6 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2024  |  SOC 3452 Section 001: Education and Society (32288)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Open (48 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC3452+Fall2024
Class Description:
We have all been through an ‘education system', and our lives have been shaped in multiple and complex ways by this experience. Education is still one of the most complex topics in our society and discussions around its past failures, its present challenges and its future potential remains polarizing. This course is an introduction to the sociology of education. We will examine some of classical and contemporary theoretical and policy debates on education. We will explore the role of education as it relates to various axis of social stratification (race, class, gender, sexuality etc). We will also examine how the educational system interact with other significant institutions in our society (politics, economy, family etc). While the majority of the course will focus on the US educational system, we will touch on other regions of the globe to give us a comparative perspective and an opportunity to critically engage with our own educational practices and policies.

Who Should Take This Class?:
Open to all.
Learning Objectives:
Understand better the goals (explicit and implicit) of public education.


· ·Learn about power dynamics (class, race, gender, citizenship, etc.) might be at play in whose voices prevail in the education sector.


· Understand how education (quality, level, credentials)
impact life chances (incomes over lifetime, health and wellness, etc.) of individuals and groups

Grading:
Written Assignments: 80%
Participation: 20%
Class Format:
Lecture/Student-Led presentations/Videos
Workload:
40-60 pages reading requirement
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32288/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 April 2024

Spring 2022  |  SOC 3452 Section 001: Education and Society (65705)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 10
Enrollment Status:
Open (46 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cabdi+SOC3452+Spring2022
Class Description:
We have all been through an ‘education system', and our lives have been shaped in multiple and complex ways by this experience. Education is still one of the most complex topics in our society and discussions around its past failures, its present challenges and its future potential remains polarizing. This course is an introduction to the sociology of education. We will examine some of classical and contemporary theoretical and policy debates on education. We will explore the role of education as it relates to various axis of social stratification (race, class, gender, sexuality etc). We will also examine how the educational system interact with other significant institutions in our society (politics, economy, family etc). While the majority of the course will focus on the US educational system, we will touch on other regions of the globe to give us a comparative perspective and an opportunity to critically engage with our own educational practices and policies.

Grading:
Written Assignments: 30%
Exams: 50%
Participation: 20%
Exam Format:
Short essay type questions
Class Format:
Lecture/Student-Led presentations/Videos
Workload:
50-70 pages reading requirement
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65705/1223
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 October 2021

Spring 2021  |  SOC 3452 Section 001: Education and Society (63643)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (53 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in a synchronous format. The course will meet online at the scheduled times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?budhi006+SOC3452+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course will deepen our understanding of education and social inequality. We will critically examine how educational systems come to be and scrutinize what happens inside educational institutions. We will also learn about how education has been a site of struggles for equality and how different thinkers have imagined its egalitarian potential. In exploring these various dimensions of education, this course will enable us to think about both how education reproduces and can challenge inequalities of social class, race, and gender.
Grading:
Weekly engagement (20%)
Two assignments (40%)
Group project (40%)
Exam Format:
No exams.
Class Format:
This course is completely online in a synchronous format. We will meet online at the scheduled times.
Workload:
To be determined by instructor.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/63643/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 October 2020

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3452 Section 001: Education and Society (33488)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (48 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?warre046+SOC3452+Fall2018
Class Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is and how schools work, partly because everyone has first-hand experience with schools and the education system. Most people have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others, why some people learn more than others, and what creates systematic group differences in educational outcomes. Beyond that, most people have ideas about how education shapes who knows more, who gets good jobs, and who enjoys a long and happy life. Virtually everyone has opinions about how schools and the education system should be changed or improved.

This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about these things. We will critically engage research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. And, we will bring academic materials into direct dialogue with structured experiences in community organizations to enrich our understanding of educational issues. The goal is to better understand how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where inequalities in educational achievements come from; how and why educational experiences and accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved.

This is not a course in which I will tell you what is true. Instead, we will collectively draw on our individual backgrounds and experiences; read and discuss research and other scholarship; debate and argue about the issues; consider how academic issues play out in the community; and challenge and transform our ideas. For the class to succeed, we must all be willing to bring our unique backgrounds and experiences into dialogue with academic knowledge and community service activities and to have our ideas and assumptions challenged. We must also all be willing to listen respectfully and carefully to one another, even when we come from different backgrounds or have sharply different views.

NOTE #1: This course involves a substantial community-engaged learning component. This is a valuable learning opportunity, but it does require 25 hours during the semester of off-campus community service.

NOTE #2: See the web page for the most recent version of the course at: https://www.rob-warren.com/3452.html

NOTE #3: See the student course evaluations for the most recent version of the course on that same web page.
Grading:
1. Community Engaged Learning (CEL)
(130 points, or 65% of course grade)

Community-engaged learning (CEL) is a teaching and learning strategy that combines meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.

You will do 25 hours of service in a community organization and complete a series of written and other assignments reflecting on your experiences there.

2. Writing Assignments: Statements of Beliefs
(30 points, or 15% of course grade)

There are two writing assignments.

First, at the start of the semester you will write an essay about your educational biography, about the factors that contributed to your educational accomplishments, and about the nature of educational inequality in America. Second, at the end of the semester you will write a version of that same essay that focuses on how your views and opinions changed after taking this course. Your will get a chance to write a rough draft of the latter essay and then revise it.

3. In-Class Quizzes & Writing Assignments
(40 points, or 20% of course grade)

There will be a brief quiz or short writing assignment during every class session. They might happen at the beginning, middle, or end of class sessions. Some days, they will ask basic questions about readings or other materials I'll ask you to review before class. Other days, they will ask about activities or discussions that happen in class.

4. Extra Credit

There are multiple ways to get extra credit in this course.
Exam Format:
There will be no exams in this course.
Class Format:
There may be short lectures at the beginning of some class sessions, but mostly the class will be interactive discussions. There will be films, YouTube clips, Skype interviews with authors, and in-class visitors.
Workload:
Most of the work of the class involves community-engaged learning. You will serve for 25 hours during the semester at an off-campus organization, and then you will write a series of short papers reflecting on your experiences there in light of class materials and discussions.
Beyond that, there are two other short papers and daily in-class quizzes or short writing assignments.

For each class session you will need to read something and to consider some online materials.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33488/1189
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/warre046_SOC3452_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 March 2018

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3452 Section 001: Education and Society (66989)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-108
Enrollment Status:
Open (75 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?warre046+SOC3452+Spring2018
Class Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is and how schools work, partly because everyone has first-hand experience with schools and the education system. Most people have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others, why some people learn more than others, and what creates systematic group differences in educational outcomes. Beyond that, most people have ideas about how education shapes who knows more, who gets good jobs, and who enjoys a long and happy life. Virtually everyone has opinions about how schools and the education system should be changed or improved.

This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about these things. We will critically engage research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. And, we will bring academic materials into direct dialogue with structured experiences in community organizations to enrich our understanding of educational issues. The goal is to better understand how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where inequalities in educational achievements come from; how and why educational experiences and accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved.

This is not a course in which I will tell you what is true. Instead, we will collectively draw on our individual backgrounds and experiences; read and discuss research and other scholarship; debate and argue about the issues; consider how academic issues play out in the community; and challenge and transform our ideas. For the class to succeed, we must all be willing to bring our unique backgrounds and experiences into dialogue with academic knowledge and community service activities and to have our ideas and assumptions challenged. We must also all be willing to listen respectfully and carefully to one another, even when we come from different backgrounds or have sharply different views.
Grading:
1. Community Engaged Learning (CEL)
(130 points, or 65% of course grade)

Community-engaged learning (CEL) is a teaching and learning strategy that combines meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.

You will do 25 hours of service in a community organization and complete a series of written and other assignments reflecting on your experiences there.

2. Writing Assignments: Statements of Beliefs
(30 points, or 15% of course grade)

There are two writing assignments.

First, at the start of the semester you will write an essay about your educational biography, about the factors that contributed to your educational accomplishments, and about the nature of educational inequality in America. Second, at the end of the semester you will write a version of that same essay that focuses on how your views and opinions changed after taking this course. Your will get a chance to write a rough draft of the latter essay and then revise it.

3. In-Class Quizzes & Writing Assignments
(40 points, or 20% of course grade)

There will be a brief quiz or short writing assignment during every class session. They might happen at the beginning, middle, or end of class sessions. Some days, they will ask basic questions about readings or other materials I'll ask you to review before class. Other days, they will ask about activities or discussions that happen in class.

4. Extra Credit

There are multiple ways to get extra credit in this course.
Exam Format:
There will be no exams in this course.
Class Format:
There may be short lectures at the beginning of some class sessions, but mostly the class will be interactive discussions. There will be films, YouTube clips, Skype interviews with authors, and in-class visitors.
Workload:
Most of the work of the class involves community-engaged learning. You will serve for 25 hours during the semester at an off-campus organization, and then you will write a series of short papers reflecting on your experiences there in light of class materials and discussions.
Beyond that, there are two other short papers and daily in-class quizzes or short writing assignments.

For each class session you will need to read something and to consider some online materials.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66989/1183
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/warre046_SOC3452_Spring2018.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
26 September 2017

Fall 2016  |  SOC 3452 Section 001: Education and Society (33989)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?warre046+SOC3452+Fall2016
Class Description:
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. We all have opinions about how schools could be improved and about other public policies related to education. ~~~~~ This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and the instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. ~~~~~ We all enter the course with unique and valuable experiences and perspectives. We will all be challenged by seriously engaging the scholarship of sociologists of education and others. ~~~~~ This is not a course in which the instructor simply tells students what is true. It is a course in which the class --- as a collective --- draws on their own backgrounds and experiences, reads and discusses research and other scholarship, debates and argues about the issues, and transforms their ideas. ~~~~~ Students who take this class must be willing to bring their backgrounds and experiences into dialogue with empirical research and to have their ideas and assumptions challenged.
Grading:
There will be a series of short papers (mainly summarizing the main points of the readings); some in-class activities (like days when students lead class by organizing debates or discussions); a required service-learning component; and probably some extra credit opportunities. There will be NO exams.
Exam Format:
There will not be exams in this course.
Class Format:
There may be short lectures at the beginning of some class sessions, but mostly the class will be interactive: discussions, debates, student-led engagement with course material. Films, YouTube clips, Skype interviews with authors, perhaps in-class visitors ... all will be more common than lectures.
Workload:
Students will be expected to read a fair amount in this course (e.g., a book or multiple articles per week) There will be frequent but short written assignments; a few independent student projects; and days when students are expected to lead discussion or moderate debates.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33989/1169
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/warre046_SOC3452_Spring2018.pdf (Spring 2018)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 July 2016

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