5 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2023  |  SOC 4321 Section 001: Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (65631)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
GLOS 4221 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 20 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
From the city streets of Bangalore to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent, creating new and revitalizing old forms of power and opportunity, exploitation and politics, social organizing and social justice. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people's lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mgoldman+SOC4321+Spring2023
Class Description:
From the factories of Shenzhen to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent. This course offers an overview of the processes forcing and encouraging people's lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. We will start with the most basic questions: What is this thing called globalization? What are the forces behind it and how are we involved? Second, we will explore the idea that this latest era of globalization is marked by dramatic transformations in the ways we work, do politics, play, and communicate. We will explore the ideas that capitalism is rapidly transforming, communication and media are altering the way we dream, entertain and engage, and yet, the division between rich and poor has intensified and ecological distress is global. We will learn about the fast-moving world of Wall Street and global-city life, and the creative projects for social and ecological change coming from communities in Jamaica, the U.S., Mexico, India, and South Africa. Throughout, this course will use texts, films, lecture, discussion, and student research and debate, to help us become fluent in diverse world-views, ideas, and trends from around the world.
Grading:
Grades will be based on short papers, small research projects, presentations and discussion, and regular attendance
Exam Format:
no exams
Class Format:
65% Lecture
35% participation, discussion, small group work
Workload:
~50-70 Pages Reading Per Week
~20 Pages Writing Per Term: two one-page assignments, two five-page papers, one eight-page paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65631/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 March 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 4321 Section 001: Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (33494)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
GLOS 4221 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 105
Enrollment Status:
Closed (15 of 15 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Globalization of organizations, political relations, and culture. Dependency, world systems theories. Growth of international nongovernmental organizations, their impact on state policies and civil society. Expansion of international norms. Globalization of popular culture. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mgoldman+SOC4321+Fall2018
Class Description:
From the factories of Shenzhen to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent. This course offers an overview of the processes forcing and encouraging people's lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. We will start with the most basic questions: What is this thing called globalization? What are the forces behind it and how are we involved? Second, we will explore the idea that this latest era of globalization is marked by dramatic transformations in the ways we work, do politics, play, and communicate. We will explore the ideas that capitalism is rapidly transforming, communication and media are altering the way we dream, entertain and engage, and yet, the division between rich and poor has intensified and ecological distress is global. We will learn about the fast-moving world of Wall Street and global-city life, and the creative projects for social and ecological change coming from communities in Jamaica, the U.S., Mexico, India, and South Africa. Throughout, this course will use texts, films, lecture, discussion, and student research and debate, to help us become fluent in diverse world-views, ideas, and trends from around the world.
Grading:
Grades will be based on short papers, small research projects, presentations and discussion, and regular attendance
Exam Format:
no exams
Class Format:
65% Lecture
35% participation, discussion, small group work
Workload:
~50-70 Pages Reading Per Week
~20 Pages Writing Per Term: two one-page assignments, two five-page papers, one eight-page paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33494/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 March 2018

Spring 2015  |  SOC 4321 Section 001: Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (67671)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
GLOS 4221 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Globalization of organizations, political relations, and culture. Dependency, world systems theories. Growth of international nongovernmental organizations, their impact on state policies and civil society. Expansion of international norms. Globalization of popular culture. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Description:
From the factories of Shenzhen to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people's lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. We will start with the most basic questions: What is this thing called globalization? Is it at all new? What are the forces behind it? Second, we will explore the idea that this latest era of globalization is marked by dramatic transformations in the ways we work, do politics, play, and communicate. Moreover, we will look into the ideas that capitalism has changed significantly, that the division between rich and poor has intensified, and that the sovereignty of governments and the basic rights of people are being challenged. We will learn about a few key actors, such as the World Bank and the World Trade Organization, and understand their main objectives and effects. We will discuss the world of immigration, of fast-moving finance capital and Hollywood/Bollywood cultural products, and the slower moving domains of everyday life, as they are experienced in Jamaica, the U.S., Mexico, India, Bolivia, Argentina, and South Africa. Along the way, we will look at globalization from below, or social movements working to bring about social change (within and across national boundaries) by contesting the worst effects of economic, political, and cultural globalization. In all, this course will use a number of texts, films, lecture, discussion, and student debates, to help us become fluent in the different scholarly concerns on globalization and its many social forces, connections, and imaginations.
Grading:
Other Grading Information: papers, research projects, quizzes, attendance
Class Format:
25% Lecture
75% Other Style guided discussion
Workload:
~75 Pages Reading Per Week
~25 Pages Writing Per Term Other Workload: (two 2-4 page papers, three 5-8 page papers);
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67671/1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 March 2011

Summer 2014  |  SOC 4321 Section 001: Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (89027)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
CHN 3022 Section 001
CHN 4004 Section 001
GLOS 4221 Section 001
Times and Locations:
May Session
 
05/27/2014 - 05/30/2014
Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 09:00AM - 01:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 240
 
06/02/2014 - 06/12/2014
Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 09:00AM - 01:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 240
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Globalization of organizations, political relations, and culture. Dependency, world systems theories. Growth of international nongovernmental organizations, their impact on state policies and civil society. Expansion of international norms. Globalization of popular culture.
Class Description:
Just what is 'globalization'? What are the forces behind it? How are people around the world involved in globalization and under what circumstances? Some say the world has become a village, but has it? And, if so, for whom? Globalization typically refers to the complex social, cultural, political and economic changes instigated by increasingly interconnected economic and communication networks. Rather than understand globalization as a downward force happening to people around the globe, this course seeks to present globalization as a historical and current phenomenon we are all participating in, albeit in a variety of ways and with different outcomes. From universities in Addis Ababa to sweatshops in Dhaka to trading floors in New York City, people's lives are increasingly intertwined. These interconnections both maintain historical continuities while generating new forms of power and exploitation and terrain for social justice claims. We will first learn and apply sociological tools to see, learn about, and understand the social world in complex ways. We will then discuss the 'project of development' as a Western and colonizing force that is part and parcel of global capitalism; debate both the positives and negatives of the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and United Nations as institutions with far-reaching consequences in people's lives around the globe; and interrogate the universality of human rights and understand how this discourse has been used to justify intervention into other countries while simultaneously helping people's movements claim rights. This will be a small discussion-based class where we will talk and debate the realities of globalization as experienced by people and as an abstract ideal. Throughout the course, we will explore how people around the world are creatively engaging with globalization on their own terms, resisting, negotiating, and recreating the meaning of globalization. We will discuss globalization theories, taking care to read scholars from around the globe, and seek to apply them to real life cases. Likely case studies include: anti-retroviral therapy medication for HIV/AIDS and World Trade Organization patent protection laws, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as a compliance mechanism for human rights discourse and practice, and global monitoring and evaluation practices as a new form of colonialism. About the instructor: I am a PhD candidate in Sociology with a minor in Development Studies and Social Change. I have worked in Ethiopia and Washington D.C. implementing USAID projects and in Sierra Leone and other African countries for non-profits. I have an interdisciplinary background and draw upon Development Studies, Policy, Gender and Women's Studies, Geography, and Anthropology. I have lots of experience teaching and am eager to teach a course on a topic I am passionate about.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
10% Reports/Papers
10% Special Projects
10% Quizzes
10% Attendance
20% Reflection Papers
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: I reserve the right to make any changes deemed necessary to class content, assignments, and grading as I finalize the syllabus. The course syllabus is influenced by the ideas and work of Professor Michael Goldman.
Exam Format:
Final exam will include a combo of multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions. The personal narrative paper will ask you to connect your own life to class concepts. We only meet 12 times, so be ready to come to each and every class session.
Class Format:
25% Lecture
15% Film/Video
30% Discussion
25% Small Group Activities
5% Guest Speakers Class will be a combination of interactive lecture, group discussions, exercises, and writing time. In addition to academic articles, we will read newspaper articles, watch short films and a few full length documentaries and have guest lecturers.
Workload:
125 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
1 Special Project(s)
8 Homework Assignment(s)
3 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: Assignments will likely include: readings summaries/reflections, a personal narrative paper exploring your own relationship to globalization, and a final exam. I will also give quizzes on lecture material so I can adjust my teaching accordingly.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/89027/1145
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 March 2014

Spring 2013  |  SOC 4321 Section 001: Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (66812)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
GLOS 4221 Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Globalization of organizations, political relations, and culture. Dependency, world systems theories. Growth of international nongovernmental organizations, their impact on state policies and civil society. Expansion of international norms. Globalization of popular culture.
Class Description:
From the factories of Shenzhen to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people's lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. We will start with the most basic questions: What is this thing called globalization? Is it at all new? What are the forces behind it? Second, we will explore the idea that this latest era of globalization is marked by dramatic transformations in the ways we work, do politics, play, and communicate. Moreover, we will look into the ideas that capitalism has changed significantly, that the division between rich and poor has intensified, and that the sovereignty of governments and the basic rights of people are being challenged. We will learn about a few key actors, such as the World Bank and the World Trade Organization, and understand their main objectives and effects. We will discuss the world of immigration, of fast-moving finance capital and Hollywood/Bollywood cultural products, and the slower moving domains of everyday life, as they are experienced in Jamaica, the U.S., Mexico, India, Bolivia, Argentina, and South Africa. Along the way, we will look at globalization from below, or social movements working to bring about social change (within and across national boundaries) by contesting the worst effects of economic, political, and cultural globalization. In all, this course will use a number of texts, films, lecture, discussion, and student debates, to help us become fluent in the different scholarly concerns on globalization and its many social forces, connections, and imaginations.
Grading:
Other Grading Information: papers, research projects, quizzes, attendance
Class Format:
25% Lecture
75% Other Style guided discussion
Workload:
~75 Pages Reading Per Week
~25 Pages Writing Per Term Other Workload: (two 2-4 page papers, three 5-8 page papers);
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66812/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 March 2011

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