4 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2021  |  PA 5690 Section 001: Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy -- LGBTQ Politics & Policy (65595)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (9 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Enrollment Requirements:
Graduate Student
Times and Locations:
First Half of Term
 
01/19/2021 - 03/08/2021
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (7 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
Class will be offered REMOTELY. Class will meet synchronously-online during Spring 2021 during the scheduled time. Brian Harrison can be reached at bfh@umn.edu. http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5690+Spring2021
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65595/1213

Spring 2019  |  PA 5690 Section 003: Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy -- LGBTQ Politics & Policy (68006)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
1.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Second Half of Term
 
03/12/2019 - 05/06/2019
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 15
Enrollment Status:
Open (9 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
The advancement of LGBTQ rights in the United States has experienced unprecedented success over the last twenty years, shifting both public attitude towards and legal protection for gay Americans. This graduate-level course will provide an in-depth analysis of current LGBTQ policy achievements in the United States. Dr. Harrison (Ph.D. Northwestern University) is a political scientist, writer, and award-winning teacher. He has taught at Northwestern University, Wesleyan University, Loyola University-Chicago, and DePaul University and has held academic affiliations with Yale University and New York University. Brian is a specialist in American politics, political communication, public opinion, political behavior and attitude change, and LGBT politics. He is co-author of Listen, We Need to Talk: How to Change Attitudes about LGBT Rights (Oxford University Press, 2017) and has been published in academic journals like Political Behavior, Legislative Studies Quarterly, and Social Science Quarterly, among others. Prior to graduate school, Brian was a White House appointee to the Department of Homeland Security. More at: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?+PA5690+Spring2019 http://brianharrison.net/about/
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/68006/1193

Fall 2018  |  PA 5690 Section 001: Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy -- Gender and Intersectional Network Series (GAINS) I (35405)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
0.5 Credits (3 Credits max.)
Grading Basis:
S-N only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/14/2018
Fri 02:15PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
 
10/12/2018
Fri 02:15PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
 
11/09/2018
Fri 02:15PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
 
11/30/2018
Fri 02:15PM - 05:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
Enrollment Status:
Open (25 of 31 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cewig+PA5690+Fall2018 http://classinfo.umn.edu/?harex004+PA5690+Fall2018
Class Description:
Women are still disproportionately underrepresented in leadership roles in public, private, and nonprofit institutions in spite of high rates of educational attainment and equal opportunity legislation. Women of color and indigenous women face even greater obstacles to advancement compared to white women. Barriers to diverse leadership today stem less from overt discrimination and more from "second generation" forms of bias - often invisible but still powerful cultural beliefs as well as workplace structures and practices (Ely, Ibarra and Kolb, 2011). Achieving leadership parity thus entails individual, collective and institutional change. GAINS: Gender and Intersectional Network Series will prepare students with the skills to lead effectively and challenge institutional norms that perpetuate gender and other forms of bias.

Course pedagogy includes: case studies, group discussions,self-reflection and simulations that have been proven to have a lasting impact on individual leaders in developing their own leadership capacity. Guest speakers will offer potential role models and will share their leadership perspectives. The workshop and two-semester format of the course allows students to benefit from a cohort model of learning and develop their own network of practice (Brue & Brue 2016). Moreover, GAINS focuses not just on individual leadership development, but also on how institutional norms and practices that perpetuate bias can be reformed.

Led by Professor Christina Ewig and Debra Fitzpatrick of the Center on Women, Gender and Public Policy, this half-credit per semester course aimed at graduate students enrolled in UMN professional schools will meet four Fridays over the course of the Fall semester. Part Two, in Spring 2019, will continue with additional topics. Students of all genders interested in addressing gendered and intersectional barriers to advancement are welcome to enroll. To get the most out of the network and cohort development aspects of this course, students are encouraged to participate for two semesters.

Topics over the course of two semesters will include: Developing Your Authentic Leadership Style; Confronting Implicit Bias; Networking and Professional Advancement; Achieving Work-life Balance; and Negotiation.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students of all genders interested in developing their own leadership capacity and addressing informal and formal barriers to leadership advancement rooted in gender, race and other forms of inequality.
Learning Objectives:
Grading:
S/N
Class Format:
This half credit course meets in an interactive workshop format for three hours on four Fridays over the course of the Fall semester.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/35405/1189
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cewig_PA5690_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 July 2018

Spring 2018  |  PA 5690 Section 001: Topics in Women, Gender and Public Policy -- Gender,Race&Pol Representation: US in Global Pers (66867)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
PA 8690 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue 05:30PM - 08:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 35
Enrollment Status:
Open (4 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Selected topics. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cewig@umn.edu+PA5690+Spring2018
Class Description:
A central tenet of democracy is the equal and just representation of its citizens. Yet, democracies around the world only unevenly represent their citizens - whether measured by the make-up of their political representatives or by the substance of their political agendas. This course is global in scope; it approaches the intersecting issues of gender, race and political representation through the study of cross-national evidence and comparative country studies from around the world in order to identify the best practices for strengthening the representation of under-represented groups. This course begins with an introduction to alternative theories of representation in a democratic society; including what constitutes representation and how an ideal democratic society should represent its citizens. The course then asks students to grapple with the concepts of gender and race; both what these are and how these have historically shape political representation. The course offers students the opportunity to engage with scholarship on how and why most democratic systems unevenly represent women and racial and ethnic minorities in political office, and the consequences of this under representation for political agendas. The core of the course focuses on the individual, structural factors and institutional factors that have been attributed to increasing the election and appointment of underrepresented groups as well as the representation of their interests on policy agendas at a variety of levels of governance.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in electoral systems and in how to achieve more robust, inclusive democracies.

This course fulfills an optional course requirement for four concentrations for Master of Public Policy students: Gender and Public Policy, Global Policy, Politics and Governance, and Social Policy. For more see: Master of Public Policy.
Learning Objectives:
1. to develop a better understanding of how and why different groups, in particular women and racial or ethnic minorities, are often represented unevenly in democratic societies and the normative and ethical implications of uneven representation.
2. to understand the individual,
structural and institutional factors that that have been key to improved political representation of traditionally underrepresented groups.

3. to understand the role of cultural and political context as well as global position for patterns of political representation and the options available to change these patterns.

4.to analyze, synthesize, and think critically about problems of democratic representation.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66867/1183
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cewig_PA5690_Spring2018.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 December 2017

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