36 classes matched your search criteria.

Summer 2024  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (81971)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/03/2024 - 07/26/2024
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This online class will meet weekly Synchronously online at the scheduled day and time. The other weekly Lecture will be shared Asynchronously each week. Click this link for more detailed information:
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/81971/1245

Spring 2024  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (53006)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2024 - 04/29/2024
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Open (14 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3251W+Spring2024
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing! Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your OWN life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of OTHERS. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the Social Construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings, such as the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and collective approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:

60% Formal Papers (3, worth 20% each)

15% Informal Papers (3, worth 5% each)

25% Class Participation (attendance + engagement)

Exam Format:
none
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
~40 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Papers (8-10 pages each)
3 Reflection Papers
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53006/1243
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
19 April 2023

Fall 2023  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (19696)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2023 - 12/13/2023
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Enrollment Status:
Closed (34 of 34 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pharr004+SOC3251W+Fall2023
Class Description:
Our goal in this course is to understand both the causes and consequences of inequality in American society. We will explore the social construction of race, class, and gender, and how their definitions and boundaries vary across time and across space. We will assess how these constructs are "real in their consequences," and have a profound impact on individual experiences, identities, and relationships. We will analyze how various axes of social inequality are reproduced at the interpersonal, institutional, and systemic level. Finally, we will examine how race, class, gender, sexuality, (dis)ability, and any number of other social statuses interact and intersect in shaping our unique standpoint. This is a writing intensive course, and students will be evaluated primarily on their ability to discuss the course material and communicate core concepts in relation to their experiences and current events. Students will contribute to weekly online discussions, submit in-depth reading journals/discussion posts, and complete one 8-10 page formal essay.
Grading:
General participation in online and offline discussion - 15%
5 discussion posts - 50%
1 8-10 page essay (including proposal, rough draft, peer revision, and final draft) - 35%
Workload:
- approximately 40 pages of reading per week
- weekly participation in online and offline discussion
- 5 500-word discussion posts
- 1 2000-2500-word formal essay (including proposal, rough draft, peer revision, and final draft)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/19696/1239
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 June 2023

Summer 2023  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (82226)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/05/2023 - 07/28/2023
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (21 of 23 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This online class will meet weekly synchronously online at the scheduled day and time. The other weekly lecture will be shared asynchronously each week. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?joh07820+SOC3251W+Summer2023
Class Description:
Numerous scholars in the social sciences have noted pervasive inequalities in the United States. These inequalities often manifest within the realms of education, health, income, wealth (among others) and often cut sharply along the lines of race, gender, and class. This course will examine the cultural processes through which such durable inequality can persist despite widespread (although not-near total) belief in egalitarian ideals in the United States. We will discover, through engagement with scholarly work spanning from the early 20th century until our current moment, how racial, classed, and gendered social positions and identities saturate every aspect of social life - our perception, our routines, our values, and even the way we carry our bodies through the world. Both during class time and within class assignments, students will use such accumulated knowledge to account for why social power remains unequally distributed in the United States.

List of assigned authors in the course include (but is not limited to): W.E.B DuBois, Dorothy Smith, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberlee Crenshaw, Pierre Bourdieu, and others.

Who Should Take This Class?:
All students who have an interest in grappling with the deep sources/consequences of social inequality, especially if they have already become interested in the sociological discipline, are welcome.

Learning Objectives:
Students will gain an entry-level understanding of essential works in sociology which explain the cultural nature and operation of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States.

In service of the above objective, students will learn strategies for how to digest and comprehend academic texts and their theoretical content.


Students will gain experience in working with other students and the instructor in a discussion (rather than purely lecture) format to review and apply course texts.


Students will develop the ability to translate sociological texts and theory into their surrounding social contexts, using it to analyze a social problem of their choosing in a course paper.


Students will learn how to develop and revise a medium length
(10-12 page) paper, and, consequently, a sociologically-informed argument, throughout multiple drafts and across several weeks.

Grading:
Students will be evaluated on a mixture of class participation, several graded components (an articulation of topic, an outline with provisional sources, a peer-reviewed draft, and the final paper) of a 10-12 page paper due in segments throughout the term, and two remotely-proctored quizzes where students summarize important class concepts in short answer form.
Exam Format:
There is no final exam for the class. A final paper will be due during the final exam period of the term.
Class Format:
Synchronous classes will include the following activities (Instruction will be semi-synchronous, meaning students will have to be online at the assigned times and work on reviewing recorded lectures and written materials on their own time):

-A material "debrief" where students are encouraged to check in with each other in breakout groups about key takeaways from readings. The instructor will also check in on breakout groups during this time to help hone student understanding of course materials

-Twice per term, students will have a one on one conference with the instructor during normal class time to discuss any ongoing issues the student has in the course/check in on progress on course objectives like the final term paper.

-Occasional group activities where students in breakout groups work on applications of course materials which will then be discussed in large-group class discussion.
Workload:
Students should expect to dedicate 4 to 6 hours a week to course readings in addition to several additional hours during weeks before major assignments
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82226/1235
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 February 2023

Spring 2023  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (53395)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2023 - 05/01/2023
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Enrollment Status:
Open (38 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3251W+Spring2023
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing! Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your OWN life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of OTHERS. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the Social Construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings, such as the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and collective approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:

60% Papers (3 papers, 20% each)

20% Final Exam

20% Class Participation

Exam Format:
1 exam, True/False and Short Answer
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Exam
3 Papers (8-10 pages each)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53395/1233
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 September 2021

Fall 2022  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (20383)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Partially Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
Tue 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 150
 
09/06/2022 - 12/14/2022
UMTC, West Bank
UMN ONLINE-HYB
Enrollment Status:
Closed (36 of 34 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This fall 2022 class will meet weekly in person on Tuesday mornings at the scheduled time, and the other weekly lecture will be shared asynchronously online each week. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sara0028+SOC3251W+Fall2022
Class Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.

Learning Objectives:
A) Explore the social construction of race, class, gender, as well as ethnicity, sexuality, citizenship, and (dis)ability;

B) Consider how race, class, gender, and other dimensions of social organization shape individual experiences and interactions with social institutions such as education, work, medicine, and law;

C) Develop and use a "sociological imagination" to analyze privilege and inequalities

D) Apply sociological approaches to contemporary issues.

Exam Format:
There will be no exams for the course. Students will create a final project.
Class Format:
Synchronous online course with flexibility for asynchronous participation.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20383/1229
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 August 2022

Summer 2022  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (81802)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Summer Session 14 wk
 
05/16/2022 - 08/19/2022
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (23 of 25 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pharr004+SOC3251W+Summer2022
Class Description:
Our goal in this course is to understand both the causes and consequences of inequality in American society. We will explore the social construction of race, class, and gender, and how their definitions and boundaries vary across time and across space. We will assess how these constructs are "real in their consequences," and have a profound impact on individual experiences, identities, and relationships. We will analyze how various axes of social inequality are reproduced at the interpersonal, institutional, and systemic level. Finally, we will examine how race, class, gender, sexuality, (dis)ability, and any number of other social statuses interact and intersect in shaping our unique standpoint. This is an online, writing intensive course, and students will be evaluated primarily on their ability to discuss the course material and communicate core concepts in relation to their experiences and current events. Students will contribute to weekly online discussions, submit in-depth reading journals/discussion posts, and complete one 8-10 page formal essay.
Grading:
General participation in online discussion - 15%
5 discussion posts - 50%
1 8-10 page essay (including proposal, rough draft, peer revision, and final draft) - 35%
Workload:
- approximately 40 pages of reading per week
- weekly participation in online discussion
- 5 500-word discussion posts
- 1 2000-2500-word formal essay (including proposal, rough draft, peer revision, and final draft)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/81802/1225
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 February 2022

Spring 2022  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (54373)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Open (42 of 43 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3251W+Spring2022
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing! Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your OWN life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of OTHERS. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the Social Construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings, such as the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and collective approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:

60% Papers (3 papers, 20% each)

20% Final Exam

20% Class Participation

Exam Format:
1 exam, True/False and Short Answer
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Exam
3 Papers (8-10 pages each)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54373/1223
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
30 September 2021

Fall 2021  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (21914)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-104
Enrollment Status:
Open (39 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?joh07820+SOC3251W+Fall2021
Class Description:
Numerous scholars in the social sciences have noted pervasive inequalities in the United States. These inequalities often manifest within the realms of education, health, income, wealth (among others) and often cut sharply along the lines of race, gender, and class. This course will examine the cultural processes through which such durable inequality can persist despite widespread (although not-near total) belief in egalitarian ideals in the United States. We will discover, through engagement with scholarly work spanning from the early 20th century until our current moment, how racial, classed, and gendered social positions and identities saturate every aspect of social life - our perception, our routines, our values, and even the way we carry our bodies through the world. Both during class time and within class assignments, students will use such accumulated knowledge to account for why social power remains unequally distributed in the United States.

List of assigned authors in the course include (but is not limited to): W.E.B DuBois, Dorothy Smith, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberlee Crenshaw, Pierre Bourdieu, and others.

Who Should Take This Class?:
All students who have an interest in grappling with the deep sources/consequences of social inequality, especially if they have already become interested in the sociological discipline, are welcome.

Learning Objectives:
Students will gain an entry-level understanding of essential works in sociology which explain the cultural nature and operation of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States.

In service of the above objective, students will learn strategies for how to digest and comprehend academic texts and their theoretical content.


Students will gain experience in working with other students and the instructor in a discussion (rather than purely lecture) format to review and apply course texts.


Students will develop the ability to translate sociological texts and theory into their surrounding social contexts, using it to analyze a social problem of their choosing in a course paper.


Students will learn how to develop and revise a medium length
(10-12 page) paper, and, consequently, a sociologically-informed argument, throughout multiple drafts and across several weeks.

Grading:
Students will be evaluated on a mixture of class participation, Small, pre-class writing assignments which will prepare you for class, and several graded components (an articulation of topic, an outline with provisional sources, a peer-reviewed draft, and the final paper) of a 10-12 page paper due in segments throughout the term. There will be no quizzes or tests.
Exam Format:
There is no final exam for the class. A final paper will be due during the final exam period of the semester.
Class Format:
Classes will include the following activities (Instruction will be synchronous, meaning students will have to be online at the assigned times) :

-Small group discussion in zoom "breakout" rooms where students will meet regularly with a set of fellow students to respond to questions from the instructor. (The instructor encourages students to "go" to class in spaces where video and audio capture from their chosen device [smart phone or computer] is possible).

-Mini "lectures" where the instructor will pull together, in real time, the contributions of the various breakout groups (the logistics of this will be ironed out early in the term), as well as his expertise, into a shared notes document for the class on the readings for the day.

-Occasional films demonstrating course concepts

-Paper workshops with the students regular breakout groups to hone and revise their paper ideas and paper text.
Workload:
Students should expect to dedicate 4 to 6 hours a week to course readings in addition to several additional hours during weeks before major assignments
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21914/1219
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 April 2020

Summer 2021  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (81387)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/07/2021 - 07/30/2021
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (31 of 35 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in a synchronous format. The course will meet online at the scheduled times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?deorn001+SOC3251W+Summer2021
Class Description:
In this course we examine race, class, and gender as axes of stratification, identity, and experience. More importantly, we learn how these and other crucial aspects of social identity intersect to form a complex matrix of privilege and power. Our goal is to understand the multiple and intersecting ways that these concepts shape American society and influence each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions.

Some of the questions we will explore include:

● What's the difference between sex and gender? Money and wealth? Race and ethnicity?

● How and why have these concepts changed over time?

● How are resources like healthcare, education, and housing distributed in U.S. society?

● What is intersectionality and why is it important?

● How does the law define gender? Disability? Indigeneity?

The opening weeks of the class are devoted to a detailed examination of each of our core concepts. We focus on the social construction of these concepts, a departure from the antiquated view of race and gender being rooted solely in biology or nature. We explore what meanings and values are attached to these concepts in the social world, as well as the historical, political, and social factors that shape their meanings and values. In the second half of the course, we move to an analysis of the significance of race, class, and gender in different institutional and interpersonal contexts. These include the labor force, education, healthcare, housing, and athletics.

Grading:

1. Participation and Attendance = 20% (100 points)

2. Five Reading Response Memos = 20% (100 points total/20 points per response)

3. Peer Review = 10% (50 points)

4. Final Paper/Product* = 50% (250 points)

*Your final paper will be broken out into several components that we will work on throughout the course -- do not be worried about one make-or-break grade!

Exam Format:
No exams. Your final paper will primarily be an academic literature review on a social inequality of your choice. You will also turn in one related product, such as brief research proposal, policy brief, op-ed, or short video, to relate your literature review to your personal academic or career goals.
Class Format:
We will meet synchronously on Zoom each class session. But to combat Zoom fatigue we won't spend all 2.5 hours looking at each other on Zoom -- any lecture material will be recorded and available to watch prior to class, and we'll break up Zoom discussions with "in-class" writing activities, social annotation exercises, time dedicated to online discussion boards, and other ways to maximize learning in this weird new space. Each class we will spend some time discussing the readings and some time moving forward on your papers.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/81387/1215
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 April 2021

Spring 2021  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (50346)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue 01:00PM - 02:15PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (43 of 44 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This lecture is completely online. On Tuesdays, the lecture will meet in a synchronous format at the scheduled time. The remaining lecture material will be available online in an asynchronous format. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?kampdush+SOC3251W+Spring2021
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class, gender and sexuality as axes of stratification, identity, and experience. Our goal is to understand the multiple and intersecting ways that these concepts shape American society and influence each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions.
The opening weeks of the class are devoted to a detailed examination of each of our core concepts. In the second half of the course, we move to an analysis of the significance of race, class, gender and sexuality in different contexts including the labor force, the family, schools, the criminal justice system and the dynamics of language. We close the class by asking how the U.S. will be shaped by race, class, gender and sexuality as we continue through the 21st century, and by evaluating solutions to the problem of social inequality. This course will make you think and reflect. Join us!!

Oh, and if you are an AAS student, don't worry, I won't forget about you! You will have some unique options to personalize this course.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Everyone! Everyone should take this class to understand more about themselves, others, and society!
Learning Objectives:
1.1 Actively engage with the professor, TAs, and other students

1.2 Engage in course activities

1.3 Reflect on personal assumptions and values in the context of gender, race, and social class

1.4 Question current knowledge of gender, race, and social class

2.1 Identify societal constructions of gender, race, and social class

2.2 Explore how gender, race, and social class applies to social relationships, communities, societal institutions, and how they could shape the future of society

2.3 Articulate how gender, race, and social class manifest in intimate relationships and in the family

2.4 Identify ways that gender, race, and social class affects the workplace and career advancement

3.1 Contrast opinions and facts in multiple media outlets

3.2 Recognize assumptions and presuppositions in own, peer, and professional opinions

3.3 Develop a clearly articulated argument to support an argument related to gender, race, and social class and use it to justify one or more conclusions related to gender, race, and social class

3.4 Analyze and assess the strength of arguments related to gender, race, and social class and the implications for the course of action and/or assumptions that flow from the argument

3.5 Teach gender, race, and social class concepts to peers inside and outside of the class

3.6 Contemplate how scholars study gender, race, and social class, and the limitations therein

4.1 Describe gender, race, and social class over time and across the life course

4.2 Synthesize gender, race, and social class as interdependent, intersectional concepts

4.3 Identify race, gender, social class, and sexual orientation-related factors that influence communities

4.4 Appreciate the diversity of American family life

5.1 Learn to write clearly and without jargon

5.2 Read the work of peers and provide feedback that is actually useful

6.1 Identify multiple personal identities, including race, social class, gender identity, sexual identity, religion, etc.

6.2 Articulate how own intersectional identities, and the values and beliefs that accompany them, shape own experiences

6.3 Appreciate how others' intersectional identities lead to different values and beliefs and experiences, both personal and professional

6.4 Question the lenses through which American society is viewed and reflect on the origins of these lenses

7.1 Communicate gender, race, and social class topics to peers

7.2 Articulate why gender, race, and social class matters

7.3 Identify a contemporary current event or media story connected to gender, race, and/or social class

Grading:
Your grade will have 7 components:
Prediction Quizzes: pass/fail quizzes that ask you to predict what you will learn the next week (pass/fail)
Quizzes: Online quizzes that cover each module's materials.
Engage Discussions: On Zoom (once per week) or Online (once per week) discussions of that weeks materials
Short Papers: Short papers on various topics.
Reflections: Short, less formal reflection of that week's module.
Blog Project: A gender, race, and social class themed blog post
Final Paper: A final paper on a question related to gender, race, and social class
Exam Format:
There are 14 quizzes (taken in Canvas) in this class. There is no midterm or final.
Class Format:
This class will meet synchronously (live on Zoom) on Tuesday only. The class will meet asynchronously in an online discussion forum on Thursday.
Workload:
This class will require you to read about 30 to 40 pages per week. It will require you to write about one two-page paper per week. It will require you to complete two quizzes (short quizzes, less than 20 minutes), per week. It will require you to complete about one reflection per week. This class is based in active learning. If you are not into doing readings for your courses, not into staying on top of tasks, or not into discussion, this may not be the class for you. Or, maybe you are into these things, but not during a global pandemic. I get it. So, you can decide for yourself whether this is the class for you. I personally think it is awesome and a lot of fun. But I might be biased; I am the professor. Ha!
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50346/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 November 2020

Fall 2020  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (16629)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Closed (40 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in a synchronous format. The course will meet online at the scheduled times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3251W+Fall2020
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing. Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your own life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of others. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the social construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings. These include the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and corporate approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:

60% Papers (3 papers, 20% each)

20% Final Exam

20% Class Participation

Exam Format:
1 exam, True/False and Short Answer
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Exam
3 Papers (8-10 pages each)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/16629/1209
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 September 2018

Summer 2020  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (82786)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/08/2020 - 07/31/2020
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (29 of 32 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sajja017+SOC3251W+Summer2020 This 8-week online class will meet on Tues & Thur evenings from 5:30-8:00 with synchronous online instruction.
Class Description:
Numerous scholars in the social sciences have noted pervasive inequalities in the United States. These inequalities often manifest within the realms of education, health, income, wealth (among others) and often cut sharply along the lines of race, gender, and class. This course will examine the cultural processes through which such durable inequality can persist despite widespread (although not-near total) belief in egalitarian ideals in the United States. We will discover, through engagement with scholarly work spanning from the early 20th century until our current moment, how racial, classed, and gendered social positions and identities saturate every aspect of social life - our perception, our routines, our values, and even the way we carry our bodies through the world. Both during class time and within class assignments, students will use such accumulated knowledge to account for why social power remains unequally distributed in the United States.

List of assigned authors in the course include (but is not limited to): W.E.B DuBois, Dorothy Smith, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberlee Crenshaw, Pierre Bourdieu, and others.

Who Should Take This Class?:
All students who have an interest in grappling with the deep sources/consequences of social inequality, especially if they have already become interested in the sociological discipline, are welcome.

Learning Objectives:
Students will gain an entry-level understanding of essential works in sociology which explain the cultural nature and operation of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States.

In service of the above objective, students will learn strategies for how to digest and comprehend academic texts and their theoretical content.


Students will gain experience in working with other students and the instructor in a discussion (rather than purely lecture) format to review and apply course texts.


Students will develop the ability to translate sociological texts and theory into their surrounding social contexts, using it to analyze a social problem of their choosing in a course paper.


Students will learn how to develop and revise a medium length
(10-12 page) paper, and, consequently, a sociologically-informed argument, throughout multiple drafts and across several weeks.

Grading:
Students will be evaluated on a mixture of class participation, Small, pre-class writing assignments which will prepare you for class, and several graded components (an articulation of topic, an outline with provisional sources, a peer-reviewed draft, and the final paper) of a 10-12 page paper due in segments throughout the term. There will be no quizzes or tests.
Exam Format:
There is no final exam for the class. A final paper will be due during the final exam period of the semester.
Class Format:
Classes will include the following activities (Instruction will be synchronous, meaning students will have to be online at the assigned times) :

-Small group discussion in zoom "breakout" rooms where students will meet regularly with a set of fellow students to respond to questions from the instructor. (The instructor encourages students to "go" to class in spaces where video and audio capture from their chosen device [smart phone or computer] is possible).

-Mini "lectures" where the instructor will pull together, in real time, the contributions of the various breakout groups (the logistics of this will be ironed out early in the term), as well as his expertise, into a shared notes document for the class on the readings for the day.

-Occasional films demonstrating course concepts

-Paper workshops with the students regular breakout groups to hone and revise their paper ideas and paper text.
Workload:
Students should expect to dedicate 4 to 6 hours a week to course readings in addition to several additional hours during weeks before major assignments
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82786/1205
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 April 2020

Spring 2020  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (53993)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Closed (42 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link ofr more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?powel489+SOC3251W+Spring2020
Class Description:
Race, class, and gender are social and structural formations of identity and inequality that affect all of our lives. They are often taken for granted and rarely confronted and challenged, though in this class we will seek to do just that. In this course, we will define and examine the importance and influence of various forms of inequality both in social interactions and in social institutions. We will begin the course examining how race, class, and gender work in tandem social contexts to shape individual experiences. The course will be divided into two units: (1) Theoretical Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender and (2) Topical Interests in Race, Class, and Gender. Course material will draw on academic journal articles/book chapters, media, and popular culture to understand race, class, and gender within society and within various institutions such as the criminal justice system, education, politics, religion, and family.
Learning Objectives:
Together, we will address such questions as:

  1. How has my social location (via race, gender, and class) shaped my life to this point?

  2. How does my social location provide opportunities and obstacles moving forward?

  3. How does my social location differ from that of people around me?

  4. How does my experience as a person who is gendered, raced, and classed compare to colleagues, acquaintances, and others?

  5. What is intersectionality, who developed it, and how can it be deployed in social analysis?

  6. How does race, class, and gender impact people's lives in terms of families, education,

the economy, immigration, and the legal system?

Grading:
TBD
Exam Format:
Final Paper: 9-10 pages
Class Format:
TBD
Workload:
(A) Ten in-class participation assignments - 5 points each (25%)
(B) Five Critical Reading Essays, 2 pages double spaced - 10 points each (25%)
(C) Two Quizzes, non-cumulative, essay questions, select 5 of 6, 25 points each (25%)
(D) Final Paper, 9-10 pages, Critical Ethnography of Race, Class, Gender, 50 points (25%)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53993/1203
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 December 2019

Fall 2019  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (20146)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2019 - 12/11/2019
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Closed (48 of 48 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?joh07820+SOC3251W+Fall2019
Class Description:
Numerous scholars in the social sciences have noted pervasive inequalities in the United States. These inequalities often manifest within the realms of education, health, income, wealth (among others) and often cut sharply along the lines of race, gender, and class. This course will examine the cultural processes through which such durable inequality can persist despite widespread (although not-near total) belief in egalitarian ideals in the United States. We will discover, through engagement with scholarly work spanning from the early 20th century until our current moment, how racial, classed, and gendered social positions and identities saturate every aspect of social life - our perception, our routines, our values, and even the way we carry our bodies through the world. Both during class time and within class assignments, students will use such accumulated knowledge to account for why social power remains unequally distributed in the United States.

List of assigned authors in the course include (but is not limited to): W.E.B DuBois, Dorothy Smith, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberlee Crenshaw, Pierre Bourdieu, and others.

Who Should Take This Class?:
All students who have an interest in grappling with the deep sources/consequences of social inequality, especially if they have already become interested in the sociological discipline, are welcome.

Learning Objectives:
Students will gain an entry-level understanding of essential works in sociology which explain the cultural nature and operation of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States.

In service of the above objective, students will learn strategies for how to digest and comprehend academic texts and their theoretical content.


Students will gain experience in working with other students and the instructor in a seminar (rather than purely lecture) format to review and apply course texts.


Students will develop the ability to translate sociological texts and theory into their surrounding social contexts, using it to analyze a social problem of their choosing in a course paper.


Students will learn how to develop and revise a medium length
(10-12 page) paper, and, consequently, a sociologically-informed argument, throughout multiple drafts and across several weeks.

Grading:
Students will be evaluated on a mixture of class participation, 2-3 short answer and essay-based reading quizzes, and several components (an articulation of topic, an outline with provision sources, a peer-reviewed draft, and the final paper) of a 10-12 page paper due in segments throughout the term.

Exam Format:
There is no final exam for the class. A final paper will be due during the final exam period of the semester.
Class Format:
Classes will include the following activities:

-A mixture of short "mini-lectures" to introduce various readings

-Small and large group discussion, low-stakes writing activities, and other strategies designed to assist students' comprehension and application of course readings

-Occasional films demonstrating course concepts

-Paper workshops to help students revise their writing as needed.
Workload:
Students should expect to dedicate two to three hours a week to course readings in addition to several additional hours during weeks before major assignments and quizzes.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20146/1199
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
5 April 2019

Summer 2019  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (82811)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/10/2019 - 08/02/2019
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-135
Enrollment Status:
Open (16 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tabor027+SOC3251W+Summer2018
Class Description:
Numerous scholars in the social sciences have noted pervasive inequalities in the United States. These inequalities often manifest within the realms of education, health, income, wealth (among others) and often cut sharply along the lines of race, gender, and class. This course will examine the cultural processes through which such durable inequality can persist despite widespread (although not-near total) belief in egalitarian ideals in the United States. We will discover, through engagement with scholarly work spanning from the early 20th century until our current moment, how racial, classed, and gendered social positions and identities saturate every aspect of social life - our perception, our routines, our values, and even the way we carry our bodies through the world. Both during class time and within class assignments, students will use such accumulated knowledge to account for why social power remains unequally distributed in the United States.

List of assigned authors in the course include (but is not limited to): W.E.B DuBois, Dorothy Smith, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberlee Crenshaw, Pierre Bourdieu, and others.

Who Should Take This Class?:
All students who have an interest in grappling with the deep sources/consequences of social inequality, especially if they have already become interested in sociology as a perspective, are welcome.

Learning Objectives:
-Students will gain an entry-level understanding of essential works in sociology which explain the cultural nature and operation of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States.

-In service of the above objective, students will learn strategies for how to digest and comprehend academic texts and their theoretical content.


-Students will gain experience in working with other students and the instructor in a seminar (rather than purely lecture) format to review and apply course texts.


-Students will develop the ability to translate sociological texts and theory into their surrounding social contexts, using it to analyze a social problem of their choosing in a course paper.


-Students will learn how to develop and revise a medium length (10-12 page) paper, and, consequently, a sociologically-informed argument, throughout multiple drafts and across several weeks.

Grading:
Students will be evaluated on a mixture of class participation, 2-3 short answer and essay-based reading quizzes, and several components (an articulation of topic, an outline with provision sources, a peer-reviewed draft, and the final paper) of a 10-12 page paper due in segments throughout the term.

Exam Format:
There is no final exam for the class. A final paper will be due during the final exam period of the semester.
Class Format:
Classes will include the following activities:

-A mixture of short "mini-lectures" to introduce various readings

-Small and large group discussion, low-stakes writing activities, and other strategies designed to assist students' comprehension and application of course readings

-Occasional films demonstrating course concepts

-Paper workshops to help students revise their writing as needed.
Workload:
Students should expect to dedicate four to six hours a week to course readings in addition to several additional hours during weeks before major assignments and quizzes.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82811/1195
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 February 2019

Spring 2019  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (54214)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2019 - 05/06/2019
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Enrollment Status:
Open (41 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3251W+Spring2019
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing. Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your own life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of others. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the social construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings. These include the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and corporate approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:

60% Papers (3 papers, 20% each)

20% Final Exam

20% Class Participation

Exam Format:
1 exam, True/False and Short Answer
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Exam
3 Papers (8-10 pages each)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54214/1193
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
14 September 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (20574)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Closed (47 of 47 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?upton042+SOC3251W+Fall2018
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20574/1189

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (83027)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/11/2018 - 08/03/2018
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-127
Enrollment Status:
Open (22 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?tabor027+SOC3251W+Summer2018
Class Description:

In this course we examine race, class, and gender as axes of stratification, identity, and experience. More importantly, we learn how these and other crucial aspects of social identity intersect to form a complex matrix of privilege and power. Our goal is to understand the multiple and intersecting ways that these concepts shape American society and influence each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions.


This course meets the Diversity and Social Justice in the U.S. theme, the Social Sciences core, and the Writing Intensive.

Learning Objectives:

In this course, students will:

-Explore the social construction of race, class, gender, as well as ethnicity, sexuality, citizenship, and (dis)ability;

-Consider how race, class, gender, and other dimensions of social organization shape individual experiences and interactions with social institutions such as education, work, medicine, and law;

-Develop and use a 'sociological imagination' to analyze privilege and inequalities;

-Learn how to develop a sociological research question, review relevant literatures, design a project, and write a research proposal

Grading:

Participation and Attendance = 20% (100 points)

Five Reading Response Memos = 20% (100 points total/20 points per response)

Peer review = 10% (50 points)

Final Paper = 50% (250 points)

Exam Format:
n/a
Class Format:
Mix of lecture, large and small group discussion, independent writing, and multimedia activities
Workload:
Students can expect to read approximately 100 pages per week, which will be a mix of journal articles, book chapters, newspaper articles, and reports. No textbooks -- all reading materials are provided by the instructor.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83027/1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
1 March 2018

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (51032)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (45 of 46 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?agui0110+SOC3251W+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course is built around the exploration of ideas in the sociology of race, class, and gender. This course will focus on understanding multiple positions, and learning how to refute arguments based on evidence and reasoning. Focus will be given to topics in the sociology of race, class, and gender that carry important political implications.

Some of the possible topics include:
- What ‘race', ‘class', and ‘gender' are
- Understanding racism in the sciences
- Sex work, pornography, and radical feminism
- Marxism and the alienation of the working class
- Intersectional theory
- Mass incarceration and prison abolition

Learning Objectives:
Students will learn about sociological perspectives on race, class, and gender. Students will also learn how to write argumentative papers, and how to navigate conversations about a variety of sociological topics.
Grading:
60% Writing Assignments
25% Final paper
15% Class participation/ other evaluations
Exam Format:
Final paper
Class Format:
50% Lecture
40% Discussion
10% Other
Workload:
Students should expect to complete around 40 pages of readings a week. In addition to the readings, students will have a few writing assignments over the course of the semester, and will be expected to participate in class discussions.

30-45 Pages Reading Per Week
1 Final Paper
3 Writing Assignments
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51032/1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 October 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (17961)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3251W+Fall2017
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing. Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your own life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of others. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the social construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings. These include the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and corporate approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:

45% Papers (3 papers, 15% each)

15% Group Presentation

20% Final Exam

20% Class Participation

Exam Format:
1 exam, True/False and Short Answer
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam
3 Papers
1 Group Presentation
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17961/1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2015

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (82902)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hubert H Humphrey Center 184
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?maha0134+SOC3251W+Summer2017
Class Description:

This course introduces students to the social, historical, political and theoretical contexts that shape our conceptions of race, gender, and class. Though the title of this course is free of spelling errors, there exists the potential for intersectional inaccuracies. The separation of race, class, and gender by commas implies that these parts of identity are uncooperative. Race, gender, class, sexuality and other dimensions of identity are relational and function within a broader, dynamic matrix comprised intersecting identities. Additive models of social difference do little to recognize the simultaneity of inequality. To "bring race into the conversation," is not license to silence other instruments (gender, sexuality, class) playing within an orchestra of oppression. Intersectional analyses of race, gender, and class require scholars to acknowledge how various forms of social difference work in concert with one another to produce and reproduce social inequalities and a multiplicative model of marginalization. Multiple forms of marginalization involve teamwork. Through such co-operation and cooperation, oppressions build off one another in cumulative,"multiplicative," and in some cases, exponential fashion. Hence, a more accurate title for this course could be racegenderclasssexualityindigeneityabilitycitizenship3.

In this course we will study the inextricable links between race, gender and class, as well as other dimensions of social difference, while ensuring that the other instruments playing in orchestras of oppression are not silenced. Students will explore both the stability and variability of race, gender, and class as dimensions of social difference. In addition to analyzing the role of race, gender, class, and other dimensions of social difference as independent conditioning forces, students will also examine the level of cooperation required between these social constructs to produce and reproduce inequality. The content of this course urges students to form a relational (as opposed to autonomous) conception of gender, race, and class to better grasp their existence as social constructs.

This course meets the following Council on Liberal Education requirements: Diversity and Social Justice in the U.S. theme, theSocial Sciences core, and the Writing Intensive core. This course contributes to the acquisition of a liberal education, helping students gain a broad understanding of the subject, including factual knowledge, the theoretical foundations of that knowledge, and its associated key modes of inquiry.

Grading:
Writing assignments = 30%
Mid-term paper = 30%
Final exam = 30%
Attendance and participation = 10%
Exam Format:
Final paper
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
25-30 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82902/1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
24 April 2017

Spring 2017  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (51698)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2017 - 05/05/2017
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3251W+Spring2017
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing. Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your own life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of others. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the social construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings. These include the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and corporate approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:

45% Papers (3 papers, 15% each)

15% Group Presentation

20% Final Exam

20% Class Participation

Exam Format:
1 exam, True/False and Short Answer
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam
3 Papers
1 Group Presentation
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51698/1173
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2015

Fall 2016  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (33987)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-108
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?upton042+SOC3251W+Fall2016
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/33987/1169

Summer 2016  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (82938)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/13/2016 - 08/05/2016
Tue, Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 210
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?manni224+SOC3251W+Summer2016
Class Description:
Student may contact the instructor or department for information.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82938/1165

Spring 2016  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (56937)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2016 - 05/06/2016
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 317
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3251W+Spring2016
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing. Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your own life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of others. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the social construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings. These include the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and corporate approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:

45% Papers (3 papers, 15% each)

15% Group Presentation

20% Final Exam

20% Class Participation

Exam Format:
1 exam, True/False and Short Answer
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam
3 Papers
1 Group Presentation
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56937/1163
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2015

Summer 2015  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (82468)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/15/2015 - 08/07/2015
Tue, Thu 09:00AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-136
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?guly0003+SOC3251W+Summer2015
Class Description:
Description: Same-sex marriage at the Supreme Court, the #blacklivesmatter movement, Patricia Arquette's Oscar night pitch for wage equality for women?these are just a few of the current controversies that this course will help you better understand. A sociological perspective on race, class, and gender suggests that such categories are not objective measures of biological or ?natural" differences, but are instead the result of historical struggles over economics, politics, and cultural identities.Thinking about how race, class, and gender work and have changed over time is central to understanding society. These social constructions, whether simultaneously or separately, organize our everyday lives. In this course we will explore what race, class, and gender are, how they are maintained, and what effects they have. To do so, we will work together to develop your critical thinking, media literacy, and writing skills. Since this is a writing-intensive course, assignments are designed to gradually build your ability to articulate an original argument clearly and concisely by building on convincing evidence.
Exam Format:
50% Reports/Papers
20% Quizzes
15% Written Homework
15% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
30% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
Workload:
60-120 Pages Reading Per Week
15 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
3 Homework Assignment(s)
6 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82468/1155
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 April 2015

Spring 2015  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (57888)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Description:
Understanding the social significance of race, class, and gender is pivotal to understanding society itself. These social constructions organize our everyday lives and, their implications?both independently and in relation to each other?are far-reaching for everyone. And, as constructions, these dynamic social categories require constant maintenance. This course will explore the roles and functions of these categories, how we maintain them, and their larger implications. To achieve this objective, strong critical thinking and writing skills are required. Critical analysis goes beyond mere summary of someone else's idea; it requires an additional level of inquiry based upon a synthesis of multiple perspectives and a deeper reading of the central concepts. Regardless of your current and future interests, the capacity to critically analyze a complex phenomenon and powerfully articulate your idea in written form is indispensible. As a writing-intensive course, the assignments and exams for this course are intended to develop and strengthen your ability to clearly and concisely articulate an original argument with convincing supporting evidence.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
20% Special Projects
10% In-class Presentations
Workload:
2 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/57888/1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 April 2013

Fall 2014  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (15826)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing. Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your own life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of others. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the social construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings. These include the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and corporate approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/15826/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 August 2013

Summer 2014  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (83478)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/16/2014 - 08/08/2014
Mon, Wed 06:00PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 240
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
Class Description:
In this course, we examine the multiple and intersecting ways that race, class, gender, and sexuality shape identity, daily social interactions, individual life-chances, and ultimately, American society as a whole. By studying the socially constructed nature of these concepts, we examine the meanings and values that have been attached to them by social actors, as well as the ways in which these social constructions help to rationalize and justify social inequality and stratification. We will also explore the significance of race, class, gender, and sexuality in a variety of institutional and interpersonal contexts, including the labor force, the family, education, culture, migration, media, and the criminal justice system. We will conclude by discussing how a more nuanced understanding of these concepts can help build human agency and work towards social change. As a writing intensive course, you will be expected to improve your ability to articulate thoughts about course materials in your written assignments and in class discussions. This will include the development of analytical skills and the ability to apply sociological concepts to a wide range of social situations, including your personal life experiences. Students will be expected to actively engage with course materials through individual exploration and group discussions. NOTE: While the required text by Paula S. Rothenburg is currently in its 9th edition, 8th edition copies are readily and cheaply available online and will suffice for this course.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
30% Reports/Papers
30% Written Homework
20% Class Participation Other Grading Information: Class participation includes attendance. Attendance will be mandatory. There will be opportunities for extra credit for those who attend regularly and complete the readings.
Exam Format:
Short essay
Class Format:
30% Lecture
25% Film/Video
45% Discussion Chime-In will be used regularly during class time.
Workload:
60-80 Pages Reading Per Week
20-25 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
5 Homework Assignment(s)
Other Workload: The homework assignments will come in the form of 3-4 page reading response papers.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83478/1145
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 April 2014

Spring 2014  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (63361)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 150
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing. Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your own life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of others. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the social construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings. These include the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and corporate approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/63361/1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 August 2013

Fall 2013  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (21714)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
AAS 3251W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2013 - 12/11/2013
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
Class Description:
Understanding the social significance of race, class, and gender is pivotal to understanding society itself. These social constructions organize our everyday lives and, their implications?both independently and in relation to each other?are far-reaching for everyone. And, as constructions, these dynamic social categories require constant maintenance. This course will explore the roles and functions of these categories, how we maintain them, and their larger implications. To achieve this objective, strong critical thinking and writing skills are required. Critical analysis goes beyond mere summary of someone else's idea; it requires an additional level of inquiry based upon a synthesis of multiple perspectives and a deeper reading of the central concepts. Regardless of your current and future interests, the capacity to critically analyze a complex phenomenon and powerfully articulate your idea in written form is indispensible. As a writing-intensive course, the assignments and exams for this course are intended to develop and strengthen your ability to clearly and concisely articulate an original argument with convincing supporting evidence.
Grading:
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
20% Special Projects
10% In-class Presentations
Workload:
2 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
1 Special Project(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21714/1139
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 April 2013

Fall 2013  |  SOC 3251W Section 002: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (34239)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2013 - 12/11/2013
Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing. Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your own life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of others. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the social construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings. These include the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and corporate approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/34239/1139
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 August 2013

Summer 2013  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (83975)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/17/2013 - 08/09/2013
Tue, Thu 09:00AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 205
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
Class Description:
In this course we examine race, class and gender as sites of stratification, inequality and identity in U.S. society. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. This class is designed for majors and non-majors to come together and learn from each other. Together we will explore how race, class and gender shape, and are shaped by, social institutions (including work, education, family, and criminal justice). We will also examine sociological perspectives on policies addressing these inequalities, such as the voting rights act, the social safety net and pay disparities. Class time will consist of small and large group discussions, films, group activities, and lecture. In this writing intensive class we will discuss and practice how to write analytically about these complicated (and often contentious) topics. Students will write and then edit a literature review related the course content in addition to completing some informal writing. Each class will require 30-60 pages of reading, equivalent to a week of a semester-long course.
Class Format:
25% Lecture
10% Film/Video
40% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Guest Speakers
Workload:
60 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Paper(s)
4 Homework Assignment(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83975/1135
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 March 2013

Spring 2013  |  SOC 3251W Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (59310)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
Class Description:
In this course, we examine race, class and gender as bases of identity, stratification, and inequality. We explore the social construction of our core concepts in the contemporary U.S., asking how they shape each of our lives, life-chances, and daily interactions. We will divide our time between lecture, small and large group discussion, and viewing segments of documentary films. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to do a good deal of formal and informal writing. Active participation in discussion and engagement with the ideas is a must. In this class, you will connect the concepts drawn from the materials to your own life experiences and thoughts about the world, and learn from the experiences and thoughts of others. In the first weeks of the class, we examine the social construction of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in American society. We then move to look at the workings of these concepts in different interpersonal and institutional settings. These include the Labor Force, Schools, the Family, the Criminal Justice System, understanding Violence, and the politics of Language. In the last week of the class we discuss individual and corporate approaches to overcoming injustice.
Grading:
55% Reports/Papers
10% Quizzes
15% In-class Presentations
20% Class Participation
Exam Format:
TF and essay
Class Format:
30% Lecture
20% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
Other Workload: 1 group presentation, 5 "reading reaction" papers
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/59310/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
4 November 2011

Spring 2013  |  SOC 3251W Section 002: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (68773)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Mon, Wed 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 240
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
Class Description:
This course will explore the ways in which race, class gender, and sexuality (rcg&s) organize and impact social life for individuals and society as a whole. We will begin with a brief introduction to the general conceptual challenges that rcg&s pose for typical, commonsense understandings of American society. We will then examine rcg&s on their own terms and as they intersect with one another, attending to the ways they are constructed, experienced, and connected with social stratification and inequalities in power and status, privilege as well as oppression. We will also focus on the ways in which rcgserve as important sites for the construction of meaning and identity. We will delve into how rcg&s shape and are shaped by social institutions, including work, education, popular culture, family, and criminal justice, focusing on the U.S. but also in relationship to other societies and across borders. As we learn, we will at the same time look for ways that we can intervene in the social world and mobilize to challenge the status quo. This class fulfills the writing intensive course requirement, the CLE's Social Science core, and the Diversity and Social Justice in the United States theme. The classroom will consist of a mix of small and large group discussions, activities, video responses, and lectures. The emphasis will be on applying course concepts and theories through 3 short papers and one research paper. To this end, students will come prepared to class with notes on readings-- which will range between 30 and 60 pages per week. No exams.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/68773/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
7 January 2013

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