2 classes matched your search criteria.

Fall 2018  |  POL 1001 Section 001: American Democracy in a Changing World (18559)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Mon, Wed 09:45AM - 11:00AM
UMTC, West Bank
Blegen Hall 150
Enrollment Status:
Closed (80 of 83 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to politics/government in the United States. Constitutional origins/development, major institutions, parties, interest groups, elections, participation, public opinion. Ways of explaining politics, nature of political science. Emphasizes recent trends.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cdmyers+POL1001+Fall2018
Class Description:

Why doesn't Congress seem to work? Why do Americans love democracy, but hate politics? Why are there only two political parties, and why do they seem to despise each other so much? This course will introduce students to politics in the United States, addressing these and many more questions about how the American political system really works. We will begin with the founding principles and historical development of the American system of government and then move on to examine the contemporary structure and function of American political institutions and the role that average citizens play in the political process. Students will exit the class with a better understanding of how the American political system succeeds or fails at living up to our ideals and what we can do about it.

Who Should Take This Class?:
This class will be of interest to anyone who wants a better understanding of how the American political system operates, what is going on in Washington, or how to effect change in our current political climate. The class is also an entry point for the department's upper division American politics classes, including classes on political psychology, social movements, Congress, the Supreme Court, and state and local government.
Grading:
Grades will be based on three elements. Short quizzes at the beginning of each class will evaluate students' comprehension of key concepts from readings and lecture (40%), three long quizzes over the course of the semester will evaluate students' ability to apply these concepts to new situations and problems (40%), and a final paper will evaluate students' ability to use these concepts to advance and defend an argument (20%).
Exam Format:
All short quizzes will be multiple choice and closed book. All long quizzes will be short answer/essay and open book.
Class Format:
Class is lecture based, but "lecture" will be broken up by short writing exercises, small group discussion, and other exercises that will ask you to apply the concepts you are learning in real time. While these will not be graded, engaging fully with them will make the subsequent quizzes and essays much, much easier.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18559/1189
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cdmyers_POL1001_Fall2018.docx
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cdmyers_POL1001_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cdmyers_POL1001_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 March 2017

Fall 2018  |  POL 1001 Section 002: American Democracy in a Changing World (18769)

Instructor(s)
Class Component:
Lecture
Credits:
4 Credits
Grading Basis:
Student Option
Instructor Consent:
No Special Consent Required
Instruction Mode:
In Person Term Based
Class Attributes:
UMNTC Liberal Education Requirement
Times and Locations:
Regular Academic Session
 
09/04/2018 - 12/12/2018
Mon, Wed 01:00PM - 02:15PM
UMTC, West Bank
Anderson Hall 330
Enrollment Status:
Open (111 of 116 seats filled)
Also Offered:
Course Catalog Description:
Introduction to politics/government in the United States. Constitutional origins/development, major institutions, parties, interest groups, elections, participation, public opinion. Ways of explaining politics, nature of political science. Emphasizes recent trends.
Class Notes:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/?cdmyers+POL1001+Fall2018
Class Description:

Why doesn't Congress seem to work? Why do Americans love democracy, but hate politics? Why are there only two political parties, and why do they seem to despise each other so much? This course will introduce students to politics in the United States, addressing these and many more questions about how the American political system really works. We will begin with the founding principles and historical development of the American system of government and then move on to examine the contemporary structure and function of American political institutions and the role that average citizens play in the political process. Students will exit the class with a better understanding of how the American political system succeeds or fails at living up to our ideals and what we can do about it.

Who Should Take This Class?:
This class will be of interest to anyone who wants a better understanding of how the American political system operates, what is going on in Washington, or how to effect change in our current political climate. The class is also an entry point for the department's upper division American politics classes, including classes on political psychology, social movements, Congress, the Supreme Court, and state and local government.
Grading:
Grades will be based on three elements. Short quizzes at the beginning of each class will evaluate students' comprehension of key concepts from readings and lecture (40%), three long quizzes over the course of the semester will evaluate students' ability to apply these concepts to new situations and problems (40%), and a final paper will evaluate students' ability to use these concepts to advance and defend an argument (20%).
Exam Format:
All short quizzes will be multiple choice and closed book. All long quizzes will be short answer/essay and open book.
Class Format:
Class is lecture based, but "lecture" will be broken up by short writing exercises, small group discussion, and other exercises that will ask you to apply the concepts you are learning in real time. While these will not be graded, engaging fully with them will make the subsequent quizzes and essays much, much easier.
Textbooks:
https://bookstores.umn.edu/course-lookup/18769/1189
Syllabus:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cdmyers_POL1001_Fall2018.docx
Past Syllabi:
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cdmyers_POL1001_Fall2017.docx (Fall 2017)
http://classinfo.umn.edu/syllabi/cdmyers_POL1001_Fall2016.docx (Fall 2016)
Instructor Supplied Information Last Updated:
27 March 2017

ClassInfo Links - Fall 2018 1000 Level Political Science Classes

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