10 classes matched your search criteria.

Summer 2018  |  SOC 1001 Section 301: Introduction to Sociology (83302)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/21/2018 - 08/24/2018
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~301&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Summer 2018  |  SOC 1001 Section 302: Introduction to Sociology (83333)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/21/2018 - 08/24/2018
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course introduces the pivotal questions that underpin classical and contemporary sociological perspectives. Analysis of how society is possible and how social order is maintained are core to an understanding of individuals as both agents and objects that shape and are shaped by their membership in society. Examining this close relationship between the individual, society, and social structures permits us to understand the dynamics of social and power relations in everyday living. The course explores diverse sociological theories purporting to explain the social, political and economic structures prevailing in our society. It also centralizes the importance of social change and the forces that drive or/and hinder change. A key objective of this course is to foster students? critical thinking abilities in their analysis of societal issues, and in their articulations of these issues. Students are expected to be able to apply sociological theories and debates into their everyday practices.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice questions, short answer, and definitions of terms
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC1001~302&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 February 2016

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3003 Section 001: Social Problems (83298)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/11/2018 - 08/03/2018
Mon, Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-136
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In this course, we will engage in a sociological examination of major social problems facing the contemporary US and abroad. We explore the origins and causes of different social problems, seek to understand how they impact individuals, groups, and the society as a whole, and evaluate solutions. We ask how an issue becomes defined as a "social problem," discuss the social construction of reality and deviance, and consider the primary frameworks under which societies have organized their responses to different social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?rajas011+SOC3003+Summer2018
Class Description:
What can you learn from sociology about how to look behind the "social problems" you hear about on the news? This class will teach you to ask yourself three questions. Why has this issue come to be seen as particularly problematic in a particular place and time? What kind of assumptions lie behind the popular interpretations of the problem? Which groups are "claiming" the problem and which are successfully persuading the public to accept their interpretation? Kicking off with the development of the concept "social problem" during the late 19th century, we will move on to the medicalization of everyday life during the 20th-century, the privatisation of "welfare" during the late 20th-century, and to the continuing debate over whether problems of inequality are best addressed by tending to "needs" or demanding "rights."Among the specific social problems we will tackle will be substance abuse, educational inequality, anorexia, and homelessness. The class will incorporate a community involvement element, where students go out and work with an activist or non-profit organisation for two to three hours per week (or four to six hours every two weeks, for example). You will digest and interpret your experiences "in the field" in class time and in the final take-home paper.
Grading:
30% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: class participation and presentations, 30% mid-term, 40% community involvement and related final paper
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Discussion
35% Other Style group work, films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
25-50 Pages Reading Per Week
10 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Other Workload: 2-3 hours of community involvement (service learning) per week.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3003~001&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 May 2007

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (82965)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/11/2018 - 08/03/2018
Mon, Wed 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-136
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wulff039+SOC3101+Summer2018
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how crime is socially constructed, how the courts function for criminal sentencing, what it is like to be in prison or on community supervision, why the U.S. has such a high imprisonment rate, and the barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
25% Final Exam Other Grading Information: 75% three exams (25% each)
Exam Format:
Three multiple choice and short answer exams, and one final take-home short essay exam
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
4 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3101~001&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 February 2016

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (83027)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/11/2018 - 08/03/2018
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-127
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tabor027+SOC3251W+Summer2018
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3251W~001&term=1185

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3421W Section 001: Sociology of Work: Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs? (87905)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/11/2018 - 08/03/2018
Tue, Thu 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-136
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Work is central to individuals, economy, and society. This course introduces students to sociological perspectives and analyses of work. We will look at what makes a good job good, a bad job bad, and impacts of joblessness on society. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?naray116+SOC3421W+Summer2018
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3421W~001&term=1185

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3701 Section 301: Social Theory (88000)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/21/2018 - 08/24/2018
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary theories of change, action, identities, and the social self. We will work to understand the social and historical environments in which these theories have developed and focus on how theoretical inquiry can serve as a guide for scientific explanation of human behavior. Some of the questions explored will include: What holds societies together? How do societies reproduce themselves? How does social change take place? How are social identities created, maintained, and transformed? What are features of modern social life and where is society headed in the future?
Exam Format:
Short answer; essays
Workload:
Other Workload: book essay
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3701~301&term=1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 July 2015

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3811 Section 001: Social Statistics (83082)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 10 wk
 
06/11/2018 - 08/17/2018
Tue, Thu 03:30PM - 05:20PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-103
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gunth031+SOC3811+Summer2018
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC3811~001&term=1185

Summer 2018  |  SOC 4108 Section 001: Current Issues in Crime Control (87938)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/11/2018 - 08/03/2018
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-219
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected current criminal justice policies from perspective of courts, legislature, community, and interest groups. Impact of criminal justice policy changes on society and on social control agencies. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?garna029+SOC4108+Summer2018
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4108~001&term=1185

Summer 2018  |  SOC 4246 Section 301: Sociology of Health and Illness (83303)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
College of Continuing Education
Online Course
Times and Locations:
ODL Extended Reg Acad Session
 
05/21/2018 - 08/24/2018
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Context of social, political, economic, and cultural forces and medical knowledge. Social meanings. How people seek help and manage illnesses. How doctors, nurses, and patients interact. Social movements surrounding health. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
After 11:59 PM Friday of the first week of the term, registration is closed and requires instructor permission.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=SOC4246~301&term=1185

ClassInfo Links - Summer 2018 Sociology Classes

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