6 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2024  |  SOC 4451 Section 001: Sport, Culture & Society (32298)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (17 of 55 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
This course is intended to stimulate critical, sociological thinking about sport? how it is socially organized, who participates in what and why, what role (or roles) sport plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life more generally. It begins from and is grounded in the notion that sport is one of the most powerful and paradoxical institutions in the modern world. The course is intended for a wide range of undergraduates, though some familiarity with basic social scientific thinking and techniques will be helpful. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC4451+Fall2024
Class Description:
This course is intended to stimulate critical, sociological thinking about sport - how it is socially organized, what role (or roles) it plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life more generally. It begins from and is grounded in the notion that sport is one of the most powerful, paradoxical, and poorly understood institutions in the modern world. The first unit of the course provides a theoretical framework and broad historical context for making social sense of these paradoxes and of the phenomenon of sport itself. The second unit then explores what it is like to "play" various sports, the determinants of participation and success, and the general impacts of such involvement. The second half of the course involves two main units. The first is the culture and political economy of elite-entertainment sport; the second involves issues of protest, politics, and social change in and through sport, focused on issues of race, racism, and racial justice. Together, these units are intended to capture the basic structure, function, and broad social significance of a cultural form that is too often naively celebrated, trivialized, or simply dismissed by both scholarly and public audiences alike. Readings will include two books (Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger and Soccer in Mind by Andrew Guest) as well as a collection of articles and book chapters.
Who Should Take This Class?:
sociology majors are encouraged but the course readings, lectures, and discussions should be accessible to all college students
Grading:
--2 Midterm Exams: 40% (20 % each)
--quizzes and class participation: 20%
--2 short essays: 20% (10 % each)
--final course project on topic of choice: 20%
Exam Format:
2 in-class midterms; terms and definitions, MC, and one or two short essays
Class Format:
40% Lecture
15% Film/Video
25% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
Workload:
--around 50-75 pages of reading per week (generally 2-3 articles or book chapters)
--12 pages of writing for the term (2 short essays, 1 slightly longer final paper)
--2 midterm examinations
--occasional quizes and group activities
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32298/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 April 2024

Spring 2021  |  SOC 4451 Section 001: Sport, Culture & Society (65543)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (29 of 30 seats filled)
Course Catalog Description:
This course is intended to stimulate critical, sociological thinking about sport? how it is socially organized, who participates in what and why, what role (or roles) sport plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life more generally. It begins from and is grounded in the notion that sport is one of the most powerful and paradoxical institutions in the modern world. The course is intended for a wide range of undergraduates, though some familiarity with basic social scientific thinking and techniques will be helpful. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This lecture is completely online. On Wednesdays, the lecture will meet in a synchronous format at the scheduled time. The remaining lecture material will be available online in an asynchronous format. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?deorn001+SOC4451+Spring2021
Class Description:

Think about all the places you encounter sport. You may participate in sport as an athlete, a coach, or a fan, but you may also see sport in media broadcasts, schools, child development recommendations, health advice, workplace smalltalk, or political language. Even if just through the sport metaphors common in business or politics, all of you will encounter sport through direct participation, spectatorship, or commentary at some point in your lives.

Whether you are new to sociology or not, through this course you will sharpen your sociological ability to evaluate sport in your own life and in our culture at large. Sport is a powerful and paradoxical social institution, and therefore a place where we can see the tensions that define sociology -- tensions between biography and history, agency and structure, social reproduction and social change. In general, how does society impact how sport is played, who has access, and the meanings we attach to sport, and how does sport in turn shape society through understandings of culture, identity, and politics?

We'll explore sport, culture and society via three units:

In unit 1, Linking Sport and Culture, we will develop the theoretical tools for the rest of class and look at how sport, especially school sport, creates (classed) habits, skills, and dispositions.

In unit 2, Sport as Contested Terrain, we will consider how sport helps to define and redefine the cultural categories of sex, gender, and sexuality.

In unit 3, Sport, Race, and Social Change, we will examine the role of sport and athletes in social movements.

The two main assessments -- a final reflection paper and a presentation project on a sport & society topic of your choosing -- emphasize your ability to apply sociological thinking to sport content. We will practice along the way through class discussion and online discussion boards, and scaffolding memos will provide additional practice and feedback as you work on the assessments.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Anyone interested in the social and cultural implications of sport. This may include those for whom sport has played a large role in their lives, but students wondering why we spend so much time talking about sport may also find this course useful. Previous coursework in sociology will be helpful but is not necessary.
Learning Objectives:

Through this course you will:

  • Apply a sociological perspective to sport in a variety of contexts, especially how sport can support both social reproduction and social change.

  • Evaluate and synthesize popular and scholarly "texts" about sport.

  • Reflect on the role of sport in your own life and the life of your community.

  • Grading:
    Weekly activities and discussion boards 40%

    Project Scaffolding Memos 5%

    Topical Project 25%

    Paper Scaffolding Memos 10%

    Final Reflection Paper 20%
    Class Format:
    Lecture material and some discussion activities will be delivered asynchronously. Synchronous class time will consist of discussion, interactive activities, and time for clarification and check-ins.
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65543/1213
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    9 November 2020

    Fall 2016  |  SOC 4451 Section 001: Modern Sport: Its Power & Paradoxes (18336)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Meets With:
    SOC 4451H Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
    Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 240
    Course Catalog Description:
    How sport is socially organized, what role(s) it plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life in general. prereq: 1001 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC4451+Fall2016
    Class Description:
    This course is intended to stimulate critical, sociological thinking about sport - how it is socially organized, what role (or roles) it plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life more generally. It begins from and is grounded in the notion that sport is one of the most powerful, paradoxical, and poorly understood institutions in the modern world. The first unit of the course provides a theoretical framework and broad historical context for making social sense of these paradoxes and of the phenomenon of sport itself. The second unit then explores what it is like to "play" various sports, the determinants of participation and success, and the general impacts of such involvement. These ideas are illustrated throughout the course using examples from intercollegiate athletics and the dynamics of race and sport in contemporary American society. Two main themes structure the second half of the course. The first is the culture and political economy of elite-entertainment sport; the second involves issues of globalization and cross-cultural exchange focusing on Olympic sport in China. Together, all of these units are intended to capture the basic structure, function, and broad social significance of a cultural form that is too often naively celebrated, trivialized, or simply dismissed by both scholarly and public audiences alike.
    Grading:
    50% Midterm Exam
    10% Reports/Papers
    15% Special Projects
    5% Quizzes
    10% Reflection Papers
    10% Class Participation
    Exam Format:
    2 in-class midterms; terms and definitions, MC, and one or two short essays
    Class Format:
    40% Lecture
    15% Film/Video
    25% Discussion
    10% Small Group Activities
    10% Guest Speakers
    Workload:
    60 Pages Reading Per Week
    10 Pages Writing Per Term
    2 Exam(s)
    3 Paper(s)
    3 Quiz(zes)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18336/1169
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    30 August 2012

    Fall 2015  |  SOC 4451 Section 001: Modern Sport: Its Power & Paradoxes (34581)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Meets With:
    SOC 4451H Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    09/08/2015 - 12/16/2015
    Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Carlson School of Management L-118
    Course Catalog Description:
    How sport is socially organized, what role(s) it plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life in general. prereq: 1001 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
    Class Notes:
    Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?hartm021+SOC4451+Fall2015
    Class Description:
    This course is intended to stimulate critical, sociological thinking about sport - how it is socially organized, what role (or roles) it plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life more generally. It begins from and is grounded in the notion that sport is one of the most powerful, paradoxical, and poorly understood institutions in the modern world. The first unit of the course provides a theoretical framework and broad historical context for making social sense of these paradoxes and of the phenomenon of sport itself. The second unit then explores what it is like to "play" various sports, the determinants of participation and success, and the general impacts of such involvement. These ideas are illustrated throughout the course using examples from intercollegiate athletics and the dynamics of race and sport in contemporary American society. Two main themes structure the second half of the course. The first is the culture and political economy of elite-entertainment sport; the second involves issues of globalization and cross-cultural exchange focusing on Olympic sport in China. Together, all of these units are intended to capture the basic structure, function, and broad social significance of a cultural form that is too often naively celebrated, trivialized, or simply dismissed by both scholarly and public audiences alike.
    Grading:
    50% Midterm Exam
    10% Reports/Papers
    15% Special Projects
    5% Quizzes
    10% Reflection Papers
    10% Class Participation
    Exam Format:
    2 in-class midterms; terms and definitions, MC, and one or two short essays
    Class Format:
    40% Lecture
    15% Film/Video
    25% Discussion
    10% Small Group Activities
    10% Guest Speakers
    Workload:
    60 Pages Reading Per Week
    10 Pages Writing Per Term
    2 Exam(s)
    3 Paper(s)
    3 Quiz(zes)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34581/1159
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    30 August 2012

    Spring 2014  |  SOC 4451 Section 001: Sport and Society (66619)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Meets With:
    SOC 4451H Section 001
    Times and Locations:
    Regular Academic Session
     
    01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
    Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Blegen Hall 415
    Course Catalog Description:
    How sport is socially organized, what role(s) it plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life in general.
    Class Description:
    This course is intended to stimulate critical, sociological thinking about sport?how it is socially organized, what role (or roles) it plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life more generally. It begins from and is grounded in the notion that sport is one of the most powerful, paradoxical, and poorly understood institutions in the modern world. The first unit of the course provides a theoretical framework and broad historical context for making social sense of these paradoxes and of the phenomenon of sport itself. The second unit then explores what it is like to ?play? various sports, the determinants of participation and success, and the general impacts of such involvement. These ideas are illustrated throughout the course using examples from intercollegiate athletics and the dynamics of race and sport in contemporary American society. Two main themes structure the second half of the course. The first is the culture and political economy of elite-entertainment sport; the second involves issues of globalization and cross-cultural exchange focusing on Olympic sport in China. Together, all of these units are intended to capture the basic structure, function, and broad social significance of a cultural form that is too often naively celebrated, trivialized, or simply dismissed by both scholarly and public audiences alike.
    Grading:
    25% Midterm Exam
    25% Final Exam
    15% Reports/Papers
    20% Special Projects
    5% Quizzes
    10% Class Participation
    Class Format:
    50% Lecture
    10% Film/Video
    20% Discussion
    10% Small Group Activities
    10% Guest Speakers
    Workload:
    50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
    10-12 Pages Writing Per Term
    2 Exam(s)
    2 OR 3 Paper(s)
    5 Quiz(zes)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66619/1143
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    8 November 2013

    Summer 2013  |  SOC 4451 Section 001: Sport and Society (89134)

    Instructor(s)
    Class Component:
    Lecture
    Credits:
    3 Credits
    Grading Basis:
    Student Option
    Instructor Consent:
    No Special Consent Required
    Instruction Mode:
    In Person Term Based
    Times and Locations:
    May Session
     
    05/28/2013 - 06/14/2013
    Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 09:00AM - 01:00PM
    UMTC, West Bank
    Hubert H Humphrey Center 30
    Course Catalog Description:
    How sport is socially organized, what role(s) it plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life in general.
    Class Description:
    Course Description: The American population's love of sport is matched only by the belief that it is an area not worthy of deeper thought, inquiry, or critique. This course seeks to understand this seemingly paradoxical notion that sport is both one of most powerful and least respected institutions in the modern world. To do so we will begin by working through theoretical approaches that give us a way to make social sense of these paradoxes and the phenomenon of sport itself. We will then examine the way sport intersects with and shapes our understanding of important social issues like gender, race, politics, and even the human body. During the course we will discuss (and watch documentaries) on a wide-range of sports and physical practices ranging from the mainstream (e.g., basketball), the alternative (e.g., roller derby), the artistic (e.g., dance), and the extreme (e.g., base-jumping). Students will be asked to critically reflect on their own experience playing, observing, or even disliking sport as a way to relate to the themes we read and discuss. By the end of the three-week term we will better be able to think about how sport and other physical practices are socially organized, what role (or roles) they play in society, and what they tell us about contemporary social life more generally. About the Instructor: Kyle Green is a sociology Ph.D. student at the University of Minnesota. He received his MA degree in geography from the University of Minnesota. He is currently working on his dissertation titled ?The Allure of Mixed Martial Arts: Meaning Making, Masculinity, and Embodiment in Suburbia.? His research interests include gender, physical practice, storytelling, and the body. His research on pain and community in the mixed martial arts gym, representations of masculinity in Super Bowl commercials, and the connections between politics and sports has appeared in journals such as Social & Cultural Geography, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, and The Society Pages.
    Class Format:
    25% Lecture
    25% Film/Video
    25% Discussion
    15% Small Group Activities
    10% Guest Speakers
    Workload:
    1 Exam(s)
    2 Paper(s)
    Textbooks:
    https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/89134/1135
    Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
    24 March 2013

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