of the three essays has a heavy weight in the final course grade. There will not be a cumulative in-class exam. The prerequisite is Soc1001 ?Introduction to Sociology.? Instructor's permission is required if students do not have taken this course.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Any sociology or non-sociology students interested in the class as part of their major requirement. Soc 1001 "Introduction to Sociology" is the prerequisite.
Learning Objectives:
Full version please read Class Description. Briefly, learning about American workplace, sociological perspectives of work and occupation, and kinds of jobs in the USA.
Grading:
60% Reports/Papers
25% Quizzes
15% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Quiz and papers, no exam.
Class Format:
90% Lecture
10% In-group discussion
Workload:
20 Pages Reading Per Week
15 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Paper(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21466/1229
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC3421W_Fall2021.pdf (Fall 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC3421W_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 March 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3501 Section 001: Sociology of Families (21468)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 317
Enrollment Status:
Open (49 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Family has long been a significant experience in human societies; much of what we understand ourselves to be, arises in family life. But family also varies widely in composition across time and place. We will learn how sociologists study and understand families theoretically, as social institutions, as well as sites and sources of social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kampdush+SOC3501+Fall2022
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21468/1229

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3503 Section 001: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (32717)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3503H Section 001
AAS 3503 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 317
Enrollment Status:
Open (13 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. Students will have an option to do community-engaged learning or another course project. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A/F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tswartz+SOC3503+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, identity,education, mental health, ethnic enclaves and ethnic economies, family and intergenerational relationships, media and culture, food, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individual's affect society. Course projects will be utilized to help students gain a concrete appreciation of how a sociological perspective sheds light on the lived experience of contemporary Asian Americans. Students will have an option to participate in community service learning, or do another project that reflects their interests. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% Exams
45% Papers/Project
25% Class Participation and Presentations
Class Format:
30% Lecture
10% Film/Video
20% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
20% Student Presentations
Workload:
60-80 Pages Reading Per Week
Quizzes Possible
2 Exams
1 Paper
3 Presentations
1 Special Project
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32717/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 April 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3503H Section 001: Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (32718)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Enrollment Requirements:
honors student
Meets With:
SOC 3503 Section 001
AAS 3503 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 317
Enrollment Status:
Open (3 of 5 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families, and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course, we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. Students will have an option to do community-engaged learning or another course project. Honors students are expected to demonstrate a greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tswartz+SOC3503H+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, identity,education, mental health, ethnic enclaves and ethnic economies, family and intergenerational relationships, media and culture, food, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individual's affect society. Course projects will be utilized to help students gain a concrete appreciation of how a sociological perspective sheds light on the lived experience of contemporary Asian Americans. Students will have an option to participate in community service learning, or do another project that reflects their interests. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% Exams
45% Papers/Project
25% Class Participation and Presentations
Class Format:
30% Lecture
10% Film/Video
20% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
20% Student Presentations
Workload:
60-80 Pages Reading Per Week
Quizzes Possible
2 Exams
1 Paper
3 Presentations
1 Special Project
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32718/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 April 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3511 Section 001: World Population Problems (33189)

Instructor(s)
No instructor assigned
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Open (22 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This class is an introduction to the contemporary issues that accompany such dramatic population change, including fertility change, disease experiences, migration as opportunity and challenge and human-environment conflict. Further, we will examine the roles of global organizations, national governments, and culture in shaping and reshaping populations. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information:
Class Description:
This course is an introduction to contemporary world population changes, demographic facts, and challenges arising out of those dynamic processes on a worldwide basis. Specifically, factors influencing demographic population change, such as fertility and mortality rates, migration movements and mobility, their causes and effects will be analyzed. Opportunities and challenges arising out of world population changes will be analyzed based on a number of case studies (e.g., South Africa; India; European Union). The role of social, economic and political environments in shaping and reshaping these processes of change will be considered. The course will draw on interdisciplinary literature and research from the fields of sociology, migration studies, demography, political studies, social policy, history and geography. The objectives of this course are to outline world population issues from different and interdisciplinary perspectives.
Learning Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • understand world population changes

  • discuss, evaluate and analyze challenges and opportunities related to population dynamics

  • understand the interdependence and role of social, economic and political environments and processes related to population changes

  • apply theory in practical research settings

Grading:
A-F
S/N
Exam Format:

(1) Attendance (5%)

(2) Participation (40%): Group work, discussions and presentations in small groups, preparation of discussion questions;

(3) Seminar Paper (55%) (in total 15-16 pages) consisting of:

(3a) 2-3 small papers (e.g. critique or reflection papers; content to be announced)

(3b) one final seminar paper (to be announced)

Class Format:
55% Lecture
45% Discussion
Workload:

Weekly reading

15-16 Pages Seminar Paper

Participation in discussions and group presentations

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33189/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 May 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3681 Section 001: Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (32721)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
soph or jr or sr
Meets With:
GWSS 3681 Section 001
GLOS 3681 Section 001
RELS 3716 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (11 of 22 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC3681+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. It aims to expand the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East to highlight the complex and diverse everyday experiences of women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical Western representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminism debates.
Exam Format:
Short answer questions
Class Format:
60% Discussion
20% Lecture
20% Film/Video
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
1 Presentation(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32721/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 August 2020

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3701 Section 001: Social Theory (20191)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 09:05AM - 10:45AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Open (57 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
15 seats reserved for Soc majors Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jvanheuv+SOC3701+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Exam Format:
Short answer; essays
Class Format:
Classes will consist of a mixture of lecture and discussion
Workload:
30-75 pages reading per week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20191/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
18 March 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3701 Section 002: Social Theory (17868)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 12:20PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Open (67 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
15 seats reserved for Soc majors Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sotox116+SOC3701+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Exam Format:
Short answer; essays
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17868/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3701 Section 301: Social Theory (34460)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (22 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
For course syllabus and details, see https://ccaps.umn.edu/oes-courses/social-theory.
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Grading:
GroupWeight
Reading Journals18%
Discussions12%
Discussion Moderation8%
Midcourse Exam30%
Final Exam30%
RATE2%
Exam Format:
Short answer (90-minute Canvas quiz, taken at any point during the exam week) and Essays (prompts completed over the exam week)
Class Format:
This class is entirely asynchronous. With the exception of some video announcements and review videos on specific concepts, all the material is in text form. Rather than video lectures students receive study notes to guide their reading. The core of this class is close engagement with original texts.
Workload:
The class is broken up in modules that each last a week. Every module runs on the same schedule and includes 1) a discussion board 2) a reading journal 3) an ungraded quiz. Once per semester students moderate one of the discussions, which involves a much more involved post and responsibility to manage the discussion. Midterm and final exams are in their own modules.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34460/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 October 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3801 Section 001: Sociological Research Methods (17866)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Open (30 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?boyle014+SOC3801+Fall2022
Class Description:
Imagine this course as a civilian's guide to social research. We'll focus on the development, conduct, and dissemination of scholarship in a way that prepares you to complete a major project in sociology, but we'll also build the tools you'll need to evaluate truth claims that circulate in everyday public life and politics. Learn how to identify quality social research and put it to work. Defend it from skeptics. Think responsibly about its effects. Our assignments will help you mobilize several different types of existing research in order to answer a range of sociological questions.
Grading:

10% Attend and participate in class discussion

10% Recall key terms and details

20% Find relevant sources of research

30% Interpret and compare different types of evidence

30% Justify and critique common research practices

Class Format:
Lecture Section:
50% conceptual development
25% participatory activities

25% guest speakers, media, in-class writing, & miscellaneous

Lab Section:
80% Analyze and discuss weekly readings (available online)
20% Workshop term paper

Workload:
20-40 pages of reading per week
2 exams
Daily in-class writing exercises
2 term papers, 5-6 pages each
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17866/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 March 2017

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3801 Section 009: Sociological Research Methods (19317)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (107 of 120 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This lecture (3801-09) is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC3801+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course focuses on the effective critical evaluation of sociological evidence. After introducing basic principles of sociological research, we will carefully read and analyze significant studies which exemplify each of four types of sociological research methods: field observations, historical archives, surveys, and experiments. No mathematical or statistical background is required.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology majors and other social scientists hoping to understand how sociological research is created and what questions we might ask of each study to better understand it's strengths and weaknesses.
Grading:
10% Worksheets and other assignments based on lectures
15% Worksheets and other assignments based on podcasts
30% Unit quizzes
30% Two brief papers analyzing the quality of methods used by professional sociologists (as described in the readings)
15% Worksheets based on readings
Exam Format:
The unit quizzes are multiple choice and short answer. There are no exams.
Class Format:
Lectures are asynchronous and available on Canvas.
Podcasts are from Give Methods a Chance -- listen to podcast, read accompanying book, answer accompanying questions, contribute to discussions.
Class is divided into nine units and each unit has a short quiz.
Deeper understanding and analysis are required to analyze the quality of methods used by professional sociologists (papers are about the assigned journal article reading material only)
Worksheets based on the assigned journal articles, assessing basic understanding, in preparation for the papers.
Workload:
30-50 pages of reading per week
20-40 minutes of podcast listening per week
10-12 pages of writing per semester
5-10 brief quizzes
2 papers critically evaluating the evidence for claims made by a professional sociologist
11 homework worksheets based on assigned readings
Students have options for how to earn points. There are more points available than are necessary for an "A". The only required assignments are the two papers.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/19317/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 March 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3811 Section 001: Social Statistics (17805)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Closed (144 of 144 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC3811+Fall2022
Class Description:
This is a social statistics course that emphasizes describing data and testing hypotheses. Lectures expose students to the theoretical bases of statistical methods and how to use them in social research. Laboratory sessions teach computing skills and data manipulation techniques. Test problems and lab assignments help students to gain knowledge of basic descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequency distributions, means tests, correlation and regression. Many examples are drawn from diverse sociological topics and illustrated with national survey data.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology majors and students from other disciplines.
Learning Objectives:
Acquire knowledge of basic statistical principles and computation methods, applied to real social data. Ability to read and understand articles that analyze social data.
Grading:
75% Three Exams
25% Two computer data analysis assignments.
Exam Format:
Computations
Short Answer
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Laboratory
Workload:
10-35 PowerPoint slides reading per week; 2 computer problem sets; 3 exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17805/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2019

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4101V Section 001: Honors: Sociology of Law (20025)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Enrollment Requirements:
honors student
Meets With:
SOC 4101W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Closed (7 of 7 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: honors student, [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC4101V+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Throughout the course, we will consider the role of law in creating, reproducing, and shaping class, gender, and race inequalities. An array of reading materials will be assigned including: theoretical works, empirical studies, and U.S. Supreme Court cases. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion and give a class presentation during the course.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
50% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20025/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2019

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4101W Section 001: Sociology of Law (19333)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 4101V Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Closed (53 of 53 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. prereq: [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC4101W+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Throughout the course, we will consider the role of law in creating, reproducing, and shaping class, gender, and race inequalities. An array of reading materials will be assigned including: theoretical works, empirical studies, and U.S. Supreme Court cases. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion and give a class presentation during the course.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
50% Reports/Papers
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/19333/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2019

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4106 Section 001: Crime on TV (21473)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
soph or jr or sr
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Open (54 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course uses television shows to explore sociological perspectives on crime and punishment. We will critically examine how (and to what extent) four television series represent or distort prevailing knowledge about crime and punishment. prereq: recommended [1001 or 1011V, 1101 or 3101 or 3102]; Soph or above or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC4106+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course uses television shows to explore sociological perspectives on crime and punishment. The premise of this class is that we can learn a great deal about lawbreaking and social control from watching (and analyzing) television shows. (It is also true that much television misrepresents the nature and consequences of crime and punishment.) We will critically examine how (and to what extent) several television series represent or distort prevailing knowledge about crime and punishment. Topics will include the social origins and functions of crime, causes and consequences of lawbreaking, policing, race and the war on drugs, mass imprisonment, the culture and social relations of prisons, prisoner re-entry, and reimagining justice. Featured shows include: Breaking Bad, The Wire, and Orange is the New Black (the exact line up is subject to change). Disclosure. The shows we will watch graphically depict poverty, sexuality, drug-use, and violence. Several of the shows include profanity and vulgar language. As such, students who may be offended or uncomfortable with such language and themes may not wish to take this course.
Learning Objectives:

By the end of the course, you will:

1. be able to think critically about law, crime, punishment, justice, politics, and media.

2. have mastery of a significant body of knowledge about how criminal legal institutions work, how they reinforce or counter social inequalities, and alternative visions of justice;

3. have the ability to interpret and evaluate your own ideas and experiences related to law, crime, and justice within a broader sociological context.

Exam Format:
See "Grading"
Class Format:
30% Lecture
55% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
Workload:
About 4 television episodes and 60 pages of reading per week.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21473/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 April 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4125 Section 001: Policing America (32722)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 370
Enrollment Status:
Open (26 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is an in-depth sociological analysis of the origins, composition, and effects of policing in contemporary U.S. society. Throughout the course, we focus on using a social science lens to understand policing dynamics and how policing shapes social life. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which race, class, and gender inequalities are reflected in and reshaped by policing practices. Throughout the course, we will draw on contemporary media stories, podcast, documentaries, and guest visitors to connect scholarship with the world around us. prereq: 3101 or 3102 recommended or instr consent, soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC4125+Fall2022
Class Description:

In the wake of the #BlackLivesMatter movement and historic calls to #DefundPolice, it is clear that U.S. policing is in a moment of transition. This course is an in-depth sociological analysis of the origins, composition, and effects of policing in contemporary U.S. society. Throughout the course, we focus on using a social science lens to understand what policing is and how it influences social life. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which race and class inequalities are reflected in and reshaped by policing practices. The course material will cover a different aspect of policing each week, including the historical origins of the police; race, class, and gender inequities; and contemporary efforts to reform, transform, and abolish the police. We will pay specific attention to activists' efforts in Minneapolis to hold police accountable and reimagine public safety to make Black Lives Matter. Throughout the course, we draw on contemporary media stories, podcast, documentaries, and guest visitors to connect scholarship with the world around us.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in policing in the United States.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the class you should understand:
-Sociological perspectives on policing
-Race, class, and gender inequities in experiences with law enforcement
-A historical overview on the police
-The similarities and differences between movements to reform or abolish the police
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
40% Class Papers
20% Participation
Exam Format:
Take-home essay questions
Class Format:
60% Lecture
10% Film/Video
20% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-150 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32722/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 March 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4141 Section 001: Youth Crime & Punishment (21556)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Meets With:
SOC 4141H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (20 of 47 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course offers an overview of social theory and research on youth crime, punishment, and delinquency. We start by critically examining the social facts surrounding the measurement, extent, and distribution of delinquency. Next, we study the principal sociological explanations of delinquent behavior. These theories provide conceptual tools for analyzing delinquency and punishment among groups such as gang members. We then trace youth experiences in the juvenile justice system, from policing, to juvenile court, to probation, and institutionalization. Throughout, we analyze the success or failure of key programs implemented in attempts to prevent or reduce delinquency. prereq: Soc 3101 or 3102 recommended; Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?uggen001+SOC4141+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course presents an overview of sociological theory and research on youth crime and punishment, along with discussion of cutting-edge controversies and policy issues. We start with a critical examination of the social facts surrounding the measurement, extent, and distribution of youth crime and punishment. Next we study some of the principal sociological explanations of delinquent behavior. These theories provide conceptual tools for analyzing monographs and meta-analyses regarding delinquency among diverse groups of young people. We conclude by analyzing some of the key policies and programs implemented in attempts to reduce delinquency and mitigate the harms of youth punishment. Course objectives: 1) To understand the way that delinquency is currently measured and the extent and distribution of delinquent behavior according to these measures; 2) To gain a working knowledge of the major sociological theories used to explain youth crime; 3) To apply the conceptual tools of these theories to selected case studies; and, 4) To critically evaluate concrete policy responses to delinquency.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students eager to engage research on youth crime and punishment.
Learning Objectives:
1) To understand the way that delinquency is currently measured and the extent and distribution of delinquent behavior from the perspective of youth, victims, and officials; 2) To gain a working knowledge of the major sociological theories used to explain delinquency; 3) To apply the conceptual tools of these theories to selected case studies; and, 4) To critically evaluate concrete policy responses to delinquency.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam
25% Reports/Papers
10% Special Projects
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Mixed
Class Format:
50% Lecture
5% Film/Video
30% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
5% Field Trips
5% Web Based
Workload:
100 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21556/1229
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/uggen001_SOC4141H_Fall2021.pdf (Fall 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/uggen001_SOC4141_Fall2020.pdf (Fall 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 March 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4141H Section 001: Honors: Youth Crime & Punishment (33482)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
Honors
Enrollment Requirements:
honors student
Meets With:
SOC 4141 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (6 of 7 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course offers an overview of social theory and research on youth crime, punishment, and delinquency. We start by critically examining the social facts surrounding the measurement, extent, and distribution of delinquency. Next, we study the principal sociological explanations of delinquent behavior. These theories provide conceptual tools for analyzing delinquency and punishment among groups such as gang members. We then trace youth experiences in the juvenile justice system, from policing, to juvenile court, to probation, and institutionalization. Throughout, we analyze the success or failure of key programs implemented in attempts to prevent or reduce delinquency. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power-point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: honors student, Soc 3101 or 3102 recommended; Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?uggen001+SOC4141H+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course presents an overview of sociological theory and research on youth crime and punishment, along with discussion of cutting-edge controversies and policy issues. We start with a critical examination of the social facts surrounding the measurement, extent, and distribution of youth crime and punishment. Next we study some of the principal sociological explanations of delinquent behavior. These theories provide conceptual tools for analyzing monographs and meta-analyses regarding delinquency among diverse groups of young people. We conclude by analyzing some of the key policies and programs implemented in attempts to reduce delinquency and mitigate the harms of youth punishment. Course objectives: 1) To understand the way that delinquency is currently measured and the extent and distribution of delinquent behavior according to these measures; 2) To gain a working knowledge of the major sociological theories used to explain youth crime; 3) To apply the conceptual tools of these theories to selected case studies; and, 4) To critically evaluate concrete policy responses to delinquency.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students eager to engage research on youth crime and punishment.
Learning Objectives:
1) To understand the way that delinquency is currently measured and the extent and distribution of delinquent behavior from the perspective of youth, victims, and officials; 2) To gain a working knowledge of the major sociological theories used to explain delinquency; 3) To apply the conceptual tools of these theories to selected case studies; and, 4) To critically evaluate concrete policy responses to delinquency.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam
25% Reports/Papers
10% Special Projects
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Mixed
Class Format:
50% Lecture
5% Film/Video
30% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
5% Field Trips
5% Web Based Media
Workload:
120 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33482/1229
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/uggen001_SOC4141H_Fall2021.pdf (Fall 2021)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/uggen001_SOC4141_Fall2020.pdf (Fall 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 March 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4161 Section 001: Criminal Law in American Society (20384)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Closed (58 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Purposes of criminal law and of principles of criminal liability, justification, and excuse. Applications to law of criminal homicide, sexual assault, drugs, and crimes against property, public order, and morals. prereq: Soc 3101 or 3102 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in a synchronous format at the posted day/time. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jbs+SOC4161+Fall2022
Class Description:

All parts of our class aim to help you develop your own "criminal law imagination" (CLI) By this I refer to your ideal blaming and punishing regime. We spend our Wednesday afternoons together interrogating a wide range of topics to help you develop your your CLI: Here are some:


1. What's criminal law and what's it good for?

2. Should we punish people only for what they do? or for what they might do? or even sometimes for who they are?

3. What are the justifications and excuses for committing crimes? Topics include defenses of justification (self-defense, defense of home) and defenses of excuse (insanity, age)

4. Partners in Crime: What should happen when teamwork hurts innocent people?

6. Uncompleted crimes: What should happen when people try to hurt other people but they fail?

5. What's the role of criminal law in unwanted sex?

6. What should happen to government officials sworn to serve and protect us and our constitutional rights, when they abuse their power?

7. How much protection should the Constitution provide to non citizens?

8. Cyberwar: How do we fight wars with malware on the internet instead of traditional weapons of war?


A final word: You'll probably learn some actual criminal law in our interactive journey through the topics in the list. Good for you. But, remember our goal is above all to work on developing your CLI.

Who Should Take This Class?:
If you're an Upper Division undergraduate from any major and you're interested in becoming a more intelligent consumer of our criminal blaming and punishing regime, then you've found the right class. That regime is a very rough engine of social control, a last resort after families, belief systems, schools, and other non criminal social institutions fail. It's also the most expensive and most invasive instrument to affect human behavior in the digital age of the US version of a constitutional democracy, committed to the values of human dignity, individual autonomy, equal justice, and social order.
Grading:

90% Weekly written quizzes that cover reading and discussion

10% Participation measured by having your cameras, taking ZOOM polls, and participation in our ZOOM discussion


Exam Format:

10% analysis of the week's assigned cases due on CANVAS by 230 on Wednesday

30% short answer quizzes on each week's assigned reading

50% reaction essay to what we discussed during ZOOMing, and discussions with others after ZOOMing discussion, due by midnight every Thursday on the day following ZOOMing

10% Cameras on and participation in ZOOMing

Class Format:

15% Lecture

85% Music to make you feel good while you wait for ZOOMing to start, video and audio clips, ZOOM polls, and discussion

10 minute break about 345

Workload:
About 35 pages of reading every week. Hey! There are no research papers, reports, or other writing requirements. This is so you have time to read thoroughly and know well the content of the assigned pages.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20384/1229
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jbs_SOC4161_Fall2020.docx (Fall 2020)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/jbs_SOC4161_Fall2018.docx (Fall 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 April 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4171 Section 001: Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking (32728)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Open (41 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course takes a sociological approach to international law, considering how history, institutions, power, and interests shape the phenomenon. What is international law, where does it come from, and how does it work? What does international law tell us about globalization and nation-states? Does it make a difference in the world? Does it have a real impact on the day-to-day lives of individuals? When is it followed; when is it ignored? This course takes a broad sociological view of international law. We analyze the actors and processes that constitute international law and then focus on particular substantive areas, including human rights, economic development,environmental concerns, trafficking, and drug interdiction. prereqs: 1001 or 3101 or 3102 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?boyle014+SOC4171+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course takes a sociological approach to international law, considering how history, institutions, power, and interests create and shape it. We focus particularly on the Transnational Organized Crime treaty, which covers human trafficking and smuggling. We consider why the U.S. was willing to ratify this treaty while failing to ratify many others. We also consider how international law issues are framed, and how the choice of frames has costs as well as benefits for addressing the root problems.
Who Should Take This Class?:

This course satisfies an elective requirement for the Law, Criminology, and Deviance major. It is appropriate for all Sociology majors, aspiring lawyers, and those interested in the social world.

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32728/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 July 2020

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4246 Section 001: Sociology of Health and Illness (21474)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
soph or jr or sr
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 230
Enrollment Status:
Closed (83 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is an introduction to the importance of health and illness in people's lives, how social structures impact who gets sick, how they are treated, and how the delivery of health care is organized. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the sociology of health and illness, and understand that health and illness are not just biological processes, but profoundly shaped by the organization of society. prereq: One sociology course recommended; soph or above; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jvanheuv+SOC4246+Fall2022
Class Description:
What do you do when you get sick? Where do you go? Who provides your medical care? In this course we will discuss why the answers to these basic questions are actually quite complex. This course is designed to introduce students to medical sociology and will examine issues surrounding health, illness and healing from a sociological perspective. Throughout the course we will cover numerous topics including: the social construction of health and illness, healthcare providers, the healthcare system - including contemporary debates regarding healthcare reform - and the social determinants of health inequalities.

Exam Format:
Multiple Choice and Short Answer
Class Format:
Classes will consist of a mixture of lecture and discussion.
Workload:
30-75 Pages Reading Per Week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21474/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 October 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4311 Section 001: Power, Justice & the Environment (21066)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
GLOS 4311 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Open (25 of 45 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to the theoretical and historical foundations of environmental racism and environmental inequality more broadly. We will examine and interrogate both the social scientific evidence concerning these phenomena and the efforts by community residents, activists, workers, and governments to combat it. We will consider the social forces that create environmental inequalities so that we may understand their causes, consequences, and the possibilities for achieving environmental justice prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mgoldman+SOC4311+Fall2022
Class Description:

This course focuses on the urgent social environmental-planetary issues of our times -- climate crisis, worsening social inequality and war. We will tap the latest scientific assessments on the severity of the climate crisis; we will explore the historical trajectory that brings us to the ways we produce, consume, travel, fuel wars, and live today; and we will engage with the environmental justice literature that explains why less-powerful populations are targeted by ecologically and socially degrading practices.


We will then look at how social movements respond with creative solutions to meet these social and ecological challenges. Finally, we will integrate these ideas into a holistic framework with which to understand concrete examples from around the world - in India, Brazil, the Arabian Peninsula, Germany, and in the U.S. such as the Twin Cities -- where people are remaking the world into a safer and more just place to live.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Someone who is interested in understanding the pressing social and ecological problems of the world, particularly climate change, its causes and solutions, from a global and sociological perspective that emphasizes power relations, the social-ecological nexus, and global transformation.
Grading:

75 % for papers, short and medium length, and a final project

25% for class discussion, small group work, and short presentations

Exam Format:
no exams
Class Format:

60% Lecture
5% Film/Video and Guest Speakers
25% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities and Presentations

Workload:

30-60 pages per week of reading

25-30 pages written throughout the semester in the form of short and medium length papers and a final project

class discussion, in-class group work, and a few short presentations

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21066/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 March 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4551 Section 001: Sociology of Sexualities (33133)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Enrollment Requirements:
soph or jr or sr
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (63 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In this course we will examine social theories and sociological research on the topic of sexuality. We will explore the concept of sexuality as it intersects with race, gender, age, and class. This course is designed to give you a basic understanding of sociological implications of sexuality in the United States. This course is intended to help you develop your analytical and critical thinking skills. You will be asked to move beyond your own experience and perspectives to sociologically analyze and evaluate over-simplified explanations of past and contemporary issues as they appear in our course readings. prereq: Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?austi241+SOC4551+Fall2022
Class Description:
In this course we will examine sociological theories and research used to study sexual attitudes, behaviors and identities. Although our primary focus is on sexualities in the United States, we will engage in comparative historical and cultural aspects throughout the semester. A sample of the topics we will discuss include the history of sexuality, how sexuality is socially constructed, sexuality over the life course, sexuality and social inequality (including intersections of social class, gender, race/ethnicity, disability and age), sexual identity, friendships and romantic relationships, sexuality and social institutions (including debates about sex education, sex work, religion, politics and health), domestic violence and sexual assault, technology and sexuality, sexuality in the media, protests and social change. In addition to developing analytical and critical thinking skills, this course aims to increase your understanding of the connections between human sexual attitudes and behaviors and larger social forces, ultimately giving you more knowledge about the inner workings of the society in which we live.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Everyone is welcome! The topics discussed in this course are applicable to many fields of study, including, but not limited to, education, psychology, law, human resources, communication studies and public health. If you have an interest in a specific topic, please let me know and I'll do my best to incorporate it. Contact me with any additional questions!
Class Format:

This course will be completely online, in an asynchronous format. Students will be required to independently read and write about the material. There will not be regularly recorded lectures/presentations. The course is structured by weekly modules in which you will have discussions (with initial posts by 11:59 p.m. on Thursdays and responses by 11:59 p.m. on Sundays). Each week you will receive an Announcement with an Agenda and other details about the week. There is a weekly structure to help keep you on track. Contact me with any questions about this!

Workload:

Approximately 9 hours of independent work on reading, research and other course requirements in accordance with UMN guidelines (3 hours per week per credit). You can expect to read a combination of textbook chapters, academic articles and non-fiction book chapters. You can also expect to watch videos available online, including, but not limited to, documentaries and movies. Students will be assessed in a variety of ways, including, but not limited to, discussion boards, reflection papers/journals and a final research paper (8-10 pages).

Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33133/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 May 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Capstone Experience: Seminar (18072)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Community Engaged Learning
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Enrollment Status:
Open (59 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC4966W+Fall2022
Class Description:

This course is designed to: a) provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a portfolio of self-presentation materials and sociological analyses based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. The main goal of the course is to guide you through the process of writing your capstone portfolio by providing structure, advice, and encouragement. Successful completion of the analytic portion of your portfolio shows mastery of the skills and perspectives of your field of study. Along the way, we will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civil engagement.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Seniors with a major in Sociology
Learning Objectives:

-- Be able to analyze the day-to-day world sociologically and express yourself in writing

-- Know other people in your graduating class and feel part of a community

-- Gain knowledge about life skills that will help after college

-- Be more prepared for the job market and/or applying to further schooling

Grading:

-- Active class participation in activities, discussion, and in-class writing (20% of grade)

-- Capstone Portfolio (60% of grade) -- Includes resume, personal statement, paper analyzing CEL site, and paper analyzing interview

-- Life-skills and job market assignments (20% of grade)

Exam Format:
There are no exams
Class Format:
10% Lecture
10% Visiting speakers
80% In-class activities in small and large groups, including writing exercises
Workload:
Students will spend significant time in class and outside of class writing and revising this writing. All students can gain points by doing optional career-focused and adulting-focused assignments. These points are not required to bass the class but are required to get an A in the class.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18072/1229
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/liebler_SOC4966W_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 March 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 4977V Section 001: Senior Honors Proseminar I (18093)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
Department Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Honors
Enrollment Requirements:
honors student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 415
Enrollment Status:
Open (11 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Exploring contemporary research for senior thesis. Guidance in defining a problem and reviewing prior theory/research. Presentation/discussion with faculty researchers. prereq: 3701, 3801, 3811, 9 additional upper div sociology cr, sr soc honors major, dept consent
Class Notes:
Must obtain permission number from Department office to register. All seats reserved for Honors students majoring in Sociology. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tswartz+SOC4977V+Fall2022
Class Description:
This is the first course in a two-semester sequence designed to help honors students majoring in sociology prepare their senior projects research papers. Throughout this semester, we review key issues in the design of social research as students work on their independent projects. Specific activities in this semester of the course sequence include development of a research topic, exploring and reviewing relevant existing literature, applying for human subjects approval, putting together a faculty committee for the project, and completing first drafts of the literature review and methods sections of the research paper. Some students may begin data collection in the fall, but data collection and analysis, as well as the write-up and presentation of the final paper, are the main activities of the spring course. Students must take both courses in the sequence.
Grading:

Class participation 20%, topic statements 10%, completed IRB form 10%, preliminary annotated bibliography 20%, methods section draft 20%, literature review draft 20%.

Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
20% Lecture
80% Discussion
Workload:
40-60 Pages Reading Per Week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18093/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 April 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 5811 Section 001: Social Statistics for Graduate Students (17811)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
jr or sr or grad student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 150
Enrollment Status:
Open (4 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In this course, students will learn core statistical and computations principles that will allow them to perform quantitative analyses using social data. The course is designed for social science students at the beginning of their graduate school careers. However, advanced undergraduates can take the course, which will involve a few modifications to the assignment schedule. Sociology 5811 will review basic probability, and then move on to univariate inference, the linear regression model, and introductory lessons of causal inference. In doing so, students will explore statistical concepts and methods that provide the foundation sociologists use to most commonly collect and analyze numerical evidence. Sociology 5811 will also provide the foundation for data management and statistical inference using Stata, a statistical computing environment that is popular in the social sciences. prereq: Undergraduate students are expected to have familiarity with the materials taught in the equivalent of 3811. Students who are unsure of the course requirements should contact the instructor. Undergraduates with a strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc majors must register A-F. 5811 is a good social statistics foundation course for MA students from other programs. 5811 will not count for credits towards the Soc PhD program requirements.
Class Notes:
5 seats reserved for Sociology graduate students and 5 seats reserved for BS Majors Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tvanheuv+SOC5811+Fall2022
Class Description:
In this course, students will learn core statistical and computations principles that will allow them to perform quantitative analyses using social data. The course is designed for social science students at the beginning of their graduate school careers. However, advanced undergraduates can take the course, which will involve a few modifications to the assignment schedule.

Sociology 5811 will review basic probability, and then move on to univariate inference, the linear regression model, and introductory lessons of causal inference. In doing so, students will explore statistical concepts and methods that provide the foundation sociologists use to most commonly collect and analyze numerical evidence. Sociology 5811 will also provide the foundation for data management and statistical inference using Stata, a statistical computing environment that is popular in the social sciences. This course focuses on the practical application and substantive understanding of the linear regression models, rather than a full expounding of the mathematical details and statistical theory underlying these models. We will work closely with real data throughout the semester, which will also introduce students to the process of data management.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students and advanced undergraduate students
Learning Objectives:
Understand the basic logic of statistical modeling.

Construct an appropriate model to appropriately address a research question.

Estimate and interpret linear regression models in Stata.

Write clean, reproducible, legible code in Stata.

Communicate results from multiple regression analyses for a broad audience.

Become familiar with visualizing multivariate relationships and presenting regression output in professional tables.
Grading:
100% Three computer data analysis assignments.
Exam Format:
Computations
Short Answer
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Laboratory
Workload:
10-35 PowerPoint slides reading per week; 3 computer problem sets; no exams
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17811/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 April 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 8001 Section 001: Sociology as a Profession (18828)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1 Credit
Repeat Credit Limit:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
S-N or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Sociology graduate student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue 01:00PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1183
Enrollment Status:
Open (3 of 10 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This 1 credit class fosters adaptation to the Graduate Program in Sociology and preparation for a sociological career. In the Fall, we explore professional careers in this field. We discuss the wide range of opportunities in sociology and help students further explore the next steps to becoming a scholar, educator, and member of various professional, intellectual, and social communities. We share practical information about being a student in sociology and about sociological careers, discuss presentations in department workshop seminars, and provide a safe place to discuss issues of student concerns. Students are encouraged to bring to the class their thoughts and reactions to experiences during their first semester in the PhD program. The Spring 8001 class is oriented to particular milestones in the Sociology Graduate Program and important student activities (for example, preparing reading lists for the preliminary exam and then writing the preliminary exam, preparing a dissertation prospectus, writing grant proposals, preparing an article for publication, etc.). Pre-req: Soc PhD students
Class Notes:
10 seats reserved for Sociology graduate students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC8001+Fall2022
Class Description:
This class fosters adaptation to the Graduate Program in Sociology and exploration of professional careers in this field.

We will discuss the wide range of opportunities in sociology and help students get started in thinking about becoming a scholar, educator, and member of various professional, intellectual, and social communities.

We will share practical information about being a student in sociology and about sociological careers, discuss presentations in department workshop seminars, and provide a safe place to discuss issues of student concern. Students are encouraged to bring to the class their thoughts and reactions to experiences in the program.




Who Should Take This Class?:
First year graduate students in Sociology.
Learning Objectives:
Students will learn about different types of sociological careers and share experiences that facilitate adaptation to the life of a graduate student.
Grading:
S-N
Exam Format:
No exams
Class Format:
We meet one hour per week. Several sessions feature visitors or panels of sociologists representing different institutional contexts (e.g. R1 university faculty, faculty at a small liberal arts college, sociologists in research organizations, those who work in government agencies, etc.).
Workload:
There are no required readings or exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18828/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 March 2017

Fall 2022  |  SOC 8090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Sociology & Its Publics (32729)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
12 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
Instructor Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Fri 10:00AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 915
Enrollment Status:
Open (2 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
Class Notes:
8 seats reserved for Sociology graduate students Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC8090+Fall2022 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?uggen001+SOC8090+Fall2022
Class Description:


Students in this workshop will serve as the graduate student board for The Society Pages, an online social science journalism project housed at the University of Minnesota. Participation is based on application. In addition to experience and qualifications, the board is selected so as to involve students from different stages in the program, substantive interest areas, and methodological specialties. Most participants are expected to make a year-long commitment to the project, though membership will rotate on an annual basis.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Graduate students in sociology
Learning Objectives:
  • To deepen students' substantive research expertise
    by engaging cutting edge sociological scholarship. Students will unearth the most interesting findings and best evidence from new research in their areas of study. This provides students with a broader vision of the sociological field and offers an opportunity to diversify their reading in the prelim and dissertation processes.

  • To develop writing and communication skills
    in addressing academic and non-academic audiences. Grad board members regularly write for the website, and our supportive, professional editorial team gives direct feedback designed to improve these skills as the pieces are published online.

  • To gain deep, practical appreciation of the process of editorial decision-making
    and public scholarship.
    TSP had almost 11 million unique page views last year. Working with the site allows students to engage in critical and constructive discussion of the field of sociology, while participating in a collaborative public outreach project by shaping and improving the site as an online vehicle to disseminate great research.

Class Format:
Weekly seminar
Workload:
4-6 hours a week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32729/1229
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hartm021_uggen001_SOC8090_Fall2021.pdf (Fall 2021)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 April 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 8590 Section 001: Topics in Life Course Sociology -- Work and Well-Being in Turbulent Times (32734)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Repeat Credit Limit:
12 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Thu 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (3 of 12 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
Sociology of aging, sociology of youth, and mental health and adjustment in early life course. Topics specified in [Class Schedule].
Class Notes:
3 seats reserved for Sociology graduate students Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phylmoen+SOC8590+Fall2022 Drawing on gendered life course, stress process, and intersectionality approaches, class will address: How do macro-level transformations precipitate unequal work transitions and conditions at different career/life stages? How do these work-related changes foster disparities in health/well-being across the life course?
Class Description:
Drawing on gendered life course, stress process, and intersectionality theoretical approaches to social change, this class will address the health and well-being implications of, and inequities around, the changing nature of paid work along with ongoing disparities around both paid work and unpaid family care work. We will adopt a gendered life course, stress process, intersectional approach to turbulent times, considering key life course and stress process themes and using an intersectional lens. These themes include shifting historical contexts, the timing of exogenous shocks in the biographies of individuals and households, processes of cumulative advantage/disadvantage and turning points; structural contexts (re)producing, exacerbating, or mitigating disparities in allocation and socialization processes, constrained choice and (perceived) control cycles , the persisting inequities: How do macro-level transformations precipitate unequal work transitions and conditions at different career/life stages? How do these work-related changes foster disparities in health/well-being across population groups at different points in their life courses?
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32734/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 May 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 8701 Section 001: Sociological Theory (18096)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (3 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Traditions of social theory basic to sociological knowledge, their reflection and expansion in contemporary theory, their applications in selected areas of empirical research. Sample topics: social inequality, social organization and politics, family organization and social reproduction, social order and change, sociology of knowledge and religion.
Class Notes:
5 seats reserved for sociology graduate students Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC8701+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course provides an introduction to the central traditions, figures and concepts in sociological theory. It is intended primarily for first-year graduate students in Sociology, but it covers work that is widely read and referenced in the social sciences generally. This course covers the work of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Mead, Goffman, Bourdieu, and several other traditions and figures.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Required for first year graduate students in Sociology. A few seats are open to other students upon request.
Grading:
Attendance and participation: 30%
Memos and class discussions: 40%
Final paper: 30%
Exam Format:
None.
Class Format:
Orienting lecture from instructor, but mostly seminar format with student leadership.
Workload:
Substantial reading. Reading may be longer and (at times) more difficult than you are used to. Please see attached syllabus to gauge average week's reading.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18096/1229
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gerte004_SOC8701_Fall2022.pdf
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gerte004_SOC8701_Fall2017.pdf (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/gerte004_SOC8701_Fall2016.pdf (Fall 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 March 2017

Fall 2022  |  SOC 8735 Section 001: Sociology of Culture (32738)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Fri 09:00AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (8 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Definition/importance of culture as dimension of social life. Structural/Durkheimian approaches, cultural Marxism, practice theory. Cultural creation/reception. Identities as cultural formations. Culture/social inequality. Culture and race. Cultural construction of social problems. Culture and globalization.
Class Notes:
8 seats reserved for Sociology graduate students Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?edgell+SOC8735+Fall2022
Class Description:
This course provides an overview of cultural sociology. We will begin with central readings in theory and method to give students a background in the motivating questions and debates in the subfield. We will consider why the field has moved away from a focus on culture as ideas and ideals and toward a conception of culture as practice and institution, and we will engage with current debates about how best to conceptualize culture (as a deep or elaborated code or as a repertoire of action?), and related questions about culture's role in shaping cognition. We will also read empirical work that focuses on the relationship between culture and symbolic boundaries, and the role of embodiment and emotion in cultural analysis.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Sociology graduate students interested in working with cultural approaches (broadly defined). Students in other disciplines interested in theories of what culture is and how it "works" in the social world.
Learning Objectives:
At the end of the course, students will:
- Understand the sociology of culture -- it's major questions and topics, themes and forms of argumentation
- Understand how to apply concepts and theories from cultural sociology to frame their own research projects or to perform analyses of their own data
- Have improved capacity to think conceptually and critically engage with ongoing debates in the sociological literature
- Have developed competency in outlining and critically assessing authors' (complex, abstract, academic) arguments and developing their own critical assessment
Grading:
70% Reports/Papers
10% In-class Presentations
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
80% Discussion
20% Student Presentations
Workload:
60-90 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Paper(s)
2 Presentation(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32738/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 April 2022

Fall 2022  |  SOC 8851 Section 001: Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: In-Depth Interviewing (32742)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Fri 11:45AM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Social Sciences Building 1114
Enrollment Status:
Open (10 of 12 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Interviewers have opened up other worlds to the sociological imagination and taught us much about the way people think, feel, and make sense of the world as well as of their own identities. We will conduct interviews; transcribe, code, and analyze interview data; and write up interview- based research. We will also consider a range of epistemological, practical, and ethical issues related to interviewing as a research method, reading materials drawn from a broad range of substantive sociological subfields as well as from geography. This course is best suited to graduate students who have an interview-based project in mind and want to acquire the skills for carrying out their research, and students who are considering using interviews in their dissertation research and want to try their hand at interviewing before making a decision. Because this is a hands-on, fieldwork-based course, no auditors are permitted.
Class Notes:
12 seats reserved for Sociology graduate students Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC8851+Fall2022
Class Description:
In-depth interviewing allows us to unveil the complex lived experiences of individuals and communities as a researcher delves deeply into the everyday practices, choices and constraints individuals face in their private and public lives. This course presents to the students techniques as well as interview-based published work. Each student pursues an original project that will be completed over the course of the semester. Students will thus learn about in-depth interviewing [adjusted in light of covid-19 constraints] by designing, executing, coding, analyzing and writing up their own projects. There will be a constant dialogue amongst us on the strengths, weaknesses and the complexity of interviewing as a research method and methodology as we work through students' projects over the course of the semester.
Who Should Take This Class?:
This course is appropriate for students whose research project is interview-based or those interested in exploring multiple forms of research methods. As the course requires students to conduct their own independent research, auditing is not allowed.
Grading:
20% Research proposal and peer review memo on research proposals
10% Transcriptions and memo on interviews
20% Coded interview data and peer review memos on classmates' coded material
50% Final Paper
Class Format:
Zoom live
Workload:
50-60 pages of reading per week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32742/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 October 2020

Summer 2022  |  SOC 1001 Section 301: Introduction to Sociology (87280)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 14 wk
 
05/16/2022 - 08/19/2022
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (26 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
.
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/87280/1225
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Summer 2022  |  SOC 1001 Section 302: Introduction to Sociology (87776)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 14 wk
 
05/16/2022 - 08/19/2022
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (25 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/87776/1225
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Summer 2022  |  SOC 3246 Section 001: Diseases, Disasters, & Other Killers (82094)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/06/2022 - 07/29/2022
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (33 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
This online class will meet weekly synchronously online at the scheduled day and time. The other weekly lecture will be shared asynchronously each week. This class begins online synchronously on Wed June 8 at the scheduled time. Class will not meet on Wed June 15. For the 2nd week, content will be shared asynchronously online. Class resumes synchronously online on Wed June 22. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?barr0325+SOC3246+Summer2022
Class Description:


  • Explore the causes and consequences of a historic worldwide transformation in death and disease;

  • Analyze how that transformation occurred differently in different parts of the world, and why it matters;

  • Consider to what extent mortality can- or can't- be further eradicated.

  • Who Should Take This Class?:
    Anyone interested in Diseases, Disasters and Other Killers. Also, this course meets the University's requirements for the Historical Perspectives core and the Environment Theme.
    Learning Objectives:


  • Explore the causes and consequences of a historic worldwide transformation in death and disease;

  • Analyze how that transformation occurred differently in different parts of the world, and why it matters;

  • Consider to what extent mortality can- or can't- be further eradicated.

  • Grading:

    6 Reflection journal entries 5 points each

    5 Discussion Posts 5 points each

    5 Quizzes 5 points each

    2 Essays 10 points each

    1 Extra Credit Essay 5 points


    Total 105 points
    Exam Format:
    Short answer, multiple choice and essay.
    Class Format:
    Online with one synchronous meeting each week.
    Workload:
    40-60 Pages Reading Per Week
    4-10 Pages Writing Per Term
    2 Exam(s)
    1 Paper(s)
    1 Assignment
    5 Quizzes
    5 Responses to Discussion Questions
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82094/1225
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    19 April 2022

    Summer 2022  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (81802)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Meets With:
    AAS 3251W Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Summer Session 14 wk
     
    05/16/2022 - 08/19/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (23 of 25 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    This course is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pharr004+SOC3251W+Summer2022
    Class Description:
    Our goal in this course is to understand both the causes and consequences of inequality in American society. We will explore the social construction of race, class, and gender, and how their definitions and boundaries vary across time and across space. We will assess how these constructs are "real in their consequences," and have a profound impact on individual experiences, identities, and relationships. We will analyze how various axes of social inequality are reproduced at the interpersonal, institutional, and systemic level. Finally, we will examine how race, class, gender, sexuality, (dis)ability, and any number of other social statuses interact and intersect in shaping our unique standpoint. This is an online, writing intensive course, and students will be evaluated primarily on their ability to discuss the course material and communicate core concepts in relation to their experiences and current events. Students will contribute to weekly online discussions, submit in-depth reading journals/discussion posts, and complete one 8-10 page formal essay.
    Grading:
    General participation in online discussion - 15%
    5 discussion posts - 50%
    1 8-10 page essay (including proposal, rough draft, peer revision, and final draft) - 35%
    Workload:
    - approximately 40 pages of reading per week
    - weekly participation in online discussion
    - 5 500-word discussion posts
    - 1 2000-2500-word formal essay (including proposal, rough draft, peer revision, and final draft)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/81802/1225
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    7 February 2022

    Summer 2022  |  SOC 3322W Section 001: Social Movements, Protests, and Change (87447)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    06/06/2022 - 07/29/2022
    Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (29 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about the dilemmas and challenges facing movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and various institutions, and the role of social movements and protest in bringing about change. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long-term and short-run impact. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    This online class will meet weekly synchronously online at the scheduled day and time. The other weekly lecture will be shared asynchronously each week. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?joh07820+SOC3322W+Summer2022
    Class Description:

    We all know that the modern social world is filled with groups and movements (e.g., Black Lives Matter, Medicare for All, organized labor, #MeToo, and The Sunrise Movement) demanding changes to the unequal power arrangements of contemporary society. What is less understood, however, is how such movements operate - how they motivate engagement, create social pressure on institutions, encourage certain patterns of emotions, and even get people to integrate a social movement into a fundamental aspect of their identities. This class will offer you tools with which to recognize and analyze the how of modern social movements, granting you the tools to become better organizers, citizens, and, more generally, a more empathetic and critical analyst of those who sacrifice their time, energy, and sometimes their health and freedom to hopefully create a better society for all of us.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Any and all students able to register for the class with an interest in how groups collaborate and challenge social power are welcome in the class.
    Learning Objectives:
    Students will work on the following skills:

    1.) Learn how to read and analyze academic texts

    2.) Learn how to collaborate and learn in non-lecture educational settings

    3.) Learn how to take ownership of scholarly ideas and apply them to personal contexts of interest

    4.) Learn how to develop and refine an original topic of the student's choosing in an academic paper.

    Grading:
    Students grades will be based on a mixture of online open note quizzes, participation and attendance in synchronous sessions, and a series of assignments concerning the planning, drafting, and submission of a final term paper.
    Exam Format:
    There will be 2-3 quizzes in the course, each taken online and with access to notes. The final exam will be a term paper.
    Class Format:
    The class will be semi-synchronous with class meetings held virtually for discussion/quizzes once per week and all instructional materials (instructional notes and recorded lectures) available virtually to review outside of class time and posted once per week.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/87447/1225
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    10 February 2022

    Summer 2022  |  SOC 3701 Section 301: Social Theory (87427)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    4 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    College of Continuing Education
    Times and Locations:
    Summer Session 15 wk
     
    05/16/2022 - 08/26/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (23 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    This course is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bokun001+SOC3701+Summer2022
    Class Description:
    What is this thing we call society? Who holds power, and how is it exercised? How is our society different from that of our parents or grandparents? This course offers a window into some of the major thinkers of social theory to enhance our understanding of societal change. We will learn about theory not as an abstraction removed from reality, but as a bridge to understanding modern phenomena, controversies, and the social construction of reality. This course provides a guided introduction to analyzing inequality, economic relationships, culture, gender, racism, social networks, and identity formation. Through close reading and discussion, we will - together - critically engage with the patterns, forces, and power structures shaping our modern and future world.
    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course, students will:

    1.) Strengthen critical thinking, reading comprehension, and writing skills

    2.) Learn how to engage in constructive discussion, debate, and critique

    3.) Identify how sociological arguments are constructed and how to evaluate them

    4.) Apply sociological theories to explain current events and social problems

    5.) Compare and contrast sociological theories

    Grading:
    1 Midterm (25%)
    1 Final Exam (25%)
    5 Quizzes (25%)
    In-class Assignments/Participation (25%)
    Exam Format:
    Short Answer
    Essays
    Workload:
    Other Workload: book essay
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/87427/1225
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    15 February 2022

    Summer 2022  |  SOC 3721 Section 001: Principles of Social Psychology (87445)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Times and Locations:
    Summer Session 10 wk
     
    06/06/2022 - 08/12/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (28 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Social psychology is at the intersection of macro and micro sociology, linking social structures, interpersonal relationships and interactions, attitudes, values and the self-concept. Principles of social psychology are drawn from multiple theoretical perspectives, including symbolic interactionism, expectation states theory, social structure and personality, and the life course. This course covers a broad range of topics as well as the diverse methods that social psychologists use to study them (for example, experiments, surveys, ethnographic observation). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    This course is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?austi241+SOC3721+Summer2022
    Class Description:
    Sociological social psychologists explore the social processes by which people develop a sense of self, negotiate meaning in everyday social interactions and how groups and social institutions influence everyday interactions. This course provides an overview of sociological social psychology and introduces students to the major methods, theories and concepts in the field. Topics include socialization over the life course (including socialization toward work), social inequality (including intersections of social class, gender, race/ethnicity and disability), the social construction of identity, the presentation of self, mental health and illness, social deviance, relationships, the sociology of groups and social change. In addition to developing critical thinking skills, this course enables students to better understand how their own interests, values and social locations shape their attitudes and behaviors.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Everyone is welcome! The concepts discussed in this course can be applied to all areas of your life, including work, identity and social issues. If you have an interest in a specific topic, please let me know and I'll do my best to incorporate it. Contact me with any additional questions!
    Class Format:
    This course will be completely online, in an asynchronous format. Students will be required to independently read the material. There will not be regularly recorded lectures/presentations.
    Workload:
    Approximately 9 hours of independent work on reading, research and other course requirements in accordance with UMN guidelines (3 hours per week per credit). Students can expect to read a combination of textbook chapters, academic articles and non-fiction book chapters. Students can also expect to watch videos available online, including, but not limited to, documentaries. Students will be assessed in a variety of ways, including, but not limited to, discussion boards, writing assignments/worksheets, reflection papers/journals and a research paper (8-10 pages).
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/87445/1225
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    16 November 2021

    Summer 2022  |  SOC 4149 Section 001: Sociology of Killing (82100)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Enrollment Requirements:
    jr or sr or grad student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    06/06/2022 - 07/29/2022
    Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (33 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course will provide a broad overview of the sociology of murder- the intentional, malicious killing of one human by another. This course will go beyond what we see about murder regularly in the media and on popular TV shows and movies. Students will be exposed to a scientific study of homicide. Key topics include the history and laws of murder; information and data sources on murder; demographic attributes of victims and offenders; different types of murder, including among others domestic, serial, mass, and gang-related murder; biological, sociological and psychological theories of the causes of murder; and the strategies involved in the criminal investigation of homicide. prereq: jr, or sr, or grad student, or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    This online class will meet weekly synchronously online at the scheduled day and time. The other weekly lecture will be shared asynchronously each week. This class begins online synchronously on Thurs June 9 at the scheduled time. Class will not meet on Thurs June 16. For the 2nd week, content will be shared asynchronously online. Class resumes synchronously online on Thurs June 23. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?barr0325+SOC4149+Summer2022
    Class Description:

    This course is about murder - a particularly grisly topic for some. Please be advised that during the semester, students will read about and discuss graphic portrayals of crimes and/or view gruesome images. This course assumes that students enrolling in this class are capable of tolerating this dark subject matter.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Anyone interested in the sociology of killing.
    Learning Objectives:
    • To understand biological, sociological, and psychological explanations for the occurrence of homicide in the United States.

    • To understand and be able to critique the various sources of information on homicide as well as what these sources tell us about offenders, victims, weapons, locations, types, and motives of homicide in the United States.

    • To understand the stages, patterns, processes, offenders, victims, and settings of homicide.

    • To understand how society and the criminal justice system react to the occurrence of homicide in the United States.

    Grading:

    2 Exams 20 points each

    5 Quizzes 4 points each

    1 Paper 20 points

    1 Assignment 10 points

    5 Responses 2 points each

    1 Extra Credit Essay 5 points


    Total 105 points
    Exam Format:
    Multiple choice, short answer, essay.
    Class Format:
    40% Lecture
    40% Discussion
    20% Guest Speakers
    Workload:
    40-60 Pages Reading Per Week
    4-10 Pages Writing Per Term
    2 Exam(s)
    1 Paper(s)
    1 Assignment
    5 Quizzes
    5 Responses to Discussion Questions
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82100/1225
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    19 April 2022

    Summer 2022  |  SOC 4246 Section 001: Sociology of Health and Illness (87446)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Enrollment Requirements:
    soph or jr or sr
    Times and Locations:
    Summer Session 14 wk
     
    05/16/2022 - 08/19/2022
    Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (17 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is an introduction to the importance of health and illness in people's lives, how social structures impact who gets sick, how they are treated, and how the delivery of health care is organized. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the sociology of health and illness, and understand that health and illness are not just biological processes, but profoundly shaped by the organization of society. prereq: One sociology course recommended; soph or above; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    This online class will meet weekly synchronously online at the scheduled day and time. The other weekly lecture will be shared asynchronously each week. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mill8570+SOC4246+Summer2022
    Class Description:
    Health and illness is something each of us encounter in our daily lives. From living during the covid-19 pandemic, engaging with doctors for routine care, caring for sick loved ones, or living with disease and disability. This course is designed to introduce students to medical sociology and provide sociological tools to understand contemporary issues in health, illness and healing. We will cover topics including: the social construction of health and illness, social determinants of health inequities, healthcare providers, the healthcare system.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    One sociology course recommended; soph or above; soc majors/minors must register A-F. This class is appropriate for anyone with an interest in health and illness. This course may be of particular relevance for students planning to enter the healing professions.
    Grading:
    Participation and discussion (30%), Reflection and application memos (40%), Mid-term and final exam (30%)
    Exam Format:
    Multiple choice and short answer.
    Class Format:
    Classes will consist of a mixture pre-recorded asynchronous lectures and synchronous discussion via zoom.
    Workload:
    30-75 Pages Reading Per Week
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/87446/1225
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    10 February 2022

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 1001 Section 001: Introduction to Sociology (52514)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Freshman Full Year Registration
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Willey Hall 175
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (239 of 240 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Discussion sections will NOT meet first week of classes Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jvanheuv+SOC1001+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Sociology offers a unique lens through which we can examine the world around us. In this course you will develop a perspective that will allow you to analyze the social world in a way that reveals the hidden and/or overlooked social forces that shape our lives. This approach, the sociological imagination, will enable you to explore how social forces influence the ways we view and navigate our social world. We will discuss how sociologists use theory and research to better understand important social issues such as inequalities of race, class, gender, sexualities and how social order and social change are possible. We will discuss how society affects individuals and in turn how individuals can affect society.
    Exam Format:
    Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
    Class Format:
    Classes will consist of a mixture of lecture and discussion.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52514/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    14 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 1001 Section 011: Introduction to Sociology (52517)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Freshman Full Year Registration
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Anderson Hall 370
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (172 of 180 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Discussion sections will NOT meet first week of classes Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tswartz+SOC1001+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what Mills calls the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists, and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. We will first explore the creation and maintenance of the social order as well as the social processes by which people develop a sense of self and negotiate meanings in everyday social interactions. We then take a look at social structure, social institutions and social inequality. Finally, we will explore how, why, and when social life changes. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. Class time will be a mix of lecture, discussion, multimedia, small group work and in-class exercises. The primary course objectives are as follows: (1) Students will be able to demonstrate a comprehensive introductory understanding of key sociological concepts, terminology, theories, approaches, and perspectives. (2) Students will be able to apply sociological analysis to contemporary examples and to their own lives. (3) Students will improve their ability to think critically and to articulate their ideas in written and verbal formats. The course is targeted to undergraduate majors and non-majors and satisfies the Liberal Education Social Science Core requirement.


    Please visit: z.umn.edu/seam

    Grading:
    40% Reports/Papers Other Grading Information: 40% exams/quizzes; 20% class participation/activities/homework/labwork
    Exam Format:
    multiple choice, short essay, essay
    Class Format:
    50% Lecture
    25% Discussion
    25% videos, small group work, in-class activities, homework, other
    Workload:
    40-60 Pages Reading Per Week
    12-15 Pages Writing Per Term
    3 Paper(s)
    Other Workload: exams/quizzes will be a mix of multiple choice, short essay, essay
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52517/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 February 2016

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 1001 Section 021: Introduction to Sociology (52520)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Freshman Full Year Registration
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue 05:15PM - 08:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (150 of 150 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    This lecture section (1001-21) is completely online in a synchronous format at the posted day/time. Discussion sections will NOT meet first week of classes Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?asalamha+SOC1001+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    How does it happen that an individual can physically torture another? Why do people discriminate? How do we reason morally? While the course does not fully answer these questions, the course hopes to begin to have preliminary discussions about them. In these discussions, we draw on classical and contemporary sociological perspectives to examine how social order is produced, and how individuals and groups knowingly - and also unknowingly - enable the emergence of the very threats they fear. The course explores sociological concepts by making connections to global social problems such as torture, genocide, inequality, and the displacement of persons. We examine how social conformity creates social stability yet also perniciously enables torture, genocide, and widespread inequality. The goals of the course are to inspire our sociological imagination - our ability to see how social forces permit and hinder the actions of individuals - as well as deepen our understanding about contemporary social problems. The course invites learners to question the ways in which they explain social events, and appreciate the multiplicity of ways - as well as - the challenges and complexity - involved in describing society. Throughout the course, you will be asked to discuss how society individually impacts you, and how you also contribute to the perpetuation - as well as degradation - of society's norms. You are anticipated to discuss readings and contemporary controversies in discussion groups.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Required for sociology majors, open to others. This course meets the requirements of the Council on Liberal Education's Social Science core and Social Justice theme.
    Learning Objectives:
    To think about the social world and the ways in which the social world shapes human experience.
    To ask why individuals and groups behave as they do.
    To understand how social problems emerge.
    To explore how human thought and perception are by-products of broader social structures.
    To engage one's sociological imagination.
    Grading:
    30% Attendance, Readings, and Journals
    70% Quizzes
    Exam Format:
    Multiple choice questions and short answers (depending on the quiz). All quizzes are conducted online (in class) including the final quiz, which takes place on the last day of classes. Quizzes are cumulative. There is no exam during the exam period. Adequate time would be given for review with teaching assistants.
    Class Format:
    Lecture and Discussion
    There are no textbooks in the course. All readings are anticipated to be available on Canvas.
    Workload:
    20-30 Pages Reading per Week
    4 Quizzes (in-class)
    1 Final Quiz (in-class)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52520/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    3 March 2020

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 1101 Section 001: Law, Crime, & Punishment (54808)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Freshman Full Year Registration
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 5
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (58 of 80 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introductory course designed to provide students with a general understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. We examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment using an interdisciplinary social science approach.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC1101+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This introductory course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. Drawing from an interdisciplinary social science perspective, we examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment with a particular focus on how forms of social control institutionalize, legitimize and perpetuate inequality. The course is comprised of two units. First, we will critically analyze central theoretical traditions in criminology with an emphasis on theories currently shaping research in the field. The second unit will include an examination of contemporary case studies in several substantive areas. Thematic topics to be discussed include law and social control; the impact of criminal record and race on the employment of ex-offenders; the effect of juvenile justice criminal policies on urban youth; and alternatives to policing and police reform.
    Grading:
    40% Reports/Papers
    15% Written Assignments
    20% Class Presentations
    25% Class Participation
    Class Format:
    45% Lecture
    5% Film/Video
    45% Discussion
    5% Small Group Activities
    Workload:
    50 Pages Reading Per Week
    2 Papers
    1 Reading Reflection
    1 Class Presentation
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54808/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    28 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3005 Section 001: Social Science Fiction (65826)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 120
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (53 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course applies theories, concepts, and principles from social science disciplines such as sociology, political science, and anthropology, to social science fiction novels, stories, and films, to understand how soc-sci-fi contributes to knowledge about current societal conditions. Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC3005+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This course applies theories, concepts, and principles from social science disciplines - anthropology, economics, organization studies, political science, psychology, sociology -
    to social science fiction novels, stories, and films, to understand how soc-sci-fi contributes to knowledge about current social problems.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Anyone curious about what social science fiction can tell us about today's social problems.
    Learning Objectives:
    Understanding social science theories and concepts by working through their implications in unfamiliar contexts of social science fiction.

    Acquiring the ability to imagine alternatives to current social problems in order to work toward those alternatives.


    Analyzing the prospects for the evolution or devolution of contemporary cultures and societies by using soc-sci-fi imagination


    Demonstrating knowledge of how social, organizational, political, economic, cultural, and ethical factors may impact human relations in hypothetical cultures and societies.


    Critically analyzing soc-sci-fi with social science principles in shorter writing assignments.


    Producing a broader analysis of soc-sci-fi with social science principles in a longer course paper
    Grading:
    Three shorter writing assignments, each 20% of the course grade. One longer course paper, 40% of the course grade.
    Exam Format:
    No exams.
    Class Format:

    Classes use a variety of teaching and learning methods - readings, film clips, lectures, small and large group discussions and debates, role-playing activities, shorter- and longer-form writing assignments - to understand how the social sciences and social science fiction can work together to create a better understanding of human societies.

    Workload:
    This course is very demanding of students'
    outside-of-class time. It involves a substantial amount of reading and writing. University of Minnesota undergraduates are expected to spend 2 hours in out-of-class preparation for each in-class hour, a total of 5 hours per week. You should begin reading the novels at least two weeks before the in-class discussions are scheduled.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65826/1223
    Syllabus:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/knoke001_SOC3005_Spring2022.pdf
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    16 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Happiness & Well-Being: Sociological Perspectives (65918)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    soph or jr or sr
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Carlson School of Management 2-233
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (29 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F; cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tswartz+SOC3090+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    Happiness is a shared goal for most Americans and people around the world. Social scientists have become increasingly interested in the subject of happiness. Sociologists have recently entered the field bringing more attention to the relationship between happiness, social context, and social life. In this course we will ask: What is happiness? Does money buy happiness? How does happiness vary across diverse groups and different societies? What social contexts, conditions, and institutions foster happiness and thriving? What stands in the way? What makes for a good life? How can we promote happiness, well-being, and flourishing for individuals and communities?


    In thinking through these questions, we will explore some of the factors that contribute to happiness and well-being including social support and connection, purpose and meaning, engagement and activity, culture, stratification and status, health, and social policies and collective life. We will also reflect on and critically evaluate different conceptions of happiness, the ideas and practices involved in "the pursuit of happiness", and the burgeoning "happiness industry." Much of our focus will be on the contemporary United States, but we will also take a look at research and experiences in other countries. As part of the work for this class, students will engage with practical lessons from the scientific study of happiness and human flourishing by applying insights from research to their own lives. For their course projects, students may choose to participate in an optional community-engaged learning experience; try out a new group physical, creative, or other activity; work for a cause that matters to them; or participate in an action project.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    There are no prerequisites for this course, and is open to all students. It may particularly interesting to sociology majors, those interested in reflecting on and promoting their own and others' well-being. The course can count toward community-engaged scholar program. The course is open to individual adaptation for Honors credit.
    Grading:
    Students will be graded based on the following components:
    -Class Participation and Engagement
    -Field Assignments
    -Reflection and Response Papers
    -Possible quizzes
    -Course Project
    -Group Presentations


    Exam Format:
    No formal exams, potential short quizzes
    Class Format:
    This course will use a variety of teaching and learning methods including reading, film clips, podcasts, lectures, small and large group discussions, student group presentations/discussion leading, formal and informal writing assignments. Much of the in-class time will be student-centered, active, and discussion based.
    Workload:
    Students will read approximately 30-60 pages per week or equivalent in podcasts, films, etc. Students projects will involve a semester long engagement in community work, group activity, or other applied or action project.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65918/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    15 November 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (53537)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-106
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (78 of 80 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?barr0325+SOC3101+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    This course will introduce you to sociological perspectives on crime and punishment in the United States. We will cover the major stages of the criminal justice process- from investigations and prosecutions to courts and punishment- and beyond.


    Within the stages of the criminal justice process, the sociological imagination is especially useful in enabling a macro-level perspective on what are commonly seen as micro-level issues that individuals involved in the criminal justice system face. We will discuss how race, gender, and socioeconomic status matter throughout the various stages of the criminal justice process. Additionally, sociological theories will be applied throughout the course to deepen your sociological understanding.


    The course meets the Council on Liberal Education's (CLE) Civic Life and Ethics Theme. As such, this course provides an opportunity to become more critical and thoughtful about the world around you and, in the process, to become more engaged in public life, whether that be through voting, serving on a jury, participating in politics, or pursuing a criminal justice career. As a Civic Life and Ethics Theme requirement, this course provides you with the tools to evaluate central moral questions including: what is crime? Who is a criminal?
    Is the U.S. system of punishment fair? How do we, as a society, respond to racial and ethnic inequalities in the criminal justice system? These questions are not just factual, but also ethical- and they may provoke strong feelings and controversy. We will spend the semester working through these controversies, and this course will help you learn how to move beyond your individual "gut reactions" to issues and to consider the broader research evidence from sociology, psychology, anthropology, and law in evaluating criminal justice patterns and policies. Not only will you be learning the central sociological literature on the criminal justice system through readings and lecture, but you will grapple with these issues yourself through class discussion, small group work, and written exams. In the process, this course will train you in how to think sociologically, digest and reformulate research findings, and use the research literature to come to your own opinions and build your own sociological arguments.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Anyone interested in learning about and examining the criminal justice system. Also, the course meets the Council on Liberal Education's (CLE) Civic Life and Ethics Theme.
    Learning Objectives:

    After completing this course you should:



    • Have developed a comprehensive understanding of the criminal justice process in the United States from start to finish.

    • Be able to critically evaluate the way crime and punishment are portrayed in mainstream media, recognizing the larger social forces operating around the issues.

    • Apply sociological theories to the criminal justice process in the United States.

    Grading:

    10% Attendance & Participation


    10% Engagement (daily quizzes on the readings)


    20% Research Paper


    30% Midterm Exam


    30% Final Exam

    Exam Format:
    multiple choice, short answer, essay
    Class Format:
    40% Lecture
    40% Discussion
    20% Other Style Guest speakers
    Workload:
    20-40 Pages Reading Per Week
    4-10 Pages Writing Per Term
    2 Exam(s)
    1 Paper(s)
    Weekly quizzes
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53537/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    22 January 2022

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (53538)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 10
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (107 of 110 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walkerml+SOC3102+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    This course concerns the social and legal origins of crime control. Students will critically examine criminal justice systems from three interrelated themes: status, criminalization, and social control. Specifically, students will respond to the following questions: What role does social status play in our criminal justice system? Who and what gets criminalized and how does this relate to status? How are social controls stratified across the U.S., and how do they relate to status?

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Students who performed well in SOC 1101 and who are interested in a deeper understanding of patterns of crime control and subsequent outcomes.
    Learning Objectives:
    By the end of the semester, students should be able to: (1) critically examine policing, court, and penal practices that lead to patterned outcomes by race, class, and gender; (2) locate current criminal justice trends and practices within a larger historical perspective
    Grading:
    The grading scale will be from 0 - 100 with each point being one percentage point of the final grade, making it easy for students to calculate their standing at any point during the semester.
    There are five essays (20pts/ea)--none of which can be longer than two pages double-spaced, using Times New Roman 12pt font.

    Each essay prompt asks students to critically engage a topic covered during the previous weeks. The essays are meant to be concise, well supported with course content and other peer-reviewed research.
    Exam Format:
    There are no exams for this course.
    Class Format:
    Class meetings are part lecture and part discussion of course material.

    The lectures will marry abstract theories and concepts with practical applications to show how social theory works in real life.

    Periodically, we meet specifically to discuss a practical matter--usually a contemporary one--that is occurring in our criminal justice system.
    Workload:
    ​Approximately 90 pages of reading per week
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53538/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    15 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: Race and Racism in the US (55013)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Meets With:
    AAS 3211W Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 255
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (42 of 42 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible - some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3211W+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    mso-fareast-;Times New Roman";>In this class we will explore the dynamics of race and racism in the 21mso-fareast-;Times New Roman";> century U.S.

    We inquire into how race works in the U.S. TODAY, as compared to how it seemed to "work" decades ago -- looking at both points of rupture and continuity.

    We'll cover issues such as race and policing, racial identity, race and schooling, race and settler colonialism, race and media, and race and electoral politics. We'll look at how race functions to stratify the society as a whole, and also examine issues salient to the lived experiences of specific racialized social groups.

    This term we'll talk about all of this using a mixture of academic writing, documentary films, and video clips. We'll incorporate frequent references to current political and social events, popular culture, and the print and online media.

    Grading:
    70% Reports/Papers
    30% Class Participation
    Class Format:
    40% Lecture
    10% Film/Video
    50% Discussion
    Workload:
    30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
    3 Formal Paper(s), ~ 7-9 pages each, and rewrite/ revision
    3 Informal Papers (reading or film reflections) 1-2 pages each
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55013/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    30 September 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3215 Section 001: Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy (65703)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    soph or jr or sr
    Meets With:
    GLOS 3215 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 425
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (7 of 12 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Far-reaching transformations of the global economy over the last seventy years in the realms of labor, consumption and the environment. The movement away from regulated national economies to a more fully integrated global economy; changing patterns and organization of production, employment, consumption, and waste disposal; rise of supercapitalism: a new culture of market rule over society and nature.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?schurman+SOC3215+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Far-reaching transformations of the global economy over the last seventy years in the realms of labor, consumption and the environment. The movement away from regulated national economies to a more fully integrated global economy; changing patterns and organization of production, employment, consumption, and waste disposal; rise of supercapitalism: a new culture of market rule over society and nature.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    This class is an upper division course and assumes some prior knowledge of global studies and/or political economy.
    Learning Objectives:
    Well after this class is over, our goal is that students will be able to utilize the perspectives and knowledge they have acquired during the course to understand the ever-changing nature of the global political economy.
    Grading:
    Attendance and participation, 20%; Weekly commentaries, 20%; Take home mid-term, 25%; in class oral presentation, 10%; research paper, 25%.
    Exam Format:
    One take home mid-term.
    Class Format:
    This course is based on lectures, films, and a lot of in-class discussion. From the outset, I want you to know that (a) this course is very reading intensive, and (b) I expect you to do all of the readings all of the time. Active participation in this class is very important.
    Workload:
    3-5 hours/week outside of class; see above for content of work.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65703/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    11 November 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (54373)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Meets With:
    AAS 3251W Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 250
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (42 of 43 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3251W+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing! Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your OWN life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of OTHERS. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the Social Construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings, such as the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and collective approaches to overcoming injustice.
    Grading:

    60% Papers (3 papers, 20% each)

    20% Final Exam

    20% Class Participation

    Exam Format:
    1 exam, True/False and Short Answer
    Class Format:
    30% Lecture
    20% Film/Video
    50% Discussion
    Workload:
    40 Pages Reading Per Week
    1 Exam
    3 Papers (8-10 pages each)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54373/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    30 September 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3452 Section 001: Education and Society (65705)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 10
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (46 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC3452+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    We have all been through an ‘education system', and our lives have been shaped in multiple and complex ways by this experience. Education is still one of the most complex topics in our society and discussions around its past failures, its present challenges and its future potential remains polarizing. This course is an introduction to the sociology of education. We will examine some of classical and contemporary theoretical and policy debates on education. We will explore the role of education as it relates to various axis of social stratification (race, class, gender, sexuality etc). We will also examine how the educational system interact with other significant institutions in our society (politics, economy, family etc). While the majority of the course will focus on the US educational system, we will touch on other regions of the globe to give us a comparative perspective and an opportunity to critically engage with our own educational practices and policies.

    Grading:
    Written Assignments: 30%
    Exams: 50%
    Participation: 20%
    Exam Format:
    Short essay type questions
    Class Format:
    Lecture/Student-Led presentations/Videos
    Workload:
    50-70 pages reading requirement
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65705/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    19 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3461 Section 001: Sociology of Neighborhoods: People, Place, Housing, and Community (66140)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 135
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (19 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is an introduction to the sociological study of neighborhoods, exploring how sociologists study people in their local communities. Generally the course focuses on neighborhoods in American society, and may explore broader issues with a research focus on neighborhoods in the Twin Cities area which students can study using a range of sociological research methods. Students will learn about a range of methods for studying neighborhoods including analysis of local area statistics, ethnographies, and interviews, and how to analyze different forms of data to meet the Data Analysis requirements for the BS in Sociology. Important themes which are addressed in the class include the composition and population structure of communities, racial and ethnic segregation, associational and civic life, municipal government and politics, community folklore and memory, housing, and local environmental issues. Soc 1001 recommended; Soc Majors and Minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?eroberts+SOC3461+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    In Sociology of Neighborhoods you will explore contemporary issues in American cities by studying neighborhood change, diversity, housing and public safety issues in a selection of Minneapolis neighborhoods. We will contrast what we find in observations and interviews of local neighborhoods with reading a selection of recent articles and books about the structure and social patterns of American neighborhoods. The class begins with reading about the theory and historical sociology of American neighborhoods, and the particular neighborhoods we will study as a class. In the second half of the class we will collaborate on a real research project in Minneapolis neighborhoods, with students having the opportunity to interview local residents. We then work as a class to interpret the interview data we have collected, and finish with student led presentations about the neighborhoods we have studied.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Students interested in gaining applied experience in interviews and research methods will have the opportunity in this class to work together on a large research project that we achieve collaboratively over the course of a semester. Students interested in social movements, social change, current debates over public safety and housing in Minneapolis will find these topics in the class. Students interested in careers in social organizing, government service, non-profit work, and social research will also benefit from the topics studied and experiences obtained in this class
    Learning Objectives:
    The two key objectives of the class are for students to 1) become more familiar with current debates in the study of American cities and neighborhoods, and 2) improve their skills in conducting applied social research drawing on quantitative, qualitative, and visual sources.
    Grading:
    Grading is based on
    1) Completion of an interview with a local resident, submitted with a transcript and analysis memo (40%),
    2) Statistical profile of demographic change in a Minneapolis neighborhood (20%),
    3) Ethnographic observations of neighborhood meetings and events (20%)
    4) Documenting your contributions to group work (10%)
    5) Poster produced by your group about the neighborhood you studied (10%)
    Exam Format:
    No exam. Entirely internally assessed.
    Class Format:
    20% lecture, 60% discussion and work in small groups, 20% external visits to neighborhoods and interviews. Students should be prepared for a flexible class format in which some weeks they spend required time outside the classroom conducting interviews, or observing neighborhood events, while other weeks have a more regular classroom structure. Neighborhood events will often occur in the evenings, and students should be prepared to accommodate attending 2-3 evening events during the semester. We visit Minneapolis neighborhoods that are easily accessible by public transit from campus, and will work as a class to share car rides where possible to make transportation easier.
    Workload:
    Approximately 60 pages of reading every week
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66140/1223
    Syllabus:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/eroberts_SOC3461_Spring2022.pdf
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    28 September 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3507 Section 001: Immigration to the United States: Beyond Walls (55501)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 255
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (53 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Immigration is one of the most politically and emotionally charged issues in the United States today. It is also poorly understood. Assumptions, myths, and misinformation about US immigration and immigrants are routinely and increasingly manifested in acrimonious political debates, news stories and sound bites, and our daily conversations and interactions with one another in the very communities in which we live and work. At the same time, US immigration and immigrants have been, are, and will continue to be an essential and vibrant part of our lived and shared experiences as individuals and communities, Minnesotans and Americans, and global citizens.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jdewaard+SOC3507+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Immigration is one of the most politically and emotionally charged issues in the United States. It is also poorly understood. Assumptions, myths, and misinformation about U.S. immigration and immigrants are routinely and increasingly manifested in acrimonious political debates, news stories and sound bites, and our daily conversations and interactions with one another in the communities in which we live and work. At the same time, U.S. immigration and immigrants have been, are, and will continue to be an essential and vibrant part of our lived and shared experiences as individuals and communities, Minnesotans and Americans, and global citizens. The aim of this course is to promote an accurate, holistic, and empathic understanding of U.S. immigration and immigrants. As doing so is necessarily an interdisciplinary endeavor, this course embraces and leverages diverse bodies of theoretical and empirical research and knowledge, questions and modes of inquiry, and practices and solutions. As such, this course facilitates a liberal education by inviting students to investigate the world from new perspectives, learn new ways of thinking that will be useful in many different areas of life, and grow as active citizens and lifelong learners.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    .
    Learning Objectives:
    1. Mastery of one or more bodies of knowledge and modes of inquiry in social science research on U.S. immigration and immigrants.
    2. Ability to creatively and consistently identify, traverse and translate, and ultimately understand the shared themes and threads that connect diverse perspectives, inquiries, and debates on U.S. immigration and immigrants in and across disciplines and areas.
    3. Proficiency in locating, critically evaluating, and using data and information on U.S. immigration and immigrants in the process of identifying, defining, and solving existing and emergent problems in innovative and impactful ways.
    4. Effective oral and written communication skills on topics and issues related to U.S. immigration and immigrants that are of interest and useful to students in their professional and personal lives as life-long learners.
    Grading:

    5% = Attendance

    20% = Assignments
    75% = 3 exams, each with closed-ended (true/false and multiple choice) and open-ended (short-answer and essay) questions, worth 25% each
    Exam Format:
    .
    Class Format:
    .
    Workload:
    .
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55501/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    26 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3613W Section 001: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (65707)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 150
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (61 of 60 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sara0028+SOC3613W+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    Hamburgers and a Coke, rice and beans, collard greens, "sustainable" sushi. What meanings do these foods conjure up, and for whom? Where are their ingredients grown, and what are the social and environmental impacts? Who prepares these dishes and who eats them? This course is built on two central premises: first, that the production, distribution, and consumption of food is profoundly relational, connecting different groups of people and places; and second, that one can gain great insights into these social relations through a sociological and political-economic analysis of food. This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the agrifood system. Among the themes we explore are the different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; work in the food sector; the global food economy; the idea of "food justice"; and the environmental consequences of food production. We will also study social movements seeking to change the food system. The general objective of this course is to teach you how to view the world of food and agriculture from a sociological and global perspective.
    A more specific objective is to get you to think analytically about something that is so "everyday" that most of us take it for granted: where our food comes from and why, why we eat the way (and what) we do, and the kind of social and political-economic relationships involved in our food encounters.
    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the term students will:

    Utilize sociological theories and concepts to understand, discuss, apply, and create knowledge about society and food in all of the course activities. These concepts are tools for thinking about food in society.


    Identify and discuss food topics, problems, perspectives, and solutions


    Make connections between individual, local, and global dimensions of the food system through the concepts of positionality, inequalities, identity, culture, economy, and nation. This will be done through course discussions, writing, and film/video reflection assignments.


    Locate claims and evidence in media sources on food and develop the skills to assess the influence on public opinion about food topics.


    Practice and improve evidence-based communication, drawing on independent research and course material to support analysis of food topics.


    Create a final learning product focused on developing personal interests in a specific food topic, conducting individual research, and presenting learning in a dynamic group setting.
    Grading:

    A-F, no incompletes
    Exam Format:
    No
    exams. Students write papers to demonstrate acquired skills and knowledge.
    Class Format:

    lectures, films, class discussion.
    Workload:

    Students can expect to read between 60-80 pages a week, write weekly commentaries that demonstrate their understanding of the readings, write two short papers, and write a 6-8 page, research-based paper on a course-related topic. The writing-intensive course is also heavily discussion-based, and attendance and active participation are required.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65707/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    13 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3701 Section 001: Social Theory (52535)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    4 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Mon, Wed 09:05AM - 10:45AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Anderson Hall 330
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (68 of 80 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    15 seats reserved for sociology majors. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC3701+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?

    In Spring 2022, the course will be taught by Professor Savelsberg. He describes his particular emphasis thus: "This class seeks to develop an understanding of sociological theory. Theory, together with empirical methods, is one of the pillars on which our sociological work is based, no matter if we deal with questions of criminology, family and the life course, organizations, social movements and politics, education and whatever other themes sociology addresses. In this course, we focus primarily on the questions and ideas that the classical sociologists have provided us with, including Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Georg Simmel and W.E.B. DuBois. Yet we also extend the line of thought to contemporary theory. Crucial questions we will engage with include: What basic changes did societies experience in the modernizing process? What holds society together, in other words: why do things work decently well? Yet, also, why does conflict erupt and how do societies handle it? When does repression and massive social inequality not result in open conflict? What role does "race" play? What role do rituals and symbols play when harmony or conflict unfold? What are social roles? Do we identify with social roles, or do we just perform them? Does the size of a group matter? Is society something outside ourselves, or do humans build (and change) it through their everyday interactions? Are human pursuits driven by rational action of self-interested individuals or by social norms and solidarity? What role do social networks play in which they are embedded?
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Sociology (general and LCD) majors
    Learning Objectives:
    Understand general sociological theories, apply them to specific sociological issues and see how they help us make sense of the world we live in.
    Grading:
    (1) 20% based on four short quizzes, consisting of short answer and multiple-choice questions. Each quiz is worth 5% of your final grade. This feature is important as it is especially crucial in this course that you stay on top of the readings and do not procrastinate. Keeping up with the course and succeeding would otherwise be very difficult.

    (2) 25% based on a midterm exam, consisting of a mixture of short answer and multiple-choice questions.

    (3) 35% based on a cumulative final exam, consisting of a mixture of short answer and multiple-choice questions.
    (4) 20% based on writing assignments.

    Exam Format:
    essay; short answer; multiple choice
    Class Format:
    lecture, plenary discussion, small group work, occasional film segments
    Workload:
    Other Workload: book essay
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52535/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    28 September 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3701 Section 002: Social Theory (55012)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    4 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Mon, Wed 12:20PM - 02:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 155
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (55 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    15 seats reserved for sociology majors. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pharr004+SOC3701+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    This course provides a broad overview of the major paradigms of social thought. While we will initially focus on classical theory and the "Big Three"
    of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, the emphasis of this course will be on how contemporary thinkers draw upon and modify the classics for modern contexts. With the help of such thinkers, we will tackle such core sociological questions as: What is social theory? How does it differ from the theories applied in "hard" sciences such as physics and biology? What holds society together? How do social networks and institutions endure over time? What is the relationship between the individual and society? How is human thought and behavior shaped by social interaction? What is power, who holds it, and how is it exercised? What are the primary axes of social change? What defines the modernity? Are we living in a post-modern era? Over the course of the semester our goal will be to not only understand a diverse range of theories and thinkers, but to apply them to our own lives and social contexts. In addition to lectures and in-class activities, students will engage in weekly online discussions to hone their own critical sensibilities by identifying and interrogating the key arguments and assumptions of the texts.

    Grading:
    60% Quizzes
    25% Final Exam
    15% General Participation (in-class and online)
    Exam Format:
    Multiple choice; essay
    Workload:
    30-45 pages reading per week
    12 quizzes submitted on Canvas
    1 final exam submitted on Canvas
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55012/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    19 August 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3701 Section 301: Social Theory (55397)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    4 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    College of Continuing Education
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (35 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    For course syllabus and details, see https://ccaps.umn.edu/oes-courses/social-theory.
    Class Description:
    This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
    Grading:
    GroupWeight
    Reading Journals18%
    Discussions12%
    Discussion Moderation8%
    Midcourse Exam30%
    Final Exam30%
    RATE2%
    Exam Format:
    Short answer (90-minute Canvas quiz, taken at any point during the exam week) and Essays (prompts completed over the exam week)
    Class Format:
    This class is entirely asynchronous. With the exception of some video announcements and review videos on specific concepts, all the material is in text form. Rather than video lectures students receive study notes to guide their reading. The core of this class is close engagement with original texts.
    Workload:
    The class is broken up in modules that each last a week. Every module runs on the same schedule and includes 1) a discussion board 2) a reading journal 3) an ungraded quiz. Once per semester students moderate one of the discussions, which involves a much more involved post and responsibility to manage the discussion. Midterm and final exams are in their own modules.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55397/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    14 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3721 Section 001: Principles of Social Psychology (65708)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (84 of 80 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Social psychology is at the intersection of macro and micro sociology, linking social structures, interpersonal relationships and interactions, attitudes, values and the self-concept. Principles of social psychology are drawn from multiple theoretical perspectives, including symbolic interactionism, expectation states theory, social structure and personality, and the life course. This course covers a broad range of topics as well as the diverse methods that social psychologists use to study them (for example, experiments, surveys, ethnographic observation). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    This course is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. 20 seats reserved for sociology majors. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?austi241+SOC3721+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Sociological social psychologists explore the social processes by which people develop a sense of self, negotiate meaning in everyday social interactions and how groups and social institutions influence everyday interactions. This course provides an overview of sociological social psychology and introduces students to the major methods, theories and concepts in the field. Topics include socialization over the life course (including socialization toward work), social inequality (including intersections of social class, gender, race/ethnicity and disability), the social construction of identity, the presentation of self, mental health and illness, social deviance, relationships, the sociology of groups and social change. In addition to developing critical thinking skills, this course enables students to better understand how their own interests, values and social locations shape their attitudes and behaviors.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Everyone is welcome! The concepts discussed in this course can be applied to all areas of your life, including work, identity and social issues. If you have an interest in a specific topic, please let me know and I'll do my best to incorporate it. Contact me with any additional questions!
    Class Format:
    This course will be completely online, in an asynchronous format. Students will be required to independently read the material. There will not be regularly recorded lectures/presentations.
    Workload:
    Approximately 9 hours of independent work on reading, research and other course requirements in accordance with UMN guidelines (3 hours per week per credit). Students can expect to read a combination of textbook chapters, academic articles and non-fiction book chapters. Students can also expect to watch videos available online, including, but not limited to, documentaries. Students will be assessed in a variety of ways, including, but not limited to, discussion boards, writing assignments/worksheets, reflection papers/journals and a research paper (8-10 pages).
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65708/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    16 November 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3801 Section 001: Sociological Research Methods (52529)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Online Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 5
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (118 of 140 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jdewaard+SOC3801+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research and the components of research design, including, for example, conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, indexes and scales, reliability and validity, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, the logic of comparison(s), and research ethics. This is followed by introducing students to research designs used in social science research, including, for example, ethnography, ethnomethodology, case and comparative case studies, comparative historical and archival methods, content analysis, interviews, focus groups, surveys, and experiments and their variants. The course concludes by considering several critical bookends, including data analysis and various tools and tricks of the trade.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    .
    Learning Objectives:

    1. Introduce students to the breadth research materials and methods in the social sciences.

    2. Facilitate students' in-depth engagement with research methods in the social sciences in a comprehensive and critical way.

    3. Develop students' capacity to traverse and translate across research methods in the social sciences as they and others ask, evaluate evidence for and against, and answer important, timely, and impactful questions about the social world.

    4. Provide students opportunities to write professional papers on topics related to research methods in the social sciences that are of interest and useful to them in their current and/or future pursuits.

    Grading:

    5% = Attendance

    20% = Assignments
    75% = 3 exams, each with closed (true/false and multiple choice) and open (short-answer and essay) ended questions, worth 25% each
    Exam Format:
    .
    Class Format:
    .
    Workload:
    .
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52529/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    26 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3811 Section 001: Social Statistics (52496)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Anderson Hall 210
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (108 of 116 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC3811+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This course will introduce sociology majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. In addition to attendance to lectures and labs, students are expected to read 15 pages of the text per week. There will be three exams. Students will need a simple calculator for assignments and exams. This course meets the CLE requirements for the Mathematical Thinking core. We explore the dual nature of social statistics as a body of knowledge with its own logic and way of thinking, and as a powerful tool for understanding and describing social reality. Students in this course are exposed to the mathematic knowledge that underlies key concepts, but they are also shown how each concept applies to real world social science issues and debates. They are asked to demonstrate their mastery of the mathematical concept and its practical application through in-class discussions, problem sets, and exam questions. Students are taught the mathematical foundations of probability and sampling theory; they are taught about sampling distributions; and they are shown the real-world implications of these ideas for how social science knowledge is gained through surveys of randomly sampled observations.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Sociology major.
    Learning Objectives:
    See full description under Class Description. Briefly, this is a requirement for a sociology major. You will learn basic quantitative analytic skills useful for senior thesis and a future research job.
    Grading:
    10% Class attendance
    50% Problem solving assignments
    40% Midterm exam !
    05% End of course extra credit
    Exam Format:
    multiple choice, computational problems
    Class Format:
    65% Lecture
    35% Laboratory
    Workload:
    10 pages per week reading (textbook and lecture notes)
    10 out of 12 assignments and weekly problem solving labs
    2 Exam(s)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52496/1223
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC3811_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC3811_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    18 September 2020

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 3811 Section 008: Social Statistics (53600)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-106
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (50 of 58 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?lars3965+SOC3811+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    If the intellectual dividing line of the early 20th century was linguistic literacy, in the beginning of the 21st century, it is quantitative literacy. Careers spanning business, politics, law, and journalism increasingly demand skills in the statistical analysis of data. At the
    same time, with frequent references to the findings of polls and studies in news reports, quantitative literacy has become essential to informed citizenship. SOC 3811 is a social science data analysis course designed for sociology majors, but is applicable to any student wanting to have an introductory to the statistical analysis of social data. In this course I will introduce students to the fundamental principles of the logic and execution of social quantitative research methods and statistics. You will develop skills in critically analyzing and producing social scientific research by examining issues pertaining to research design, sampling, conceptualization and operationalization of measures, data visualization, and a range of quantitative methods including descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses. In addition to these statistical fundamentals, you will also think about where and when these skills are best put to responsible use. Whether you plan to go to graduate school, go into a data-driven job, or just want to be a better consumer of information, these skills should help students engage critically with quantitative information.
    Learning Objectives:
    1. Explain how researchers use data and statistical evidence to develop sociological insights.
    2. Critically evaluate quantitative claims about the social world.
    3. Statistically analyze social data in connection with research questions of interest.
    4. Responsibly interpret the results of statistical analyses and summarize results effectively.
    Grading:
    Labs 20% 100 pts.
    Short Papers 20% 100 pts.
    Project 50% 250 pts.
    "Scholarly Attitude" 10% 50 pts.
    Exam Format:
    No Exams
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53600/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    26 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4102 Section 001: Criminology (55952)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Meets With:
    SOC 4102H Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-106
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (29 of 48 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This class seeks to develop an understanding of patterns of crime and punishment in the United States (including American particularities in international comparison), their social, political, economic, cultural, and institutional conditions, and how these patterns relate to broader sociological themes. We will examine a cross-section of most outstanding recent and some (by now) classical criminological and sociological books and a few articles that have attracted much attention among scholars and/or the broader public. prereq: [SOC 3101 or SOC 3102 or instr consent], Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC4102+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This course examines core themes in criminological research, especially innovative ways of thinking about crime and punishment. A cross-section of important criminology books and articles will be discussed that have attracted much attention among scholars and/or the broader public. Examples for crime theories discussed are Messner and Rosenfeld's "Crime and the American Dream," Sampson and Wilson's focus on inner city poverty and dislocation as a central root of crime, Hagan/McCarthy's "Mean Streets" with its focus on homeless youth and crime, Newman's "Rampage," a study on school shootings, and Anderson's "Code of the Street." The punishment side covers sections from books by Beckett on the role of media and politics in creating moral panics, Garland with his focus on punitive responses in times of uncertainty, and texts on international differences in punishment. A new section provides a brief introduction into a much neglected theme: criminal violations of human rights and humanitarian law such as war crimes and genocide as well as other crimes of the powerful and control responses to these types of offenses. Students read chapters from books and articles while lecture provides background information. Lecture is accompanied by discussion and small group work.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    This class is of special interest to honors students concerned with issues of crime and punishment. This applies especially to sociology LCJ majors, but also to other sociology students and students beyond sociology. Examining issues of crime and punishment teaches us much broader lessons about American society, its social structure, patterns of inequality, the functioning of its government, law and the enforcement of law (and how the US compares to other countries).
    Learning Objectives:
    Understanding patterns of crime in the context of a country's structural and cultural contexts (specifically but not exclusively for the US). Understanding the construction of crime and responses to crime, especially criminal punishment, in the context of institutions of government, law and law enforcement.
    Grading:
    60% six quizzes; 30% final exam; 10% class participation plus a paper of about 12-15 pages is expected (possibly the review of a book on which students agree with the instructor at the beginning of the semester; alternative paper types can be considered).
    Exam Format:
    essay, multiple choice, short answer
    Class Format:
    50% Lecture
    15% Film/Video
    20% Discussion
    15% Small Group Activities small group work
    Workload:
    60 pages reading per week
    6 quizzes, one final exam and one paper
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55952/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    28 September 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4102H Section 001: Honors: Criminology (65709)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Honors
    Enrollment Requirements:
    honors student
    Meets With:
    SOC 4102 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-106
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (4 of 7 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This class seeks to develop an understanding of patterns of crime and punishment in the United States (including American particularities in international comparison), their social, political, economic, cultural, and institutional conditions, and how these patterns relate to broader sociological themes. We will examine a cross-section of most outstanding recent and some (by now) classical criminological and sociological books and a few articles that have attracted much attention among scholars and/or the broader public. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees' research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. prereq: Honors student, [SOC 3101 or SOC 3102 or instr consent], Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC4102H+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This course examines new trends in criminological research, i.e. innovative explanations of crime and punishment. A cross-section of recent criminology books and articles will be discussed that have attracted much attention among scholars and/or the broader public. Examples for crime theories discussed are Messner and Rosenfeld's "Crime and the American Dream," Sampson and Wilson's focus on inner city poverty and dislocation as a central root of crime, Hagan/McCarthy's "Mean Streets" with its focus on homeless youth and crime, Newman's "Rampage," a study on school shootings, and Anderson's "Code of the Street." The punishment side covers sections from books by Beckett on the role of media and politics in creating moral panics, Garland with his focus on punitive responses in times of uncertainty, and texts on international differences in punishment. A new section examines a much neglected theme: criminal violations of human rights and humanitarian law such as war crimes and genocide and control responses to them. Students read chapters from books and articles while lecture provides background information. Lecture is accompanied by discussion and small group work. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    This class is of special interest to honors students concerned with issues of crime and punishment. This applies especially to sociology LCJ majors, but also to other sociology students and students beyond sociology. Examining issues of crime and punishment teaches us much broader lessons about American society, its social structure, patterns of inequality, the functioning of its government, law and the enforcement of law (and how the US compares to other countries).
    Learning Objectives:
    Understanding patterns of crime in the context of a country's structural and cultural contexts (specifically but not exclusively for the US). Understanding the construction of crime and responses to crime, especially criminal punishment, in the context of institutions of government, law and law enforcement.
    Grading:
    60% six quizzes; 30% final exam; 10% class participation plus a paper of about 12-15 pages is expected (possibly the review of a book on which students agree with the instructor at the beginning of the semester; alternative paper types can be considered).
    Exam Format:
    essay, multiple choice, short answer
    Class Format:
    50% Lecture
    15% Film/Video
    20% Discussion
    15% Small Group Activities small group work
    Workload:
    60 pages reading per week
    6 quizzes, one final exam and one paper
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65709/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    28 September 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4111 Section 001: Sociology of Deviance (65891)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 317
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (47 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course considers why and how certain attributes and behaviors are defined as deviant, the consequences of deviant labels, and how norms, values, and rules are made and enforced. We will discuss basic concepts that cut across deviance theories and research, including social control, subcultures and deviant careers. We will explore theories of and societal reaction to deviant behavior. We will also discuss methodology and how the "social facts" of deviance are determined and disseminated. Finally, we will examine case studies addressing crime, organizational and occupational deviance, substance use, sexuality, body image, and more. prereq: Soc 3101 or 3102 recommended; Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?uggen001+SOC4111+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Whether something is considered deviant or normative is constantly shifting, as the rapid change in thinking around marijuana legalization, marriage equality, and many other issues illustrates. This course asks why and how certain attributes and behaviors are defined as deviant, the consequences of deviant labels, and how norms, values, and rules are made and enforced. Rather than focusing on deviant behavior(s), this course examines how attributes or behavior come to be defined as deviant, the social consequences of deviant labels, and how social groups create and apply norms, values, and rules. There are four units. We first take up basic concepts that cut across theories and research on deviance, including social control, subcultures, and deviant careers. The second unit is devoted to theories of deviant behavior and societal reaction. We then discuss methodology and how the "social facts" around behaviors considered deviant are determined and disseminated. Case studies in topical areas are the fourth focus, addressing crime, organizational and occupational deviance, substance use, heteronormativity and sexuality, suicide, disability, and mental illness. Course objectives include the following: (1) To understand how deviance is defined and produced; (2) To gain a working knowledge of the key sociological explanations of deviance; (3) To critically apply these ideas to selected case studies; and, (4) To critique and evaluate institutional responses to deviance and control. There is one basic text for the course and supplemental readings available online in Adobe pdf format. The Adler and Adler reader is a collection of excerpts from classic and contemporary writings on deviance, with a much heavier emphasis on the social construction of deviance. If you purchase an earlier edition of the text, please understand that you will be responsible for the material in the most recent editions. Most of the supplementary readings will come from my local work with Minnesota graduate and undergraduate students on topics such as disenfranchisement, sexual harassment, and workplace deviance. This is more difficult material, but I will explain the research during lectures.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Anyone interested in sociology and social definitions of deviant and conforming behavior is welcome. A background in intro sociology or intro criminology is helpful, but not required.
    Learning Objectives:
    To understand how deviance is defined and produced.

    To gain a working knowledge of the key sociological theories of deviance.

    To apply the conceptual tools of these theories to selected case studies.

    To critically evaluate institutional responses to deviance and control.

    Grading:
    25% Midterm Exam
    30% Final Exam
    25% Reports/Papers
    10% Special Projects
    10% Class Participation
    Exam Format:
    Mixed -- typically 70% essay
    Class Format:
    50% Lecture
    10% Film/Video
    25% Discussion
    10% Small Group Activities
    5% [optional] Service learning, media, and in-class exercises.
    Workload:
    70 Pages Reading Per Week
    16 Pages Writing Per Term
    2 Exam(s)
    1 Paper(s)
    Other Workload: Service learning is available as an option for the paper assignment.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65891/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    22 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4133 Section 001: Sociology of Gender, Sex, and Crime (66437)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 150
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (50 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Crime and criminal justice is a gendered phenomena. In this seminar course, we will examine the contribution of feminist theoretical work to the field of criminology and to our understanding of how gender prescriptives are embedded in and influence criminal behaviors, the operation of the criminal justice system, and our conceptualizations of both. In so doing, we will critically assess the experiences of women, men and transgender persons in the criminal justice system as victims, offenders, and defendants. The readings are drawn from a broad range of interdisciplinary empirical works. Students should critically assess both the strengths and limitations of the research. Lecture will be accompanied by class discussion, film segments (as well as legal proceedings), and small group work. Soc 1001 or Soc 1101 recommended; Soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC4133+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Crime and criminal justice is a gendered phenomena. In this seminar course, we will examine the contribution of feminist theoretical work to the field of criminology and to our understanding of how gender prescriptives are embedded in and influence criminal behaviors, the operation of the criminal justice system, and our conceptualizations of both. In so doing, we will critically assess the experiences of women, men and transgender persons in the criminal justice system as victims, offenders, and defendants. The readings are drawn from a broad range of interdisciplinary empirical works. Students should critically assess both the strengths and limitations of the research. Lecture will be accompanied by class discussion, film segments (as well as legal proceedings), and small group work.
    Class Format:
    45% Lecture
    5% Film/Video
    50% Discussion
    Workload:
    75 Pages Reading Per Week
    1 Paper
    Weekly Reading Reflections
    1 Class Presentation
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66437/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    28 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4147 Section 001: Sociology of Mental Health & Illness (56055)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 10
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (81 of 80 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is designed to give you an overview of the ways a sociological perspective informs our understanding of mental health and illness. While sociologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and others all deal with issues of mental illness, they often approach the topic in very different ways. In general, a sociological perspective tends to focus on aspects of the social environment that we often ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It calls attention to how society or groups are organized, who benefits or is hurt by the way things are organized, and what beliefs shape our behaviors. In viewing mental illness, sociologists have primarily challenged dominant views of mental illness, examined how social relationships play a role in mental illness, questioned the goals and implications of mental health policy and researched how mental health services are organized and provided. prereq: Soc 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jvanheuv+SOC4147+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This course is designed to give an overview of sociological perspectives of mental health and illness. As a part of this course we will critically examine issues surrounding mental health and illness by situating them in a broader social context including: social relationships, social structures, and social institutions. Throughout the semester we will address key topics including how mental health is defined in different contexts, the role of social stigma, and policies and health services surrounding mental health and illness.
    Exam Format:
    Multiple Choice and Short Answer
    Class Format:
    Classes will consist of a mixture of lecture and discussion.
    Workload:
    30-75 Pages Reading Per Week
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56055/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    14 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4149 Section 001: Sociology of Killing (65720)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    jr or sr or grad student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-106
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (80 of 80 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course will provide a broad overview of the sociology of murder- the intentional, malicious killing of one human by another. This course will go beyond what we see about murder regularly in the media and on popular TV shows and movies. Students will be exposed to a scientific study of homicide. Key topics include the history and laws of murder; information and data sources on murder; demographic attributes of victims and offenders; different types of murder, including among others domestic, serial, mass, and gang-related murder; biological, sociological and psychological theories of the causes of murder; and the strategies involved in the criminal investigation of homicide. prereq: jr, or sr, or grad student, or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?barr0325+SOC4149+Spring2022
    Class Description:


    This course is about murder - a particularly grisly topic for some. Please be advised that during the semester, students will read about and discuss graphic portrayals of crimes and/or view gruesome images. This course assumes that students enrolling in this class are capable of tolerating this dark subject matter.



      • To understand biological, sociological, and psychological explanations for the occurrence of homicide in the United States.

      • To understand and be able to critique the various sources of information on homicide as well as what these sources tell us about offenders, victims, weapons, locations, types, and motives of homicide in the United States.

      • To understand the stages, patterns, processes, offenders, victims, and settings of homicide.

      • To understand how society and the criminal justice system react to the occurrence of homicide in the United States.


    Grading:

    2 Exams 20 points each


    5 Quizzes 4 points each


    1 Paper 20
    points


    1 Assignment 10
    points


    5 Responses
    2 points each


    1 Extra Credit Essay 5 points


    Total 105 points
    Exam Format:
    Multiple choice, short answer, essay.
    Class Format:
    40% Lecture
    40% Discussion
    20% Guest Speakers
    Workload:
    20-40 Pages Reading Per Week
    4-10 Pages Writing Per Term
    2 Exam(s)
    1 Paper(s)
    1 Assignment
    5 Quizzes
    5 Responses to Discussion Questions
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65720/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    22 January 2022

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4162 Section 001: Criminal Procedure in American Society (55014)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
    Off Campus
    UMN REMOTE
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (52 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    How constitutional democracy balances need to enforce criminal law and rights of individuals to be free of unnecessary government intrusion. prereq: Soc 3101 or 3102 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    This course is completely online in a synchronous format at the posted day/time. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jbs+SOC4162+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    Welcome to our interactive criminal procedure class!

    We spend our Wednesday afternoons together interrogating the central promise of US criminal justice: to balance the power of government to protect the safety and security of all persons against those who want to do them harm, while at the same time protecting their right to come and go as they please without government interference, and guaranteeing all persons that the government will enforce the law on the street, at the police station, in the courts, and when punishing criminal wrongdoing. This promise is also the criminal blaming and punishing regime's greatest problem: How close to social reality is the promise of EQUAL rights and justice to every individual. This promise and this problem have fascinated our beloved "U" undergrads--and me--at least once a year since 1971. I promise to work as hard as I can to make our Interactive Criminal Procedure ZOOM 2022 fascinating and valuable too!😺

    A final word: You'll probably learn some actual criminal procedure law in our interactive journey through the criminal process. Good for you. But, remember our goal is above all to work on developing YOUR CPI

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    If you're an Upper Division undergraduate from all majors and you're interested in becoming a more intelligent consumer of our criminal blaming and punishing regime, then you've found the right class. That regime is a very rough engine of social control, a last resort after families, belief systems, schools, and other non criminal justice social institutions fail. It's also the most expensive and most invasive instrument to affect human behavior in the digital age of the US version of a constitutional democracy, committed to the the values of human dignity, individual autonomy, equal justice for all, and social order.
    Grading:
    90% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: 90%,13 non cumulative short answer and essay exams; 10%, participation in course surveys
    Exam Format:
    60% identification, definition; description and explanation of legal concepts and social science findings (no multiple choice); 10% case briefs; 30% discussion reaction essays
    Class Format:
    15% Lecture
    85% Discussion
    Workload:
    About 35 Pages Reading Per Week. Some weeks are "thicker" than "others."
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55014/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    22 November 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4246 Section 001: Sociology of Health and Illness (55926)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    soph or jr or sr
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 5
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (82 of 80 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is an introduction to the importance of health and illness in people's lives, how social structures impact who gets sick, how they are treated, and how the delivery of health care is organized. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the sociology of health and illness, and understand that health and illness are not just biological processes, but profoundly shaped by the organization of society. prereq: One sociology course recommended; soph or above; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jvanheuv+SOC4246+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    What do you do when you get sick? Where do you go? Who provides your medical care? In this course we will discuss why the answers to these basic questions are actually quite complex. This course is designed to introduce students to medical sociology and will examine issues surrounding health, illness and healing from a sociological perspective. Throughout the course we will cover numerous topics including: the social construction of health and illness, healthcare providers, the healthcare system - including contemporary debates regarding healthcare reform - and the social determinants of health inequalities.

    Exam Format:
    Multiple Choice and Short Answer
    Class Format:
    Classes will consist of a mixture of lecture and discussion.
    Workload:
    30-75 Pages Reading Per Week
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55926/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    14 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4521 Section 001: Love, Sex, & Marriage (67742)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 317
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (36 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course will provide an overview of sociological approaches to intimate human relationships. What can sociology and related disciplines tell us about these seemingly intensely personal subjects? More than you might think! Specific topics we will cover include love and romance, dating and mate selection, sexuality, cohabitation, marriage, and divorce. The focus is on contemporary American society, but current U.S. practices are placed in historical and cross-cultural context. prereq: [1001 or instr consent], soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?lyimo002+SOC4521+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This class provides an overview of sociological approaches to intimate human relationships. It aims at understanding what sociology and other related disciplines tell us about these seemingly intensely personal subjects. More than you might think! Specific topics we will cover include love and romance, dating and mate selection, sexuality, cohabitation, marriage, and divorce. The focus is on contemporary American society, but current U.S. practices are placed in historical and cross-cultural context.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Any one interested in intimate human relationships can take this course
    Learning Objectives:
    This course aims to familiarize you with social scientific approaches to the study of intimate human relationships and increasing your interest in the topic, challenge some of your taken-for-granted notions about what is "natural" or "normal" with regard to love, sexuality, and marriage, stimulate you to think about the impact of broad social forces (particularly the rise of modernity) on beliefs and practices related to intimate relationships, highlight the silences of various social identities-including race/ethnicity, class, age, sexual orientation, and especially gender-to beliefs and practices around intimacy, and introduce you to some of the significant current policy debates regarding intimate relationships , and fostering your ability to critically assess the arguments on all of these debates
    Grading:
    Final grades will be determined on the following basis;

    Mid-term exam 25%

    Final exam/paper 25%

    Short Quizzes 25% (5 points each)

    Discussion question essays and attendance 25%


    Additionally, course grades will be on the A-F system. The grading standards are those prescribed by CLA policy as indicated on the syllabus.
    Exam Format:
    The exams will consist of both short answers, possible multiple choice questions and possible long essay questions
    Class Format:
    This class is completely synchronous (face-to-face). It will combine the lectures and discussion course supplemented by selected videos.
    Workload:
    The expectations for students in this course are that you attend class regularly, complete all the readings by the assigned dates and participate in class discussions. You will be required to complete the readings on time (i.e. before the class session for which they are assigned).
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67742/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 November 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4881 Section 001: Population Studies Research Practicum (65712)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 215
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (10 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students enrolled in this course will gain hands-on experience with population studies research by (1) working under the mentorship of an individual researcher or a research team at the Minnesota Population Center (MPC) and (2) attending and reflecting in writing on MPC's weekly research seminar. In addition, students in the course will meet weekly with the instructor to discuss their research experiences and to develop and present a final research poster.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kampdush+SOC4881+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    (I cannot stop laughing about the thumbnail on this video, hopefully it makes you laugh too)

    The University of Minnesota is among the most vibrant and productive research universities in the country. Its faculty are leaders and pioneers in many scientific (including social scientific) fields, and the university annually attracts tens of millions of dollars in federal and private research support. However, undergraduate students often have a hard time connecting to the research going on around them in a way that improves their skills, provides valuable experiences to them, or helps them explore their professional interests.

    Sociology 4881 is designed to meaningfully connect undergraduate students to an ongoing population studies research project, to see that project through from the "idea stage" to a finished product, and to explore scientific research as a potential career option. (Population studies, by the way, is an interdisciplinary field of study that uses demographic data and methods to describe, explain, and predict social phenomena.)

    Students in Sociology 4881 will be involved in every phase of the project - including problem formulation; literature review and critique; decisions about conceptualization and measurement; empirical analyses; writing; and the presentation and publication of results. Each week, students will also listen to a research presentation at the Minnesota Population Center (MPC) and reflect on the presentation in a way that will further their exposure to all phases of the research process. Along the way, students will also learn about ethical issues as they pertain to population and social scientific research; how research projects are funded; how scientists present, discuss, and critique one another's work; and how scientific publishing works. Finally, students will develop specific skills in the analysis of quantitative data.

    SPRING 2021 RESEARCH TOPIC: In spring 2022, students will use the National Couples' Health and Time Study data to examine family relationships during the pandemic. The National Couples' Health and Time Study (NCHAT) is the first fully-powered, population-based study of couples in America that contains representative samples of racial and ethnic diverse and sexual and gender diverse individuals. NCHAT entered the field on September 1, 2020, and data collection completed in April 2021. The sample includes 3,642 main respondents and 1,515 partners. NCHAT is uniquely suited to address COVID, stress, family functioning, and physical and mental health and includes an abundance of contextual and acute measures of race and racism, sexism, and heterosexism.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Do you like writing? Do you like numbers? Do you like figuring out problems? Do you like research? Do you like hands on classes? If so, this is the class for you!!! This course will be especially valuable for students who are (1) interested in learning more about the scientific research process and/or (2) considering careers in scientific research. It might be most valuable for students interested in social scientific, public health, or population studies research. Students considering attending graduate programs in those fields are especially likely to benefit from the course. Students who have not taken undergraduate courses in research methods or statistics may find Sociology 4881 more challenging, but they are still welcome to enroll.
    Learning Objectives:
    Students in Sociology 4881 will learn how scientific research projects are conceived, defined, funded, and executed and how their results are communicated, evaluated, critiqued, and disseminated. Beyond this, the University of Minnesota has defined several "Student Learning Outcomes" that will be pursued in Sociology 4881. These include:
    1. Identifying, defining, and solving problems;
    2. Locating and critically evaluating information;
    3. Mastering a body of knowledge and a mode of inquiry;
    4. Communicating effectively; and
    5. Understanding the role of creativity, innovation, discovery, and expression across disciplines.
    Grading:
    Your grade will comprise of individual and group assignments. You will work with the same group all semester. Assignments are due about every week to two weeks, and there are daily quizzes. I like Canvas, and will be setting everything up in Canvas so you can use the To Do List function to keep track of everything.
    Exam Format:
    There is no exam, just quizzes.
    Class Format:
    This class will be taught flipped classroom style. I am not going to lecture readings at you. When we are in class, we are going to have short lectures, lots of discussion, and many activities.
    Workload:
    Hmm, this is a hard one. I would say the word load is moderate. This is a 4000 level course that involves actually doing research, so you are going to do work. But, hopefully it will be fun and interesting work, rather than several tedious readings that are so jargon-y that you have to re-read each sentence multiple times.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65712/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    26 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4966W Section 001: Capstone Experience: Seminar (52724)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    4 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    Department Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 250
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (34 of 34 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mgoldman+SOC4966W+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    The purpose of this course is to assist students in fulfilling CLA's senior project requirement, the 'capstone' of the undergraduate career, by creating the learning environment to write a final research paper. Enrollment is limited to student majors in Sociology. The class provides a structure and guided format for completing the senior project. Students select a topic, formulate a research question, read on the topic, conduct preliminary research or use already experienced research, analyze your material and locate within existing debates, and write up the materials as a final analytic paper. Students can choose to focus their project on a new topic, or materials from a previous class, or from an already experienced study abroad, service learning, or employment opportunity. Each week we will discuss specific aspects of the research-and-writing process, so that the final paper will be thought through and written, step by step, throughout the semester. Course work requires intensive engagement in the design of a project and active class discussion of the issues students face in the process.
    Grading:
    75% final paper
    25% weekly short assignments and class participation
    Class Format:
    Class discussion, small group activities, writing exercises, and in-class presentations
    Workload:
    Weekly readings that are mostly related to your own research project; short writing assignments due throughout the semester as building blocks to your final paper; and the final paper, which will be approximately 15 pages
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52724/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    29 October 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4966W Section 002: Capstone Experience: Seminar (54892)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    4 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    Department Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 155
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (36 of 36 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC4966W+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    This course is designed to: a) provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a portfolio of self-presentation materials and sociological analyses based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. The main goal of the course is to guide you through the process of writing your capstone portfolio by providing structure, advice, and encouragement. Successful completion of the analytic portion of your portfolio shows mastery of the skills and perspectives of your field of study. Along the way, we will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civil engagement.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Seniors with a major in Sociology
    Learning Objectives:


    Grading:

    -- Active class participation in activities, discussion, and in-class writing (20% of grade)

    -- Capstone Portfolio (60% of grade) -- Includes resume, personal statement, paper analyzing CEL site, and paper analyzing interview

    -- Community-Engaged Learning (20% of grade)

    Exam Format:
    There are no exams
    Class Format:
    20% Lecture
    20% Visiting speakers
    60% In-class activities in small and large groups, including writing exercises
    Workload:
    Students will spend significant time in class and outside of class writing and revising this writing.
    Students who chose to do community engaged learning will spend at least 15 hours total on this during the semester, with the hope of 30 hours.
    All students can gain points by doing optional career-focused and adulting-focused assignments. People who do not do community engaged learning will need to do a lot more of these.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54892/1223
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/liebler_SOC4966W_Spring2020.pdf (Spring 2020)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 April 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4966W Section 003: Capstone Experience: Seminar (65701)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    4 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    Department Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Community Engaged Learning
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 415
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (34 of 34 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC4966W+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    In this "capstone" version of the course, we will be looking back at what sociology was all about, looking forward to what sociology majors do after graduation. Most important, the course will provide the resources, assistance and encouragement to help majors in the Sociology Department to fulfill this requirement for a paper in the major field during the senior year -- mostly based on observational studies tied to service learning projects. The course is organized as a seminar and workshop. There are no formal lectures, but the instructor will present overviews of the stages of research and writing necessary to complete the senior project paper. Students build their major project through completing guided, periodic assignments. Along the way, we will be reading and thinking about how to apply a sociological eye to understand success, failure, and the world around us.
    Grading:
    50% Reports/Papers
    10% Attendance
    20% Journal
    20% Class Participation
    Class Format:
    25% Discussion
    25% Small Group Activities
    10% Guest Speakers
    40% Service Learning
    Workload:
    20-50 Pages Reading Per Week
    25-35 Pages Writing Per Term
    3 Paper(s)
    Other Workload: Assignments relating to sections of project paper
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65701/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    11 November 2016

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 4978V Section 001: Honors Capstone Experience: Proseminar II (52726)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    4 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    Department Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Honors
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Pol 4977V, honors
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Wed 02:30PM - 05:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (14 of 14 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This is the second course in the two-course Honors Capstone Experience. In Soc 4978V, students will complete their data collection and analysis while the focus of the seminar turns to scholarly writing, and particularly to drafting and refining arguments. The Department of Sociology does not make any initial distinction between Honors students who are seeking cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude levels of Latin Honors. Instead, our focus is on helping students to develop ambitious and high-quality original research papers of which they can be justifiably proud and which can serve as testaments to their abilities. The Department of Sociologys approach is to support every Honors student as they plan and conduct summa-level work. The ultimate recommendation for level of latin honors is made by the committee at the time of the thesis defense. In addition to the Honors thesis requirements, the recommendation for summa-level honors is reserved for the papers that demonstrate the following criteria: - Tight integration between a clearly defined question or thesis and the research presented; - Ambitious original research design, with research completed on time and analyzed appropriately; - Integration of ongoing conversations in the research literature into the design and analysis of the data gathered; - Powerful and precise prose which weaves together evidence and argument and which is attentive to both the lessons and limits of the data. Students will do an Oral Defense and participate in a panel presentation at the spring Sociological Research Institute (SRI). The Sociology Department requires completion of Soc 4977V/4978V to graduate with Latin Honors. prereq: 1001/1011V, 3701, 3801, 3811, 4977V, and at least 12 upper-division SOC credits; Sociology honors major & department consent
    Class Notes:
    14 seats reserved for SOC majors, Jr. or Sr. Honors. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC4978V+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This is the second course in the two-course Honors Capstone Experience. In Soc 4978V, students will complete their data collection and analysis while the focus of the seminar turns to scholarly writing, and particularly to drafting and refining arguments. The Department of Sociology does not make any initial distinction between Honors students who are seeking cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude levels of Latin Honors. Instead, our focus is on helping students to develop ambitious and high-quality original research papers of which they can be justifiably proud and which can serve as testaments to their abilities. The Department of Sociologys approach is to support every Honors student as they plan and conduct summa-level work. The ultimate recommendation for level of latin honors is made by the committee at the time of the thesis defense. In addition to the Honors thesis requirements, the recommendation for summa-level honors is reserved for the papers that demonstrate the following criteria: - Tight integration between a clearly defined question or thesis and the research presented;
    - Ambitious original research design, with research completed on time and analyzed appropriately; - Integration of ongoing conversations in the research literature into the design and analysis of the data gathered; - Powerful and precise prose which weaves together evidence and argument and which is attentive to both the lessons and limits of the data. Students will do an Oral Defense and participate in a panel presentation at the spring Sociological Research Institute (SRI). The Sociology Department requires completion of Soc 4977V/4978V to graduate with Latin Honors. prereq: 1001/1011V, 3701, 3801, 3811, 4977V, and at least 12 upper-division SOC credits; Sociology honors major &
    department consent
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Those students who were enrolled in Soc4977V during fall semester of 2020.
    Learning Objectives:
    To complete the student's empirical study and the writing of the thesis paper.
    Grading:
    100% on the quality of the thesis paper completed.
    Exam Format:
    No exam.
    Class Format:
    In class discussions and instructor-student individual meetings.
    Workload:
    For the whole semester, a completed thesis paper of up to 30 pages. Weekly readings, an empirical study, and the writing of the thesis will vary among students.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52726/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    18 September 2020

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 8001 Section 001: Sociology as a Profession (53348)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    S-N or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Sociology graduate student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue 01:15PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Social Sciences Building 1114
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (9 of 12 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This 1 credit class fosters adaptation to the Graduate Program in Sociology and preparation for a sociological career. In the Fall, we explore professional careers in this field. We discuss the wide range of opportunities in sociology and help students further explore the next steps to becoming a scholar, educator, and member of various professional, intellectual, and social communities. We share practical information about being a student in sociology and about sociological careers, discuss presentations in department workshop seminars, and provide a safe place to discuss issues of student concerns. Students are encouraged to bring to the class their thoughts and reactions to experiences during their first semester in the PhD program. The Spring 8001 class is oriented to particular milestones in the Sociology Graduate Program and important student activities (for example, preparing reading lists for the preliminary exam and then writing the preliminary exam, preparing a dissertation prospectus, writing grant proposals, preparing an article for publication, etc.). Pre-req: Soc PhD students
    Class Notes:
    12 seats reserved for SOC grad students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?savel001+SOC8001+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This course should help graduate students in the transition from the first part of graduate studies to the second, and the much more independent part, that is driven by your own work. Supplementing the work you will be doing with your advisors (and eventually committee members), this course will provide additional assistance with the production of reading lists and prelims. This structure is flexible, however, and we will adjust based on the needs of the group. We do not have papers, readings or formal graded assignments. The main goal of the course is to provide a structure for what you need to get done, and to encourage peer-review and discussion of work in progress. In addition to practical matters of working toward prelim papers, topics may include: library search strategies; planning for the prospectus; grant proposals; journal submissions; and IRB applications.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Third year graduate students in Sociology (possibly 2nd year, especially if entered the program with an MA in hand).
    Learning Objectives:
    Students will learn and exchange ideas about strategies of moving toward prelim writing, possibly prospectus work and beyond.
    Grading:
    S-N
    Exam Format:
    No exams
    Class Format:
    We meet one hour per week. Several sessions feature visitors, e.g., a librarian, more advanced students in the ABD stage (or recent graduates, looking back).
    Workload:
    There are no required readings or exams.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53348/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    29 September 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 8011 Section 001: Teaching Sociology: Theory & Practice (54573)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Sociology graduate student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue 06:00PM - 08:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Social Sciences Building 1183
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (8 of 10 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Social/political context of teaching. Ethical issues, multiculturalism, academic freedom. Teaching skills (e.g., lecturing, leading discussions). Active learning. Evaluating effectiveness of teaching. Opportunity to develop syllabus or teaching plan. prereq: Soc grad student or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    10 seats reserved for SOC graduate students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?liebler+SOC8011+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This course is aimed at graduate students preparing to become teachers at the college level. We begin by working to understand the social/political context of teaching, including topics such as ethics, multiculturalism, and academic freedom. Students also learn practical teaching skills to be used when lecturing or leading discussions. Active learning strategies are emphasized as effective tools for engaging a wide variety of adult learners. A major part of the course is the independent development of a course syllabus and related lesson plans and exercises.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Sociology graduate students
    Learning Objectives:
    Develop a sociological understanding of university classrooms
    Plan a course to teach in the future, including syllabus, assignments, rubrics, and teaching philosophy
    Learn student-centered teaching methods and backward course design for effective day to day life in the classroom
    Communicate some aspect of this learning to the broader UM sociology community at SRI
    Grading:
    To earn an "A" in this course, you must have no more than one unexcused absence; actively partipate during our class sessions, including co-facilitating the discussion twice; turn in all assignments fully complete and on-time; provide thoughtful reviewer comments on your partner's work on time and every time; and your work must show effort and growth. Poor performance on any of these will cause your grade to be lower. You are at risk of failing this course if you have three unexcused absences or do not turn in a major assignment. I will not give an Incomplete except when required by university policy.
    Exam Format:
    There are no exams in this class.
    Class Format:
    This course is based on in-class discussion of readings, collaborative preparation of materials such as a teaching statement and syllabus, engagement with guest speakers from around the university, and building a capstone group project to share what we have learned.
    Workload:
    Over the semester, you will hone your CV, create a teaching statement, develop a syllabus for a future class, and write the guidelines and grading rubric for a major assignment for that class. Multiple drafts of each of these will be due at various times during the semester. You will also provide written feedback to other students on their drafts. We also work as a class to create an interesting and meaningful session at the department's SRI conference.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54573/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    5 October 2018

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 8090 Section 001: Topics in Sociology -- Sociology & Its Publics (65713)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1.5 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    12 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    Instructor Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Fri 10:00AM - 11:30AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Social Sciences Building 1114
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (5 of 7 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
    Class Notes:
    By instructor consent. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC8090+Spring2022 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?uggen001+SOC8090+Spring2022
    Class Description:


    Students in this workshop will serve as the graduate student board for The Society Pages, an online social science journalism project housed at the University of Minnesota. Participation is based on application. In addition to experience and qualifications, the board is selected so as to involve students from different stages in the program, substantive interest areas, and methodological specialties. Most participants are expected to make a year-long commitment to the project, though membership will rotate on an annual basis.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Graduate students in sociology
    Learning Objectives:
    • To deepen students' substantive research expertise
      by engaging cutting edge sociological scholarship. Students will unearth the most interesting findings and best evidence from new research in their areas of study. This provides students with a broader vision of the sociological field and offers an opportunity to diversify their reading in the prelim and dissertation processes.

    • To develop writing and communication skills
      in addressing academic and non-academic audiences. Grad board members regularly write for the website, and our supportive, professional editorial team gives direct feedback designed to improve these skills as the pieces are published online.

    • To gain deep, practical appreciation of the process of editorial decision-making
      and public scholarship.
      TSP had almost 11 million unique page views last year. Working with the site allows students to engage in critical and constructive discussion of the field of sociology, while participating in a collaborative public outreach project by shaping and improving the site as an online vehicle to disseminate great research.

    Class Format:
    Weekly seminar
    Workload:
    4-6 hours a week
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65713/1223
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/hartm021_uggen001_SOC8090_Fall2021.pdf (Fall 2021)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 April 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 8221 Section 001: Sociology of Gender (65716)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Wed 11:45AM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Social Sciences Building 1114
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (10 of 12 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Organization, culture, and dynamics of gender relations and gendered social structures. Sample topics: gender, race, and class inequalities in the workplace; women.s movement; social welfare and politics of gender inequality; theoretical and methodological debates in gender studies; sexuality; science; sociology of emotions.
    Class Notes:
    3 seats reserved for SOC graduate students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC8221+Spring2022
    Class Description:

    This course explores contemporary developments in the sociology of gender while also covering some early critical feminist scholarship (Simone de Beauvoir, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberly Kay Hoang, Tey Meadow…). The aim is to centralize the multidimensional and historically produced practices and performances of gender in social interactions across multiple structural locations. As such intersectional as well as comparative lens will be underscored. We will cover themes on gender politics including bodies, race, sexual boundaries, and families.In practical terms, the seminar provides a community where students enrolled can develop their empirical and theoretical interests in gender scholarship through constructive dialogue with others in the course.

    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65716/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    10 November 2021

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 8801 Section 001: Sociological Research Methods (53672)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    4 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Soc grad
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Social Sciences Building 1114
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (4 of 8 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    3 seats reserved for SOC graduate students. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hull+SOC8801+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    This is a survey course covering some of the most commonly used research methods in sociology and related disciplines. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between theory and evidence, and how various methods contribute to the development or testing of social theories by gathering and analyzing various forms of evidence. We will also pay attention to the (often implicit) underlying epistemological assumptions or commitments embedded in various methodological approaches. The course seeks to equip students with the ability to evaluate empirical social scientific work based on a range of methodological traditions, but is not focused on detailed training in any individual method. Such training is best obtained through advanced methods courses and/or through active involvement in research projects under the guidance of experienced investigators or mentors/advisors. The course will challenge students to refine their own ideas about how to link their areas of interest with concrete plans for empirical research. Course Objectives o To learn the basics of how research is conducted using different sociological methods. o To develop awareness of the knowledge claims and standards of evidence that underpin various methodological approaches. o To develop the ability to critically evaluate scholarship that uses various methods. o To gain experience in translating general research interests and ideas about research design and evidence into a proposal for a research project that carefully and thoughtfully links research questions, theoretical framing, choice of method(s), and specific plans for data collection and analysis.
    Grading:
    40% Reports/Papers
    40% Written Homework
    10% In-class Presentations
    10% Class Participation
    Class Format:
    75% Discussion
    10% Student Presentations
    15% Guest Speakers
    Workload:
    100-150 Pages Reading Per Week
    50 Pages Writing Per Term
    1 Paper(s)
    2 Presentation(s)
    8 Homework Assignment(s)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53672/1223
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    14 November 2014

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 8811 Section 001: Advanced Social Statistics (52848)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 210
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (5 of 12 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC8811+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Topics for Spring 2012: logistic regression, event history analysis, and multilevel modeling or structural equation models.
    Grading:
    3 data analysis papers on the three topics, each 33.3% of the course grade.
    Exam Format:
    No exams
    Class Format:
    60% Lecture
    10% Discussion
    30% Laboratory
    Workload:
    12 Pages Reading Per Week
    40 Pages Writing Per Term
    3 Data Analysis Paper(s)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52848/1223
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/knoke001_SOC8811_Spring2016.pdf (Spring 2016)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    17 September 2018

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 8852 Section 001: Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum (66147)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Soc 8801, grad student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Fri 11:45AM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Social Sciences Building 715
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (7 of 8 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Ethnographic practice involves two core activities: engaging people in their own space and time, and separating yourself enough from the fieldwork site to write about observations and experiences with some degree of analytical distance and theoretical sophistication. Ethnographers are always both participant and observer, although some of them -- often those who start off as insiders at a site from the beginning -- will be more practically or emotionally enmeshed in a fieldwork site than others. This seminar emphasizes both these core activities: students develop the practice of shuttling constantly between fieldwork site and writing field notes and analysis. Complementing the field work will be reading and discussion of classic and contemporary ethnographies. Each student will undertake his or her own fieldwork project, learning how to generate field notes that include rich description and coherent, flexible analysis. These projects should generate a useful body of qualitative data, as well as an intensive, hands-on experience of the design, research process, and analysis of ethnography. Prerequisites: graduate student, and completion of SOC 8801, or instructor consent.
    Class Notes:
    8 seats reserved for SOC graduate students until 1/19/2022. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tgowan+SOC8852+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66147/1223

    Spring 2022  |  SOC 8890 Section 001: Advanced Topics in Research Methods -- Sex, Death, and Mobility (65717)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    Graduate Student
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
    Wed 04:00PM - 06:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Social Sciences Building 1114
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (7 of 12 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Advanced Research Methods (e.g., multilevel models), historical/comparative, field, survey research. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 8801, 8811, or instr consent. Cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
    Class Notes:
    2 seats reserved for SOC graduate students until 12/9/2021. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jdewaard+SOC8890+Spring2022
    Class Description:
    Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65717/1223

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 1001 Section 001: Introduction to Sociology (18884)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Anderson Hall 210
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (237 of 240 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tvanheuv+SOC1001+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
    Exam Format:
    Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
    Workload:
    30-60 pages of reading per week.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18884/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    1 November 2019

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 1001 Section 015: Introduction to Sociology (18891)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Completely Online
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Off Campus
    Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (238 of 240 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    This lecture (Soc 1001-15) is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC1001+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This course is an introduction to the fascinating field of sociology. The broad aim of the class is for students to learn to develop and deploy their "sociological imagination" in order to better understand and participate in the social world. Sociology is the study of social life, or life in groups. In this class you will read the works of classical and contemporary theorists, view sections of documentary films, and engage in debate and discussion with your peers and professor. You will learn to use a sociological lens in analyzing many of the cultural, economic and political phenomena that surround us every day. You will question things that may have never before seemed strange, and you will begin to make sociological sense of things that you may have always before questioned. By the end of the course, you will be familiar with the sociological toolkit-- the core concepts, methods, and theories of the discipline-- and be able to begin to use this toolkit to make sense of the world around you.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    You should take this class if you want to understand the world around you better! A warning however- once you develop and put on your sociological "lenses" you'll never be able to take them off! :)
    Grading:
    30% Exams (1 midterm & 1 final)
    50% Short Writing Assignments
    20% Class Participation (discussion and attendance)
    Exam Format:
    MC
    Class Format:
    50% Lecture
    15% Film/Video
    15% Discussion in Lecture
    20% Section Participation
    Workload:
    30-40 Pages reading per week
    2 MC Exams
    5 Short (3-4 page) writing assignments
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18891/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    1 April 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 1001 Section 030: Introduction to Sociology (18895)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Willey Hall 125
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (118 of 120 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC1001+Fall2021
    Class Description:

    This course introduces pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analyses of how society is possible and how order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining the close relationship of the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of power relations in everyday living. The course material is chosen to help you develop your sociological imagination, to give you the tools to understand how our lives are linked to larger forces that ultimately shape our individual and collective experiences. We will explore diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society and the forces that drive or/and hinder change.

    Learning Objectives:
    Students are expected to show a good understanding of core sociological concepts and perspectives.
    Students should be able to apply sociological analysis to their everyday experience
    Students will be expected to improve their critical thinking skills and learn to better articulate their ideas in both verbal and written formats.

    Exam Format:
    multiple choice/True-Falso/Short answer questions
    Class Format:
    Discussion
    Lectures, discussions, Videos
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18895/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    14 August 2020

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 1101 Section 001: Law, Crime, & Punishment (21679)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Anderson Hall 210
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (137 of 145 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Introductory course designed to provide students with a general understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings that dominate socio-legal studies and contemporary criminology. We examine the connections and relationships between law, crime, and punishment using an interdisciplinary social science approach.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walkerml+SOC1101+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This introductory course is designed to provide students with a general understanding of some of the main theoretical perspectives and empirical findings in the sociological study of crime control. Students will investigate the relationship between the sociopolitical landscape and the construction and execution of state power. The course is organized thematically: (1) general principles and ideas, (2) policing, courts, and corrections, and (3) reentry. Key readings for each section will be provided.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    First year students interested in understanding the relationships between law, crime, and punishment in the United States.
    Learning Objectives:
    (1) Understand and articulate what social control is and how it matters for understanding crime and punishment; (2) critically interrogate perspectives on policing, courts, and corrections.
    Grading:
    Grading will be out of 100 points, so students will be able to calculate their individual scores. Assignments generally include short-answer essays (no more than two pages long) and concept-driven quizzes.
    Exam Format:
    There will not be any exams.
    Class Format:
    Generally, the course is designed to teach you and not test you. Lectures are teaching-focused. The readings are used to provide a foundation about the themes discussed in the class.
    Workload:
    There will be weekly readings but none too onerous.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21679/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    10 April 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3090 Section 002: Topics in Sociology -- Wonderful/Wretched: Reading MN's Racial Paradoxes (34418)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    1 Credit
    Repeat Credit Limit:
    6 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    Topics Course
    Enrollment Requirements:
    soph or jr or sr
    Times and Locations:
    Second Half of Term
     
    10/26/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Tue 04:00PM - 05:40PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 140
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (20 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F; cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC3090+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This special 1 cr, seven-week course (SECOND HALF of the semester, 10/26/2021 - 12/15/2021) uses a new book of diverse, first-person essays "Sparked: George Floyd, Racism, and the Progressive Illusion of Minnesota" to reflect on the significance, complexity, and tragedy of race in the wake of the summer of 2020.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34418/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 April 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (19856)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Meets With:
    SOC 3101H Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Anderson Hall 270
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (98 of 100 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how certain behaviors are defined as crime, how police and the courts function, and the experience of imprisonment and barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. We will also investigate how police, jails, prisons, and other criminal justice agencies responded to the COVID-19 pandemic. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic,racial, class,and gender inequality. Assignments will include books, reports, articles, podcasts, and documentaries.

    The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework.

    Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion and will be assigned additional reading and writing assignments.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Students interested in the criminal justice system.
    Learning Objectives:
    To become familiar with the criminal justice system in the United States.
    Grading:
    50% Quizzes + Participation
    25% Midterm Essay
    25% Final Essay or Project
    Exam Format:
    Multiple choice, short answers, and essays
    Class Format:
    TBD -- In person if college approves large in person classes
    Workload:
    50-100 Pages reading per week (+ videos, podcasts, etc.)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/19856/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    11 March 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3101H Section 001: Honors: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (33534)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F only
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Honors
    Enrollment Requirements:
    honors student
    Meets With:
    SOC 3101 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Anderson Hall 270
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (15 of 15 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: Honor students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power-point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F, honors
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101H+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how certain behaviors are defined as crime, how police and the courts function, and the experience of imprisonment and barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. We will also investigate how police, jails, prisons, and other criminal justice agencies responded to the COVID-19 pandemic. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic,racial, class,and gender inequality. Assignments will include books, reports, articles, podcasts, and documentaries.

    The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework.

    Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion and will be assigned additional reading and writing assignments.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Students interested in the criminal justice system.
    Learning Objectives:
    To become familiar with the criminal justice system in the United States.
    Grading:
    50% Quizzes + Participation
    25% Midterm Essay
    25% Final Essay or Project
    Exam Format:
    Multiple choice, short answers, and essays
    Class Format:
    TBD -- In person if college approves large in person classes
    Workload:
    50-100 Pages reading per week (+ videos, podcasts, etc.)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33534/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    11 March 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (19857)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 5
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (83 of 83 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC3102+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control. We will focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime. This course covers diverse types of crime, including: street crime, violent crime, white-collar crime, occupational crime, war crimes and torture. In addition, we will examine the punishment of crime, including policing, prosecution, sentencing and mass incarceration. There will be a particular focus on how crime and forms of social control impact social inequality and divisions around race, class, and gender.
    Grading:
    35% Midterm Exam
    35% Final Exam
    30% Reports/Papers
    Exam Format:
    Essay and short answer (1 mid-term, 1 final)
    Class Format:
    45% Lecture
    5% Film/Video
    45% Discussion
    5% Small Group Activities
    Workload:
    50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
    2 Exams
    1 Paper
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/19857/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    10 April 2017

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3201 Section 001: Inequality: Introduction to Stratification (21473)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 250
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (54 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Why does inequality exist? How does it work? These are the essential questions examined in this class. Topics range from welfare and poverty to the role of race and gender in getting ahead. We will pay particular attention to social inequities why some people live longer and happier lives while others are burdened by worry, poverty, and ill health. prereq: soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tvanheuv+SOC3201+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Who gets what, and why? How are power, privilege, and prestige distributed across individuals and groups, and why is it that some enjoy more than others? We consider how different dimensions of inequality have evolved over time, with special focus on inequalities across race, class, and gender. We assess how inequality shapes the lives of individuals in society, how and why inequality persists, and how people have worked to both challenge and reproduce their places in society.

    We approach social inequality from a variety of angles, developing an understanding of how inequality works in and through schooling, labor markets, employment, identity and prejudice, social mobility, and the role of major social institutions such as work, family, education, politics and law. We examine core statements of social stratification from sociology and engage with contemporary theories from sociology, psychology, political science, and economics. By the end of this course, you will have a clearer understanding of the types of inequality that exist in society, how inequality operates through the broader social context, and the constraints and opportunities faced by individuals in different positions in society.
    Grading:
    Grades will be based on writing assignments and regular quizzes.
    Workload:
    40-70 pages per week.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21473/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    24 April 2020

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: Race and Racism in the US (20875)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Meets With:
    AAS 3211W Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-109
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (38 of 39 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible - some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sara0028+SOC3211W+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This course is designed to help students begin developing informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to how sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations, and racism. We will cover the core theories that sociologists use to understand race in U.S. society and provide a historical overview of various racial and ethnic groups' experiences to explain racialized groups' present-day social status. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the dominant social narratives of race in the United States. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society, albeit in different ways.
    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the semester, students will be able to:

    • Utilize sociological theories and concepts to understand, discuss, apply, and create knowledge about race and racism in society in all of the course activities. These concepts are tools for thinking about society.

    • Locate claims and evidence in media sources on race and develop the skills to assess public narratives about race topics.

    • Practice and improve evidence-based communication, drawing on theory, course topics, and secondary sources to discuss race topics.

    • Create a final paper focused on developing personal interests in a specific race topic.

    Exam Format:
    Midterm and final exams are in the form of papers.
    Class Format:
    Active participation and discussion are encouraged in this class environment. Students should expect in-class activities.
    Workload:
    Students interested in this course can expect to read 10-30 pages of academic work per week; since this is a writing intensive course, we will be writing and revising paper work over the course of the semester.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20875/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    9 April 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3241 Section 001: Sociology of Women's Health: Experiences from Around the World (22905)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 120
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (53 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Health care is a fundamental right, but access to it is not shared evenly by all. This course considers women's and men's health needs, and how health systems assign priority to those needs. The course also covers how differences in health policy, national medical systems, levels of wealth, and cultural contexts around the world affect women's health and treatment and their experiences of wellness and illness. Women are taking an active role in shaping healthy societies. The final portion of this course looks at the goals and successes of women's movements in the health sphere. Throughout the course, there will be an emphasis on how sociological approaches to health differ from medical or epidemiological approaches, the advantages of the sociological approaches, and the respective advantages and disadvantages of qualitative versus quantitative approaches to studying women's health. Pre-req: Soc majors and minors must register A-F; Soc 1001 recommended.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?boyle014+SOC3241+Fall2021
    Class Description:

    This course takes a sociological and global approach to gender, health and illness. It begins by distinguishing sex from gender. We consider how gender expectations vary around the world and over time, and the implications for health. We review global goals (Sustainable Development Goals) for improving health, and ideas to reach those goals. Throughout the course, there is attention to the relative advantages of qualitative and quantitative approaches to studying gender and health. Students are introduced to, and learn to interpret, global health data.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Sociology, Global Studies, and Political Science majors. Students getting a Public Health or Population Studies minor. Students interested in learning how to work with global health data.
    Learning Objectives:

    -- Develop a sociological understanding of sex, gender, and health

    -- Consider how policies, resources, and culture influence the priority given to women's health

    -- Learn the relative advantages of qualitative versus quantitative approaches to studying health

    -- Become acquainted with important resources to study health globally

    Grading:
    This may change a bit:

    Online reading quizzes (10) 20%

    Exams (2) 20%

    Country report on women's health based on qualitative sources 15%

    Country report on women's health based on quantitative data 15%

    Peer reviews (2) 10%

    Group presentation of country report 10%

    Participation/Attendance/In-class Assignments 10%

    Exam Format:
    Short answer, multiple choice, and fill-in-the-blank questions with one longer essay question.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/22905/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 April 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3243W Section 001: On Drugs: Pleasures, Panics & Punishments (34915)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 415
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (45 of 45 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    In this course we are going to study and reflect on the immense popularity of mood-enhancing drugs, legal and illegal, around the world today. Why do we want to modify our moods, and how do we set about it? Why do some people throw themselves into drug use while others fearfully avoid it? And why do many more of us feel worried about "addiction" to shopping, sex, or gambling? Together we will build a comparative analysis of drug cultures and practices - understanding the place of "journey" and "possession" inebriation across time, and how the temporal and ritual boundaries delimiting substance use get broken down by the mass commoditization of alcohol and other drugs by 19th century capitalism. From there we trace the amazingly confused development of addiction and changing forms of intervention, from alarmist educational campaigns and the militarized maneuvers of the drug war to the drug court movement, and from the twelve-step cure to alternative harm reduction approaches. This class will offer you a mixture of accessible and detailed material, together with some theoretical work which will help you grasp the subject on a deeper level. As a writing intensive class you will develop a three-stage paper with feedback at each stage, producing a strong writing sample. Pre-req: Soc 1001 recommended; Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tgowan+SOC3243W+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    In this course we examine the immense popularity of mood-enhancing drugs, legal and illegal, around the world today. Why do we want to modify our moods, and how do we set about it? Why do some people throw themselves into drug use while others fearfully avoid it? Why do states and medical authorities promote some mood-changing drugs while waging wars against other, often very similar drugs? Together we will build a comparative analysis of drug cultures and drug regulation. We will start by exploring forms of "journey" and "possession" inebriation across time, learning about how earlier temporal and ritual boundaries limiting substance use get broken down by the modern capitalist commodification of alcohol, tobacco, opium, cocaine, and more. From there we trace how substances shift back and forward between legal, illicit and pharmaceutical statuses, as governments swing between militarized drug wars and more therapeutic controls such as contemporary drug courts and coerced treatment. Throughout the class we will explore the changing meanings of addiction, comparing the twelve-step movement to alternative approaches such as harm reduction. This class will offer you a mixture of accessible and detailed material, together with some theoretical work which will help you grasp the subject on a deeper level.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Take this class if you are interested in drug cultures and addiction, and wanting to move beyond simplistic judgments about "good" vs "bad" drug use!
    Learning Objectives:
    This class should help you "understand diverse philosophies and cultures within and across societies" (UMN SLO) It should also substantially improve your confidence and skill in qualitative research and writing. Students are expected to complete a research paper that is from 2000 to 2500 words in length, including references. You will use the class qualitative research project to identify a substantive topic or theoretical issue which the interviews illuminate, review important research on that topic, synthesize results, and present an engaging thesis.

    NOTE: Students can sign up to make this class satisfy the senior project requirement (instead of taking the capstone class). A senior thesis version of the paper will require a more substantial literature review, addressing their theme across all the class project data, and a paper of 3500 to 4000 words in length, including refs.)
    Grading:
    The final grade will be weighted
    in the following way: 30% term paper (10% for the first draft, 20% for final draft), 30% for moderator posts, 30% for class project participation (15% for interview transcript and profile, 15% for coding and presentations), 10% class and Canvas citizenship.
    Class Format:
    Short lectures and plenty of discussion, both in small groups and full class.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34915/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 April 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3246 Section 001: Diseases, Disasters, & Other Killers (22237)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    Partially Online
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Tue 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 155
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Tue 11:00AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    UMN ONLINE-HYB
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (81 of 83 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
    Class Notes:
    This lecture is completely online. On Tuesdays, the lecture will meet in a synchronous format at the scheduled time. The remaining lecture material will be available online in an asynchronous format. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ewf+SOC3246+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This class is about the past, present, and future of why people die. Why did infectious diseases rapidly seem to disappear--and will they come back? How have historical changes in social organization and interaction with the natural environment changed when and how we die, and what do medical advances, climate change, and persistent inequalities imply for what we might die of in the future?

    We will:
    * Explore the causes and consequences of a historic worldwide transformation in death and disease
    * Analyze how that transformation occurred differently in different parts of the world, and why it matters
    * Consider to what extent mortality can--or can't--be further eradicated.
    Grading:
    Grades will be based on three written essays, regular reading responses, and regular (approximately weekly) reading quizzes.
    Class Format:
    Lecture and discussion
    Workload:
    Substantial reading; regular quizzes based on readings (lowest two dropped); three essays
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/22237/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    29 March 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (21914)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Meets With:
    AAS 3251W Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hanson Hall 1-104
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (39 of 40 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?joh07820+SOC3251W+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Numerous scholars in the social sciences have noted pervasive inequalities in the United States. These inequalities often manifest within the realms of education, health, income, wealth (among others) and often cut sharply along the lines of race, gender, and class. This course will examine the cultural processes through which such durable inequality can persist despite widespread (although not-near total) belief in egalitarian ideals in the United States. We will discover, through engagement with scholarly work spanning from the early 20th century until our current moment, how racial, classed, and gendered social positions and identities saturate every aspect of social life - our perception, our routines, our values, and even the way we carry our bodies through the world. Both during class time and within class assignments, students will use such accumulated knowledge to account for why social power remains unequally distributed in the United States.

    List of assigned authors in the course include (but is not limited to): W.E.B DuBois, Dorothy Smith, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberlee Crenshaw, Pierre Bourdieu, and others.

    Who Should Take This Class?:
    All students who have an interest in grappling with the deep sources/consequences of social inequality, especially if they have already become interested in the sociological discipline, are welcome.

    Learning Objectives:
    Students will gain an entry-level understanding of essential works in sociology which explain the cultural nature and operation of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States.

    In service of the above objective, students will learn strategies for how to digest and comprehend academic texts and their theoretical content.


    Students will gain experience in working with other students and the instructor in a discussion (rather than purely lecture) format to review and apply course texts.


    Students will develop the ability to translate sociological texts and theory into their surrounding social contexts, using it to analyze a social problem of their choosing in a course paper.


    Students will learn how to develop and revise a medium length
    (10-12 page) paper, and, consequently, a sociologically-informed argument, throughout multiple drafts and across several weeks.

    Grading:
    Students will be evaluated on a mixture of class participation, Small, pre-class writing assignments which will prepare you for class, and several graded components (an articulation of topic, an outline with provisional sources, a peer-reviewed draft, and the final paper) of a 10-12 page paper due in segments throughout the term. There will be no quizzes or tests.
    Exam Format:
    There is no final exam for the class. A final paper will be due during the final exam period of the semester.
    Class Format:
    Classes will include the following activities (Instruction will be synchronous, meaning students will have to be online at the assigned times) :

    -Small group discussion in zoom "breakout" rooms where students will meet regularly with a set of fellow students to respond to questions from the instructor. (The instructor encourages students to "go" to class in spaces where video and audio capture from their chosen device [smart phone or computer] is possible).

    -Mini "lectures" where the instructor will pull together, in real time, the contributions of the various breakout groups (the logistics of this will be ironed out early in the term), as well as his expertise, into a shared notes document for the class on the readings for the day.

    -Occasional films demonstrating course concepts

    -Paper workshops with the students regular breakout groups to hone and revise their paper ideas and paper text.
    Workload:
    Students should expect to dedicate 4 to 6 hours a week to course readings in addition to several additional hours during weeks before major assignments
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21914/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    13 April 2020

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3322W Section 001: Social Movements, Protests, and Change (33535)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 250
    Enrollment Status:
    Closed (58 of 58 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about the dilemmas and challenges facing movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and various institutions, and the role of social movements and protest in bringing about change. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long-term and short-run impact. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC3322W+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This course covers the origins, dynamics and consequences of social movements and collective action. This includes the challenges facing social movement participants and social movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and political institutions, and the role of movements in bringing about change. We will explore both theoretical issues and grounded case studies in our discussions and reading.
    Grading:
    30% Reports/Papers
    30% Quizzes
    20% Journal
    10% In-class Presentations
    10% Class Participation
    Class Format:
    35% Lecture
    5% Film/Video
    35% Discussion
    20% Small Group Activities
    5% Student Presentations
    Workload:
    30-60 Pages Reading Per Week
    25 Pages Writing Per Term
    2 development papers, leading to 1 final paper.
    2 Presentations
    10 Quiz(zes)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33535/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    11 November 2016

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3421W Section 001: Sociology of Work: Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs? (33536)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 120
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (34 of 35 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Work is central to individuals, economy, and society. This course introduces students to sociological perspectives and analyses of work. We will look at what makes a good job good, a bad job bad, and impacts of joblessness on society. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bianx001+SOC3421W+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Work is of centrality to individuals, economy, and society. This course is to introduce students to sociological perspectives and analyses of work. The instructor will give lectures on relevant topics with the assistance of PPT presentation. Students are expected to satisfy three course requirements: (1) read the required and recommended texts and participate in class discussions organized to exchange opinions about issues of work in America today; (2) take in-class quizzes designed to review some of lectured topics and discussed issues; and (3) develop three essays on problems of work described on this syllabus. This is a writing intensive course, and the development of the three essays has a heavy weight in the final course grade. There will not be a cumulative in-class exam. The prerequisite is Soc1001 ?Introduction to Sociology.? Instructor's permission is required if students do not have taken this course.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Any sociology or non-sociology students interested in the class as part of their major requirement. Soc 1001 "Introduction to Sociology" is the prerequisite.
    Learning Objectives:
    Full version please read Class Description. Briefly, learning about American workplace, sociological perspectives of work and occupation, and kinds of jobs in the USA.
    Grading:
    60% Reports/Papers
    25% Quizzes
    15% Class Participation
    Exam Format:
    Quiz and papers, no exam.
    Class Format:
    90% Lecture
    10% Discussion
    Workload:
    20 Pages Reading Per Week
    15 Pages Writing Per Term
    3 Paper(s)
    5 Quiz(zes)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33536/1219
    Syllabus:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC3421W_Fall2021.pdf
    Past Syllabi:
    http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bianx001_SOC3421W_Spring2019.pdf (Spring 2019)
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    2 October 2018

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3446 Section 001: Comparing Healthcare Systems (33537)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Anderson Hall 330
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (76 of 83 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Examination of national health systems from an international comparative perspective, emphasizing social, organizational, political, economic, cultural, and ethical dimensions of healthcare policies and programs to deliver services and their impacts on the health of population groups. The comparative approach will enable students to acquire a better understanding of the problems and potential for reforming and improving US healthcare delivery. Pre-req: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?knoke001+SOC3446+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Examination of national health systems from an international comparative perspective, emphasizing social, organizational, political, economic, cultural, and ethical dimensions of healthcare policies and programs to deliver services and their impacts on the health of population groups. The comparative approach will enable students to acquire a better understanding of the problems and potential for reforming and improving US healthcare delivery.
    Who Should Take This Class?:
    Students in liberal arts, health sciences, business, and related fields who are interested in learning about careers in healthcare, research on interorganizational systems, or public policy making.
    Learning Objectives:
    This course enables student to develop skills in understanding different sides of controversial issues, to improve their critical reasoning abilities, and to acquire ethical standards for participating in society as thoughtful, well informed, and engaged citizens. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to read, interpret, and understand information and analyses of international healthcare systems. Students will ponder ethical issues of privacy, efficiency, and equity in healthcare systems. They will enhance their abilities to communicate effectively by developing analyses and arguments both orally and in writing. Not least, the course lays a foundation for life-long learning about healthcare and searching for productive strategies to use in their personal and professional lives. The numerous objectives of this course are highly relevant for subsequent careers in a variety of healthcare fields, including management, administration, finance, planning, and policy making. Key learning objectives include:
    • Analyze the historical development, organization, financing, and delivery of public and private health services in comparative international healthcare systems.
    • Identify key components in theories explaining healthcare organizations, professions, and delivery systems of diverse nations.
    • Understand differences in national responses to the 2020-21 global covid-19 pandemic.
    • Demonstrate understanding of the impacts of social, organizational, political, economic, cultural, and ethical factors on international healthcare systems.
    • Critically analyze healthcare system programs and organizations by using international case studies in shorter writing assignments.
    • Produce a broader analysis comparing international healthcare systems in a longer course
    Grading:
    Three shorter writing assignments (20% each), one course paper (40%).
    Exam Format:
    No exams!
    Class Format:
    Classes meet twice a week for 75 minutes are conducted in lecture, discussion, small group activity, and video format. Class meetings consist of four types of activities: (1) an overview of the main aspects of a topic, in formal presentations by the instructor and occasional guest speakers; (2) open discussions among all participants of key issues, applications to empirical research, and potential directions for future developments; and (3) small group exercises such as debates and role-playing activities; and (4) short video clips on healthcare practices and policies.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33537/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 March 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3501 Section 001: Sociology of Families (33538)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 317
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (53 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Family has long been a significant experience in human societies; much of what we understand ourselves to be, arises in family life. But family also varies widely in composition across time and place. We will learn how sociologists study and understand families theoretically, as social institutions, as well as sites and sources of social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hull+SOC3501+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    Sociology of Families is a survey course providing an overview of sociological approaches to theorizing, studying and understanding families. We will cover a range of topics, including defining and researching families, the history of families, romantic and sexual relationships, marriage and divorce, blended families, parenting and the socialization of children, families and work, the impact of social problems on family life, and the future of families. As we explore this broad variety of topics, we will give special attention to a few unifying themes, including the diversity of family forms and practices, the nature of social inequalities within and across families, and the persistence of change over time.
    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the course, you will: be able to think critically about families and related issues, including policy questions; have mastery of a significant body of knowledge about how families work, the challenges they face, and family-related trends over time; have awareness of how families are implicated in systems and processes of social inequality, and be able to think creatively about how inequalities might be ameliorated; have the ability to interpret and evaluate your own ideas and experiences related to family within a broader sociological context.

    Grading:
    Four writing assignments and a final exam
    Exam Format:
    Short answer.
    Class Format:
    In person.
    Workload:
    60-100 pages of reading per week.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33538/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    23 March 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3505 Section 001: Migrations: People in Motion (33539)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Class Attributes:
    UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
    Enrollment Requirements:
    soph or jr or sr
    Meets With:
    GLOS 3705 Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 330
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (19 of 20 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    Students in this course will tackle debates related to migration from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and will compare and connect diverse migration trends around the world (Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America). Students will critically engage with various paradigms on the geopolitical, racial, and gender power dynamics that anchor migration processes and outcomes. Why would the movement of individuals from some parts of the world (often from the least developed regions to the highly developed Western nations) create such strong and highly charged debates? How are cross border social and economic relations of individuals and households maintained and perpetuated? What are particular governments doing to either encourage or hinder these movements? How are current migrations different from earlier eras? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore the above questions through academic and policy published literature. prereq: Soph, jr, or sr
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC3505+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    How is transnationalism or cross border social and economic relations maintained and perpetuated? How are these relations affecting identity? How is current transnationalism different from earlier migration? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore these questions through theoretical and case study based literature on the subject. The first part of the course provides a historical overview on migration over the last two centuries. The second section centralizes identity in terms of transnational or dispersed communities. The aim of this section is to introduce the complex web of culture, agency and structure in play when dealing with migration. The third section presents case studies on the social and economic relations of transnational communities. The nature of family connections across borders and the economic ties of those who migrated with their families in the home country is discussed. The role of gender in these relations is also explored. The final section of the course deals with the role of the nation-state in transnational migration.
    Grading:
    30% Midterm Exam
    30% Final Exam
    30% Written Homework
    10% Class Participation
    Class Format:
    50% Lecture
    20% Film/Video
    30% Discussion
    Workload:
    65 Pages Reading Per Week
    15 Pages Writing Per Term
    2 Exam(s)
    1 Paper(s)
    1 Presentation(s)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33539/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    1 April 2013

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3701 Section 001: Social Theory (21683)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    4 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Mon, Wed 09:05AM - 10:45AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 317
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (53 of 55 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    15 seats reserved for Soc majors Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?lyimo002+SOC3701+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?

    Social theory has two sides, the analytical and the normative. The analytical seeks to define the principles by which the social world works. The normative seeks to criticize society for its faults and indicate how to correct them, so as to better fulfill human needs and potentials. Sometimes the two sides work well together; other times they draw apart with hopes running faster than evidence. In any case, no matter how much theorists and students may come to sociology out of a desire to fix social problems, their ideas still have to be held to the standard of evidence. That's why sociology is a science and not a set of ethics. If you want to improve society, it helps to first know how society works. But this is not so easy. Society is often pretty confusing and complicated. Even an idea about how society works is basically a theory. To state a problem, why have many societies confined women to household work? Some people might theorize that its due to biological differences from men, but others would counter that its due to cultural norms created by male desire for power. Here are two theories. Which is correct? We would have to look at detailed studies to find the answer. Testing theories is not so much the job of this course. Rather, the job is getting to know the range of theoretical ideas and how they have evolved over time. These ideas have provided the starting points for many long courses of research.

    Who Should Take This Class?:

    Soc majors/minors and any one interested in the core sociological questions about how society works? What holds society together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed. prereq: 1001 recommended.

    Learning Objectives:

    The objective of the course is to understand the intellectual and social environment within which various theories and theorists emerged in explaining social change and how society works. The point for us will be to understand the key concepts and ideas from different theorists, not just memorize them. Understanding is when something goes "click!" in your mind and you suddenly see the world in a new way. The "aha!" moment. The aim here is to be able to use various concepts/theories to understand social problems/issues and our own lived experiences outside classroom situation.

    Grading:
    1 Midterm (25%), two quizzes (30%) 6 Reading Responses (30%), In-class assignments/Participation (15%)
    Exam Format:
    The mid-term exams will be a combination of multiple-choice, and short answers. The mid-term will cover content from course readings, lectures, films, and in-class discussions and activities. It will cover materials for up to Week 4. The quizzes will cover materials from Week 5 to Week 8. There will not be a final exam.
    Class Format:
    Class sessions will consist of online lectures, video excerpts, and in-class exercises (through breakout rooms). We will frequently use small-group discussions to give you a chance to discuss the readings in a less structured environment and help you understand the material as we proceed.
    Workload:
    In addition to weekly reading assignments, students in this class are expected to submit 6 reading responses over the course of the semester. These reading responses are one-paragraph-long reflections that demonstrate your understanding of the assigned material and help you create the habit of forging connections between various readings and ideas. The reading responses will also be used for participation
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21683/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 April 2021

    Fall 2021  |  SOC 3701 Section 002: Social Theory (18903)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    4 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    A-F or Audit
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
    Mon, Wed 12:20PM - 02:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Anderson Hall 250
    Enrollment Status:
    Open (79 of 83 seats filled)
    Also Offered:
    Course Catalog Description:
    This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    15 seats reserved for Soc majors Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jvanheuv+SOC3701+Fall2021
    Class Description:
    This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
    Exam Format:
    Short answer; essays
    Class Format:
    Classes will consist of a mixture of lecture and discussion
    Workload:
    30-75 pages reading per week
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18903/1219
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    18 March 2021