9 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2024  |  SOC 3301W Section 001: Politics and Society (32287)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2024 - 12/11/2024
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Open (55 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Political sociology is concerned with the social bases of power and the social consequences of the organization of power, especially how power operates in relationship to various forms of inequality and different institutions. We will explore political socialization, electoral politics and voting, social movements, the media and framing, and politics of inequality, poverty, and welfare. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?koksa002+SOC3301W+Fall2024
Class Description:
This course familiarizes students with political sociology, a subfield of sociology that focuses on the interaction between the state and society. We will explore how political sociologists analyze the concept of "power" across its political, economic, and cultural dimensions, and examine how power shapes social inequalities based on race, class, gender, and nationality. Throughout the semester, we will cover a range of topics including the forces driving social and political change, the mediating roles of political institutions such as parties and elections, and the influence of civil society and social movements in challenging existing relations of power. We will also explore the multifaceted aspects of political culture, both on collective and individual levels, and unpack a spectrum of political ideologies, from nationalism to populism, using a sociological lens. In addition to introducing students to key scholarly debates surrounding political institutions, the course will cover the dynamics of political change, such as democratization and democratic backsliding, and analyze how identities based on class, gender, race, ethnicity, and nationality influence political attitudes. We will engage with theoretical literature on these topics, supplemented by their practical illustrations drawn from case studies in specific national contexts. While we will have a primary focus on U.S. politics and society, we will maintain a global outlook by incorporating research from other countries and exploring how historical and cultural factors shape global struggles for democracy and political rights.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Open to all Sociology majors and minors, the course welcomes all students with introductory backgrounds in social sciences, humanities, and related fields, who are interested in critically examining their political beliefs and attitudes, as well as those of others, and developing a comparative understanding of the underlying social forces shaping contemporary politics in the U.S. and beyond.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the course, students will learn about some of the key concepts and debates in political sociology, acquire a solid foundation in different perspectives on the operation of political power across various political institutions in modern societies, and develop a creative toolkit for interpreting and analyzing socio-political phenomena using sociological theory and data.
This is a writing-intensive course, aiming to advance the students' ability to write clearly and persuasively. Writing assignments will comprise a significant portion of the coursework and contribute substantially to the final grade. The students will be required to complete an individual writing project, which will be divided and assigned throughout the semester to allow for feedback and revision.
Grading:
Attendance and participation: 20 points
Weekly reading responses and writing assignments: 25 points
Writing project (multiple drafts): 55 points
Class Format:
Class time will be divided between short introductory lectures, group discussions, and individual free-writing sessions. Regular attendance and active participation are required. Students will be expected to complete the assigned readings for each session prior to the class and participate thoughtfully and respectfully in discussions.
Workload:
Students will need to complete an average of 40-50 pages of reading and write approximately 1 page per week.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/32287/1249
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 April 2024

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3301W Section 001: Politics and Society (65582)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Enrollment Status:
Open (58 of 60 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Political sociology is concerned with the social bases of power and the social consequences of the organization of power, especially how power operates in relationship to various forms of inequality and different institutions. We will explore political socialization, electoral politics and voting, social movements, the media and framing, and politics of inequality, poverty, and welfare. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?brigh009+SOC3301W+Spring2023
Class Description:
Political sociology uses politics as a way to theorize or ideally to better understand how/why power functions the way it does in society - political sociology is less about politics traditionally and more about power in society. In this course you will spend some time looking at political institutions and how power to allocate resources is connected to elite institutions. In this first section of the course, the role of capitalism in environmental politics, healthcare politics, and the United Nations as a limited power broker within the organizing structure of national sovereignty will be explored (thus, we'll discuss nation states, how they are made and unmade). This course will also look at power and social movements, specifically addressing issues related to Minneapolis and the University of Minnesota. Topics to be infused throughout the course will include ideology (and how it forms, mutates, infests, changes, dissipates), drivers of inequality including what informs the construction and maintenance of law and rules, and the tenuous role of democracy (what is its role?) in addressing capitalism and inequality in the US and globally. Because the current political landscape is too loud to be ignored, we will take the time we need to sociologically make sense of current political events *as they unfold* during the course of the semester. You will ideally leave this course thinking about and looking for manifestations of power in both likely and unlikely places, having interrogated your beliefs about who gets what, where, when, why, and how, as well as the beliefs of others. We will rely heavily on the role of data as a way to understand the various phenomena, and even gather some of our own.
Who Should Take This Class?:
prereq of 1001
Learning Objectives:
1. Define power in multiple ways. Identify these "types" of power in our social landscape.
2. Apply various social institutions (not the brick and mortar kind) to processes of power, construction of laws, and allocation of resources.
3. Engage with US and global politics in real time, linking course material to current events.
4. Practice 1-2 data gathering methods.
Grading:
20% Weekly "reading check" quizzes
20% Two 3- to 5-page papers (10% each)
20% One final 7- to 10-page paper
20% Two short memos connecting current events to course material
20% Attendance/participation
Exam Format:
Weekly quizzes will be multiple choice, to be taken prior to class for the week, on your own in Canvas
Class Format:
Lecture/Discussion
Workload:
30-40 pages to read a week.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65582/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 November 2022

Fall 2020  |  SOC 3301W Section 001: Politics and Society (31558)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Closed (30 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Political sociology is concerned with the social bases of power and the social consequences of the organization of power, especially how power operates in relationship to various forms of inequality and different institutions. We will explore political socialization, electoral politics and voting, social movements, the media and framing, and politics of inequality, poverty, and welfare. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in a synchronous format. The course will meet online at the scheduled times. Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?broad001+SOC3301W+Fall2020
Class Description:
Politics and society go together like a horse and carriage, but its hard to tell which is the horse and which the carriage! This course approaches politics from the standpoint of society. Accordingly, it does not focus on the details of the formal political institutions such as voting, legislatures or the presidency. Rather, it focuses on how issues develop in society and push politics. Society is divided by social and cultural categories such as race, class, gender, age, education, religion, associational membership, wealth and relationship to the environment. These categories, equal or unequal, exploitative or cooperative, and so forth, determine the allocation of "goods" and "bads" in society, and therefore many political dynamics. In addition, people and groups have different levels of social capital (connections) and cultural capital (for instance, levels of education and tastes about music, theater, literature, news, sports and alcohol). These different factors help create ideological values such as group and nationalist beliefs. They bear upon how individuals and groups think about the issues that face them and how they do or do not translate these into political issues demanding governmental action. These social factors interact with the type of local and national regime and its placement in global systems to channel conflicts and outcomes. Depending on the openness of the regime, popular pressures can lead to peaceful democratic change, open protests, or revolution.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Anyone interested in the social aspects of politics
Learning Objectives:
To write a paper about the social aspects of politics
Grading:
15% Midterm Exam
15% Final Exam
45% Reports/Papers
5% Quizzes
18% Written Homework
2% Class Participation
Exam Format:
short essay, T/F, multiple choice
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Discussion
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
6 Homework Assignment(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: This is a writing intensive (W) course. It requires that you develop your term paper in four stages, each of which is submitted for feedback and improvement.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/31558/1209
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2019

Spring 2020  |  SOC 3301W Section 001: Politics and Society (65570)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Open (42 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Political sociology is concerned with the social bases of power and the social consequences of the organization of power, especially how power operates in relationship to various forms of inequality and different institutions. We will explore political socialization, electoral politics and voting, social movements, the media and framing, and politics of inequality, poverty, and welfare. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?broad001+SOC3301W+Spring2020
Class Description:
Politics and society go together like a horse and carriage, but its hard to tell which is the horse and which the carriage! This course approaches politics from the standpoint of society. Accordingly, it does not focus on the details of the formal political institutions such as voting, legislatures or the presidency. Rather, it focuses on how issues develop in society and push politics. Society is divided by social and cultural categories such as race, class, gender, age, education, religion, associational membership, wealth and relationship to the environment. These categories, equal or unequal, exploitative or cooperative, and so forth, determine the allocation of "goods" and "bads" in society, and therefore many political dynamics. In addition, people and groups have different levels of social capital (connections) and cultural capital (for instance, levels of education and tastes about music, theater, literature, news, sports and alcohol). These different factors help create ideological values such as group and nationalist beliefs. They bear upon how individuals and groups think about the issues that face them and how they do or do not translate these into political issues demanding governmental action. These social factors interact with the type of local and national regime and its placement in global systems to channel conflicts and outcomes. Depending on the openness of the regime, popular pressures can lead to peaceful democratic change, open protests, or revolution.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Anyone interested in the social aspects of politics
Learning Objectives:
To write a paper about the social aspects of politics
Grading:
15% Midterm Exam
15% Final Exam
45% Reports/Papers
5% Quizzes
18% Written Homework
2% Class Participation
Exam Format:
short essay, T/F, multiple choice
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Discussion
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
6 Homework Assignment(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: This is a writing intensive (W) course. It requires that you develop your term paper in four stages, each of which is submitted for feedback and improvement.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/65570/1203
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2019

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3301W Section 001: Politics and Society (66988)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Open (34 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Political sociology is concerned with the social bases of power and the social consequences of the organization of power, especially how power operates in relationship to various forms of inequality and different institutions. We will explore political socialization, electoral politics and voting, social movements, the media and framing, and politics of inequality, poverty, and welfare. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?broad001+SOC3301W+Spring2018
Class Description:
Politics and society go together like a horse and carriage, but its hard to tell which is the horse and which the carriage! This course approaches politics from the standpoint of society. Accordingly, it does not focus on the details of the formal political institutions such as voting, legislatures or the presidency. Rather, it focuses on how society organizes around and pushes political questions. For instance, society is divided by social categories such as race, class, gender, age, education, religion, associational membership, wealth. The systemic relations among these categories, equal or unequal, exploitative or cooperative, and so forth, determine the allocation of "goods" and "bads" in society, and therefore many political dynamics. In addition, people and groups have different levels of social capital (connections) and cultural capital (for instance, levels of education and tastes about music, theater, literature, news, sports and alcohol). These different factors help create ideological values such as group and nationalist beliefs. They bear upon how individuals and groups think about the issues that face them and how they do or do not translate these into political issues demanding governmental action. These social factors interact with the type of local and national regime and its placement in global systems to channel conflicts and outcomes. Depending on the openness of the regime, popular pressures can lead to peaceful democratic change, open protests, or revolution.
Grading:
15% Midterm Exam
15% Final Exam
45% Reports/Papers
5% Quizzes
18% Written Homework
2% Class Participation
Exam Format:
short essay, T/F, multiple choice
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Discussion
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
6 Homework Assignment(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: This is a writing intensive (W) course. It requires that you develop your term paper in four stages, each of which is submitted for feedback and improvement.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/66988/1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 February 2016

Fall 2016  |  SOC 3301W Section 001: Politics and Society (18314)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 215
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Political sociology is concerned with the social bases of power and the social consequences of the organization of power, especially how power operates in relationship to various forms of inequality and different institutions. We will explore political socialization, electoral politics and voting, social movements, the media and framing, and politics of inequality, poverty, and welfare. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?broad001+SOC3301W+Fall2016
Class Description:
Politics and society go together like a horse and carriage, but its hard to tell which is the horse and which the carriage! This course approaches politics from the standpoint of society. Accordingly, it does not focus on the details of the formal political institutions such as voting, legislatures or the presidency. Rather, it focuses on how society organizes around and pushes political questions. For instance, society is divided by social categories such as race, class, gender, age, education, religion, associational membership, wealth. The systemic relations among these categories, equal or unequal, exploitative or cooperative, and so forth, determine the allocation of "goods" and "bads" in society, and therefore many political dynamics. In addition, people and groups have different levels of social capital (connections) and cultural capital (for instance, levels of education and tastes about music, theater, literature, news, sports and alcohol). These different factors help create ideological values such as group and nationalist beliefs. They bear upon how individuals and groups think about the issues that face them and how they do or do not translate these into political issues demanding governmental action. These social factors interact with the type of local and national regime and its placement in global systems to channel conflicts and outcomes. Depending on the openness of the regime, popular pressures can lead to peaceful democratic change, open protests, or revolution.
Grading:
15% Midterm Exam
15% Final Exam
45% Reports/Papers
5% Quizzes
18% Written Homework
2% Class Participation
Exam Format:
short essay, T/F, multiple choice
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Discussion
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
6 Homework Assignment(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: This is a writing intensive (W) course. It requires that you develop your term paper in four stages, each of which is submitted for feedback and improvement.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18314/1169
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 February 2016

Fall 2015  |  SOC 3301W Section 001: Politics and Society (34551)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2015 - 12/16/2015
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Ideas of citizenship. Relationship between politics and society. Public sphere, civil society. Research practicum volunteering at policy-relevant site using participant observation methods. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?broad001+SOC3301W+Fall2015
Class Description:
Politics and society go together like a horse and carriage, but its hard to tell which is the horse and which the carriage! This course approaches politics from the standpoint of society. Accordingly, it does not focus on the details of the formal political institutions such as voting, legislatures or the presidency. Rather, it focuses on how society organizes around and pushes political questions. For instance, society is divided by social categories such as race, class, gender, age, education, religion, associational membership, wealth. The systemic relations among these categories, equal or unequal, exploitative or cooperative, and so forth, determine the allocation of "goods" and "bads" in society, and therefore many political dynamics. In addition, people and groups have different levels of social capital (connections) and cultural capital (for instance, levels of education and tastes about music, theater, literature, news, sports and alcohol). These different factors help create ideological values such as group and nationalist beliefs. They bear upon how individuals and groups think about the issues that face them and how they do or do not translate these into political issues demanding governmental action. These social factors interact with the type of local and national regime and its placement in global systems to channel conflicts and outcomes. Depending on the openness of the regime, popular pressures can lead to peaceful democratic change, open protests, or revolution. The course explores these issues from the perspective of three case studies: one case of severe ethnic conflicts in a giant democracy (India), one case of revolution against dictatorship (the Arab Spring) -- and within that, the role of the internet communications in popular mobilization and what it presages for the future--, and one case about welfare politics in a conservative capitalist democracy (the US--the politics of the recent Affordable Care Act).
Grading:
15% Midterm Exam
15% Final Exam
45% Reports/Papers
5% Quizzes
18% Written Homework
2% Class Participation
Exam Format:
essay
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Discussion
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
6 Homework Assignment(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: This is a writing intensive (W) course. It requires that you develop your term paper in four stages, each of which is submitted for feedback and improvement.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34551/1159
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 July 2013

Spring 2015  |  SOC 3301W Section 001: Politics and Society (69154)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 145
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Ideas of citizenship. Relationship between politics and society. Public sphere, civil society. Research practicum volunteering at policy-relevant site using participant observation methods. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Description:
Political sociology is concerned with the social bases of power and the social consequences of the organization of power, especially how power operates in relationship to various forms of inequality and different institutions. We will explore a wide range of topics in political sociology, beginning with an analysis of different theories of power and of the state. We will then explore electoral politics and voting, social movements, the media and framing, and the politics of inequality, poverty, and welfare. The final part of the course will address the politics of crime and punishment, environmental politics, the politics of gender and sexuality, war, peace, and terrorism, and alternative possible futures. Many of the readings and lectures concern different perspectives on power, the state, political parties, and political change and the focus will be on the United States, although we will also address political issues in other parts of the globe.
Grading:
70% Reports/Papers
30% Quizzes Other Grading Information: The 4-5 page research proposal will be 20% of the final grade. The two drafts of the 12-15 pages research paper constitute 60% of the final grade. The reaction paper and leadership of class discussion count for 20% of the final grade.
Class Format:
20% Lecture
10% Film/Video
50% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
5% Student Presentations
5% Service Learning
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
16-20 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: Students will write a research proposal (4-5 pages) and two drafts of a 12-15 page paper based on community service learning or library research.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/69154/1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 November 2014

Fall 2013  |  SOC 3301W Section 001: Politics and Society (30942)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2013 - 12/11/2013
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 425
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Ideas of citizenship. Relationship between politics and society. Public sphere, civil society. Research practicum volunteering at policy-relevant site using participant observation methods.
Class Description:
Politics and society go together like a horse and carriage, but its hard to tell which is the horse and which the carriage! This course approaches politics from the standpoint of society. Accordingly, it does not focus on the details of the formal political institutions such as voting, legislatures or the presidency. Rather, it focuses on how society organizes around and pushes political questions. For instance, society is divided by social categories such as race, class, gender, age, education, religion, associational membership, wealth. The systemic relations among these categories, equal or unequal, exploitative or cooperative, and so forth, determine the allocation of "goods" and "bads" in society, and therefore many political dynamics. In addition, people and groups have different levels of social capital (connections) and cultural capital (for instance, levels of education and tastes about music, theater, literature, news, sports and alcohol). These different factors help create ideological values such as group and nationalist beliefs. They bear upon how individuals and groups think about the issues that face them and how they do or do not translate these into political issues demanding governmental action. These social factors interact with the type of local and national regime and its placement in global systems to channel conflicts and outcomes. Depending on the openness of the regime, popular pressures can lead to peaceful democratic change, open protests, or revolution. The course explores these issues from the perspective of three case studies: one case of severe ethnic conflicts in a giant democracy (India), one case of revolution against dictatorship (the Arab Spring) -- and within that, the role of the internet communications in popular mobilization and what it presages for the future--, and one case about welfare politics in a conservative capitalist democracy (the US--the politics of the recent Affordable Care Act).
Grading:
15% Midterm Exam
15% Final Exam
45% Reports/Papers
5% Quizzes
18% Written Homework
2% Class Participation
Exam Format:
essay
Class Format:
60% Lecture
40% Discussion
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
6 Homework Assignment(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: This is a writing intensive (W) course. It requires that you develop your term paper in four stages, each of which is submitted for feedback and improvement.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/30942/1139
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 July 2013

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