7 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2019  |  SOC 3451W Section 001: Cities & Social Change (33087)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2019 - 12/11/2019
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Open (44 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The core themes of this class will provide an essential toolkit for approaching broad questions about social justice, culture, work, housing and service provision on multiple levels and across the globe. This course will have units on economic development, inequality, the interaction between design and human action, inclusive and exclusive cultural formations, crime and cultures of fear, social control and surveillance. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
For details about the course go to: classinfo.umn.edu/ and search for the course number.
Class Description:
Who you are is in many ways where you are. Our friendships and romantic lives, our work opportunities and political engagement, and our sense of self and relationship to society are inextricably connected to the type of community in which we live. In this course we will attend to the sociology of place, focusing specifically on cities and communities. We will examine how cities relate to many core fields of sociology:
inequality, race and ethnicity, self and identity, deviance and social control, work and occupations, immigration, globalization, and social networks, for example. We will consider differences between communities, such as the rural-urban divide, and we will consider differences within cities, including segregation, neighborhood effects, and the history of urbanization. We will engage with foundational sociological theories of urbanization and contemporary empirical studies. By the end of this course, you will have developed a critical understanding of the role that cities and communities play in maintaining social order and enabling social change. The instructor for this course, Tom VanHeuvelen, will be a new faculty member starting in Fall 2019.
Grading:
20% Class Participation
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: exams, 20% reading reports, 40% term paper
Class Format:
A mixture of lecture and discussion.
Workload:
30-70 pages reading per week. Because this is a writing intensive course, a substantial portion of the final grade will be based on writing. You will receive substantial feedback on writing assignments and be expected to revise your written work in response.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33087/1199
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 March 2019

Spring 2019  |  SOC 3451W Section 001: Cities & Social Change (68651)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2019 - 05/06/2019
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-228
Enrollment Status:
Open (27 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
The core themes of this class will provide an essential toolkit for approaching broad questions about social justice, culture, work, housing and service provision on multiple levels and across the globe. This course will have units on economic development, inequality, the interaction between design and human action, inclusive and exclusive cultural formations, crime and cultures of fear, social control and surveillance. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Description:
This course will draw on theories and research in sociology, history and urban studies to explore the phenomenon of urbanism and the rise of "cities," investigating the causes and consequences of that rise. We will cover topics like modernization and the changing conceptions of place and community in the modern world, the urban-rural divide, suburbanization, segregation and gentrification, and the right to the city. Throughout the course, we will investigate the ways that race, class, gender, and religion shape the urban experience. While the class will be more heavily focused on the US context, international comparisons will be included throughout. Since this is a writing intensive (W) course, students will develop their insights into cities and urban life through writing, including ethnographic exercises in the Twin Cities, reading and film reports, exams, and a term paper. Students will have the opportunity to produce a well-written and well thought-out term paper, following a three-stage planning, drafting, and revision process over several weeks.
Grading:
10% Class Participation
20% Reading and film reports
30% Exams
40% Term paper
Exam Format:
Essay exams
Class Format:
Mix of lecture, large and small group discussion, independent writing, and multimedia activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
5 Reading/Film Reports
2 Exams
1 Paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/68651/1193
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 November 2018

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3451W Section 001: Cities & Social Change (88109)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Tue, Thu 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-224
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Social, economic, cultural foundations of modern city. Theories/models of urbanism from Wirth to Sassen. Migration/ethnic enclaves. Racial segregation, social control. Urban social movements. Urban-suburban divide. Decline of urban liberalism. "Brazilianization" of American city. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?karak014+SOC3451W+Summer2017
Class Description:
Using sociology, along with history and urban studies this course, will follow the rise of "cities". We will study the great scholars of urbanism, including Wirth, Engels, DuBois, Castells and Sassen, to apply their models to topics such as the rise of modernism, the city as a milieu of design and consumption, ecological sustainability, the urban-suburban divide, and the contemporary "Brazilianization" of the American city.
Learning Objectives:
What makes a space urban? How can we make sense of urbanism? How are cities different than the countryside, how are they interlinked? We will start our summer-long journey with these questions that have informed scholars of the urban, people who both theorized about and influenced the making of cities. In order to make sense of the urban phenomenon we will historicize it, as social scientists usually do. We will look at the idea of the polis, following it in medieval European towns and industrial cities. Reading visions of architects and designers will help us investigate the link between modernity, modernism, and cities, as well as the suburban dream and its critiques. Before the midterm we will see how people, who will of course be raced, classed and gendered fit in our historicized model of cities and discuss how our backgrounds influence, and contribute to the urban experience. In the second half, we will do some weaving and connect the world by looking at global cities, unequal urban development, and deconstruct the notion of development itself, through cases of Turkey and Brazil. Lastly, we will tackle with gentrification, city as a space of consumption, and nostalgia.

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Grading:
24% Midterm
36%Short Response Papers
10%Participation
30%Final Paper
Exam Format:
Midterm consists of short answer questions, a short essay and comparison. It is a tool to assess how we are doing in class, and if we are ready to move ahead or linger some more on previous subjects.
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Discussion
35% Other Style writing exercises, films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Session
15-20 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam, 1 Final Paper Short Response Papers
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/88109/1175
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/karak014_SOC3451W_Summer2017.pdf
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
25 April 2017

Spring 2016  |  SOC 3451W Section 001: Cities & Social Change (67760)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2016 - 05/06/2016
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 25
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Social, economic, cultural foundations of modern city. Theories/models of urbanism from Wirth to Sassen. Migration/ethnic enclaves. Racial segregation, social control. Urban social movements. Urban-suburban divide. Decline of urban liberalism. "Brazilianization" of American city. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tgowan+SOC3451W+Spring2016
Class Description:
Description: This course will use a combination of sociology, history, first-person accounts, and film to follow the rise of urbanism in Europe and the United States. We will read key texts by some of the great scholars and shapers of urban life, including Louis Wirth, Walt Whitman, Engels, W.E.B. DuBois, Guy DeBord, Jane Jacobs, Sharon Zukin and David Harvey, and apply their models to topics including the phenomnology of urban life, segregation and social control, the city as artistic milieu, ecological sustainability, the urban-suburban divide, and the contemporary "Brazilianization" of the American city. Lectures and group work, blogged discussions and reading reports, and qualitative fieldwork in the Twin Cities will help the students to develop their insights into cities and urban life. This process will culminate in a substantial term paper, developed through a three-stage planning, drafting, and revision process over several weeks.
Grading:
Other Grading Information: 20% Official Blog Entries 10% ethnographic exercise 10% first exam 10% second exam 10% first polished draft 25% final paper 15% class and blog citizenship.
Exam Format:
Mostly long answer.
Class Format:
30% Lecture, 40% Discussion. 30% writing exercises, films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
Other Workload: 50-75 pages of reading per week, 45 pages of writing per semester. There will be 2 exams, up to 4 quizzes and one term paper. Final projects incorporating artwork, music, or fiction may also be approved subject to consultation with the professor.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67760/1163
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 November 2013

Fall 2014  |  SOC 3451W Section 001: Cities & Social Change (34376)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 105
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Social, economic, cultural foundations of modern city. Theories/models of urbanism from Wirth to Sassen. Migration/ethnic enclaves. Racial segregation, social control. Urban social movements. Urban-suburban divide. Decline of urban liberalism. "Brazilianization" of American city.
Class Description:
The objective of this course is to develop a deeper understanding of the transformation of urban life. We will apply a multidisciplinary approach in investigating the dramatic social, political/economic, and spatial changes that have occurred in U.S. cities. We will pay close attention to how these changes have structured institutions and ideologies of today's metropolis and resulted in differential experiences of ?belonging.? We will conclude by analyzing the possibilities for social justice within the culture of a postmodern metropolis.
Grading:
20% Class Participation
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: exams, 20% reading reports, 40% term paper
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Discussion
35% Other Style writing exercises, films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34376/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2012

Spring 2014  |  SOC 3451W Section 001: Cities & Social Change (64782)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
SOC 3451V Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 425
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Social, economic, cultural foundations of modern city. Theories/models of urbanism from Wirth to Sassen. Migration/ethnic enclaves. Racial segregation, social control. Urban social movements. Urban-suburban divide. Decline of urban liberalism. "Brazilianization" of American city.
Class Description:
Description: This course will use a combination of sociology, history, first-person accounts, and film to follow the rise of urbanism in Europe and the United States. We will read key texts by some of the great scholars and shapers of urban life, including Louis Wirth, Walt Whitman, Engels, W.E.B. DuBois, Guy DeBord, Jane Jacobs, Sharon Zukin and David Harvey, and apply their models to topics including the phenomnology of urban life, segregation and social control, the city as artistic milieu, ecological sustainability, the urban-suburban divide, and the contemporary "Brazilianization" of the American city. Lectures and group work, blogged discussions and reading reports, and qualitative fieldwork in the Twin Cities will help the students to develop their insights into cities and urban life. This process will culminate in a substantial term paper, developed through a three-stage planning, drafting, and revision process over several weeks.
Grading:
Other Grading Information: 20% Official Blog Entries 10% ethnographic exercise 10% first exam 10% second exam 10% first polished draft 25% final paper 15% class and blog citizenship.
Exam Format:
Mostly long answer.
Class Format:
30% Lecture, 40% Discussion. 30% writing exercises, films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
Other Workload: 50-75 pages of reading per week, 45 pages of writing per semester. There will be 2 exams, up to 4 quizzes and one term paper. Final projects incorporating artwork, music, or fiction may also be approved subject to consultation with the professor.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64782/1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
8 November 2013

Spring 2013  |  SOC 3451W Section 001: Cities and Social Change (66818)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Social, economic, and cultural foundations of modern city. Theories/models of urbanism from Wirth to Sassen. Migration/ethnic enclaves. Racial segregation, social control. Urban social movements. Urban-suburban divide. Decline of urban liberalism. "Brazilianization" of American city.
Class Description:
The objective of this course is to develop a deeper understanding of the transformation of urban life. We will apply a multidisciplinary approach in investigating the dramatic social, political/economic, and spatial changes that have occurred in U.S. cities. We will pay close attention to how these changes have structured institutions and ideologies of today's metropolis and resulted in differential experiences of ?belonging.? We will conclude by analyzing the possibilities for social justice within the culture of a postmodern metropolis.
Grading:
20% Class Participation
20% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: exams, 20% reading reports, 40% term paper
Class Format:
40% Lecture
25% Discussion
35% Other Style writing exercises, films and other in-class activities.
Workload:
2 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66818/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 December 2012

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