29 classes matched your search criteria.

Spring 2022  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (53537)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/18/2022 - 05/02/2022
Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Enrollment Status:
Open (0 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information:
Class Description:
This course provides an overview of the American criminal justice system. We will analyze the functions and missions of the police, courts, and corrections agencies. We will think critically about the structure of the criminal justice system and the formal and informal rules guiding criminal justice decision-making. The textbook and lectures are designed to help you understand the organization of the criminal justice system. Films and discussions illustrate current issues and debates in criminal justice. Finally, guest speakers will share their experiences and inform us of the practical challenges they face in their daily work. No prior knowledge of the criminal justice system is required.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
25% Final Exam
13% Reports/Papers
12% Quizzes
25% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: 2nd midsemester exam
Exam Format:
multiple choice, short answer, essay
Class Format:
60% Lecture
30% Discussion
10% Other Style Guest speakers
Workload:
15-20 Pages Reading Per Week
4 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Other Workload: 2 quizzes
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53537/1223
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 February 2016

Fall 2021  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (19856)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/07/2021 - 12/15/2021
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 270
Enrollment Status:
Open (98 of 100 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101+Fall2021
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how certain behaviors are defined as crime, how police and the courts function, and the experience of imprisonment and barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. We will also investigate how police, jails, prisons, and other criminal justice agencies responded to the COVID-19 pandemic. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic,racial, class,and gender inequality. Assignments will include books, reports, articles, podcasts, and documentaries.

The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework.

Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion and will be assigned additional reading and writing assignments.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in the criminal justice system.
Learning Objectives:
To become familiar with the criminal justice system in the United States.
Grading:
50% Quizzes + Participation
25% Midterm Essay
25% Final Essay or Project
Exam Format:
Multiple choice, short answers, and essays
Class Format:
TBD -- In person if college approves large in person classes
Workload:
50-100 Pages reading per week (+ videos, podcasts, etc.)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/19856/1219
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
11 March 2021

Spring 2021  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (49491)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2021 - 05/03/2021
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Open (102 of 103 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online in a synchronous format. The course will meet online at the scheduled times. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC3101+Spring2021
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to help students develop an introductory understanding of the criminal punishment system in the United States. We study law enforcement, courts, prisons, jails, parole, and capital punishment. Additionally, we analyze the relationships between criminal punishment and social processes, including: ethnic, racial and class inequality; political and economic change; and popular representations of crime and criminals. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam,
30% Final Exam,
30% Quizzes,
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (3 quizzes, 1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture,
5% Film/Video,
40% Discussion,
5% Small Group Activities,
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: There will be three opportunities for extra credit, all of which include writing.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/49491/1213
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 November 2016

Fall 2020  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (14522)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
Completely Online
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Online Course
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2020 - 12/16/2020
Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
Off Campus
UMN REMOTE
Enrollment Status:
Closed (68 of 68 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
This course is completely online and semi-synchronous. We will meet as a class online during the first half of the scheduled time. The second half of the class time will be spent on asynchronous online course work. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101+Fall2020
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how certain behaviors are defined as crime, how police and the courts function, and the experience of imprisonment and barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. We will also investigate how police, jails, prisons, and other criminal justice agencies are responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic,racial, class, and gender inequality. Assignments will include books, reports, articles, podcasts, and documentaries.

The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework.

Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion and will be assigned additional reading and writing assignments.
Who Should Take This Class?:
Students interested in the criminal justice system.
Learning Objectives:
To become familiar with the criminal justice system in the United States.
Grading:
50% Quizzes + Participation
25% Midterm Essay
25% Final Essay or Project
Exam Format:
Multiple choice, short answers, and essays
Class Format:
50% Quizzes + Participation
25% Midterm Essay
25% Final Essay or Project
Workload:
50-100 Pages Reading Per Week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/14522/1209
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
16 July 2020

Spring 2020  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (53011)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020
Tue, Thu 02:30PM - 03:45PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 230
Enrollment Status:
Open (100 of 105 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
2 seats reserved for PSEO students through 12/12/2019. Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC3101+Spring2020
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to help students develop an introductory understanding of the criminal punishment system in the United States. We study law enforcement, courts, prisons, jails, parole, and capital punishment. Additionally, we analyze the relationships between criminal punishment and social processes, including: ethnic, racial and class inequality; political and economic change; and popular representations of crime and criminals. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam,
30% Final Exam,
30% Quizzes,
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (3 quizzes, 1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture,
5% Film/Video,
40% Discussion,
5% Small Group Activities,
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: There will be three opportunities for extra credit, all of which include writing.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53011/1203
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 November 2016

Fall 2019  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (17882)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2019 - 12/11/2019
Tue, Thu 11:15AM - 12:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
West Bank Skyway AUDITORIUM
Enrollment Status:
Open (127 of 135 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
For details about the course, go to: classinfo.umn.edu/ And search for the course number.
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how crime is socially constructed, how the courts function for criminal sentencing, what it is like to be in prison or on community supervision, why the U.S. has such a high imprisonment rate, and the barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
25% Final Exam Other Grading Information: 75% three exams (25% each)
Exam Format:
Three multiple choice and short answer exams, and one final take-home short essay exam
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
4 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/17882/1199
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 February 2016

Spring 2019  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (53171)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2019 - 05/06/2019
Tue, Thu 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 250
Enrollment Status:
Open (102 of 103 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC3101+Spring2019
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to help students develop an introductory understanding of the criminal punishment system in the United States. We study law enforcement, courts, prisons, jails, parole, and capital punishment. Additionally, we analyze the relationships between criminal punishment and social processes, including: ethnic, racial and class inequality; political and economic change; and popular representations of crime and criminals. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam,
30% Final Exam,
30% Quizzes,
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (3 quizzes, 1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture,
5% Film/Video,
40% Discussion,
5% Small Group Activities,
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: There will be three opportunities for extra credit, all of which include writing.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/53171/1193
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 November 2016

Fall 2018  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (18143)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 350
Enrollment Status:
Open (100 of 101 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC3101+Fall2018
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to help students develop an introductory understanding of the criminal punishment system in the United States. We study law enforcement, courts, prisons, jails, parole, and capital punishment. Additionally, we analyze the relationships between criminal punishment and social processes, including: ethnic, racial and class inequality; political and economic change; and popular representations of crime and criminals. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam,
30% Final Exam,
30% Quizzes,
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (3 quizzes, 1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture,
5% Film/Video,
40% Discussion,
5% Small Group Activities,
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: There will be three opportunities for extra credit, all of which include writing.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18143/1189
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 November 2016

Summer 2018  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (82965)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/11/2018 - 08/03/2018
Mon, Wed 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-136
Enrollment Status:
Open (13 of 30 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?wulff039+SOC3101+Summer2018
Class Description:

This course will introduce you to a sociological perspective on crime and punishment in the United States. Three central aspects of the criminal justice process will be discussed. First, this course will start with an account of policing and the courts. Second, we will discuss punishment with a focus on incarceration. Third, we will discuss the causes and consequences of the carceral state.

This course meets the Council on Liberal Education's (CLE) Civic Life and Ethics Theme. That said, this course offers an opportunity to become critically engaged about the world around you and to become more informed in your public life whether when serving on a jury, getting involved in politics, or pursuing a criminal justice career. As a Civic Life and Ethics Theme requirement, this course equips you with analytical skills to evaluate core questions about the criminal justice system such as: What is a crime? Who is a criminal? Is the U.S. system of punishment fair? How does society seek to address racial and ethnic inequalities in the criminal justice system? These questions are not just objective but also ethical and normative and should elicit strong feelings and debate. As we spend this semester examining and discussing these controversies, this course will enable you to learn how to consider broader research evidence from various disciplinary perspectives, including anthropology, sociology, psychology, and law, when analyzing criminal justice patterns and policies.

Learning Objectives:
When thinking through these aspects of the criminal justice process, exercising the sociological imagination will be useful for advancing a macro-level understanding of what are typically viewed as micro-level issues that individuals involved in the criminal justice system experience. Throughout the different stages of the criminal justice process race, gender, and socio-economic status play an integral part. The gendered, racialized, and classed nature of crime and punishment will be a central focus of this course. In addition, sociological theories, particularly Durkheim and neo-Marxist perspectives, will be applied to the different units in the class, which will deepen your sociological understanding.

In this course, you will be exposed to the major sociological literature on the criminal justice system through readings and lectures. Further, you will also learn material through class discussion, in-class quizzes, an outside field assignment, and written exams. Through these various approaches to learning, this course will train you how to think sociologically,

to interpret and reformulate research findings, and use the research literature to arrive at your own conclusions and construct your own sociological arguments.
Grading:

10% Attendance & Participation
20% Engagement
10% Outside Field Assignment
30% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam

Exam Format:
The two exams (i.e., mid-term and final) will consist of multiple choice and essay questions.
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
30-50 pages of reading per week
Daily quizzes on the readings
One 3-5 page outside field assignment
2 Exams
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82965/1185
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 February 2018

Spring 2018  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (49934)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/16/2018 - 05/04/2018
Wed 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Hanson Hall 1-106
Enrollment Status:
Open (101 of 110 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101+Spring2018
Class Description:
This course provides an overview of the American criminal justice system. We will analyze the functions and missions of the police, courts, and corrections agencies. We will think critically about the structure of the criminal justice system and the formal and informal rules guiding criminal justice decision-making. The textbook and lectures are designed to help you understand the organization of the criminal justice system. Films and discussions illustrate current issues and debates in criminal justice. Finally, guest speakers will share their experiences and inform us of the practical challenges they face in their daily work. No prior knowledge of the criminal justice system is required.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
25% Final Exam
13% Reports/Papers
12% Quizzes
25% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: 2nd midsemester exam
Exam Format:
multiple choice, short answer, essay
Class Format:
60% Lecture
30% Discussion
10% Other Style Guest speakers
Workload:
15-20 Pages Reading Per Week
4 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Exam(s)
2 Paper(s)
Other Workload: 2 quizzes
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/49934/1183
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 February 2016

Fall 2017  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (15081)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/05/2017 - 12/13/2017
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
West Bank Skyway AUDITORIUM
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101+Fall2017
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how crime is socially constructed, how the courts function for criminal sentencing, what it is like to be in prison or on community supervision, why the U.S. has such a high imprisonment rate, and the barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% In-Class Quizzes
30% In-Class Midterm Exam
30% Take-Home Final Essay
10% Participation
Exam Format:
Short answers and essays
Class Format:
60% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-120 Pages Reading Per Week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/15081/1179
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 August 2016

Summer 2017  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (82838)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/12/2017 - 08/04/2017
Mon, Wed 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 2-224
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?mave0013+SOC3101+Summer2017
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to engage students in a sociological analysis of the ?American Criminal Justice system.? We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision (i.e., probation and parole). Throughout the course, we will investigate the relationships between criminal punishment and ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. Specific topics include the social construction of crime and criminals, whether criminal justice policies, practices, and institutions are ?just,? and unique characteristics of American criminal justice. No prior knowledge of the criminal justice system is required. The course meets two university requirements: the Council on Liberal Education's (CLE) Social Science Core and the Civic Life and Ethics Theme. As such, this course will address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the critical framework of Liberal Education and provide tools to evaluate moral questions relating to punishment.
Grading:
25% Final Exam Other Grading Information: 75% three exams (25% each)
Exam Format:
Three multiple choice and short answer exams, and one final take-home short essay exam
Class Format:
30% Lecture
10% Film/Video
30% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Student Presentations
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
~100 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82838/1175
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
17 February 2016

Spring 2017  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (50398)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/17/2017 - 05/05/2017
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management L-110
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC3101+Spring2017
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to help students develop an introductory understanding of the criminal punishment system in the United States. We study law enforcement, courts, prisons, jails, parole, and capital punishment. Additionally, we analyze the relationships between criminal punishment and social processes, including: ethnic, racial and class inequality; political and economic change; and popular representations of crime and criminals. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam,
30% Final Exam,
30% Quizzes,
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (3 quizzes, 1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture,
5% Film/Video,
40% Discussion,
5% Small Group Activities,
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: There will be three opportunities for extra credit, all of which include writing.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50398/1173
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
12 November 2016

Fall 2016  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (15288)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/06/2016 - 12/14/2016
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 370
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information: http://classinfo.umn.edu/?phelps+SOC3101+Fall2016
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how crime is socially constructed, how the courts function for criminal sentencing, what it is like to be in prison or on community supervision, why the U.S. has such a high imprisonment rate, and the barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% In-Class Quizzes
30% In-Class Midterm Exam
30% Take-Home Final Essay
10% Participation
Exam Format:
Short answers and essays
Class Format:
60% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-120 Pages Reading Per Week
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/15288/1169
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 August 2016

Summer 2016  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (82850)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/13/2016 - 08/05/2016
Tue, Thu 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 260
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?horow035+SOC3101+Summer2016
Class Description:
This course will introduce students and focus on the three main stages of the American Criminal Justice system from a critical perspective: policing and arrest, punishment, and causes and consequences of the carceral state. The course is designed to familiarize students with these broad topical areas and to explore the decision-making process and the equality of treatment that takes place within the American Criminal Justice system. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics and of the Social Sciences.Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice, through critical framework of Liberal Education.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam, 30% Final Exam, 20% quizzes and participation.
Exam Format:
Both essay and multiple choice questions on midterm and final, equally weighted.
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
2-3 readings per class
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82850/1165
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 April 2016

Spring 2016  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (50501)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/19/2016 - 05/06/2016
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 230
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?page+SOC3101+Spring2016
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to help students develop an introductory understanding of the criminal punishment system in the United States. We study law enforcement, courts, prisons, jails, parole, and capital punishment. Additionally, we analyze the relationships between criminal punishment and social processes, including: ethnic, racial and class inequality; political and economic change; and popular representations of crime and criminals. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
Grading:
30% Midterm Exam,
30% Final Exam,
30% Quizzes,
10% Class Participation
Exam Format:
Essay and short answer (3 quizzes, 1 mid-term, 1 final)
Class Format:
45% Lecture,
5% Film/Video,
40% Discussion,
5% Small Group Activities,
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-75 Pages Reading Per Week
2 Exam(s)
2 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: There will be three opportunities for extra credit, all of which include writing.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50501/1163
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
29 October 2015

Fall 2015  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (15129)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/08/2015 - 12/16/2015
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 10
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S.
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?horow035+SOC3101+Fall2015
Class Description:
This course will introduce students and focus on the three main components of the American Criminal Justice system: law enforcement, the criminal judicial process and correctional approaches in dealing with offenders. The course is designed to familiarize students with these broad topical areas and to explore the decision-making process and the equality of treatment that takes place within the American Criminal Justice system. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics and of the Social Sciences.Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice, through critical framework of Liberal Education.
Grading:
25% Final Exam Other Grading Information: 75% three exams (25% each)
Exam Format:
Three multiple choice and short answer exams, and one final take-home short essay exam
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
4 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/15129/1159
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
18 March 2015

Summer 2015  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (82223)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/15/2015 - 08/07/2015
Mon, Wed 09:30AM - 12:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Carlson School of Management 1-127
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice/agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Notes:
Click this link for more detailed course information http://classinfo.umn.edu/?stewa640+SOC3101+Summer2015
Class Description:
This course will serve as a sociological introduction to the American criminal justice system. The first section of the course will examine the history and politics of American criminal justice and the growth of mass incarceration. Subsequent sections will critically explore the different phases of the criminal justice system, including policing (e.g., law enforcement and law enforcement strategies), courts (e.g., the American court system, the courtroom workgroup, and sentencing policies/practices), and punishment (e.g., prison, probation, reentry, and collateral consequences). The readings chosen for this course include a mix of theoretical and empirical sociological scholarship and policy papers that will all be available online. We will also have several guest speakers who will provide their firsthand experiences working in areas relating to criminal justice. The objectives for this course are that by the end, students will have (1) a strong understanding of the various processes of the American CJS and how those processes interact with other institutions and social structures; (2) learned important social facts associated with the effects of the CJS; and (3) developed a critical perspective of the American CJS informed by these social facts and socio-criminological theories. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework.
Grading:
The three exams will consist of multiple choice and short answer questions. For the most part, they will not be comprehensive.
Exam Format:
Other Grading Information: You will have the choice of two grading tracks. "Track A" spreads the points out through the semester, while "Track B" focuses the points on the 3 exams and an ethnography paper. You have until after the first exam to choose a grading track.
Class Format:
50% Lecture
15% Film/Video
25% Discussion
10% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50-100 Pages Reading Per Week
5-7 Pages Writing Per Term
3 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/82223/1155
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
3 March 2015

Spring 2015  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (50604)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/20/2015 - 05/08/2015
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 210
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice/agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how crime is socially constructed, how the courts function for criminal sentencing, what it is like to be in prison or on community supervision, why the U.S. has such a high imprisonment rate, and the barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics. Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework.
Grading:
40% Midterm Exam
40% Final Exam
20% Quizzes
Exam Format:
Two multiple choice and short answer exams.
Class Format:
60% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40-70 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50604/1153
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
13 January 2015

Fall 2014  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (15439)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 350
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice/agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Description:
This course will introduce students and focus on the three main components of the American Criminal Justice system: law enforcement, the criminal judicial process and correctional approaches in dealing with offenders. The course is designed to familiarize students with these broad topical areas and to explore the decision-making process and the equality of treatment that takes place within the American Criminal Justice system. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics and of the Social Sciences.Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice, through critical framework of Liberal Education.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
50% Final Exam
25% Reflection Papers Other Grading Information: There will be 50 points on the mid-term, 100 points on the final exam and 50 points on the reflection papers for a total of 200 points.
Exam Format:
Short answer and short essay.
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
5-8 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
5-8 Paper(s)
5 Homework Assignment(s)
Other Workload: The papers will be short (one page) reactions to films, discussions, class activities.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/15439/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 March 2013

Fall 2014  |  SOC 3101 Section 002: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (15440)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/02/2014 - 12/10/2014
Thu 06:00PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 155
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice/agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how crime is socially constructed, how the courts function for criminal sentencing, what it is like to be in prison or on community supervision, why the U.S. has such a high imprisonment rate, and the barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics and the Social Science Core. Courses with these designations are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam
35% Quizzes Other Grading Information: 70% two exams (35% each) and 30% final exam.
Exam Format:
Two multiple choice and short answer exams and one final take-home short essay exam
Class Format:
60% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40-70 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/15440/1149
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 October 2013

Summer 2014  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (83218)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/16/2014 - 08/08/2014
Mon, Wed 09:00AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 250
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice/agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to engage students in a sociological analysis of the ?American Criminal Justice system.? We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision (i.e., probation and parole). Throughout the course, we will investigate the relationships between criminal punishment and ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. Specific topics include the social construction of crime and criminals, whether criminal justice policies, practices, and institutions are ?just,? and unique characteristics of American criminal justice. No prior knowledge of the criminal justice system is required. The course meets two university requirements: the Council on Liberal Education's (CLE) Social Science Core and the Civic Life and Ethics Theme. As such, this course will address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the critical framework of Liberal Education and provide tools to evaluate moral questions relating to punishment.
Grading:
25% Final Exam Other Grading Information: 75% three exams (25% each)
Exam Format:
Three multiple choice and short answer exams, and one final take-home short essay exam
Class Format:
30% Lecture
10% Film/Video
30% Discussion
15% Small Group Activities
10% Student Presentations
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
~100 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
1 Paper(s)
1 Presentation(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83218/1145
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 April 2014

Spring 2014  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (55485)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Meets With:
SOC 3101H Section 001
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 350
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice/agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Description:
Overview and analysis of the U.S. criminal justice system. The course stresses three themes: 1. the balance between the government's power to control crime and the rights of individuals; 2. the appropriate decision making criteria (seriousness of offense, criminal history of offenders, and strength of evidence) and the illegal criteria (race, ethnicity) that can infect decision-making in the major crime control agencies (police, courts, and corrections); 3. the evaluation of criminal justice policies and practices (Do they work? Are they legal? Are they fair? Are they smart?). The course describes, analyzes, and provides information and arguments to stimulate you to think critically about crime control in a constitutional democracy. Topics include crime, trends in crime, criminals and their families; victims and their families; crime control in a constitutional democracy; criminal law; police roles and culture, police strategies, and police and the Constitution; charging suspects; prosecuting, defending, and sentencing defendants; probation and incarceration; and prisoner reentry into society ("Eventually, they all come home.") No prior knowledge of the criminal justice system is required.
Grading:
10% Class Participation
90% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: 3 NONCUMULATIVE exams + a NONCUMULATIVE final%
Exam Format:
multiple choice, True/False, and short essays
Class Format:
55% Lecture
5% Film/Video
20% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
5% Guest Speakers
1. documentary videos of police, courts, corrections; 2. Guest lecturers are Minnesota criminal justice professionals, including police officers, prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, and corrections officials
Workload:
25 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
4 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55485/1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
20 November 2013

Spring 2014  |  SOC 3101 Section 002: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (55486)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014
Wed 06:00PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 230
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice/agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a sociological account of the criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and community supervision. Specific topics include how crime is socially constructed, how the courts function for criminal sentencing, what it is like to be in prison or on community supervision, why the U.S. has such a high imprisonment rate, and the barriers individuals face after they are released from prison. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics and the Social Science Core. Courses with these designations are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework.
Grading:
35% Midterm Exam
30% Final Exam
35% Quizzes Other Grading Information: 70% two exams (35% each) and 30% final exam.
Exam Format:
Two multiple choice and short answer exams and one final take-home short essay exam
Class Format:
60% Lecture
15% Film/Video
20% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40-70 Pages Reading Per Week
3 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/55486/1143
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
22 October 2013

Fall 2013  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (21317)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2013 - 12/11/2013
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 210
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice/agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Description:
Overview and analysis of the U.S. criminal justice system. The course stresses three themes: 1. the balance between the government's power to control crime and the rights of individuals; 2. the appropriate decision making criteria (seriousness of offense, criminal history of offenders, and strength of evidence) and the illegal criteria (race, ethnicity) that can infect decision-making in the major crime control agencies (police, courts, and corrections); 3. the evaluation of criminal justice policies and practices (Do they work? Are they legal? Are they fair? Are they smart?). The course describes, analyzes, and provides information and arguments to stimulate you to think critically about crime control in a constitutional democracy. Topics include crime, trends in crime, criminals and their families; victims and their families; crime control in a constitutional democracy; criminal law; police roles and culture, police strategies, and police and the Constitution; charging suspects; prosecuting, defending, and sentencing defendants; probation and incarceration; and prisoner reentry into society ("Eventually, they all come home.") No prior knowledge of the criminal justice system is required.
Grading:
10% Class Participation
90% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: 3 NONCUMULATIVE exams + a NONCUMULATIVE final%
Exam Format:
multiple choice, True/False, and short essays
Class Format:
55% Lecture
5% Film/Video
20% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
5% Guest Speakers
1. documentary videos of police, courts, corrections; 2. Guest lecturers are Minnesota criminal justice professionals, including police officers, prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, and corrections officials
Workload:
25 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
4 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21317/1139
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 March 2013

Fall 2013  |  SOC 3101 Section 002: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (21318)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/03/2013 - 12/11/2013
Tue 06:00PM - 08:30PM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 150
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice/agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Description:
The goal of this course is to develop an introduction to the criminal justice system in the United States. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, jails, prisons, and parole. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequality; political and economic change; and popular representations of crime and criminals. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics and the Social Science Core. Courses with these designations are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice through the Liberal Education critical framework.
Grading:
25% Final Exam Other Grading Information: 75% three exams (25% each)
Exam Format:
Three multiple choice and short answer exams, and one final take-home short essay exam
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
4 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/21318/1139
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
23 April 2013

Summer 2013  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Introduction to the American Criminal Justice System (83639)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
06/17/2013 - 08/09/2013
Mon, Wed 09:00AM - 11:30AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 215
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice and agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Description:
This course broadly examines the American Criminal Justice System through a sociological lens. Topics include policing, courts, corrections, media representations of crime, and inequities in the system. The course will include a variety of guest speakers, documentary films, and field observations of court and police. Requirements include three quizzes and one final paper, which we will develop throughout the summer. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics and of the Social Sciences.Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice, through critical framework of Liberal Education.
Grading:
30% Reports/Papers
30% Quizzes
20% Journal
20% Class Participation
Exam Format:
The format will be multiple choice, true/false, and short essay.
Class Format:
25% Lecture
15% Film/Video
25% Discussion
5% Small Group Activities
5% Field Trips
25% Guest Speakers
Workload:
50 Pages Reading Per Week
5-8 Pages Writing Per Term
1 Paper(s)
3 Quiz(zes)
Other Workload: Writing workload: One final paper 5-8 pages, reading journal.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/83639/1135
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
10 May 2013

Spring 2013  |  SOC 3101 Section 001: Introduction to the American Criminal Justice System (50621)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Tue, Thu 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 210
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice and agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Description:
Overview and analysis of the U.S. criminal justice system. The course stresses three themes: 1. the balance between the government's power to control crime and the rights of individuals; 2. the appropriate decision making criteria (seriousness of offense, criminal history of offenders, and strength of evidence) and the illegal criteria (race, ethnicity) that can infect decision-making in the major crime control agencies (police, courts, and corrections); 3. the evaluation of criminal justice policies and practices (Do they work? Are they legal? Are they fair? Are they smart?). The course describes, analyzes, and provides information and arguments to stimulate you to think critically about crime control in a constitutional democracy. Topics include crime, trends in crime, criminals and their families; victims and their families; crime control in a constitutional democracy; criminal law; police roles and culture, police strategies, and police and the Constitution; charging suspects; prosecuting, defending, and sentencing defendants; probation and incarceration; and prisoner reentry into society ("Eventually, they all come home.") No prior knowledge of the criminal justice system is required.
Grading:
10% Class Participation
90% Other Evaluation Other Grading Information: 3 NONCUMULATIVE exams + a NONCUMULATIVE final%
Exam Format:
multiple choice, True/False, and short essays
Class Format:
55% Lecture
5% Film/Video
20% Discussion
10% Small Group Activities
5% Guest Speakers
1. documentary videos of police, courts, corrections; 2. Guest lecturers are Minnesota criminal justice professionals, including police officers, prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, and corrections officials
Workload:
25 Pages Reading Per Week
20 Pages Writing Per Term
4 Exam(s)
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50621/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 July 2011

Spring 2013  |  SOC 3101 Section 002: Introduction to the American Criminal Justice System (50622)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
3 Credits
Grading Basis:
A-F or Audit
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Delivery Medium
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
01/22/2013 - 05/10/2013
Mon 05:30PM - 08:00PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 230
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice and agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
Class Description:
This course will introduce students and focus on the three main components of the American Criminal Justice system: law enforcement, the criminal judicial process and correctional approaches in dealing with offenders. The course is designed to familiarize students with these broad topical areas and to explore the decision-making process and the equality of treatment that takes place within the American Criminal Justice system. The course meets the Liberal Education requirements of Civil Life and Ethics and of the Social Sciences.Courses with this designation are carefully designed to address the components, dynamics, and philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice, through critical framework of Liberal Education.
Grading:
25% Midterm Exam
50% Final Exam
25% Reflection Papers Other Grading Information: There will be 50 points on the mid-term, 100 points on the final exam and 50 points on the reflection papers for a total of 200 points.
Exam Format:
Short answer and short essay.
Class Format:
70% Lecture
15% Film/Video
10% Discussion
5% Guest Speakers
Workload:
40-50 Pages Reading Per Week
5-8 Pages Writing Per Term
2 Exam(s)
5-8 Paper(s)
5 Homework Assignment(s)
Other Workload: The papers will be short (one page) reactions to films, discussions, class activities.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/50622/1133
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
28 February 2013

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