10 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2017  |  PA 5790 Section 001: Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Urban Food Systems and Policy (67836)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2017 - 05/05/2017
Mon 06:00PM - 08:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 60
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?anu+PA5790+Spring2017 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?boyer120+PA5790+Spring2017
Class Description:
This course will explore: A) the different policy objectives emerging in the narrative around urban agriculture and food systems, including social, environmental, and economic objectives; B) Emerging analysis tools to evaluate progress toward these objectives; and C) Pathways to achieve urban food system objectives from perspectives of urban farmers, farmers markets, food policy councils, etc.. The course will include guest lectures from faculty and practitioners alike, including mayors and food policy council members, and field visits to urban farms and food policy councils.
Learning Objectives:
·
Interdisciplinary and systems thinking; understanding diverse policy actors and priorities in the urban foodscape
·
Understanding how to quantify community-wide food use;
understanding resource intensity of urban food use (water, land, greenhouse gases, energy)



Class participation: 10%

Reflections: 10%

Assignment 1: 20%

Assignment 2: 20%

Assignment 3: 20%

Assignment 4: 20%
Class Format:

1hr lecture

1hr guest lecture

30 min - discussion (readings and class content)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=PA5790~001&term=1173
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 February 2017

Spring 2015  |  PA 5790 Section 002: Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Science and Policy of Global Env Change (60915)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
EEB 5146 Section 001
FNRM 5146 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Tue, Thu 10:15AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, St Paul
Learning & Environmental Sci R380
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
Science and Policy of Global Environmental Change.
Class Description:
Investments in basic scientific research and technological development have had an enormous impact on innovation, economic growth and societal well-being. Yet, science policy decisions at the federal and state levels of government are typically dominated by advocates for particular scientific fields or missions. Policy decisions are frequently based upon past practice or data trends that may be out of date or have limited relevance to the current situation. We do not have the capacity to predict how best to make and manage future investments so as to exploit the most promising and important opportunities. While some fields benefit from the availability of real-time data and computational models which allow for prospective analyses, science policy does not benefit from a similar set of tools and modeling capabilities. In addition, there is a vigorous debate as to whether analytically-based science policy is possible, given the uncertainty of outcomes in the scientific discovery process. Yet an interdisciplinary and international community of practice is emerging to advance the scientific basis of science policy, through the development of data collection, theoretical frameworks, models and tools, so that we can make future policy decisions based on sound science and informed judgment. This course will develop the foundations of an evidence-based platform of science policy. (See syllabus for more.)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=PA5790~002&term=1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 March 2008

Spring 2015  |  PA 5790 Section 003: Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Science-to-Action for the Common Good (68035)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
PA 5022 Section 011
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/23/2015 - 05/08/2015
Tue 05:30PM - 08:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 184
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
Science-to-action for the Common Good
Class Description:
This interdisciplinary course will examine issues at the nexus of law, ethics, public policy, and emerging sciences and technologies (ES&T) including nanotechnology, genetic and biomedical engineering, cognitive science, synthetic biology, and robotics. Topics we will explore include the role of science and technology as both a tool for and the subject of law and policy; the legal, ethical, economic, and policy implications of ES&T research and development; environmental and human health risk analysis and regulation (e.g., EPA, FDA, OSHA, and state and local regulatory mechanisms); intellectual property issues; liability issues; and global impacts. Topics will be approached from the perspective of different stakeholders (e.g., federal agencies, industry, academic researchers, the environment, international organizations, and the public) and in the context of different application areas (e.g., drugs, devices, food, agriculture, energy, environmental remediation) using a variety of interdisciplinary approaches. Students with a broad range of interests are encouraged to enroll.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=PA5790~003&term=1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 April 2014

Spring 2015  |  PA 5790 Section 004: Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Domestic Food Policy: Actors/Arenas/Agendas (68036)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 210
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Notes:
Tentative: Food Policy
Class Description:
The production and consumption of food products is shaped as much by public policy as it is by the vagaries of the weather. Because specific policies impose costs on some segments of society and confer benefits to others, interest groups, social movements, and other actors engage in the political process and with policy makers in order to influence the distribution of these burdens and rewards. The social, political, economic, and cultural factors that influence the ways in which these participants interact with political decision makers and the consequences that result from these exchanges will be the primary emphases of the course. Over time, the sheer number of groups operating in the agricultural policy arena has expanded significantly as new issues such as the environment, public health, and sustainability have been placed on the agenda. By engaging with contemporary policies, programs, and state and local initiatives related to food systems, students will evaluate, analyze, and discuss the current state of domestic food policy making in a variety of areas. By the completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and explain the roles that the major stakeholders and public institutions take in shaping domestic food policy. 2. Become informed on the current landscape surrounding domestic food policy including the 2014 Farm Bill and the process leading to it. 3. Have a deeper historical knowledge about the evolution of U.S. food policy over the last century and the ways in which these policies have increasingly been linked to other concerns about equity, the environment and public health. 4. Acquire a better understanding of how various stakeholders participate in political conflicts about food, and understand how these actors operate at different levels of government to promote preferred food policies. Be able to critique specific food policies through various lenses with respect to their evidence base, adequacy of implementation, impact and forces that hinder or help the implementation of the specific policy.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=PA5790~004&term=1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 December 2014

Spring 2015  |  PA 5790 Section 005: Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Sustainable Infrastructure and Cities (70476)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
PA 4790 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Tue 05:30PM - 08:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 205
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics. prereq: Grad or instr consent
Class Description:
All Paths for Translating Science to Action for the Common Good Translating science to action has occurred in all societies, but is more complicated in technological societies when multiple aspirations (economy, environment, health, climate-risks) are at play, where people are removed from the natural system, and, where technological innovation is rapid but often not well-understood in terms of impact. As a result, solving ?grand challenges? of environmental sustainability, food security, climate-resilience and governance of emerging technologies requires integrating multiple pathways and multiple sectors for translating science to action. The multiple pathways refer to regulations, voluntary programs, cooperative approaches, entrepreneurial and market-based solutions. The various pathways require multi-sector collaboration between academia, governments, for-profit and NGO sectors, all of whom play different roles in translating science to action. Further, communities themselves hold vast local informal knowledge ? often untapped - that is essential for place-based problem-solving . Most importantly, professionals no longer work within or with only one sector throughout their career, and are now expected to have the knowledge of the multiple pathways and sectors described above. Given these needs, this course is envisioned as a first introductory course for translating science to action for the common good, offered to students, researchers and professionals who are seeking high social impact Course Objectives: This course will: - Introduce students to the available theories and frameworks that describe some of the strengths and weaknesses, and best practices in working on grand challenge challenges across communities, businesses, governments, academia and NGO sectors. - Using the example of sustainable city development, different pathways will be delineated as well as the need for using a portfolio approach incorporating multiple pathways, and multiple sectors. - Experts from the different sectors will share their experiences describing the culture as well as practice in these different sectors. - Students and faculty will participate in the course in a seminar format with reflections after each week, and a synthesis paper addressing pathways and sectors for a ?challenge? problem defined by the student. Grading: The course is a blend of a seminar plus project-based course. Grading will be based on framing relevant and creative questions (25%), engaging in dialogue with the weekly speakers and with the class-cohort (25%), and, on translating learning from the course into a real world project (chosen by the student) that will be due at the end of the course (50%).
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=PA5790~005&term=1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 February 2014

Fall 2014  |  PA 5790 Section 001: Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Material-Energy Flows & Society (26834)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Tue 05:30PM - 08:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 20
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Material-Energy Flows and Society. For MS-STEP students, this class can fulfill the 5722 requirement.
Class Description:
All Paths for Translating Science to Action for the Common Good Translating science to action has occurred in all societies, but is more complicated in technological societies when multiple aspirations (economy, environment, health, climate-risks) are at play, where people are removed from the natural system, and, where technological innovation is rapid but often not well-understood in terms of impact. As a result, solving ?grand challenges? of environmental sustainability, food security, climate-resilience and governance of emerging technologies requires integrating multiple pathways and multiple sectors for translating science to action. The multiple pathways refer to regulations, voluntary programs, cooperative approaches, entrepreneurial and market-based solutions. The various pathways require multi-sector collaboration between academia, governments, for-profit and NGO sectors, all of whom play different roles in translating science to action. Further, communities themselves hold vast local informal knowledge ? often untapped - that is essential for place-based problem-solving . Most importantly, professionals no longer work within or with only one sector throughout their career, and are now expected to have the knowledge of the multiple pathways and sectors described above. Given these needs, this course is envisioned as a first introductory course for translating science to action for the common good, offered to students, researchers and professionals who are seeking high social impact Course Objectives: This course will: - Introduce students to the available theories and frameworks that describe some of the strengths and weaknesses, and best practices in working on grand challenge challenges across communities, businesses, governments, academia and NGO sectors. - Using the example of sustainable city development, different pathways will be delineated as well as the need for using a portfolio approach incorporating multiple pathways, and multiple sectors. - Experts from the different sectors will share their experiences describing the culture as well as practice in these different sectors. - Students and faculty will participate in the course in a seminar format with reflections after each week, and a synthesis paper addressing pathways and sectors for a ?challenge? problem defined by the student. Grading: The course is a blend of a seminar plus project-based course. Grading will be based on framing relevant and creative questions (25%), engaging in dialogue with the weekly speakers and with the class-cohort (25%), and, on translating learning from the course into a real world project (chosen by the student) that will be due at the end of the course (50%).
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=PA5790~001&term=1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 February 2014

Fall 2014  |  PA 5790 Section 003: Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Emerging Sciences & Tech: Law, Policy & Ethics (34323)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
BTHX 8000 Section 002
LAW 6037 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/03/2014
Tue 04:05PM - 07:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Walter F. Mondale Hall 65
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Emerging Sciences and Technologies: Law, Policy, and Ethics.
Class Description:
This interdisciplinary course will examine issues at the nexus of law, ethics, public policy, and emerging sciences and technologies (ES&T) including nanotechnology, genetic and biomedical engineering, cognitive science, synthetic biology, and robotics. Topics we will explore include the role of science and technology as both a tool for and the subject of law and policy; the legal, ethical, economic, and policy implications of ES&T research and development; environmental and human health risk analysis and regulation (e.g., EPA, FDA, OSHA, and state and local regulatory mechanisms); intellectual property issues; liability issues; and global impacts. Topics will be approached from the perspective of different stakeholders (e.g., federal agencies, industry, academic researchers, the environment, international organizations, and the public) and in the context of different application areas (e.g., drugs, devices, food, agriculture, energy, environmental remediation) using a variety of interdisciplinary approaches. Students with a broad range of interests are encouraged to enroll.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=PA5790~003&term=1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 April 2014

Spring 2014  |  PA 5790 Section 002: Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Science & Policy of Global Environmental Change (68037)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
EEB 5146 Section 001
FNRM 5146 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Tue, Thu 10:15AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, St Paul
Learning & Environmental Sci R380
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Science and Policy of Global Environmental Change.
Class Description:
Investments in basic scientific research and technological development have had an enormous impact on innovation, economic growth and societal well-being. Yet, science policy decisions at the federal and state levels of government are typically dominated by advocates for particular scientific fields or missions. Policy decisions are frequently based upon past practice or data trends that may be out of date or have limited relevance to the current situation. We do not have the capacity to predict how best to make and manage future investments so as to exploit the most promising and important opportunities. While some fields benefit from the availability of real-time data and computational models which allow for prospective analyses, science policy does not benefit from a similar set of tools and modeling capabilities. In addition, there is a vigorous debate as to whether analytically-based science policy is possible, given the uncertainty of outcomes in the scientific discovery process. Yet an interdisciplinary and international community of practice is emerging to advance the scientific basis of science policy, through the development of data collection, theoretical frameworks, models and tools, so that we can make future policy decisions based on sound science and informed judgment. This course will develop the foundations of an evidence-based platform of science policy. (See syllabus for more.)
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=PA5790~002&term=1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 March 2008

Spring 2014  |  PA 5790 Section 003: Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Science-to-Action for the Common Good (69638)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
ESPM 5019 Section 001
MGMT 5019 Section 060
PA 5022 Section 011
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/24/2014 - 05/09/2014
Tue 05:30PM - 08:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management L-118
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
Science-to-Action for the Common Good
Class Description:
All Paths for Translating Science to Action for the Common Good Translating science to action has occurred in all societies, but is more complicated in technological societies when multiple aspirations (economy, environment, health, climate-risks) are at play, where people are removed from the natural system, and, where technological innovation is rapid but often not well-understood in terms of impact. As a result, solving ?grand challenges? of environmental sustainability, food security, climate-resilience and governance of emerging technologies requires integrating multiple pathways and multiple sectors for translating science to action. The multiple pathways refer to regulations, voluntary programs, cooperative approaches, entrepreneurial and market-based solutions. The various pathways require multi-sector collaboration between academia, governments, for-profit and NGO sectors, all of whom play different roles in translating science to action. Further, communities themselves hold vast local informal knowledge ? often untapped - that is essential for place-based problem-solving . Most importantly, professionals no longer work within or with only one sector throughout their career, and are now expected to have the knowledge of the multiple pathways and sectors described above. Given these needs, this course is envisioned as a first introductory course for translating science to action for the common good, offered to students, researchers and professionals who are seeking high social impact Course Objectives: This course will: - Introduce students to the available theories and frameworks that describe some of the strengths and weaknesses, and best practices in working on grand challenge challenges across communities, businesses, governments, academia and NGO sectors. - Using the example of sustainable city development, different pathways will be delineated as well as the need for using a portfolio approach incorporating multiple pathways, and multiple sectors. - Experts from the different sectors will share their experiences describing the culture as well as practice in these different sectors. - Students and faculty will participate in the course in a seminar format with reflections after each week, and a synthesis paper addressing pathways and sectors for a ?challenge? problem defined by the student. Grading: The course is a blend of a seminar plus project-based course. Grading will be based on framing relevant and creative questions (25%), engaging in dialogue with the weekly speakers and with the class-cohort (25%), and, on translating learning from the course into a real world project (chosen by the student) that will be due at the end of the course (50%).
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=PA5790~003&term=1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 February 2014

Fall 2013  |  PA 5790 Section 002: Topics in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy -- Material-Energy Flows & Society (35603)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
PA 5022 Section 004
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2013 - 12/11/2013
Tue 05:30PM - 08:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management L-118
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics.
Class Notes:
For MS-STEP students, this class can fulfill the 5722 requirement.
Class Description:
OVERVIEW: How do material and energy flows shape development of a sustainable society? Material-Energy Flows will be discussed in the context of: A) Resource depletion and recycling, B) Economic development, and, C) As a source of environmental pollution. Students will learn skills of direct material-energy flow analysis (MEFA), life cycle assessment (LCA), the combination of MEFA and LCA for environmental footprint-ing, economic input-output analysis, and cost benefit analysis for resource extractions/recycling decisions as well as pollution abatement decisions. The first half of the course will focus on general principles and methods in. In the second half, students will work on group projects, handling real-world data to develop environmental footprints of different units of society: 1. Production Systems ? businesses or industries 2. Infrastructure systems (energy supply, water supply); 3. Consumers (households) 4. Different Regions: National, State and Metropolitan/ City scales WEEKLY PLAN: Week 1 - Overview of Material-Energy Flows in Society: Global resources, renewable and non-renewable, Units and Conversions, Issues of material scarcity and interdependence of water-energy and materials Week 2: Material-Energy Flows in Different Units of Society: Producers (Industry and Businesses), Infrastructure (water supply, energy supply, transportation systems, etc.), Consumers (households), and Regions (nations, cities, metropolitan areas). Issues of resource scarcity and environmental pollution, and their relationship with sustainability. Week 3-4: General Principles/Methods:MEFA at different scales; MEFA and the Economy, Introduction to Economic Input Output tables. Week 5-6: General Principles & Methods: Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Combining MEFA with LCA to develop resource use and pollution emission footprints Week 7-8: General Principles & Methods: Cost-Benefit Analysis for decisions about resource extraction, recycling and environmental pollution abatement Week 9-11: Material-Energy Use and Sustainability of Production Systems- Economic Aspects - Technical and economic feasibility of resource extraction and recycling, Cost-benefit analysis and decision-making Environmental Performance of products, industries and infrastructure services Examples of the mining industry, water or energy infrastructure, fisheries and recycling systems. Week 11: Material-Energy Flows and Sustainability of Consumers - focus on households, quality of life and sufficiency Week 12-14: Material-Energy Flows and Regional Sustainability - We will study the economy (GDP, job creation), resource use, and pollution footprints of cities, states and the US economy. Week 15: Final Presentation GRADING: 45% for three quizzes interspersed in the weeks; 30% for homework; and 25% for the group project. STUDENTS: Graduate or senior level standing, with high math literacy. INSTRUCTOR: Anu Ramaswami
Grading:
45% Quizzes Other Grading Information: 30% for Homework. 25% for Group Project.
Textbooks:
http://www.bookstores.umn.edu/buybooks.cgi?deptlookup=1&search=PA5790~002&term=1139
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 December 2013

ClassInfo Links - Public Affairs Classes

To link directly to this ClassInfo page from your website or to save it as a bookmark, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=PA&catalog_nbr=5790
To see a URL-only list for use in the Faculty Center URL fields, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=PA&catalog_nbr=5790&url=1
To see this page output as XML, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=PA&catalog_nbr=5790&xml=1
To see this page output as JSON, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=PA&catalog_nbr=5790&json=1
To see this page output as CSV, use:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?subject=PA&catalog_nbr=5790&csv=1