19 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2022  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (53538)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
Mon, Wed 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walkerml+SOC3102+Spring2022
Class Description:

This course concerns the social and legal origins of crime control. Students will critically examine criminal justice systems from three interrelated themes: status, criminalization, and social control. Specifically, students will respond to the following questions: What role does social status play in our criminal justice system? Who and what gets criminalized and how does this relate to status? How are social controls stratified across the U.S., and how do they relate to status?

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in understanding how criminal justice outcomes become patterned by race, class, and gender will find this course interesting.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the semester, students should be able to: (1) critically examine policing, court, and penal practices that lead to patterned outcomes by race, class, and gender; (2) locate current criminal justice trends and practices within a larger historical perspective
Grading:
The grading scale will be from 0 - 100 with each point earned or loss being one percentage point of your final grade. (Students will find it easy to calculate their standing in the class.)
Essays: five, 1-page, double-spaced essays (10pts each)
Model: in-class theoretical models of violence (5pts each)
Project: presentation of material--no more than 5 minutes (25pts); typewritten explanation of presentation (15pts)
Exam Format:
There will not be exams; however, see the "Grading" section for details about course assignments.
Class Format:
My approach in class involves tethering abstract theories and concepts to everyday human practices with the goal of showing how social theory works in real life. I use a lot of pictures, video, and audio to show culture in action and to interrogative existing theories and possibly integrate theory whenever possible. We want to better understand and explain our social world.
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53538/1223
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 October 2018

Fall 2021  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (19857)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 5
Enrollment Status:
Closed (83 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC3102+Fall2021
Class Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control. We will focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime. This course covers diverse types of crime, including: street crime, violent crime, white-collar crime, occupational crime, war crimes and torture. In addition, we will examine the punishment of crime, including policing, prosecution, sentencing and mass incarceration. There will be a particular focus on how crime and forms of social control impact social inequality and divisions around race, class, and gender.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
35% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exams
1 Paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/19857/1219
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2017

Spring 2021  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (49492)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Closed (110 of 110 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. 1 seat reserved for non PSEO, non admitted student. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC3102+Spring2021
Class Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control. We will focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime. This course covers diverse types of crime, including: street crime, violent crime, white-collar crime, occupational crime, war crimes and torture. In addition, we will examine the punishment of crime, including policing, prosecution, sentencing and mass incarceration. There will be a particular focus on how crime and forms of social control impact social inequality and divisions around race, class, and gender.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
35% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exams
1 Paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/49492/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2017

Fall 2020  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (14523)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
Online Course
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
Off Campus
Virtual Rooms ONLINEONLY
Enrollment Status:
Open (79 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in an asynchronous format. There are no scheduled meeting times. Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walkerml+SOC3102+Fall2020
Class Description:

This course concerns the social and legal origins of crime control. Students will critically examine criminal justice systems from three interrelated themes: status, criminalization, and social control. Specifically, students will respond to the following questions: What role does social status play in our criminal justice system? Who and what gets criminalized and how does this relate to status? How are social controls stratified across the U.S., and how do they relate to status?

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in understanding how criminal justice outcomes become patterned by race, class, and gender will find this course interesting.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the semester, students should be able to: (1) critically examine policing, court, and penal practices that lead to patterned outcomes by race, class, and gender; (2) locate current criminal justice trends and practices within a larger historical perspective
Grading:
The grading scale will be from 0 - 100 with each point earned or loss being one percentage point of your final grade. (Students will find it easy to calculate their standing in the class.)
Essays: five, 1-page, double-spaced essays (10pts each)
Model: in-class theoretical models of violence (5pts each)
Project: presentation of material--no more than 5 minutes (25pts); typewritten explanation of presentation (15pts)
Exam Format:
There will not be exams; however, see the "Grading" section for details about course assignments.
Class Format:
My approach in class involves tethering abstract theories and concepts to everyday human practices with the goal of showing how social theory works in real life. I use a lot of pictures, video, and audio to show culture in action and to interrogative existing theories and possibly integrate theory whenever possible. We want to better understand and explain our social world.
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/14523/1209
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 October 2018

Spring 2020  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (53012)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Open (77 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC3102+Spring2020
Class Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control. We will focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime. This course covers diverse types of crime, including: street crime, violent crime, white-collar crime, occupational crime, war crimes and torture. In addition, we will examine the punishment of crime, including policing, prosecution, sentencing and mass incarceration. There will be a particular focus on how crime and forms of social control impact social inequality and divisions around race, class, and gender.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
35% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exams
1 Paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53012/1203
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2017

Fall 2019  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (17883)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2019 - 12/11/2019
Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
West Bank Skyway AUDITORIUM
Enrollment Status:
Closed (80 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walkerml+SOC3102+Fall2019
Class Description:

This course concerns the social and legal origins of crime control. Students will critically examine criminal justice systems from three interrelated themes: status, criminalization, and social control. Specifically, students will respond to the following questions: What role does social status play in our criminal justice system? Who and what gets criminalized and how does this relate to status? How are social controls stratified across the U.S., and how do they relate to status?

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in understanding how criminal justice outcomes become patterned by race, class, and gender will find this course interesting.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the semester, students should be able to: (1) critically examine policing, court, and penal practices that lead to patterned outcomes by race, class, and gender; (2) locate current criminal justice trends and practices within a larger historical perspective
Grading:
The grading scale will be from 0 - 100 with each point earned or loss being one percentage point of your final grade. (Students will find it easy to calculate their standing in the class.)
Essays: five, 1-page, double-spaced essays (10pts each)
Model: in-class theoretical models of violence (5pts each)
Project: presentation of material--no more than 5 minutes (25pts); typewritten explanation of presentation (15pts)
Exam Format:
There will not be exams; however, see the "Grading" section for details about course assignments.
Class Format:
My approach in class involves tethering abstract theories and concepts to everyday human practices with the goal of showing how social theory works in real life. I use a lot of pictures, video, and audio to show culture in action and to interrogative existing theories and possibly integrate theory whenever possible. We want to better understand and explain our social world.
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17883/1199
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 October 2018

Spring 2019  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (53172)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2019 - 05/06/2019
Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Open (78 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walkerml+SOC3102+Spring2019
Class Description:

This course concerns the social and legal origins of crime control. Students will critically examine criminal justice systems from three interrelated themes: status, criminalization, and social control. Specifically, students will respond to the following questions: What role does social status play in our criminal justice system? Who and what gets criminalized and how does this relate to status? How are social controls stratified across the U.S., and how do they relate to status?

Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in understanding how criminal justice outcomes become patterned by race, class, and gender will find this course interesting.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of the semester, students should be able to: (1) critically examine policing, court, and penal practices that lead to patterned outcomes by race, class, and gender; (2) locate current criminal justice trends and practices within a larger historical perspective
Grading:
The grading scale will be from 0 - 100 with each point earned or loss being one percentage point of your final grade. (Students will find it easy to calculate their standing in the class.)
Essays: five, 1-page, double-spaced essays (10pts each)
Model: in-class theoretical models of violence (5pts each)
Project: presentation of material--no more than 5 minutes (25pts); typewritten explanation of presentation (15pts)
Exam Format:
There will not be exams; however, see the "Grading" section for details about course assignments.
Class Format:
My approach in class involves tethering abstract theories and concepts to everyday human practices with the goal of showing how social theory works in real life. I use a lot of pictures, video, and audio to show culture in action and to interrogative existing theories and possibly integrate theory whenever possible. We want to better understand and explain our social world.
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53172/1193
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 October 2018

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (18144)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Enrollment Status:
Open (78 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?pieho001+SOC3102+Fall2018
Class Description:
​This course addresses general issues in conceptualizing and controlling criminal behavior. Course content will be particularly concerned with the processes of classification and the construction of criminal behavior relative to other idealized forms of behavior. Some important questions include: How does criminal behavior and social control change across time and space? What is the relationship between status characteristics like race, gender, sexuality, and prestige etc. and the classification and controlling of some behaviors versus others?
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
(1) Review paper
(1) Term paper
(1) Group/Individual Project
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18144/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2017

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (49935)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 317
Enrollment Status:
Closed (80 of 80 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walk0938+SOC3102+Spring2018
Class Description:
​This course addresses general issues in conceptualizing and controlling criminal behavior. Course content will be particularly concerned with the processes of classification and the construction of criminal behavior relative to other idealized forms of behavior. Some important questions include: How does criminal behavior and social control change across time and space? What is the relationship between status characteristics like race, gender, sexuality, and prestige etc. and the classification and controlling of some behaviors versus others?
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in the processes by which certain persons and behaviors are criminalized and controlled will find this course useful.
Learning Objectives:
Principally, students will learn a set of skills with which they can analyze the social world--to make sense of social behavior without relying upon folk knowledge or what is thought to be "common sense." More specifically, students will learn the relationship between status characteristics like race, gender, age, beauty, residence etc., criminalization processes, and social control.
Grading:
The grading scale will be from 0 - 100 with each point earned or loss being on percentage point of your final grade. This way, students will always know precisely where they are in the course. There will be five assignments of varying weight, but the focus will be on the gaining and application of knowledge.
Exam Format:
There will be a few short quizzes, a group or individual project, a term paper, two shorter critical papers, and participation points.
Class Format:
My pedagogy melds abstract theoretical ideas with everyday human practices, so that students see how social theory applies to their daily lives. Thus, multimedia is key in this class, and we will watch ESPN's 30 for 30 on O.J. Simpson as a method for broaching the classes larger themes.
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/49935/1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 October 2017

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (15082)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-104
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?walk0938+SOC3102+Fall2017
Class Description:
​This course addresses general issues in conceptualizing and controlling criminal behavior. Course content will be particularly concerned with the processes of classification and the construction of criminal behavior relative to other idealized forms of behavior. Some important questions include: How does criminal behavior and social control change across time and space? What is the relationship between status characteristics like race, gender, sexuality, and prestige etc. and the classification and controlling of some behaviors versus others?
Workload:
​Approximately 60 pages of reading per week
(1) Review paper
(1) Term paper
(1) Group/Individual Project
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/15082/1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2017

Spring 2017  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (50399)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2017 - 05/05/2017
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 10
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?garna029+SOC3102+Spring2017
Class Description:

This course seeks to develop an understanding of patterns of crime and punishment in the United States on the basis of various sociological theories. It is a class in the sociology of crime and punishment, and as such, seeks to develop the students' "sociological imagination" and "critical thinking", itself an overused cliché that ought to be critically thought of.

The course is divided into two parts: The first, Crime,
and the second, Social Control. In the first, we will examine theories which explain crime in general and the exceptionally high crime rates in the U.S. more specifically, with an emphasis on race and space. The second part of the course begins with a short overview of the philosophical debates over punishment, which center on two fundamental questions: Why punish? And how? From the philosophy of punishment we move on to the sociology of punishment, which asks who is being punished, by whom, and for what reasons; such questions will be examined in the context of mass incarceration and the war on drugs, again, with an emphasis on race.


This course by no means attempts to cover all or even most theories about crime and punishment;
rather, it privileges depth over breadth, and focuses on a selection of theories and texts that are fundamental (most), thought-provoking (all) and exciting to read (we hope).

Grading:
2 take-home assignments - 25% each (total of 50%)
4 quizzes - 10% each (40%)
In-class assignments (10%)
Workload:
30-50 Pages Reading Per Week

4 Quizzes
2 Take-home assignments (2-3 pages)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50399/1173
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 January 2017

Fall 2016  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (15289)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Thu 06:00PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 230
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?barr0325+SOC3102+Fall2016
Class Description:
What is crime? What is the extent and nature of crime in the U.S.? How do sociological theories help us understand criminal offending? How do we attempt to control crime? Do these efforts work? In this course, students will evaluate crime, criminal behavior and responses to crime from a sociological perspective. Emphasis is placed on how sociological theories and research impact criminal justice policy.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
10% Quizzes
Exam Format:
multiple choice, short answer and essay
Class Format:
50% Lecture
30% Discussion
20% Other Style small groups
Workload:
30-50 Pages Reading Per Week
4-6 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
Other Workload: 5 quizzes
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/15289/1169
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 October 2015

Spring 2016  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (50502)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2016 - 05/06/2016
Mon 06:00PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 255
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Issues in science of crime as a social phenomenon. Creation/use of laws, patterns/causes of crime. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?rselmini+SOC3102+Spring2016
Class Description:
The course addresses general issues in definition, understanding and features of criminal behavior and social control. During the course students will discuss questions like: what is a "criminal behavior" and who has the power to give this definition? Which are the most important theories in understanding and explaining crime? How do criminal behavior and social control change across time and space? The first part of the course is mainly devoted to the analysis of theories and their development - from the "Delinquent Man" by Cesare Lombroso to current attempts to explain crime. The second part focuses on some types of criminal behaviors, especially gangs, street crime, violent crime and gender violence. The course ends with a section on recent tendencies in criminalization and on some specific forms of social control, from the more traditional (policing) to more recent forms of urban control (control through technology, community crime prevention and architectural control). The course uses a variety of reading materials (including case studies and newspaper articles) and involves small group discussion of film/video. In each section we will pay attention to comparisons across countries and to how criminal behavior - and its definition - changes in different contexts.
Grading:
80% Midterm Exam
10% Quizzes
5% Attendance
5% Class Participation Other Grading Information: There will be 4 interim exams, each counts 20% .
Exam Format:
Short answers and short essays
Class Format:
50% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
4 Exams
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50502/1163
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
15 October 2015

Fall 2015  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Criminal Behavior and Social Control (15131)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2015 - 12/16/2015
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 350
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Issues in science of crime as a social phenomenon. Creation/use of laws, patterns/causes of crime. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?ferrales+SOC3102+Fall2015
Class Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control. We will focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime. This course covers diverse types of crime, including: street crime, violent crime, white-collar crime, occupational crime, war crimes and torture. In addition, we will examine the punishment of crime, including policing, prosecution, sentencing and mass incarceration. There will be a particular focus on how crime and forms of social control impact social inequality and divisions around race, class, and gender.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
35% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exams
1 Paper
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/15131/1159
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
9 July 2015

Spring 2015  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Introduction to Criminal Behavior and Social Control (50606)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Mon 06:00PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 230
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Issues in science of crime as a social phenomenon. Creation/use of laws, patterns/causes of crime. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
Class Description:
The course addresses general issues in definition, understanding and features of criminal behavior and social control. During the course students will discuss questions like: what is a "criminal behavior" and who has the power to give this definition? Which are the most relevant theories in understanding and explaining crime? How do criminal behavior and social control change across time and space? The first part of the course is mainly devoted to the analysis of theories and their development - from the "Delinquent Man" by Cesare Lombroso to current attempts to explain crime. The second part focuses on some types of criminal behaviors, especially gangs, street crime, violent crime and gender violence. The course ends with a section on recent tendencies in criminalization and on some specific forms of social control, from the more traditional (policing) to more recent forms of urban control (control through technology, community crime prevention and architectural control). The course uses a variety of reading materials (including case studies and newspaper articles) and involves small group discussion of film/video. In each section we will pay attention to comparisons across countries and to how criminal behavior - and its definition - changes in different contexts.
Grading:
80% Midterm Exam
10% Quizzes
5% Attendance
5% Class Participation Other Grading Information: There will be 4 interim exams, each counts 20% .
Exam Format:
Short answers and short essays
Class Format:
50% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
20% Small Group Activities
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
4 Exam(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: 4 exams, all will consist of short answers and short essays
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50606/1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 November 2014

Fall 2014  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Introduction to Criminal Behavior and Social Control (15441)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Tue, Thu 08:15AM - 09:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-106
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Issues in science of crime as a social phenomenon. Creation/use of laws, patterns/causes of crime.
Class Description:
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control. We will focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime. This course covers diverse types of crime, including: street crime, violent crime, white-collar crime, occupational crime, war crimes and torture. In addition, we will examine the punishment of crime, including policing, prosecution, sentencing and mass incarceration. There will be a particular focus on how crime and forms of social control impact social inequality and divisions around race, class, and gender.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
35% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture
5% Film/Video
45% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/15441/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
2 November 2011

Spring 2014  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Introduction to Criminal Behavior and Social Control (55487)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 330
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Issues in science of crime as a social phenomenon. Creation/use of laws, patterns/causes of crime.
Class Description:
The course addresses general theories of criminal behaviour and social control. Students will learn and become familiar with the most relevant theories in understanding and explaining crime. . Criminological and socio-legal theories of crime are examined critically, and we attempt to understand better how the discourse about criminal behaviour and social control changes across space and time. The first part of the course is mainly devoted to the analysis of theories and their development, while the second part focuses more on some types of criminal behaviours, especially gangs, street crime, violent crime and gender violence. The course ends with a section on recent tendencies in social control (policing, community crime control, prison). The course uses a variety of reading materials (including empirical studies and newspaper articles) and involves small group discussion of film/video. Objectives of the course: The course helps students become familiar with the most influential theories about criminal behavior and social control and build a strong background in this field. The course aims to help students distinguish among different theories, understand the interconnections between theories of crime and practices of control and have a better understanding of the process of criminalization. At the end of the course students should have developed skills in applying this knowledge to case studies and to selected practices and policies of social control. One more goal is to broaden students' perspectives by examining views and theories from different parts of the world.
Grading:
50% Midterm Exam
40% Final Exam
5% Quizzes
5% Attendance Other Grading Information: 50% intermediate exams
Exam Format:
Short answers and essay questions
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
30-40 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
5 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: 2 intermediate exams, 1 final exam. All consist of short answer and essay questions
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55487/1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
31 October 2013

Fall 2013  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Introduction to Criminal Behavior and Social Control (21319)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2013 - 12/11/2013
Mon 06:20PM - 08:50PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-104
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Issues in science of crime as a social phenomenon. Creation/use of laws, patterns/causes of crime.
Class Description:
What is crime? What is the extent and nature of crime in the U.S.? How do sociological theories help us understand criminal offending? How do we attempt to control crime? Do these efforts work? In this course, students will evaluate crime, criminal behavior and responses to crime from a sociological perspective. Emphasis is placed on how sociological theories and research impact criminal justice policy.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam
30% Reports/Papers
10% Quizzes
Exam Format:
multiple choice, short answer and essay
Class Format:
50% Lecture
30% Discussion
20% Other Style small groups
Workload:
30-50 Pages Reading Per Week
4-6 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
3 Paper(s)
Other Workload: 5 quizzes
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21319/1139
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
21 May 2007

Spring 2013  |  SOC 3102 Section 001: Introduction to Criminal Behavior and Social Control (50623)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 330
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Issues in science of crime as a social phenomenon. Creation/use of laws, patterns/causes of crime.
Class Description:
The course will address general theories of criminal behaviour and social control. Students will learn and become familiar with the most relevant theories in understanding and explaining crime. The class will also use a historical perspective starting with the origins of attempts to explain criminal behaviour. Criminological and socio-legal theories of crime will be examined critically, and we will attempt to better understand how the discourse about criminal behaviour and social control changes across space and time. The first part of the course will be mainly devoted to the analysis of theories and their development, while the second part will focus more on some types of criminal behaviours, especially gangs, street crime, violent crime and organized crime. The course will end with a section on recent tendencies in social control (policing, community crime control, prison). The course uses a variety of reading materials (including empirical studies and newspaper articles) and will involve small group discussion of film/video.
Grading:
40% Final Exam
5% Attendance
5% Class Participation Other Grading Information: 50% intermediate exams
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
Workload:
20-25 Pages Reading Per Week Other Workload: 2 intermediate exams, 1 final exam
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50623/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 November 2012

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