8 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2021  |  SOC 3322W Section 001: Social Movements, Protests, and Change (33535)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Closed (58 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about the dilemmas and challenges facing movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and various institutions, and the role of social movements and protest in bringing about change. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long-term and short-run impact. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC3322W+Fall2021
Class Description:
This course covers the origins, dynamics and consequences of social movements and collective action. This includes the challenges facing social movement participants and social movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and political institutions, and the role of movements in bringing about change. We will explore both theoretical issues and grounded case studies in our discussions and reading.
Grading:
30% Reports/Papers
30% Quizzes
20% Journal
10% In-class Presentations
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
35% Lecture
5% Film/Video
35% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
Workload:
30-60 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
2 development papers, leading to 1 final paper.
2 Presentations
10 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33535/1219
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Fall 2020  |  SOC 3322W Section 001: Social Movements, Protests, and Change (33876)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (56 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about the dilemmas and challenges facing movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and various institutions, and the role of social movements and protest in bringing about change. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long-term and short-run impact. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in a synchronous format. The course will meet online at the scheduled times. Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?joh07820+SOC3322W+Fall2020
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33876/1209

Spring 2020  |  SOC 3322W Section 001: Social Movements, Protests, and Change (65707)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Enrollment Status:
Closed (55 of 55 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about the dilemmas and challenges facing movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and various institutions, and the role of social movements and protest in bringing about change. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long-term and short-run impact. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?koksa002+SOC3322W+Spring2020
Class Description:
What is a social movement, and why do they emerge when they do? What does it take to organize people around collective demands? When and why does protest become a meaningful strategy, and how does it lead to social change? Featuring case studies from the United States and beyond, this course explores the contributions of sociology to understand how social transformation is carried out from below. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long-term and short-run impact. While we will draw on empirical research on social movements around the world, the emphasis will be on applying sociological concepts and theories to help analyze the social movement selected for your research.
Learning Objectives:
This course meets the requirements of the Council of Liberal Education's Civic Life and Ethics theme and we address ethical issues throughout the course. Civic life and ethics theme courses equip you to manage contemporary problems by developing an understanding of how civic and ethical principles have been historically developed, critically assessed by individuals and groups, and negotiated within specific cultural settings.
Grading:
Attendance and Participation: 20%
Reading Responses: 20%
Paper Draft 1 (3-4 pages): 10%
Paper Draft 2 (10-12 pages): 20%
Final Draft (~25 pages): 30%
Class Format:
Monday lectures will review prior research and introduce you to basic concepts and theories in the study of social movements. They will identify what I regard as central issues/debates for each topic. Lectures will be supplemented by in-class active learning exercises and videos. Wednesday classes will be devoted to a discussion of the required readings and how they connect to your research projects. We will break into smaller working groups to discuss the application of the concepts and theories covered in the readings to the social movement you are analyzing in your research paper.
Workload:
This is a writing intensive course. Your course grade is directly tied to the quality of your writing as well as your knowledge of substantive course content. All students must write a 25-page research paper based on original research on a social movement. You can choose any movement but you might want to consider a social movement that has a local base and/or branch, since that will enable you to supplement documentary research with interview and observational data. There are many local and campus movement organizations, including some that are engaged in activism around issues ranging from immigrant rights to environmental justice to wealth and income inequality. You will submit a series of two analytical papers in the first half of the course and a final research paper that substantially builds on the material you covered in the first two papers. This paper may provide a basis for your senior project, or a writing sample for graduate school applications. You should also complete required readings (40-50 pages) and show regular attendance and active participation in class.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65707/1203
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 November 2019

Spring 2017  |  SOC 3322W Section 001: Social Movements, Protests, and Change (52727)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2017 - 05/05/2017
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 15
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements. Challenges facing movement organizations. Relationship between movements and political institutions. Role of movements in bringing about social change. Theoretical issues, case studies. prereq: 1001 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?gerte004+SOC3322W+Spring2017
Class Description:
This course covers the origins, dynamics and consequences of social movements and collective action. This includes the challenges facing social movement participants and social movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and political institutions, and the role of movements in bringing about change. We will explore both theoretical issues and grounded case studies in our discussions and reading.
Grading:
30% Reports/Papers
30% Quizzes
20% Journal
10% In-class Presentations
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
35% Lecture
5% Film/Video
35% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
Workload:
30-60 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
2 development papers, leading to 1 final paper.
2 Presentations
10 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52727/1173
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2016

Spring 2016  |  SOC 3322W Section 001: Social Movements, Protests, and Change (67759)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2016 - 05/06/2016
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements. Challenges facing movement organizations. Relationship between movements and political institutions. Role of movements in bringing about social change. Theoretical issues, case studies. prereq: 1001 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?broad001+SOC3322W+Spring2016
Class Description:
Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about why and how movements arise and take shape, the dilemmas and challenges for making a movement organization and keeping it going, the relationship between social movements and established political parties and institutions, the transition from movement to non-governmental organization (NGO) or other formalized association, and the role of social movements and protest in bringing about change. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long- term and short-run impact. To illustrate these theoretical concepts, we will read a number of articles about social movements in one region of the world: East Asia (Japan, China, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore). This region is of great economic importance but does not have the presence or at least historical depth of the liberal democratic state compared the US and Western Europe, the usual sites for cases of social movement study. Studying social movements in this relatively un-analyzed context will help clarify many existing theories and suggest directions for new theories and concept.
Grading:
10% Midterm Exam
10% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
5% Quizzes
5% In-class Presentations
10% Class Participation Other Grading Information: This is a writing intensive course. The student writes the paper in three sections, gets peer and instructor feedback on each, and then combines them into the full final paper.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice and short essay
Class Format:
45% Lecture
30% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
60 Pages Reading Per Week
14 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
4 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67759/1163
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 November 2013

Fall 2014  |  SOC 3322W Section 001: Social Movements, Protests, and Change (34716)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Meets With:
GLOS 3322W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements. Challenges facing movement organizations. Relationship between movements and political institutions. Role of movements in bringing about social change. Theoretical issues, case studies.
Class Description:
Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about the dilemmas and challenges facing movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and political institutions, and the role of social movements in bringing about social and political change. Although the course is organized around general theoretical issues, we will draw on empirical case studies of a wide variety of social movements. Students will be asked, in their written work, to apply the concepts and theories in the readings to the local social movement organization they choose for their required community service learning project. This course will be web enhanced but the URL is not yet available.
Grading:
75% Reports/Papers
25% Class Participation Other Grading Information: Note: To receive a grade of B or better, students must submit the ten required weekly one page reaction papers, which will not be graded.
Exam Format:
no exams
Class Format:
50% Lecture
50% Discussion
Workload:
60-70 Pages Reading Per Week
25-30 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Paper(s)
Other Workload: in-class active learning exercises and weekly one page reaction papers based on required readings
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34716/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 April 2014

Spring 2014  |  SOC 3322W Section 001: Social Movements, Protests, and Change (64780)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
GLOS 3322W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements. Challenges facing movement organizations. Relationship between movements and political institutions. Role of movements in bringing about social change. Theoretical issues, case studies.
Class Description:
Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about why and how movements arise and take shape, the dilemmas and challenges for making a movement organization and keeping it going, the relationship between social movements and established political parties and institutions, the transition from movement to non-governmental organization (NGO) or other formalized association, and the role of social movements and protest in bringing about change. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long- term and short-run impact. To illustrate these theoretical concepts, we will read a number of articles about social movements in one region of the world: East Asia (Japan, China, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore). This region is of great economic importance but does not have the presence or at least historical depth of the liberal democratic state compared the US and Western Europe, the usual sites for cases of social movement study. Studying social movements in this relatively un-analyzed context will help clarify many existing theories and suggest directions for new theories and concept.
Grading:
10% Midterm Exam
10% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
5% Quizzes
5% In-class Presentations
10% Class Participation Other Grading Information: This is a writing intensive course. The student writes the paper in three sections, gets peer and instructor feedback on each, and then combines them into the full final paper.
Exam Format:
Multiple choice and short essay
Class Format:
45% Lecture
30% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
60 Pages Reading Per Week
14 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
4 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/64780/1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 November 2013

Spring 2013  |  SOC 3322W Section 001: Social Movements, Protests, and Change (66816)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements. Challenges facing movement organizations. Relationship between movements and political institutions. Role of movements in bringing about social change. Theoretical issues, case studies.
Class Description:
Social movements are collective, sustained, organized, and non-institutional vehicles for challenging authorities, power-holders, and cultural institutions. Social movements vary widely in both their organization, the issues that they address, and the challenge their pose to authorities. While some movements seek deep changes to the social structure (such as anarchists, socialists, and other revolutionary movements), others seek only limited changes at the individual level (such as veganism, local foods movements, and other lifestyle movements). This course will be an introduction to social movements from a sociological perspective. Many of us are interested in social movements because we are committed to the work that particular movements do. But as sociologists, we seek to understand movements comparatively and from a scientific perspective. This course will examine sociological theories as to the origins of social movements; why individuals join, stay, or leave movements; how social movements are organized and structured; and how movement organizations interact with broader environments. Additionally, we will look at social movements not only as site that articulate social opposition and alternatives, but also as sites in which social theories are tested, developed, and employed. While much of the readings will draw on case studies and theories, the emphasis of this class will be on applying what we read, learn, and discuss to the organizations you are studying for your service learning project. This is a writing-intensive course, and in addition to the three major papers, students will be expected to journal weekly on the course blog about readings and their experiences at their service learning site.
Grading:
75% Reports/Papers
15% Journal
10% Class Participation
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
30% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
Workload:
40-70 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Paper(s)
Other Workload: Weekly reflections on readings and service learning
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66816/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 November 2012

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