16 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2018  |  ALL 5920 Section 001: Topics in Asian Culture -- Literature and Justice in South Asia (67810)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Mon 01:00PM - 03:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 118
Enrollment Status:
Open (4 of 17 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Description:
The purpose of this class will be to engage with various aspects of justice through literary texts. Rigorously informed by political, social, and cultural contexts, we will read and discuss several literary texts that represent and protest against political and social marginalization in modern South Asia. We will ask ourselves why literary texts are not mere representation, but essential and powerful mode of moving towards equity and equality. Starting with anti-colonial writings in 18th and 19th-century India, we will engage in discussion of literary texts dealing with caste violence, gender discrimination, environmental justice, and communal segregation, among others. Texts included are written by authors like Muhammad Iqbal, Rabindranath Tagore, B.R. Ambedkar, Ismat Chughtai, Sadaat Hasan Manto, Intizaar Hussain, Mahasweta Devi, Shantabai Kamble, Namdeo Dhasal, Gogu Shyamla, Temsula Ao, Easterine Kire.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67810/1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 November 2017

Spring 2018  |  ALL 5920 Section 002: Topics in Asian Culture -- The Monkey King and Transcultural China (69286)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Wed 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, East Bank
Pillsbury Hall 121
Enrollment Status:
Open (6 of 17 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Description:
The Monkey King (Sun Wukong) is one of the most iconic images in Chinese culture, and has a rich transcultural history from its Indian origins to its numerous adaptations in contemporary global media. This seminar traces the evolution and meanings of the Monkey's image, and addresses a range of materials including the Indian epic "The Ramayana," the classical Chinese novel "The Journey to the West," the Asian American writer Maxine Hong Kingston's "Tripmaster Monkey," and contemporary Chinese films. Conceptually, the class focuses on reading the Monkey's image as a figure of otherness and in-betweenness, and explores through this perspective new visions of the Chinese cultural heritage, globalization, and cross-cultural identity. Taught in English.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/69286/1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 November 2017

Fall 2017  |  ALL 5920 Section 001: Topics in Asian Culture -- Visuality and Japanese Modernity (36029)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 3
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/36029/1179
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bposadas_ALL5920_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)

Fall 2017  |  ALL 5920 Section 002: Topics in Asian Culture -- Culture and Society of the Arabian Peninsula (36192)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Meets With:
ALL 3920 Section 003
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, East Bank
Ford Hall 151
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Meets with ALL 3920-003 "Culture and Society of the Arabian Peninsula."
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/36192/1179

Fall 2016  |  ALL 5920 Section 001: Topics in Asian Culture -- Chinese New Media (34132)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Topics Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 119
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Topic: Chinese New Media
Class Description:
This course is organized around readings of literary and cinematic texts that reference and remediate 'Japan' in their narratives. Attentive not only to the accuracy or authenticity of these various texts' respective representations of Japan, but also to the structuring of desires, affects, and horizons of expectation that their their deployment of an imagined cultural geography engender, our discussions will examine the various ways 'Japan' is represented and resignified across a range of different novels, plays, and films at different historically specific moments. Particular emphasis will be placed on such focal points as: ethnographic cinema, the politics of travel and translation, the intersecting performances of race and gender, the uses of cultural otherness in the writing of alternate histories, and the ramifications of techno-orientalist discourse. No preceding knowledge of Japanese language, literature, or cinema is required. All the required readings are available in English, and discussions are conducted in English
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34132/1169
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 February 2015

Spring 2016  |  ALL 5920 Section 001: Topics in Asian Culture -- Gender and Sexuality in Arabic Literature (60118)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2016 - 05/06/2016
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 5
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Topic Title: Gender and Sexuality in Arabic Literature http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ALL5920+Spring2016
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/60118/1163

Spring 2016  |  ALL 5920 Section 002: Topics in Asian Culture -- A Digital Project For San Francisco Opera (60120)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
HIST 5940 Section 001
EMS 5500 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2016 - 05/06/2016
Tue 02:30PM - 05:20PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 4
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Topic Title: Building the Dream: A Digital Humanities Project For San Francisco Opera
Class Description:
This course will be dedicated to the production of an on-line course to accompany the San Francisco Opera's production of Dream of the Red Chambe. Students will work with experts in Chinese literature and in digital production to build on-line modules that provide cultural background for the Dream. The opera is based on a great classical Chinese novel that engages a wide variety of cultural themes, from romantic love to the Buddhist life, from family politics to the machinations of the imperial court. Students will become familiar with the novel (in English or Chinese) and do background research in preparation for the digital production. The class invites students of various training and skills.
Grading:
60% on weekly assignments; 40% on a final project
Class Format:
The class will be discussion and hands-on work making digital modules.
Workload:
.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/60120/1163
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 October 2015

Fall 2015  |  ALL 5920 Section 001: Topics in Asian Culture -- Representations and Reimaginations of 'Japan' (25012)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2015 - 12/16/2015
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Nicholson Hall 145
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Topic Title: Representations and Remediations of "Japan". http://classinfo.umn.edu/?bposadas+ALL5920+Fall2015
Class Description:
This course is organized around readings of non-Japanese literary and cinematic texts that take up the fantasy of 'Japan' in their narratives. Attentive to the structuring of desires, affects, and horizons of expectation that their deployments of an imagined cultural geography named "Japan" engender, our discussions will examine the various ways 'Japan' is represented across a range of different texts by authors who are not Japanese to serve as a point of departure for the interrogation of our own critical practice in taking up 'Japan' as an object of intellectual inquiry. Particular emphasis will be placed on such focal points as: ethnographic cinema, the politics of travel and translation, the intersecting performances of race and gender, the uses of cultural otherness in the writing of alternate histories, and the ramifications of techno-orientalist discourse. Discussions will cover work by Roland Barthes, Philip K. Dick, Marguerite Duras, David Henry Hwang, Chris Marker, Ruth Ozeki, and others. No preceding knowledge of Japanese is required; all the readings are available in English.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/25012/1159
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bposadas_ALL5920_Fall2015.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 July 2015

Spring 2015  |  ALL 5920 Section 001: Topics in Asian Culture -- Science Fiction, Empire, Japan (67873)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 04/15/2015
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 107
 
04/16/2015 - 04/21/2015
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 116
 
04/22/2015 - 05/08/2015
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 107
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Topic Title: Science Fiction, Empire, Japan
Class Description:
This course serves the dual purpose of introducing students to key issues and themes arising out of the history of Japanese science fiction and providing a space to critically engage with the imbrication of science fiction with empire. It is premised on the understanding that the inter-textually circulated motifs, images, and narratives of science fiction form a coherent and historically situated discourse indebted to the language and logic of colonialism. On the one hand, Japan has become a fetishized site in Anglophone texts such that "Japan" itself is often imagined as signifying a science fictional space as such; on the other hand, the emergence of the SF genre in Japan in the first half of the twentieth century is intertwined with the ideological deployments of science and discourses of "civilization" embedded in the nation's historical position as the only non-Western colonial empire. With this context in mind, this course will take up "Japan" as a specific locus of analysis from which standpoint we will track the overlaps and interactions between the emergence and subsequent development of the genre of science fiction and the histories of empire. All materials will be available in English translation; no previous knowledge of Japanese is required.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67873/1153
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/bposadas_ALL5920_Fall2015.pdf (Fall 2015)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 November 2014

Spring 2015  |  ALL 5920 Section 002: Topics in Asian Culture -- Media & Public Culture in Modern South Asia (67875)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F only
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 04/27/2015
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 118
 
04/28/2015 - 05/01/2015
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 116
 
05/02/2015 - 05/08/2015
Mon, Wed 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 118
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Topic Title: Media & Public Culture in Modern South Asia
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67875/1153

Fall 2014  |  ALL 5920 Section 001: Topics in Asian Culture -- Taiwan Film (27706)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 119
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Tue 06:00PM - 09:00PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 118
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Film Screening Tuesdays 6:00 - 9:00
Class Description:
The social and cultural experience of modernity has long been characterized by successive waves of new visual media, from the periodicals of printing presses to the various forms of moving-image technologies, from silent cinema to computer-generated animation. In each case, however, the 'newness' of new media has been mitigated by processes such as the remediation of older media through newer ones (and newer media through older ones) and the broader tendency of new media to reflect pre-existing cultural and narrative forms within any particular social and historical context. In addition, intermediality may occur between two or more types of new media at a specific historical juncture?for example, between early sound cinema and pop music, or between underground comics and digital cinema. This course explores new media and intermediality from specific moments in the history of modern China. The new photographic practices and illustrated periodicals of the late Qing Dynasty serve as examples of how new forms of visual culture became both reflexive and constitutive of modernity. Silent cinema of the Republican era both drew upon and defined itself against existing Chinese dramatic forms, particularly opera. In the 1930s, the arrival of sound in cinema provided a space for phonographic modernity to be expressed through film. In the People's Republic, the productive interplay between traditional art forms and cinema entered a new era, culminating in the cinematic adaptations of the 'model plays' of the Cultural Revolution. Finally, recent years have seen the explosive growth of internet culture, gaming communities, computer animation, and digital cinema. This course will devote sections to earlier examples of 'old' new media and intermediality before turning in the second half of the course to the new media of contemporary China and the intermedial relationships among computer graphics, internet culture, special-effects blockbuster cinema, and underground DV filmmaking.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/27706/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 March 2012

Fall 2014  |  ALL 5920 Section 002: Topics in Asian Culture -- Early Chinese Art (33879)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
ARTH 5765 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 415
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Description:
This course surveys the art and material culture of China from the Neolithic (ca. 5000-2000 BCE) to the early imperial period (221 BCE-906 CE), the latter of which spans from the unification of Qin (221-206 BCE) to the collapse of Tang (618-906 CE). With primary reference to archaeological evidence discovered in the recent decades, the course considers (1) cities and palaces, (2) tombs and ritual architecture, (3) trans-and intra-regional contacts, and (4) the rise of new media and technologies during that span of Chinese history. In addition, the second half of the course does distinctively discuss (5) the spread of Buddhist material culture (from the Indian subcontinent and through Central Asia) and its impact to the various Chinese lives. The survey mandates to promote a critical understanding of religious and socio-political context in early China, as manifested at the spectacular articles of its visual culture.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
30% Attendance
Exam Format:
Short essay
Class Format:
100% Lecture
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
7 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33879/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 April 2014

Fall 2014  |  ALL 5920 Section 003: Topics in Asian Culture -- Japanese Language and Food (35381)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
LING 5900 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 118
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Topic prereq - JPN 3022
Class Description:
ALL5920 (LEC 003) Topics in Asian Culture: Japanese Language and Food (Polly Szatrowski) In 2013, washoku `traditional Japanese cuisine' was honored by UNESCO as an Intangible Cultural Heritage. According to the BBC World News (Nov. 17, 2009), Tokyo is "the best place to eat", having 160,000 restaurants, and the most Michelin 3-star restaurants in the world. Japan is presently experiencing a food boom as shown by the great number of restaurants featuring cuisine from all over the world in Tokyo and the numerous cooking and eating shows on Japanese television. The Japanese language has developed many ways to talk about food, including many cooking terms and special expressions for the tastes, textures, smells, visual features, and sounds associated with food. In this course, we will address the following questions: 1) How do Japanese people organize their language and bodies around food, i.e., how do they use them to get to and from the table, and to proceed in a meal (e.g., at a sushi restaurant)? 2) How is the Japanese language used to taste, identify and assess food, and how do these fine distinctions and discriminations relate to the Japanese identity? 3) How do Japanese people talk about their experience of food and tell stories about food? 4) What linguistic forms and metaphors does the Japanese language have for food and how does the use of the Japanese language in the context of food relate to gender? 5) How is the Japanese language used to socialize children around food? We will explore the relation between the Japanese language and food by analyzing actual Japanese conversations about and while eating a variety of foods. The class will be most rewarding for students who like to cook/eat, talk about food, and educate their palate. PREREQUISITES: JPN 3022 Intermediate Japanese, OR permission of the instructor.
Grading:
40% Class Participation Other Grading Information: Major paper, abstract, presentation:30%; Written homework and data collection: 30%
Class Format:
30% Lecture
40% Discussion
30% Student Presentations
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
20-30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/35381/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 April 2014

Fall 2013  |  ALL 5920 Section 001: Topics in Asian Culture -- Japanese Language and Food (34871)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Discussion
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
ALL 3920 Section 004
LING 5900 Section 002
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2013 - 12/11/2013
Tue, Thu 12:45PM - 02:00PM
UMTC, East Bank
Elliott Hall S225
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Notes:
Topic prereq - Jpn 3022 or instr consent
Class Description:
According to the BBC World News (Nov. 17, 2009), Tokyo is "the best place to eat", having 160,000 restaurants, and the most Michelin 3-star restaurants in the world. Japan is presently experiencing a food boom as shown by the great number of restaurants featuring cuisine from all over the world in Tokyo and the numerous cooking and eating shows on Japanese television. The Japanese language has developed many ways to talk about food, including many cooking terms and special expressions for the tastes, textures, smells, visual features, and sounds associated with food. In this course, we will address the following questions: 1) How do Japanese people organize their language and bodies around food, i.e., how do they use them to get to and from the table, and to proceed in a meal (e.g., at a sushi restaurant)? 2) How is the Japanese language used to taste, identify and assess food, and how do these fine distinctions and discriminations relate to the Japanese identity? 3) How do Japanese people talk about their experience of food and tell stories about food? 4) What linguistic forms and metaphors does the Japanese language have for food and how does the use of the Japanese language in the context of food relate to gender? 5) How is the Japanese language used to socialize children around food? We will explore the relation between the Japanese language and food by analyzing actual Japanese conversations about and while eating a variety of foods. The class will be most rewarding for students who like to cook/eat, talk about food, and educate their palate.
Grading:
40% Reports/Papers
30% Written Homework
30% In-class Presentations
Class Format:
40% Lecture
30% Discussion
30% Student Presentations
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Paper(s)
Other Workload: Pages Writing per Term: paper (20-30) + homework (10-15 pages) = 30-45
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34871/1139
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 May 2013

Spring 2013  |  ALL 5920 Section 001: Topics in Asian Culture -- Cinematic Ecologies in World Cinema (60710)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, East Bank
Folwell Hall 118
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Description:
Ecocriticism is a growing field in literary studies, but only recently has film become a focus within environmental humanities. This course is designed to explore the filmic expression of ecopolitical relationships among human and nonhuman subjects in western and Asian cinema. Students will view and discuss a range of genres including experimental, mainstream, and documentary film and familiarize themselves with recent theories of film criticism that engage questions concerning humanism and the expression of ecological and biological relations among beings in visual culture. Some topics to be address include but are not limited to: ecocritical theory for visual culture; biopolitics in film; animal bodies and eyes in cinema; anthropomorphism, zoomorphism and plasmaticity in film; catastrophe and contamination in visual culture; insects and media.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/60710/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 November 2012

Spring 2013  |  ALL 5920 Section 003: Topics in Asian Culture -- Early Chinese Art (68423)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
ARTH 5765 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue, Thu 04:00PM - 05:15PM
UMTC, East Bank
Blegen Hall 260
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Class Description:
This course surveys the art and material culture of China from the Neolithic (ca. 5000-2000 BCE) to the early imperial period (221 BCE-906 CE), the latter of which spans from the unification of Qin (221-206 BCE) to the collapse of Tang (618-906 CE). With primary reference to archaeological evidence discovered in the recent decades, the course considers (1) cities and palaces, (2) tombs and ritual architecture, (3) trans-and intra-regional contacts, and (4) the rise of new media and technologies during that span of Chinese history. In addition, the second half of the course does distinctively discuss (5) the spread of Buddhist material culture (from the Indian subcontinent and through Central Asia) and its impact to the various Chinese lives. The survey mandates to promote a critical understanding of religious and socio-political context in early China, as manifested at the spectacular articles of its visual culture.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
30% Attendance
Exam Format:
Short essay
Class Format:
100% Lecture
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
7 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/68423/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 November 2012

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