17 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2022  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: Race and Racism in the US (55013)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 58 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible - some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3211W+Spring2022
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. Our goal is to examine the myriad ways that race structures American society and influences the experiences and life chances of all its members. In the opening sections of the class, we study definitions of race and major theories of how race and racism work in the contemporary U.S. The next unit begins with an overview of the concept of racial identity, and asks how social location impacts one's identity and daily interactions. After inquiring into the general process of identity formation, we look at the specific experiences of whites, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and multiracial Americans. Though our central focus is on race relations in today's society, we also provide a historical overview of the experiences of each group in order to help explain their present-day social status. The next part of the course examines the significance of race in several specific contexts. We look at controversies over race and immigration, race and education, and race and popular culture. We close the class by considering the future of race relations in the U.S., and evaluating remedies to racial inequality.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Formal Paper(s), ~ 7-9 pages each, and rewrite/ revision
3 Informal Papers (reading or film reflections) 1-2 pages each
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55013/1223
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 November 2019

Fall 2021  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: Race and Racism in the US (20875)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-109
Enrollment Status:
Open (38 of 39 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible - some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sara0028+SOC3211W+Fall2021
Class Description:
This course is designed to help students begin developing informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to how sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations, and racism. We will cover the core theories that sociologists use to understand race in U.S. society and provide a historical overview of various racial and ethnic groups' experiences to explain racialized groups' present-day social status. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the dominant social narratives of race in the United States. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society, albeit in different ways.
Learning Objectives:

By the end of the semester, students will be able to:

  • Utilize sociological theories and concepts to understand, discuss, apply, and create knowledge about race and racism in society in all of the course activities. These concepts are tools for thinking about society.

  • Locate claims and evidence in media sources on race and develop the skills to assess public narratives about race topics.

  • Practice and improve evidence-based communication, drawing on theory, course topics, and secondary sources to discuss race topics.

  • Create a final paper focused on developing personal interests in a specific race topic.

Exam Format:
Midterm and final exams are in the form of papers.
Class Format:
Active participation and discussion are encouraged in this class environment. Students should expect in-class activities.
Workload:
Students interested in this course can expect to read 10-30 pages of academic work per week; since this is a writing intensive course, we will be writing and revising paper work over the course of the semester.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/20875/1219
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 April 2021

Spring 2021  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: Race and Racism in the US (51030)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 01/22/2021
Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
 
01/25/2021 - 05/03/2021
Mon 09:45AM - 11:00AM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Closed (44 of 44 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible - some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
Class Notes:
On Wed. Jan. 20, the lecture will meet online synchronously at the scheduled time. After the first week, the lecture will meet on Mondays online synchronously at the scheduled time. The remaining lecture material will be available on line in an asynchronous format. Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3211W+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. Our goal is to examine the myriad ways that race structures American society and influences the experiences and life chances of all its members. In the opening sections of the class, we study definitions of race and major theories of how race and racism work in the contemporary U.S. The next unit begins with an overview of the concept of racial identity, and asks how social location impacts one's identity and daily interactions. After inquiring into the general process of identity formation, we look at the specific experiences of whites, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and multiracial Americans. Though our central focus is on race relations in today's society, we also provide a historical overview of the experiences of each group in order to help explain their present-day social status. The next part of the course examines the significance of race in several specific contexts. We look at controversies over race and immigration, race and education, and race and popular culture. We close the class by considering the future of race relations in the U.S., and evaluating remedies to racial inequality.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Formal Paper(s), ~ 7-9 pages each, and rewrite/ revision
3 Informal Papers (reading or film reflections) 1-2 pages each
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/51030/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 November 2019

Fall 2020  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: Race and Racism in the US (15548)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Closed (33 of 33 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible - some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?agui0110+SOC3211W+Fall2020
Class Description:
"Race" has been an important of American history, but we try to talk about a "post-racial" society in the 21st century. This class will cover the origins of race (and racism), before diving into race in American history and the consequences this history has for contemporary race relations. We will discuss what exactly "race" is and isn't, why race and racism are central to American politics and culture, and how "race"
in the post-Civil Rights Era and the 21st century has both declined and grown in significance.
Class Format:
Active participation and discussion are encouraged in this class environment. Students should expect in-class activities.
Workload:
Students interested in this course can expect to read 10-30 pages of academic work per week; in addition, we will be writing and revising paper work over the course of the semester.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/15548/1209
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 March 2017

Spring 2020  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: Race and Racism in the US (54728)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Enrollment Status:
Open (38 of 40 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible - some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3211W+Spring2020
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. Our goal is to examine the myriad ways that race structures American society and influences the experiences and life chances of all its members. In the opening sections of the class, we study definitions of race and major theories of how race and racism work in the contemporary U.S. The next unit begins with an overview of the concept of racial identity, and asks how social location impacts one's identity and daily interactions. After inquiring into the general process of identity formation, we look at the specific experiences of whites, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and multiracial Americans. Though our central focus is on race relations in today's society, we also provide a historical overview of the experiences of each group in order to help explain their present-day social status. The next part of the course examines the significance of race in several specific contexts. We look at controversies over race and immigration, race and education, and race and popular culture. We close the class by considering the future of race relations in the U.S., and evaluating remedies to racial inequality.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Formal Paper(s), ~ 7-9 pages each, and rewrite/ revision
3 Informal Papers (reading or film reflections) 1-2 pages each
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/54728/1203
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
6 November 2019

Fall 2019  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: Race and Racism in the US (18981)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2019 - 12/11/2019
Thu 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (39 of 42 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible - some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?sara0028+SOC3211W+Fall2019
Class Description:
"Race" has been an important of American history, but we try to talk about a "post-racial" society in the 21st century. This class will cover the origins of race (and racism), before diving into race in American history and the consequences this history has for contemporary race relations. We will discuss what exactly "race" is and isn't, why race and racism are central to American politics and culture, and how "race"
in the post-Civil Rights Era and the 21st century has both declined and grown in significance.
Class Format:
Active participation and discussion are encouraged in this class environment. Students should expect in-class activities.
Workload:
Students interested in this course can expect to read 10-30 pages of academic work per week; in addition, we will be writing and revising paper work over the course of the semester.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18981/1199
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 March 2017

Spring 2019  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (55193)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2019 - 05/06/2019
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Open (48 of 49 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jmbell+SOC3211W+Spring2019
Class Description:
This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will begin by talking generally about the basic structure of racial formations in the contemporary U.S., the mechanisms by which they are reproduced, and possibilities for resistance and change. In the second part of the course, we will turn to the issue of popular representations of people of color in the US. We will look specifically at how African American, Asian American Latino and Native American women and men are portrayed in popular culture. We will look at how these images are related to racial inequality and how they shape the way that we think about particular groups in American society. In the Third part of the course, we will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. These units will focus especially on the experiences of Asian and Mexican immigrants. The objective in these units is both to learn more about these groups and also to consider what their experiences reveal with respect to the challenges racial and ethnic formations present for conventional, individualistic understandings of citizenship, group membership and social justice. The course will then conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
Grading:
Writing intensive course, 2 exams, 3 papers, in class writing.
Exam Format:
Multiple Choice and short answer
Class Format:
40% lecture, 30% film, 30% discussion
Workload:
50-75 pages of reading per week on average. Less at the beginning, more at the end. 3 papers, one of which will be revised over the course of the semester, in-class writing assignments.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55193/1193
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 March 2017

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (19328)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Closed (52 of 52 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?maha0134+SOC3211W+Fall2018
Class Description:

To fully endorse a course called "American Race Relations," we must first interrogate the extent to which racialized groups relate. Through such examination, we will question how race is used as a classificatory system of difference and differential relations of human value and valueness. We will explore how these differences are magnified through processes of racialization and how race is used as a tool for domination through systemic racism producing stark inequalities between groups. It's often said that race may be a social construct, but it is real in its implications. We will discuss the limitations of conceptualizing race as a "social construct" when it has denied many racialized groups access to the social and thus, the possibility humanness. As a class, we will attend to the role of relationality between groups. What factor does race play in esteeming some groups at the expense and further marginalization of others? Without conceptualizing race in relation to other classificatory systems of difference such as a gender, class, indigeneity, sexuality, ability, and citizenship, the study of race relations is incomplete. Hence, we will continuously explore the ways both oppression and privilege multiply based on the entanglement of difference.

Class Format:
Active participation and discussion are encouraged in this class environment. Students should expect in-class activities.
Workload:
Students interested in this course can expect to read 10-30 pages of academic work per week; in addition, we will be writing and revising paper work over the course of the semester.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/19328/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 July 2018

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (52225)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Enrollment Status:
Closed (47 of 47 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3211W+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. Our goal is to examine the myriad ways that race structures American society and influences the experiences and life chances of all its members. In the opening sections of the class, we study definitions of race and major theories of how race and racism work in the contemporary U.S. The next unit begins with an overview of the concept of racial identity, and asks how social location impacts one's identity and daily interactions. After inquiring into the general process of identity formation, we look at the specific experiences of whites, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and multiracial Americans. Though our central focus is on race relations in today's society, we also provide a historical overview of the experiences of each group in order to help explain their present-day social status. The next part of the course examines the significance of race in several specific contexts. We look at controversies over race and immigration, race and education, and race and popular culture. We close the class by considering the future of race relations in the U.S., and evaluating remedies to racial inequality.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/52225/1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 March 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (16336)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 235
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?rajas011+SOC3211W+Fall2017
Class Description:
"Race" has been an important of American history, but we try to talk about a "post-racial" society in the 21st century. This class will cover the origins of race (and racism), before diving into race in American history and the consequences this history has for contemporary race relations. We will discuss what exactly "race" is and isn't, why race and racism are central to American politics and culture, and how "race" in the post-Civil Rights Era and the 21st century has both declined and grown in significance.
Class Format:
Active participation and discussion are encouraged in this class environment. Students should expect in-class activities.
Workload:
Students interested in this course can expect to read 10-30 pages of academic work per week; in addition, we will be writing and revising paper work over the course of the semester.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/16336/1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 May 2017

Spring 2017  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (67166)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2017 - 05/05/2017
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
Class Notes:
Click on this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?jmbell+SOC3211W+Spring2017
Class Description:
This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial "problems" by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will begin by talking generally about the basic structure of racial formations in the contemporary U.S., the mechanisms by which they are reproduced, and possibilities for resistance and change. In the second part of the course, we will turn to the issue of popular representations of people of color in the US. We will look specifically at how African American, Asian American Latino and Native American women and men are portrayed in popular culture. We will look at how these images are related to racial inequality and how they shape the way that we think about particular groups in American society. In the Third part of the course, we will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. These units will focus especially on the experiences of Asian and Mexican immigrants. The objective in these units is both to learn more about these groups and also to consider what their experiences reveal with respect to the challenges racial and ethnic formations present for conventional, individualistic understandings of citizenship, group membership and social justice. The course will then conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
Grading:
Writing intensive course, 2 exams, 3 papers, in class writing.
Exam Format:
Multiple Choice and short answer
Class Format:
40% lecture, 30% film, 30% discussion
Workload:
50-75 pages of reading per week on average. Less at the beginning, more at the end. 3 papers, one of which will be revised over the course of the semester, in-class writing assignments.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/67166/1173
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 November 2016

Fall 2016  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (16749)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
AAS 3211W Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3211W+Fall2016
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. Our goal is to examine the myriad ways that race structures American society and influences the experiences and life chances of all its members. In the opening sections of the class, we study definitions of race and major theories of how race and racism work in the contemporary U.S. The next unit begins with an overview of the concept of racial identity, and asks how social location impacts one's identity and daily interactions. After inquiring into the general process of identity formation, we look at the specific experiences of whites, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and multiracial Americans. Though our central focus is on race relations in today's society, we also provide a historical overview of the experiences of each group in order to help explain their present-day social status. The next part of the course examines the significance of race in several specific contexts. We look at controversies over race and immigration, race and education, and race and popular culture. We close the class by considering the future of race relations in the U.S., and evaluating remedies to racial inequality.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/16749/1169
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 August 2013

Fall 2015  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (21461)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2015 - 12/16/2015
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?elogan+SOC3211W+Fall2015
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. Our goal is to examine the myriad ways that race structures American society and influences the experiences and life chances of all its members. In the opening sections of the class, we study definitions of race and major theories of how race and racism work in the contemporary U.S. The next unit begins with an overview of the concept of racial identity, and asks how social location impacts one's identity and daily interactions. After inquiring into the general process of identity formation, we look at the specific experiences of whites, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and multiracial Americans. Though our central focus is on race relations in today's society, we also provide a historical overview of the experiences of each group in order to help explain their present-day social status. The next part of the course examines the significance of race in several specific contexts. We look at controversies over race and immigration, race and education, and race and popular culture. We close the class by considering the future of race relations in the U.S., and evaluating remedies to racial inequality.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21461/1159
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 August 2013

Fall 2014  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (22766)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Mon 06:00PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Conceptual/theoretical tools sociologists use to study race relations in the United States. Historical experiences among racial/ethnic groups. American Indians, African-Americans, Latinos, Asian-Americans, and white ethnics.
Class Description:
This course introduces students to the theoretical and historical foundations of race relations in the United States. In particular, we focus on the formation of racial and ethnic identities, on how these are produced through political struggle at the local, national, global scales, and how they are maintained and transformed over time. We pay close attention to the ways in which race and ethnicity intersect with gender, sexuality, class, citizenship, and nation in order to better understand how systems of power, privilege, and inequality are constructed, reinforced, and challenged. The role and impact of social movements in shaping these social categories will be at the center of the course focus. Students are expected to apply social scientific concepts and theories to the subject matter, drawing on frameworks from Sociology, History, American Studies, Ethnic Studies, and Law.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam
10% Quizzes
20% Written Homework
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Both the midterm and final exams will be take home tests requiring the use of course readings, lectures, discussions, and films to answer questions.
Class Format:
65% Lecture
10% Film/Video
15% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
5% Guest Speakers service learning component is optional
Workload:
60-80 Pages Reading Per Week
15 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
3 Homework Assignment(s)
3 Quiz(zes)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/22766/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 April 2009

Spring 2014  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (61223)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Conceptual/theoretical tools sociologists use to study race relations in the United States. Historical experiences among racial/ethnic groups. American Indians, African-Americans, Latinos, Asian-Americans, and white ethnics.
Class Description:
What is race? How have our understandings of race and racism changed over time? Why do deep racial inequalities persist in the post-civil rights era? In this class we will use sociological perspectives and theories to address these and other questions regarding the nature of race, racism, and racial relations in the U.S. We will explore the ways in which race continues to be a salient factor in social, economic, and political organization, paying particular attention to contemporary forms of racism in the ?age of colorblindness.? We will also examine how race informs aspects of personal identity and perspective. In doing so, this course is designed to challenge popular notions about the meaning and importance of race, and to encourage a deeper, more reflective understanding of how race and racism continue to structure American society, and the life experiences of its members. This is an intellectual and often emotional journey that requires critical thought, an open mind, a willingness for self-reflection, and is well worth the trouble!
Grading:
40% Reports/Papers
10% Quizzes
40% Reflection Papers
10% Class Participation Other Grading Information: There will be four reflection papers, worth 10% each. The final research paper will be assigned and graded in three parts: a proposal (5%), a rough draft (15%), and a final draft (20%) due the last day of class.
Class Format:
40% Lecture
20% Film/Video
25% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
Workload:
60-90 Pages Reading Per Week
25 Pages Writing Per Term
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/61223/1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 January 2014

Fall 2013  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (29246)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2013 - 12/11/2013
Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 130
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Conceptual/theoretical tools sociologists use to study race relations in the United States. Historical experiences among racial/ethnic groups. American Indians, African-Americans, Latinos, Asian-Americans, and white ethnics.
Class Description:
This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. Our goal is to examine the myriad ways that race structures American society and influences the experiences and life chances of all its members. In the opening sections of the class, we study definitions of race and major theories of how race and racism work in the contemporary U.S. The next unit begins with an overview of the concept of racial identity, and asks how social location impacts one's identity and daily interactions. After inquiring into the general process of identity formation, we look at the specific experiences of whites, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and multiracial Americans. Though our central focus is on race relations in today's society, we also provide a historical overview of the experiences of each group in order to help explain their present-day social status. The next part of the course examines the significance of race in several specific contexts. We look at controversies over race and immigration, race and education, and race and popular culture. We close the class by considering the future of race relations in the U.S., and evaluating remedies to racial inequality.
Grading:
20% Final Exam
60% Reports/Papers
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
10% Film/Video
50% Discussion
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
30 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/29246/1139
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 August 2013

Spring 2013  |  SOC 3211W Section 001: American Race Relations (56764)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 120
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Conceptual/theoretical tools sociologists use to study race relations in the United States. Historical experiences among racial/ethnic groups. American Indians, African-Americans, Latinos, Asian-Americans, and white ethnics.
Class Description:
This class is designed to offer students a deeper understanding of the many ways that race structures American society and shapes our experiences and life chances. We will focus broadly on racial inequality, white privilege, intersectionality (how our experiences are shaped by race, gender, and class collectively), race in the media, racial identities, and the social construction of race and racial difference. We will look at the specific experiences of African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Whites and multiracial Americans. Though our central focus is on race relations in today`s society, we also cover the historical experiences of each group in order to help explain their present-day social status. We will conclude the class with discussions on the future of race relations in the rapidly changing United States. This class meets the Writing Intensive requirement and therefore includes a revision process leading up to the final paper, which allows you to improve your writing skills.
Grading:
50% Reports/Papers
30% Quizzes
20% Class Participation
Class Format:
40% Lecture
20% Film/Video
30% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
Workload:
60 Pages Reading Per Week
12-15 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
15 Homework Assignment(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/56764/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 January 2013

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